Wayne County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Aley Mill
Description:See Aley Mountain.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Aley Mountain
Description:A large mountain two miles west of Patterson in the eastern part of Logan Township. On the north side of the mountain was Aley's Mill, established before the Civil War. Solomon Aley, for whom both the mountain and the mill were named, entered the original land grant and established the mill. (Rhodes, Settle, W.C. Eaton) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allison Cut
Description:A place on the farm of Dr. John L. Allison where the railroad was cut through a very high hill. (Sellars; Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allison School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Black River Township, named for Dr. John L. Allison, who owned land near the school. Allison School was formed from Butler School district about 1910. Butler School was named for Hampton Butler. (Ward, Barrow, Harmon, Sellar, W.C. Bealy, A.R. Allman) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Anderson Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery one and a half miles west of Gad's Hill in the northern part of Benton Township. The land for the cemetery was deeded by N.M. Anderson, for whom it was named, in 1904. (E.L. Evans; Dr. Toni) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Andy's Branch
Description:A small stream in the northern part of Lost Creek Township, which empties into Bear Creek at old Hog Eye Mill. The stream was once called Hog Eye Creek, from the mill which was one of the first in the county. It was named for an early settler. (Twidell) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the southern part of Cedar Creek Township, near the original site of Antioch Cemetery is in the southwest part of Black River Township. (Collins) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Church [1 of 2]
Description:A rural Christian Church in the southwest part of Black River Township, discontinued about 1910. The church was organized prior to the Civil War. The cemetery is still there, but is no longer used. Cf. above. (Moore; Casey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Church [2 of 2]
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the southern part of Cedar Creek Township, organized before 1854, according to Douglass, the first in the county. It was organized by Rev. Gower and Ben Hughes in Bennet's schoolhouse. The church is no longer in existence, the members having united with a group in Lodi. The old cemetery remains to mark the site. For the reason for the name see above. (G.W. Owensby, Whitmer, Collins, Lewis, Douglass I, 471) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Arab
Description:A post office established in 1908 in the eastern part of Jefferson Township by Jasper Cooper of Bollinger County, interested in a chain of stores. Later the Cooper Store was moved about three miles southwest to the present site of Arab where Peter Stilts and Grisham Mercantile Company had a store. Several names were sent to the post office authorities who accepted Arab; but what prompted its suggestion is not remembered. Marvin Clubb was the first postmaster. (Tom McShea, Frank Stilts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Asher Creek
Description:A stream in the extreme southern part of Black River and Lost Creek Townships, flowing east into St. Francois River. Named for Thomas Asher, an early settler. It appears on Campbell's Map of 1873. (Mrs. Mary Robinson, J. Casey, Campbell, 1873, Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Asher Creek School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Black River Township, named from Asher Creek (q.v.). (Mrs. J.F. Taylor, Don Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Asher Creek Valley
Description:A large valley about two miles long, named from Asher Creek (q.v.). The creek changed its course because of a dam's having been built, so that this old valley does not follow the course of the present stream. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baird Cemetery
Description:See Dalton Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barlow
Description:A railroad station, also known as Barlow Switch, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad between Williamsville and Mill Spring in the northern part of Williams Township. It was established as a switch in 1891 for a lumber mill and continued in use until 1916. It was named for James Barlow, a farmer and early settler. There is a story, of the folk etymology type, which tells of a man in the lumber camp who stabbed another with a barlow knife and thus gave the place its name. The place was completely deserted by 1930 and no trace of its existence remains. (Ensminger, Wilkinson, Wallis, M.A. Davis, Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barlow Switch
Description:See Barlow.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barn Fork
Description:A branch of Otter Creek in the eastern part of Mill Spring Township. This may be a map maker's error for Barnes Fork, a personal name; or it may be so named because a barn occupies a prominent place near the juncture of this stream and Otter Creek. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barnes Fork
Description:A fork of Bear Creek near Lowndes in the southeast part of Cowan Township, named for Clayburn Barnes, who owned land at the forks of the creek. (W.C. Beaty)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barren Fork
Description:A fork of Bear Creek in the southeast part of Cowan Township, flowing through the region known as the Barrens (q.v.), from which it is named. (McGhee)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barrens, The
Description:See Flatwoods.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barrett Mine
Description:An iron mine in the western part of Black River Township owned and operated by Hiram Barrett, for whom it was named. This mine produced more iron ore than any other in the county. (Sallars, Dan Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bates Branch
Description:A small stream of Benton Township, flowing into McKenzie Creek. George Bates homesteaded 640 acres in that vicinity soon after the Civil War and set up a sawmill. (E.L. Evans, W.C. Eaton) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bates Canyon
Description:See Lou Sanders Canyon.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Cowan Township flowing into Castor River in Bollinger County. The name was given by pioneers because there were many bears in that part of the county. (C.W. Wallis, A. Hinchey, C.F. Hopkins) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek Church
Description:A rural Missionary Baptist Church organized prior to 1835, when it was one of the six churches dismissed from the Black River Association. It was named for its location on Bear Creek (q.v.) on land belonging to Uncle John Bennett, a prominent member. It was also known as White Hollow (q.v.). The congregation disbanded in 1933, but the old building is still used for funerals conducted for White Hollow Cemetery. (Goodspeed 556, Wallis, Twidell, Collins, Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek School
Description:See Davis School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beaver Creek
Description:See Seitz Branch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beaver Lake
Description:A large lake covering about five acres in the eastern part of St. Francois Township, a fine fishing place. Beavers frequented the lake as late as 1882. (de Celis, Fronabarger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beckville
