Webster County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:All
Description:A post office in the southwestern part of the county, established in 1900 and discontinued in 1908. The new postmaster, when asked what it was to be called, remarked in jest, "it's a post office, that's all!" It has been All ever since. (James Thompson; Fr. Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Amity School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Atteberry (earlier Beach)
Description:A post office, established in 1904 and discontinued in 1908 and named for the first postmaster, Charles Atteberry. The family name is usually spelled Attebury, but "r" is never pronounced in such a position in the Ozarks. (Jim Thompson; Fr. Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Beach (later Attebury)
Description:A post office, established in 1899 by Vin Rader and discontinued in 1904. The name was given by the Postal Department. (Jim Thompson, Fr. Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bell Spring
Description:A spring south of Marshfield named for the Bell family who lived near there. (Perry Shook)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Benton Township
Description:A township formed May 22, 1855 and named for Thomas Benton (1782-1858), famous Missouri statesman, who held a seat in Congress from Missouri for thirty years. (Frank Julian; T.C. Besson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bethel School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Black Oak School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Blankenship Springs
Description:A spring named for the Blankenship family, early settlers in Webster County.(Jim Thompson; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bloomington (earlier Lick Skillet; later Waldo)
Description:A town laid off in 1870 and named for Bloominton, Illinois; however, it was not a success and it never developed. (Jake Good; Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bodenhammer
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bracken (also High Prairie; earlier Hazelwood)
Description:A post office, established in 1877 and discontinued in 1893, was named for Bracken Creek which ran near the post office. (Mrs. Geo. Cliff; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bracken Creek
Description:A creek named for an early family of Brackens who settled on its banks about 1850. (Jake Good; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Buckeye School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bunker Hill (later Northview)
Description:A town surveyed in 1870 and named for the battle of Bunker Hill. (Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Burford Hollow
Description:A hollow named for the Burford family, who settled there before the Civil War. (Perry Shook; Judge J.H. Robertson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Burford Spring
Description:A spring which received its name just before the Civil War from a family of Burfords who owned the land on which it was located. (Perry Shook; Judge J.H. Robertson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Burnett School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Caddo
Description:A post office, established in 1892 and discontinued in 1903; named for the Caddo Indian tribe; though the name seems to have been suggested by some other post office, perhaps the Caddo in Louisiana or Oklahoma. (Perry Shook; Judge J.H. Robertson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Camp Arrowhead
Description:A scout camp six miles from Marshfield which has been in existence five or six years. The name was doubtless given from the Indian relics which may be found in this country. (T.C. Bassore; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cat Tail Hollow
Description:A hollow two miles east of Niangua which is named for the rank growth of cat-tails in the hollow. (T.C. Bassore; Perry Shook)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cave Springs School
Description:A transferred name from a stream or spring.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cedar Bluff
Description:A bluff which takes its name from the dense growth of cedars found there. (Judge J.H. Robertson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Center Point School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Compton
Description:A post office, established between 1876-1886 and discontinued in 1908; named for John Compton, who owned the land on which the post office was located. (Jim Thompson; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Conklin
Description:A post office, established about 1881 and discontinued between 1904-1910, was named by Luther Duggan in honor of Roscoe Conkling (1829-1888). In 1880 Conkling was nationally known as a leader of the Republican Party, which he split into two factions over the nomination of Grant. The spelling may merely represent the Missouri pronunication of the senator's name. (Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Copening's Chapel
Description:An old chapel built about 1850 and named for the family of Jake Copening who lived near the church. (Frank Julian; Perry Shook)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Crown School
Description:A transferred name from a store.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cummings Schoolhouse
Description:A school, mentioned as early as 1858, which was named after the Cummings, on whose land it was erected. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dailey School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dallas
Description:An old post office twelve miles southwest of Marshfield which was established about the time of the Civil War and discontinued in 1876. It was named for Dallas Township (q.v.). (T.C. Bassore; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dallas Township
Description:A township established May 22, 1855, and named for George M. Dallas (1792-1864), American statesman and diplomat, Vice- President of the United States (1845-1849). (Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Davis School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Deerlick
Description:A spot in the midst of what is now the town of Seymour, which derives its name from the fact that in early pioneer days there was salt in the soil and deer came up to lick the spot. (Jake Good; Mrs. Jake Good)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Devil's Den
Description:A lake on the top of a hill which to all appearances is bottomless. The name was given by early hunters and trappers because of its depth; it seems to be the Devil's den. (T.C. Bassore; Perry Shook)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Diggins (earlier Cut Throat, then Stella, then Livingston)
Description:A town plotted October, 1887 by Cyrus and Sallie Patterson and named for the general manager of the Frisco Railway Company, Mr. H.W. Diggins. (Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Diggin's School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, post office, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dillon School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dry Creek
Description:A prong of the James River which was named Dry Creek by early settlers because it is dry most of the year. (T.C. Bassore; Perry Shook)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Duncan
Description:A post office, established about 1882 and discontinued in 1929, and named for the Duncan family who settled there in pioneer days. (Frank Julian; Perry Shook)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:East Dallas Township
Description:A township formed May 10, 1888, from the eastern part of Dallas Township and hence called East Dallas Township. (Judge J.H. Robertson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Ebenezer Chapel
Description:A community and Baptist Church given the Biblical name Ebenezer, (I Samuel 7:12). (T.C. Bassore; Jim Thompson; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Elberta School
Description:A transferred name from a fruit farm.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Elkland
Description:A post office established in 1882 and named for the elks which were found in that community. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Elkland School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, post office, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Ellis
Description:A post office, established in 1912 and discontinued in 1917; named for the father, Marshal Ellis, of the postmaster Leander Ellis. (Frank Julian; Chas. Ellis)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Eureka School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Finley Creek
Description:A creek which is said to have been named after John Finley, the famous pioneer trapper who conducted Daniel Boone to Kentucky in 1769. However, it is uncertain that Finley ever visited Missouri. Mr. Bruce says, "So far as is known Boone and Finley never met after the latter's departure from Kentucky. In fact, with that departure Finley steps off the stage of authentic history. Dr. Thwaites says that after leaving Boone, he went to visit relatives in Pennsylvania, but what became of him afterwards is unknown." (1) It may be as Mr. Barnes says that Finley was named after a trapper, James Finley. (2) (1. Bruce (34), p. 65; 2. Jim Thompson; Jim Barnes)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Finley Falls
Description:The falls of Finley Creek near Seymore. (Jake Good; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Finley School
Description:A transferred name from a stream spring.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Finley Township
Description:A township established May 22, 1855, and named for Finley Creek, which flows through the township. (Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Flint Hollow School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Fordland
Description:A town laid out by Judge W.S. Thompson in 1882, who named it for J.S. Ford, comptroller of the Kansas City, Fort Scott and Memphis Railroad Company. (Frank Julian; Missouri Hist. of Webster, Wright & Laclede 16)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Fordland School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, post office, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Forkner's Hill
Description:A post office located on the county line and at present listed in Webster County. Named for a pioneer family, it is listed in Laclede in 1860 and 1871 and in Dallas from 1873 to 1886. (Postal Guide; Charles Smithpeters; Campbell (1874), p. 186; Campbell (1873), p. 26; HIST. LACLEDE (1887), p. 692; Mo. Gaz. (1860); Colton (1871)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Frankfort
Description:A city of Frankfort was surveyed by Richard Pitts, April, 1858, and named for Frankfort, Kentucky. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Free-Will Chapel
Description:An old Free-Will Baptist Church northwest of Marshfield. (T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Fyan Prairie
Description:A prairie named for the Fyan family, especially Judge Robert W. Fyan, and outstanding lawyer in the community and judge of the Circuit Court. (T.C. Bassore; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Gasconade River
Description:A river named for the province of Gascony in France by the French hunters and trappers during the latter part of the 18th century. (N.J. Craig; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Gentry School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Gobbler Bottom
Description:A bottom near Hartsville which takes its name from the wild turkeys found there in early hunting days. (Mrs. Mary Welchel)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Good Hope School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Goss Cave
Description:A cave three and one-half miles south of Seymour. Named for John Goss, the man who owned the cave. (Jake Good)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Goss School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Grant Township
Description:A township formed May 2, 1871, and named for President U.S. Grant (president 1869-1877). (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Green Hill School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Greenfield Church
Description:A Free-Will Baptist Church, now torn down, probably named from its situation; but it has been suggested that it may have been named for Greenfield, Indiana. (T.C. Bassore; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Greenwood School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Grove Spring
Description:An old post office established in 1866 and named for its location in a grove near a spring. (Tom Hensley; G.W. Freeman)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Haggott
Description:A post office, established in 1907 and discontinued about 1912. Named for the Haggott family, who secured the first post office. (T.C. Bassore; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Happy Hollow