Description:A very small village across McKenzie Creek from Piedmont; physically a part of Piedmont, but not within the incorporation. In the early 1890s, Louis Beck, a negro owning forty acres of land there, divided it into lots and sold several on which small houses were built. (E.L. Evans; W.C. Eaton) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beckville Branch
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Benton Township flowing into McKenzie Creek southeast of Piedmont. Named for the village (q.v.).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bell Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery three miles northeast of Lowndes in the southeast part of Cowan Township, first known as Cowan Cemetery for Uncle Dickey (Richard D.) Cowan, a pioneer who came here in 1808. Later it took the name of Bell Cemetery from George Bell, a prominent landowner. In this cemetery is the monument erected to seven Civil War Confederate soldiers, six of whom are buried here. "These seven soldiers" according to Mr. Bennett's account "were going to Texas to join the Confederates--this was after the Civil War. They were caught in Arkansas. The inscription on their tomb reads: 'Caught, blindfolded, and murdered by Union Soldiers.' The men were Smith, brother of Henry Smith, Raney, Mike Barnhart, Hugh McGhee, "Nigger" Jim and one other." (McGhee, Bennett, Stilts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bennett Graveyard
Description:A rural cemetery in the western part of Cedar Creek Township, named for Larkin Bennett, pioneer. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bennett School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Cedar Creek Township. It was first known as Hughes School, from Ben Hughes, prominent citizen, but later named for the family of Larkin Bennett. The school is no longer in existence. (Bennett, Kelly) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bennett Spring
Description:A spring near the head of Bennett Creek (q.v.), from which it was named. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bennett's Creek
Description:A small stream in the western part of Cedar Creek Township, a tributary of St. Francois River. Named for Larkin Bennett, a pioneer, who lived at the head of the creek. Larkin Bennett, I entered a grant at the head of the creek in 1815 or 1816 and now Larkin Bennett, V lives there. (Bennett, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Benton Township
Description:In the northwest part of the county, one of the oldest townships, organized before 1840, and named in honor of Thomas H. Benton (1782-1858), one of Missouri's first senators, who served from 1820-1850. In 1872 it was reduced in size by the cutting off of Mill Spring Township (q.v.). (Frank Stilts, Hinchey, U.S. Census of 1840 & 1880) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Cemetery
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in the southern part of Black River Township. The church and the old cemetery surrounding it were started in 1875, the church being one of the first in the county. "Bay" White contributed land for the church, which was given this common church name. The founders are said to have been influenced in their choice of names by Bethel Church of Cape Girardeau, the first west of the Mississippi River. (Burton, HIST.Bethel School OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS, 301, Collins; Moore; Wallis, Molge) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel School
Description:A rural school in the east-central part of Black River Township. The school was first known as Pink Root Hollow School from its location in Pink Root Hollow (q.v.). Later the school adopted the name of nearby Bethel Church (q.v.). Here Sam A. Baker, native of Wayne County and later governor of the state, taught his first school. (Moore, Harmon)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bettis Ford
Description:See Greenville.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beulah Church
Description:A Nazarene Church established in 1912, near Gad's Hill in the northern part of Benton Township. The name, a common one for churches, is a symbolic term for Israel (Isa. 62:4). It may have inherited the name from the old pioneer church, now disbanded, which met in Beulah School (q.v.). (E.L. Evans, Collins) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beulah School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Benton Township, established before 1880. The name was suggested by a pioneer church named Beulah, which met in the school building until it was disbanded. (Lucy) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Brushy Church
Description:A rural Missionary Baptist Church located on Big Brushy Creek (q.v.) from which it was named. It was in the western part of Mill Spring Township, four miles from Mill Spring and was organized in 1879. The building burned in 1934. (Rhodes) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Brushy Creek
Description:See Brushy Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Creek
Description:A large stream in the northwest part of Cedar Creek Township. It enters from Iron County, flows in a southeast direction and empties into St. Francois River near Taskee in Williams Township. The stream, large and rapid, is third in size of the county's streams. (Rhodes, Bennett, Calton (1850), Campbell (1873)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Creek Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, east of Coldwater, organized in 1835 and one of the six churches dismissed from Cape Girardeau Assn. in 1835 to form Black River Assn. Named for the creek. (Paullus, Goodspeed 556)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Lake
Description:A large slough or lake in the northwest part of St. Francois Township, named from its size. (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Lake Church
Description:A rural Missionary Baptist Church organized in 1868 eight miles southeast of Piedmont in the eastern part of Mill Spring Township; named from Big Lake (q.v.). (Collins, Wallis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Lake Creek
Description:A stream in the northwest part of St. Francois Township, so named because the creek flows from a large slough or lake. It has now been drained. (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Lake School
Description:A rural school in the western part of St. Francois Township, named for Big Lake Creek. (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Rock
Description:A post office which existed from 1913-1915, in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, obviously named from a large rock, possibly one unearthed by quarrying operations. (Pallus, Collins, Settle) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Bridge
Description:A bridge across St. Francois River, one and a half miles from Patterson in the southern part of St. Francois Township, named for John Black, who lives nearby. (Duncan) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Lake
Description:See Blackstone Lake.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Mingo Bayou
Description:A small stream flowing through Black Mingo Swamp (q.v.), from which it was named. It is also called Black Mingo Slough. (Rhodes) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Mingo Slough
Description:See Black Mingo Bayou.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Mingo Swamp
Description:A large swamp in the southwest part of Lost Creek and Jefferson Townships, extending into Stoddard County. Called both Black and Black Mingo Swamp before its drainage in 1920(?), it was so named from the dark appearance of the water and from the Mingo Indians who were here until 1845. (Rhodes) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black River
Description:A large stream which rises in Iron County, flows through Reynolds County, enters Wayne County in the northern part of Mill Spring Township. It flows seventy-five miles through Wayne County and enters Butler County, whence it flows into Arkansas and empties into White River. The stream, also known as Big Black River because of its size, is said to have been named from the dark color of the water which is colored by the vegetation growing in the stream. (Conard, 1901, Wetmore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black River Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church organized in 1818 by Elder H. Lassiter on the middle fork of Black River, from which it was named. (Douglass I, 469-470)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black River Township
Description:In the southern part of the county, named from Black River (q.v.), the principal stream in this region. It is one of the oldest townships, having existed at least since 1840, but in 1872 was reduced in size by the cutting off of Williams Township (q.v.). (U.S. Census of 1840 & 1880) (R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Swamp [1 of 2]
Description:See Dark Swamp.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Swamp [2 of 2]
Description:See Black Mingo Swamp.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blackstone Lake
Description:A large lake formed by a dam laid across Carter's Lake in the western part of Mill Spring Township. Carter's Lake was named for Wm. Carter. This lake was formed by Charles D. Yancey, a prominent lawyer of Wayne County, about 1890. He planned to make it a resort, but died soon after he started the project. He is said by some authorities to have named the lake for Sit William Blackstone (1723-1780), the eminent English authority on law; by others to have honored Dr. Ed. Blackstone who had a shack near the lake. The name is often shortened to Black Lake, probably because it is near Black River and because the vegetation in the lake makes the water seem black. Milton Adair now owns the property. (Duncan, Templeton, Wilkinson) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Hole Hollow
Description:A valley near Lost Creek so named because of the deep hole of water of bluish color which is located in the valley. Old Pine Grove School is nearby. (Fronabarger, Stilts) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Spring [1 of 2]
Description:A large spring six miles south of Greenville in the southern part of St. Francois Township, with a flow of 50,000,000 gallons per day. The spring is the largest in Wayne County, and almost as large as Big Spring near Van Buren in Carter County. So named because of its water which looks blue. It flows into St. Francois River. Now owned by J.E. Clubb of Kime, Missouri. A grist mill, possibly Wyatt's Mill, was once operated by the spring. The spring is also referred to as Davidson Blue Spring because a Mr. Davidson from St. Louis has made a tourist camp near the spring. (Bennett, Templeton, Davidson, W.P.A. GUIDE 532) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Spring [2 of 2]
Description:See Rhodes Spring.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bluff Spring
Description:A good spring from under a small bluff on Bear Creek on a farm belonging to Mr. Henry B. Smith in Cowan Township. (H. B. Smith) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blum
Description:A discontinued stop on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the southeast part of Williams Township, which originated as Blum's Mill. Henry Blum came to this place in 1874 and operated a sawmill. He had a station established for loading his logs. The station was known as Blum Switch or Blum Tank because of the water tank used by the railroad. An earlier settlement here was known as Theresa, doubtless for the wife of a pioneer. (Rhodes, Hinchey, Manning, Sallars, Cram (1879) "Am. Republic" Feb. 18, 1933)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blum Switch
Description:See Blum.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blum Tank
Description:See Blum.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blum's Mill
Description:See Blum.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boals' Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the southern part of Mill Spring Township, named for Frank Boals who came from Pennsylvania, and bought this farm from James Rodgers, pioneer. The cemetery was first known as Rodgers Cemetery for James Rodgers. (Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boals' Springs
Description:Five springs feeding Kelo Valley Branch, which are located on Frank Boals' farm in the southern part of Mill Spring Township. Also known as Rodger's Spring, for the land originally belonged to James Rodgers. (Mrs. Maggie Duncan) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bob Myric Branch
Description:See Blum Branch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boggs
Description:A name which appears on Ensminger's map of 1934, about the location and origin of which nothing could be learned. Miss McLain says simply "a deserted village." (Ensminger, 1934) (McLain)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bollinger Branch
Description:See Seitz Branch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bottomless Spring
Description:A large spring north of Patterson in the eastern part of Logan Township, so named because it is very deep, seemingly bottomless. (Hinchey, Wilkinson) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bounds
Description:A post office maintained from 1887-1935. It was first located on Bounds Creek (q.v.), from which it is named. Later moved and reestablished three miles north in the central part of St. Francois Township, retaining the original name. (Ward, Settle, Davidson) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bounds Creek
Description:A small stream in the northern part of St. Francois Township, emptying into St. Francois River. Named for Isaac and Stephen Bounds, who had been soldiers in the Union Army. They became landowners and farmers in this community soon after the Civil War. (Bennett, Settle) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bounds Creek Church
Description:See New Prospect Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bounds Graveyard
Description:See New Prospect Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bowman's Chapel
Description:See Dee's Chapel.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bright Prospect Church
Description:A General Church in the southeast part of Jefferson Township, organized in a brush arbor in August, 1921. The church was dedicated October 9, 1921. Rev. H.A. George suggested the name. He had come from Brownwood (in Stoddard County) to hold a revival in the brush arbor. The results of the revival were such that Rev. George suggested organizing the church, and said there were "Bright Prospects for a good church." (E.A. de Celis, W. Ward) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brown Branch
Description:See East Prong of List Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brunot
Description:A small village in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township. A post office was established here as early as 1873, for Campbell (1873) mentions Brunot as a place with "one store and a post office" though the name is known as early as 1860. It was named for Felix A.R. Brunot of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, one of the Partners of Singer and Company. When it was laid out it was intended as the county seat. (Templeton, Hinchey, Jones, Settle) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brunot Creek
Description:A small stream in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township. Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brunot Spring
Description:A large spring in Brunot (cf. above) near which a Civil War skirmish occurred. Some valuable historical papers are said to have been buried near the spring by Union soldiers, who came later to search for them. (Jones) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brushy Creek