Description:A hollow six miles north of Diggins. The humorous alliteration has made this name a favorite throughout the state. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Harmony Church
Description:A Free-Will Baptist Church which was built about 1880. The popular name Harmony was chosen by its members to indicate the spirit of the organization. (T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hazelwood (later High Prairie, or Bracken)
Description:A post office established in 1844 and named for the hazel nut grove that surrounded the post office. (1) It was used as a county seat for a few years, but "After Governor McClurg's removal to Linn Creek, the old county seat may be said to have disappeared. In its vicinity the village of High Prairie (q.v.) or Bracken (q.v.) sprang up, and there was established a post office station in August, 1877." (2) (1. Jim Thompson, Frank Julian; 2. Campbell's GAZETTEER OF MISSOURI 22, 1874)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hazelwood Township
Description:A township formed May 22, 1855, and named for the town, Hazelwood. (W.T. Sallee; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Henderson
Description:A town, surveyed February 9, 1880, for Samuel Caldwell and named for Uncle Sam Henderson, who settled in that community during the early days of the county. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Henderson Academy
Description:An academic school founded in 1879 and named for Henderson, the town. (Perry Shook; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Herd Hollow
Description:A hollow named for an early settler, Herd, who lived on the hill overlooking the hollow. (Mrs. Jake Good; Jake Good)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hiatt
Description:A post office, established in 1900 and discontinued in 1907; named for the family of Hiatts who had the store and post office. (Jim Thompson; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:High Prairie (also Bracken; earlier Hazelwood)
Description:A community and post office established in August, 1877, and named for the topographical aspect of the surrounding country. (Campbell's GAZETTEER, p. 343; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Holman School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hyde Creek
Description:A creek named for the Hyde family that settled there before the Civil War. (J.C. Grizzel)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Independence School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Jackson Township
Description:A township formed May 5, 1884, and named for President Andrew Jackson (term, 1829-1837). (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Jacob's Well
Description:A spring near Mountain Dale which derives its name from the Biblical wells, (John 4:6) because it is very deep and it has never been known to go dry. (Mrs. Jake Good; Jake Good)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Jameson School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Jump School-House
Description:An old schoolhouse named for the family of Jumps who lived near the school and were influential in securing it. (Jim Thompson; Perry Shook; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Ketcher (later Seymour)
Description:A community, later Seymour (q.v.); named for a man by the name of Ketcher who ran a store there, soon after the Civil War. (Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Kilburn School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Letchworth School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Lick Skillet (later Waldo)
Description:A community where the post office Waldo (q.v.) is now situated. The only explanation suggested for the name is that it was given by a traveler who, passing by during the early days of the 19th century, saw a woman set outside of the door a skillet that was promptly licked by the dog. However, it was more likely a humorous gibe by neighbors at the supposed greediness or bad manners of the inhabitants. Myers says that Lick Skillet was an early fanciful name. (Frank Julian; Myers 59, p. 102)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Limestone Valley
Description:A valley named for the limestone found there. (Chas. Ellis; J.E. Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Linington (earlier Cut-Throat, then Stella; later Diggins)
Description:A post office established in 1885 by S.W. Walton to replace Stella (q.v.) and named for some of his relatives, or a friend. When the railroad station was built it was called Diggins (q.v.). To avoid confusion the name of the post office was changed to Diggins in 1887. (Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Love Ridge
Description:A community near Waldo which derives its name from the fruit farm run by Thomas Love. The farm was on a ridge, hence Love Ridge farm. (T.C. Bassore; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mac Mahan School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Macedonia
Description:A Free- Will Baptist Church built about 1890 and named for the greek province mentioned in Acts 16:9. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Macedonia School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Marlin Prairie
Description:A prairie named after the family of Judge Spencer Marlin, an early presiding judge. They settled on the prairie about 1833-1834. (Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Marlin School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Marshfield
Description:The county seat of Webster County, laid out in 1855 on the site donated by William T. Buford and named for the home of Daniel Webster, Marshfield, Massachusetts. (Judge J.H. Robertson; T.C. Bassore; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Marshfield School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, post office, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Matney Hollow
Description:A hollow near Seymour which derived its name from a Mr. Matney who settled in the hollow soon after the Civil War. (Jake Good; Mrs. Jake Good)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:McKeel Spring (later Scout Camp Spring)
Description:A spring six miles southeast of Marshfield which derived its name from the McKeel family that owned the land. When Camp Arrowhead (q.v.) was established there, the spring became known as Scout Spring Camp (q.v.). (J.C. Grizzel)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Miller School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Minor School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mount Zion