Description:A large creek which flows into Wayne County from Carter County on the southwest and into Black River in the southeast part of Mill Spring Township. The name was given by pioneers because of the dense growth of underbrush. There are three branches of the creek known as Big Brushy (the main stream), Little Brushy and Middle Brushy. The name was given as early as 1842. (Duncan) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bull Run Camp
Description:A logging camp in the western part of Williams Township. It belonged to H. Holliday, and was so called because oxen were used for logging in the early days. (Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bunyard Mountain
Description:See Finley Mountain.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bunyard's Store
Description:See Damon.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burbank
Description:A small village in the eastern part of St. Francois Township. A post office was maintained from 1909-1932. The first settlement here was Camp No. 9, a logging camp established by Holliday-Klatz Lumber Company. In 1895 the place was known as Highland or Highland Orchard because Hiram Holliday set out a ten-acre orchard on the high land here. When the post office was established in 1909, Frank Gorman and Mr. York named it to honor Luther Burbank (1849-1926), the great naturalist and orchard expert. Mr. and Mrs. John Koszegi ran the post office from 1909-1932. (Koszegi, Hinchey, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burbank School
Description:In eastern St. Francois Township. Organized in 1912 and named for the post office. It was earlier named Tibbs School for J.O. Tibbs, on whose land it was built. (Koszegi, Burton) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burch
Description:A post office in the northwest part of Cowan Township until 1932, when it was discontinued. The first post office here was named Exist, maintained from 1895-1896, in the Brit Ward home and then transferred to Coldwater. The name Exist is probably an indication of pioneer humor, suggesting the fact that times were hard and people could merely "exist" here. Burch post office was established in 1905 and named for George Burch, landowner, who established the post office in his home. Later Andrew Crites took the office into his home, but the name was unchanged. (Pallus, Owenby, Mrs. Geo. Burch, Hampton Ward, Rhodes, Hinchey, Hamlett) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burch Cemetery
Description:In Cowan Township. Named for the first person buried there. John Burch who was killed by the "Bushwhackers" during the Civil War. It is no longer used. (H. Ward, Mrs. G. Burch) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burlington School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township. It was originally known as Upper Cedar Creek School, from its location on Cedar Creek, as Upper Coldwater School from its location northeast of Coldwater School, and as Frank White School for Frank White, a prominent settler there since 1890. It was named Burlington by Carter Greer and Neal Wilkinson, but the reason for their choice is not known. Possibly it was the name of a prominent man and friend of the two men who named it. (Pallus, Settle, Myers) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burns Mill
Description:See De Haven Mill.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burns Spring
Description:A large spring in the northern part of Williams Township, which operated a mill owned by M.J. Markham and Lee Burns for whom it was named. (Templeton) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burton
Description:A stop in the eastern part of St. Francois Township on the Holliday Railroad maintained in 1912 for a sawmill camp; possibly named for the family of C.E. Burton, pioneers. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Butler Ferry
Description:A ferry on the St. Francois River in the southern part of Lost Creek Township maintained in 1888 by George W.H. Butler, for whom it was named. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Butler School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Lost Creek Township, named, as was Butler Switch, for Hampton Butler, landowner, who gave the land for the school. (Beaty, W.F. Ward) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Butler Shell Lake
Description:A small lake in the southeast part of Lost Creek Township, named for Hamton Butler, landowner. Why the term Shell is used as a part of the name is unknown. (Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Butler Switch
Description:A timber switch on the Frisco Railroad two miles west of Wappapello. No town ever existed here, but the stop was maintained for the landowner, Hampton Butler, for whom it was named. (John Casey, W.C. Beaty, W.F. Ward) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Butts Branch
Description:See Little Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buzzard's Hill School
Description:See Davis School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cain Branch
Description:A branch of West Prong of Bear Creek in the southwest part of Cowan Township, named for Cain Ward, who owned land there until recently when the land was purchased by Ben Dees. The name Dees Branch is also applied to the stream. (Twidwell, Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caldwell's Creek
Description:A small stream flowing into St. Francois River. It was named for James Caldwell, who had a Spanish land grant here in 1847.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp
Description:A camp or settlement northeast of Greenville in the northeast part of St. Francois Township. It was one of the logging camps operated by Holliday. (Hinchey, Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 10
Description:Number 10 in the series of lumber camps established by Holliday; in the northeast part of Lost Creek Township, near Pine Grove School. (Manns)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 23
Description:A large sawmill camp in the northeast part of St. Francois Township one of a series numbered by Holliday. (Myers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 24
Description:Sawmill Camp No. 24 in the eastern part of St. Francois Township, one of Holliday's. (Twidell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 26
Description:A sawmill camp on Hunter's Creek in the south-central part of Cedar Creek Township, near Lodi. (Twidell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 28
Description:A sawmill camp, one of a series, in the western part of Cowan Township, near Hiram. (Twidell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 30
Description:A sawmill camp located on a hill northeast of Clubb in the northeast part of St. Francois Township. (Twidell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 31
Description:A sawmill camp at the head of Turkey Creek in the southeast part of Cedar Creek Township. (Twidell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 32
Description:Located in Thompson Holler (q.v.), this sawmill camp in the eastern part of Cedar Creek Township, later provided a building for the Thompson Holler School (q.v.). (Twidell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 33
Description:See Graphite.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 34
Description:See Cascade.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 8
Description:See York.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp 9
Description:See Burbank.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp Creek
Description:A branch of Peachtree Fork in the northeast part of Benton Township, which was known as early as 1873. It was probably known as Kemper Creek before 1865 for John Kemper and his wife Elizabeth who owned land and ran a store there before the Civil War. They deeded their property to Columbia Miller in 1865. Later the creek was named Camp Creek from the logging camps which were established in the neighborhood. (A.N. Ellis (Mrs.), Jno. Black, Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp Creek School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Benton Township, located on Camp Creek (q.v.), from which it is named. The school is now part of Patterson Consolidated District. This school was originally called Lower Camp Creek School until Upper Camp Creek School took the name Mountain View, since when the distinguishing appelation is unnecessary. (Black)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Girardeau and Southwestern Railroad
Description:A railroad extending from Cape Girardeau on the Mississippi River to the Iron Mountain Railroad at Williamsville in Wayne County. It was built under the direction of Louis Houck in 1886. (Julian, Mrs. May)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carson Hill Cemetery
Description:One of the oldest burial grounds in the county, three miles southwest of Mill Spring. Named for two brothers, Steve and James Carson, landowners who were early settlers. (A. Duncan, J.N. Nunn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carson Hill Church
Description:A Christian Church in the southwest part of Mill Spring Township. It was built in 1893, but no congregation now meets there. Named, as was the cemetery and school for two landowners, James and Steve Carson. The name Ijames Church is sometimes used, for it is in the Ijames settlement. (Nunn, D. Duncan, J. Harmon, Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carson Hill School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Mill Spring Township, named for James and Steve Carson, pioneer landowners. Steve Carson was also a teacher. (J. Nunn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carter Graveyard
Description:See White Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carters
Description:A station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the west-central part of Mill Spring Township, also called Carter's Switch when it was in use during lumber or timber cutting days about 1910. Named for Wm. Carter who owned land there, it was discontinued when the lumber making days were ended. A post office maintained in 1876-1877 was known as Carterville. (Wilkinson, Aunt Sarah Carter, Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carter's Lake
Description:See Blackstone Lake.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carterville
Description:See Carters.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cascade
Description:A railroad station southwest of Gravelton, the northeast terminus of the Greenville-Williamsville Railroad, now abandoned. It was named by L.M. Wagner, founder of Concordia College (q.v.). for the small rapids in Little Creek on which it was located. The first settlement here was a sawmill camp, known as Camp 34. (Twidell, Hinchey, Stroupe, Wagner, Beaty, Myers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor River
Description:See former study.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor River
Description:Castor River rises in St. Francois County, flows south through Madison County near the eastern boundary, then for a short distance along the boundary line between Wayne and Bollinger. It enters Bollinger in Fillmore Township and flows southeast through Wayne Township into Stoddard County, and thence into New Madrid County, where it empties into Little River. Prior to the white man's coming the region in what is now the southern part of Madison and the western part of Bollinger counties was a mass of canebrakes where pools of water collected in rainy seasons. Here beavers built dams and held back the water coming down from the St. Francois hills to the north. When heavy rains came, the beaver dams were broken and the water formed a channel. After many repetitions of this process a river was formed, and it was called Castor, a word meaning beaver, by the French who came to the Mine LaMotte district (in Madison County) near the source of this stream in 1725. Schoolcraft in 1818 refers to this branch as Crooked Creek. (Present Crooked Creek is a few miles east and joins Castor River in New Madrid County). Beck calls the river Castor or Crooked Creek in 1823; Wetmore calls it Castor in 1837, but the name Crooked Creek is not entirely separated from this branch until 1873. (Conard, Douglass I: XII, XIV, Schoolcraft, Beck, Wetmore, Long's Voyage, Campbell, Hopkins, Miss Hamlett's thesis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cat Tail Hill
Description:A hill at the edge of a swamp in the west-central part of Jefferson Township. Cat tails (flags) grow in the swamp and gave the hill its name. (de Celis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cave Creek
Description:A large stream which rises in Wayne County and empties into Current River in Carter County. "Its name is derived from the number of caves found on its bank," according to Beck in 1823. (Beck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cave Hollow
Description:In Cedar Creek Township, near Lodi. The name was given by early settlers because of the small cave there. A good spring that served for a watering place for a large section of range land in the vicinity is known as Cave Hollow Spring. (Thos. Lewis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cave Hollow Spring
Description:See Cave Hollow.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cave Spring
Description:A small spring at the foot of Kelly Hill in the northern part of St. Francois Township, near Spickerman's place, so named because the spring comes from a small cave at the foot of the hill. (Thomas Lewis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Bay
Description:A stop on the Missouri Pacific Railroad just north of Leeper, in the western part of Mill Spring Township, established for the shipping of timber from Jim Clarkson's mills in the 1890s. See Cedar Bay Branch. (Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Bay Branch
Description:A small stream emptying into the Black River in the western part of Mill Spring Township. The bay was formed by the railroad. Cedars grow along the stream and reflect in the clear water, hence the name. (Wilkinson,)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Bay Hollow
Description:A region surrounding Cedar Bay Branch in the western part of Mill Spring Township. See above. (Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Bay Iron Mines
Description:See Clarkson.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Bluffs
Description:High bluffs on which cedars grow profusely in the central part of St. Francois Township; they rise 300 ft. above the St. Francois River. (AM. REPUBLIC May 15, 1929, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Creek [1 of 2]
Description:See Coldwater.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A large creek in the northern part of the county, which rises near Coldwater and empties into St. Francois River. There are three branches, Upper, Middle, and Lower Cedar Creek. (Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Creek Church
Description:See Coldwater Baptist Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Creek Township
Description:In the northern part of the county, named for Cedar Creek (q.v.), the principal stream. It appears first in the census for 1860, and must have been organized sometime between 1840 and 1860. (U.S. Census for 1840 and 1860)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Center Ridge Church