Description:A Free- Will Baptist church established soon after the Civil War and named for the Biblical Mt. Zion in Jerusalem. (T.C. Bassore; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mountain Dale
Description:A community near Waldo which was named for the Mountain Dale School, one of the oldest educational institutions in the county. (Mrs. Jake Good; Jake Good)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mountain Dale School
Description:An old school, now discontinued, which was built about 1865 and which was named because of its position on a mountain overlooking a dale. (Mrs. Jake Good; Jake Good)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mountain Dale School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mountain Dale Springs
Description:Several springs which, for about sixty years, have been known as the Mountain Dale Springs; named for the Mountain Dale School. (Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mountain Grove
Description:A Free-Will Baptist church built about 1880 and named because of its position upon a ridge in a grove of trees. (Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mt. Pleasant School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:New Hope School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Niangua
Description:An early post office established before the Civil War and named for the stream. (T.C. Bassore; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Niangua River
Description:A river named for the Indian Chief, Niangua, who is said to have gone up the river seeking his lost sweetheart; Niangua is a corruption of the original Indian name Nehemgar, (Niangua) meaning "bear." (Eaton 46, p. 43; Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Niangua School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Niangua Township
Description:A township formed February 7, 1888 and named after the Niangua River. (J.F. Robertson; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Norma
Description:An old post office, established about 1876 and discontinued in 1887, which was probably named for the daughter of the postmaster though no one is able to say definitely. (T.C. Bassore; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:North Carolina Branch
Description:A creek which was named by early settlers from the fact that practically everyone along the creek came from North Carolina. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Northview (earlier Bunker Hill)
Description:A post office, originally called Bunker Hill (q.v.), which was so named in 1882 by railroad officials because of the beautiful view of the north. (Jim Thompson; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Old Dallas School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, post office, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Old Fort Sand Springs (later Sand Springs)
Description:An old Civil War fort located where Sand Springs, the town, was later situated, took its name from the sand formations of that region and the springs in the community. (T.C. Bassore; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Old Wire Road
Description:A road leading from Springfield to Rolla during the Civil War, which took its name from the fact that the first telegraph wire in the section was strung along the road. (T.C. Bassore; Rufe Scott)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Olga
Description:A post office near Panther Creek, established in 1891 and discontinued in 1898; named for the wife of the postmaster. (Perry Shook; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Osage Fork
Description:The Osage Fork of the Gasconade River was named by early settlers after the Osage Indians. (Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Osage School
Description:A transferred name from a stream or spring.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Ozark Church
Description:An early Free-Will Baptist church which was built about 1870 and named for the Ozark Mountains. (Jim Thompson; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Ozark Township
Description:A township formed May 22, 1855, and named for the Ozark Mountains. (Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Pack School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Panther Creek
Description:A creek named by early hunters for the many panthers that lived on its banks. (Jake Good; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Panther Valley
Description:A post office, established about 1875 and discontinued in 1889, and named for Panther Creek which runs near the post office. (Jim Thompson; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Panther Valley School
Description:A transferred name from a stream or spring.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Patterson Mill
Description:A mill named for its owner, Gibson Patterson, who operated it about 1850-1863. (Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Paw Paw Valley
Description:A valley named during the latter part of the 19th century for the paw paw trees which grew there. (J.E. Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Pleasant Prairie
Description:An old camp ground and meeting place near Marshfield; named for its beauty and pleasantness. (T.C. Bassore; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Pomme de Terre
Description:A river rising in a large spring in Pleasant Prairie which was named by early French trappers and fur traders. The prase means potato in French. It was so named because plants resembling potatoes grew on its banks. There is a legend that La Salle in 1682 gave the stream its name when he crossed through the Ozarks. (The pronunciation with an "l" instead of a "d" is universal). (N.J. Craig; T.C. Bassore; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Prospect School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Rader
Description:A post office, established in 1887 and discontinued in 1902 which takes its name from the Rader family who established the first post office. (Perry Shook; Judge J.H. Robertson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Reed School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Rogersville School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, post office, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Russelville
Description:A town, which disappeared before 1886; named for a family of Russels who lived in the community. (T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Sampson
Description:A post office established in 1907 and named for a family of Sampsons who established the office. (T.C. Bassore; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Sand Springs (earlier Old Fort Sand Springs)