Description:A General Baptist Church in the southern part of St. Francois Township, named from the school (q.v.). (Burton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Center Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of St. Francois Township. This somewhat isolated neighborhood was called Lonesome Ridge during Civil War days when Hewry Mabrey settled here, having come from Bollinger County. When the school was built about 1880 the name Lonesome Ridge was suggested by Nora Mabrey, daughter of Henry, but others objected to this name and suggested Center Ridge School because the elevation on which the school was built ran in a south-easterly direction between two other ridges, hence Center Ridge. (Mrs. Philip Estes, Burton, W.C. Beaty)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chaonia
Description:A village in the southeast part of Black River Township. The first town laid out and post office established in 1887 was named Wellsdale for Peter F. Wells from Virginia who donated forty-five acres to the town and helped Louis Houck, then extending the Frisco Railroad through this place, lay it out. When a post office was applied for in 1887 postal authorities objected because of Wellsville in Montgomery County, laid off in 1856, and Louis Houck suggested Chaonia, which was accepted. Chaonia is an Indian name, said to have been the name of a Shawnee chief. (Jno. Casey, Sallars, Ensminger, 1934, Goodspeed, 460, Harmon, Mary Robinson, Douglass I 392, Hinchey, Bennett, Miss Leech's thesis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chapel Hill Church
Description:A Methodist Church at the head of Little Brushy Creek in the western part of Williams Township organized about 1880, possibly by Ledbetter and old Jaspar Markham. The church or chapel was built on a hill; hence the name. (G.P. Hillis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chapel Hill School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Williams Township on Little Brushy Creek, named for Chapel Hill Church (q.v.). (Burton, G.P. Hillis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chenoz
Description:A spot mentioned by Campbell in 1874 as "a very large deposit of red hematite; within a circuit of five miles there are a number of promising exposures that are all unworked." It was probably in northeast Logan Township or in Iron County. Nothing could be learned of the source of the name, if it ever existed. (CAMPBELL'S G 753)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cherry Grove School
Description:Now consolidated with Patterson. Established soon after the Civil War and named because the wild cherry trees were so numerous in that section. (J. Black)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chilton
Description:See Gaylor.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chilton's Crossing
Description:See Gaylor.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cholybeate Spring
Description:A medical spring about three miles south of Brunot in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township. "The medicinal properties of the spring are highly spoken of," says Parker in 1867. Several promoters intended to make it a health resort, but it has not been developed in Wayne County. In Iron County just across tnhe line the Cape Mason's have a resort. (Templeton, Parker 414)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the east-central part of St. Francois Township, north of Greenville on the old Greenville-Perryville Road. It was established long before the Civil War and named for the landowner Ezra Clark, father of James Clark who lives nearby now. (Wilkinson, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark Graveyard
Description:A cemetery northwest of Patterson in the western part of Logan Township, near land which John Clark acquired as a Spanish Grant. (W.C. Eaton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark's Creek
Description:A large creek which rises in the northwest part of Benton Township, flows southeast and empties into Logan's Creek in the southeast part of Logan Township. Francis Clark received a Spanish land grant here in 1800, though the more prominent member of the family was "Uncle" Johnny Clark who lived near this creek until 1933, when he died at the age of 87. In 1850 the creek was known as Oak Creek, doubtless for the growth of oak trees along the strream. (Colton, 1860, Campbell, 1873, Duncan, Paullus, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark's Creek Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church organized in 1842 by Rev. James M. Covington. In 1844 there were fifteen members; in 1894, fifty-two members. It was named from it's location on Clark's Creek in the northwest part of Benton Township. (Douglass I 481-490)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark's Creek School
Description:One of the first schools of the county. The district was later divided into Dale, Peachtree Fork, Damon and Ring's Creek schools. (W.C. Eaton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark's Iron Bank
Description:Two regions are known by this name. The earlier shown on Colton's map in 1860 is southwest of Greenville in the southwest part of St. Francois Township, the second region is northeast of Greenville in the eastern part of St. Francois Township. Both names suggest Francis Clark, who received a large Spanish land grant. Cf. Clark's Creek. (Colton 1860; Campbell 1873; Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark's Mountain
Description:An outstanding cone shaped mountain, the highest elevation in the county, in the northwest part of Benton Township. The rugged top of protruding granite can be reached only by climbing afoot or horseback. A spring flows near the top, which is encircled by a drive which is fourteen miles long. The place was considered for the location of the Sam A. Baker Park, but a more scenic spot was chosen. This mountain, like Clark's Creek (q.v.), was named for a pioneer, Francis Clark. (Wayland, Wallis, Wilkinson, R. Davis, Parker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clarkson Iron Mines
Description:A deep hole three miles east of Piedmont in the southeast part of Benton Township, one of the many limonite ore banks in Wayne County, named for George Clarkson who had a sawmill there during the early 1870s, and whose father James G. Clarkson had settled here even earlier. Also known as the Cedar Bay Iron Mines, because of its location near Cedar Bay. (Campbell 1874, 754; Hinchey; Wayland; Rhodes; Wilkinson; Arthur Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clay Creek
Description:A small stream in the southern part of St. Francois Township, emptying into Reece's Creek, named for Tom Clay, a pioneer. (Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clear Water
Description:See Clearwater.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clearwater
Description:A post office maintained from 1888-1897 for a sawmill and station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the central part of Mill Spring Township. So named because the water in the springs was so clear and sparkling. The first mill here was established in the 1870s by Stanfield from Michigan. Later C.E. Ferguson from Wisconsin bought the timber interests and brought new mill machinery. The George Withers & Company of Illinois opened the mills and operated them until a big twenty-seven ft. rise in Black River washed everything away. (Wilkinson; Duncan; Hinchey; Postal Guide; Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clearwater Dam
Description:A dam on Black River in the northwest part of Mill Spring Township, on the border between Wayne and Reynolds Counties. It was named, as was Clearwater (q.v.), for the appearance of the stream. (Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clipper Mill
Description:A large mill on Widow's Creek in the southern part of Black River Township, doubtless named for the proprietor.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clubb
Description:A small community and post office in the western part of Cowan Township. It replaced Ivy, a post office maintained in 1887 about one mile away. Ivy was named for Conn Ivy, later Judge of the County Court, a pioneer farmer who opened the post office in his home. Ivy's father came from Tennessee in the 1830s and entered a land grant. The post office was discontinued after one year. Then in 1893 Clubb post office was established by a merchant, Jake Clubb, who operated the post office in his store. (Ward; Wallis; Smith; Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clubb School
Description:The school of the village of Clubb was first named Lost Creek for its location on Lost Creek; then Davis School for Alfred, Madison, and John Davis, pioneer landowners. Mrs. Eletha Davis moved here from Kentucky, in 1868 with her three sons, who became prominent citizens. Later the school was moved to the village of Clubb and took its name. (Ward, Bennett, Burton, Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cold Water
Description:See Coldwater.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cold Water Hill
Description:A ridge or divide between Lodi and Coldwater in the western part of Cedar Creek Township. There is a large spring of cold water at Taylor Camp. (Paullus, Mrs. Thomas Lewis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cold Water Spring
Description:The spring from which Coldwater received its name. The spring has an abundant flow of very cold water, hence the name. About 1867 J.P. Ellis of Tennessee built a store there, and the spring was often called Ellis Spring in his honor. (Rhodes, Ellis, Paullus, Templeton, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coldwater
Description:A village in the north-central part of Cedar Creek Township, first known as Cedar Creek when Ed Settles established a store and post office there. The place was surveyed in 1859 and a town plat drawn by James R. Willett. The plat was not recorded until 1869. The name was changed to Cold Water in 1868 when James P. Ellis took over the post office. The name, suggested by the cold water of the spring there, was written Cold Water until 1895 when the present spelling became predominant. A carding mill and large grist mill once were maintained here and the village had a population of two-hundred when it was at its heights. (Templeton, Paullus, Kelly, Bowers, Gipoon, Hinchey) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coldwater Baptist Church
Description:The Baptist Church of Coldwater was first known as Cedar Creek Church when it was organized by James E. Paullus and Peter Price in 1844 on Cedar Creek (q.v.), from which it was named. The present building was erected in 1886, and the name changed to that of the community and post office, Coldwater, which had been established there in 1876. (Cassie Paullus, Collins, Goodspeed 558)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Collier
Description:A post office in the northeast part of Cedar Creek Township, in 1867. The post office named for an old settler was discontined before 1876. (Rhodes, Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Collier Creek
Description:A small stream in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, named for Drew Collier. It is a branch of Cedar Creek. (Rhodes, Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Collier Prong
Description:See East Prong.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Concordia College
Description:A school established in Gravelton in the northeast part of Cedar Creek Township in 1877 by the Rev. Luther M. Wagner. Rev. Wagner was born in Tennessee in 1851, was ordained a minister of the Lutheran Church in 1875 when he graduated from Mosheim College at Mosheim, Tennessee. In 1877 he came to Gravelton and organized Concordia College, which opened with an enrollment of seventy. For the name cf. Concordia Seminary. (Goodspeed 1148, Wagner, Douglass I 648)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cool Spring
Description:A spring in the western part of Black River Township, so named by the pioneers for the cool water flowing from the spring. It is located on land now belonging to John "Jack" Sheridan, who purchased the land from Patrick Harmon of Ireland who entered the land. (Rhodes, John Harmon, D.T. Davis, W.O. Manns)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cool Spring Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery near Cool Spring, from which it is named, on the site of old Cool Spring Union Church (q.v.). (Rhodes, Farbes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cool Spring Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the western part of Black River Township organized in 1888 with George H. Adams as pastor. In the early days the building was used by Methodist, Christian, and Baptist denominations and hence called Cool Spring Union Church, but in 1918 the Christian congregation moved to Taskee, the Baptists scattered, the old church was torn down and the present building was erected by the Methodists. The name comes from Cool Spring (q.v.). (C.D. Forbes, Goodspeed 544, Robinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cool Spring School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Black River Township, near Cool Spring (q.v.), from which it is named. (Harmon, Burton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cool Spring Union Church
Description:See Cool Spring Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coon Holler
Description:See Coon Hollow.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coon Hollow
Description:A valley in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, so named because of the large number of raccoons found there by pioneer hunters and settlers. Usually the place is called Coon Holler. (Paullus)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coon Hollow Branch
Description:A small branch of Cedar Creek in Cedar Creek Township. Cf. above. (Mrs. M. Paullus)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Copper Region
Description:A region in the northwest part of Cedar Creek Township, near Brunot, noted on the map of 1865. Robert R. Singer and Alexander Nimich of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, own a lot of mineral land in the region of Brunot. (Fidels)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Corinth Church
Description:A General Baptist Church in the northwest part of Lost Creek Township. When it was first organized in 1900 it was known as Oak Grove Church for the oak trees growing there. The first building was used for the services of both Baptists and Methodists and so called Union Church. It has always been known locally and unofficially as the Fronabarger Church because Uncle Mike Fronabarger, pioneer farmer and Bapltist deacon, gave four acres of land for the church. Officially the church was named Corinth at the General Baptist Association by Rev. Henry Georges, just after the Methodist congregation withdrew. Doubtless the name was reminiscent of the apostolic church to which St. Paul wrote I and II Corinthians. (Irene Crites, M.L. Fronabarger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cowan Cemetery
Description:See Bell Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cowan Township
Description:In the northeast part of the county, named for Uncle Dicky (Richard D.) Cowan, who owned a large tract of land and operated Hog Eye Mill. He came to the county in 1808. It is one of the oldest townships, listed in the United States Census reports since 1840. (Henry B. Smith, Hinchey, Rhodes, Hopkins, U.S. Census)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crane
Description:A limonite ore bank in the northwest part of Cedar Creek Township; it appears on Campbell's map of 1874. Doubtless it was named for the pond (q.v.). (Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crane Pond
Description:A small lake or pond in the northwest part of Cedar Creek Township, named for the cranes which are seen there even today. (Dr. Jones, Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crane Pond Creek