Description:A town surveyed May 1, 1868 for Samuel Keese and named by early settlers for Old Fort Sand Springs which was located there during the Civil War. (T.C. Bassore; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Sand Springs School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, post office, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Sarvis Point
Description:A post office, established about 1880 and discontinued in 1906, and named by the postmaster, a Mr. Jennings, for the service (or "sarvis") bushes and berries that grew around the office. Sarvis is a dialect pronunciation for service. The service berry is a well-known fruit in the Ozarks. (T.C. Bassore; Wright's Dialect Dictionary)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Sayers Creek
Description:A creek which is named for Tom, John and Hiram Sayer who owned all the land on both sides of the creek. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Scout Camp Spring (earlier McKeel Spring)
Description:A spring now called Scout Camp Spring because of its situation at Camp Arrowhead (q.v.), a scout camp six miles from Marshfield. (J.C. Grizzel)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Seymour (earlier Ketcher)
Description:A town named after Seymour, Indiana, by Mr. T.P. Crabbe when the railroad came through in 1881. (Jake Good; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Seymour School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Shackleford Spring
Description:A spring near Marshfield named for Garland Shackleford who owned it the latter part of the 19th century. (Perry Shook; Judge J.H. Robertson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Shady Grove School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Shockey School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Silver Shade School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Slack School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Sparkle Brook School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Spout Spring
Description:A spring long known as Spout Spring because of its appearance. (Charles Ellis; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:St. James School
Description:A transferred name from a stream or spring.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:St. Luke
Description:A post office and store which derive their names from St. Luke's Church. The store was first opened by Benjamin and Daniel Burford in 1846 and the post office established in 1852. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:St. Luke School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:St. Luke's Church
Description:An early Free-Will Baptist church which was built early in the 19th century and named for the Evangelist. (T.C. Bassore; Charles Ellis)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Stella (earlier Cut-Throat; later Lininington, then Diggins)
Description:A post office established in the store formerly known as Cut-Throat (q.v.) in 1880 and discontinued in 1885; named for the wife of the first postmaster. (Frank Julian; Jake Good)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Sun Rise School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Susanna
Description:A post office, established in 1893 and discontinued in 1912, which was named for Susanna, the wife of Jim Cunningham, who owned the land on which the office was established. (Judge J.H. Robertson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Teagues
Description:A post office established in 1880 and discontinued in 1929, which takes its name from Teague's Creek (q.v.) on which it is situated. (Jim Thompson; Frank Julian)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Teague's Creek (also Teague Creek)
Description:A creek named for an early pioneer family who settled in the county about 1845. (Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Teagues School
Description:A transferred name from a stream or spring.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Thief Neck
Description:A community in the southwestern part of the county which got its name from its reputation. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Tiggs Creek
Description:A small stream near Seymour which derived its name from the Tiggs family who lived on its banks during the middle of the 19th century. (A different stream from Teague Creek). (Jake Good; Mrs. Jake Good)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Trimble Schoolhouse
Description:A schoolhouse named for Judge Trimble, judge of the County Court and a prominent citizen of the county. (Jake Good; W.T. Sallee)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Turnbow
Description:A creek originally named Turnbo after a family of Turnbos who lived on its banks. However, it is erroneously spelled Turnbow on government maps. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Union Township
Description:A township formed May 22, 1855, and so named because they united several communities and towns to form the township. (Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Waldo (earlier Lick Skillet)
Description:A post office, established in 1881. Named by the Postal Department. (Frank Julian; Jake Good)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Warden's Chapel
Description:A church, which is one of the oldest in the county, was named for a Mr. Warden on whose land it was built. (Frank Julian; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Washington School
Description:Named for a famous man.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Washington Township
Description:A township established February 6, 1856 and named for George Washington. (Jim Thompson; T.C. Bassore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Webster County
Description:W.T. Burford, the first white settler in Webster County, moved here from Tennessee in 1830 and settled near the present site of Marshfield. March 3, 1855 Webster County was organized from portions of Wayne, Crawford, and Greene Counties and named in honor of Daniel Webster (1782-1852) the brilliant statesman who had recently died. (A.M. Haswell; p. 76; Eaton (46) V, p. 73)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:White Oak School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Winans
Description:A post office, established in 1898 and discontinued in 1902, which took its name from a fruit farm owned by and named for L.M. Winans. (T.C. Bassore; Jim Thompson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

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