Description:A small stream originating in Crane Pond (q.v.), from which it is named, and flowing into Big Creek. It is now in Sam A. Baker Park. (Jones, Wilkinson, Wm. Wood, Wallis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crites Store
Description:A rural store four miles west of Lowndes, established in 1915 in the community and the "Depression" of 1929 caused its closing in 1933. (Mrs. Irene Crites)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crooked Creek
Description:A small stream in the southeast part of Jefferson Township, so named because of its many turns or crooks. It empties into St. Francois River. (Sallars, Beaty, Williams)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cross Roads Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery near Cross Roads Church (q.v.), from which it was named. (Moore, Collins, Crites)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cross Roads Church
Description:A General Baptist Church in the eastern part of Lost Creek Township, built in 1902 by the Holmes Chapel Baptist Church at the crossing of the main roads one mile from old Holmes Chapel. The building is now used by several denominations, and sometimes referred to as Union Church. Since it is near Wills post office, it is also often called Wills Church. (Moore, Crites, Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crow Branch
Description:A small stream in the northeast part of Logan Township, flowing into Clark's Creek. It was named for Jim Crow, former landowner. Sometimes it is called Sweazea Branch for Walter Sweazea, farmer and road overseer of the community. (Bunyard)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cuba School
Description:In the western part of St. Francois Township, established about the time the Spanish American War closed when the United States projected Cuba; hence the name. (C.E. Burton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cutler's Mill
Description:See Lone Rock.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dale School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Logan Township, organized about 1878, and named for Jim Dale, farmer and landowner, who gave the land for the school. It is also called Upper Clark's Creek School because of its location on Clark's Creek (q.v.). (Owenby, Eaton, Wallis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dalton Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the eastern part of Williams Township. It was first known as Baird Cemetery for Samuel J. Baird, who came from Ohio in 1827 and settled in Williams Township. Later Elijah Dalton settled on Otter Creek, near this cemetery in 1852 and his name was given to the cemetery. In the 1880s Dalton became County Judge. (Manning, Collins, Rhodes) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Damon
Description:A discontinued post office in the northeast part of Logan Township. The first establishment here was the store of Leonard Nixon; later it was sold to Damon Taylor who operated a store and post office from 1895-1902. Since 1932 the store has been operated by Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bunyard and the place is often called Bunyard's Store, though the post office name Damon still exists in Damon School. There is sufficient evidence to prove the source of the name is Damon Taylor, yet the story persists that the name suggests "rural peace," inspired by the locality and by the literary pastoral of Milton, his Latin elegy "Epitaphium Damonis," written in 1638-1639 in memory of his closest friend Charles Diodati. This attribution seems purely fanciful. (Eaton, Mrs. Fred Bunyard, Duncan, Wallis, Chas. Diodati) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Damon Chapel
Description:A Presbyterian Church near the site of Damon post office (q.v.), from which it was named. The church building is comparatively new, but the congregation has disbanded, and the building is used for a community center. (Collins, Fred Wilkerson) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Damon Taylor Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill in the southeast part of Logan Township, operated by Damon Taylor as early as the 1830s. The mill no longer exists, and the Bunyard Store is built near the site. (Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Daniel's Creek
Description:A small creek in the southwest part of Benton Township, named for Carter Daniels, pioneer, on whose farm it is located. (Davidson, Wallis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Danielsville
Description:See Piedmont.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dark Swamp
Description:A large swamp, also known as Black Swamp, in the southeast part of Jefferson Township. Heavy virgin timber, particularly cypress, made both names appropriate ones. (de Celis, McGhee, Ben Stilts) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davidson Blue Spring
Description:See Blue Spring.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the eastern part of Lost Creek Township. It was started about 1850 as the McAllister family graveyard by Arch McAllister on whose land it was located. About 1860 Wm. Davis purchased the land and gave the plat to the community for a public cemetery, which came to be known as the Davis Cemetery. (T.J. Davis, Sallars, Ward, McGhee) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis School [1 of 2]
Description:A rural school in the western part of Lost Creek Township, sometimes called Buzzard's Hill School because of the buzzards which raised their young on a high bluff nearby. It was named Davis School for John Davis who gave the land for the school which was first located one and a quarter miles from its present site, on Bear Creek (q.v.). The school was first known as Bear Creek School. (Moore, Beaty, de Celis, Estes, Ward, Davis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis School [2 of 2]
Description:See Clubb School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis Store
Description:See McGee.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:De Celis Branch
Description:A small stream in the eastern part of Jefferson Township, flowing into McGhee Creek. Named for Sebastian de Celis who came from Spain to the Carolinas, and thence to Wayne County, where he settled on the creek which bears his name in 1860. (de Celis, McGhee) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:De Haven Mill
Description:A bur mill for corn and wheat in the western part of Williams Township, established in the 1830s by John Williams and called Williams Mill. Lee Burns purchased it from Williams and it was Burns Mill until Jeff Markham purchased it just before the Civil War, when it was Markham's Mill. Markham sold his property to A.C. Plunkett and his name was used to designate the mill. In 1876 Ike De Haven came here from London, England, purchased the mill, made a pond or lake by erecting the levee and directing water from Markham's Spring. He made it a first class rolling mill about 1885. De Haven was shot by a man jealous of "foreigners'" success. His sons, Joe and Bill De Haven continued to live in the community. The mill is no longer operated. (Sallars, Duncan, Hinchey, Wallis, AM. REPUB. 1929) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dee's Branch
Description:See Cain Branch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dees Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church in the southwest part of St. Francois Township, organized in 1830 and named for the Dees family. "Uncle" Davy Dees, Henry Dees, and Elijah Dees came from Tennessee and settled there. The church or chapel was evidently first called Bowman's Chapel, for Jacob Lanius, presiding elder, writes in his diary in 1839: "December 21, Held a meeting at old father Dee's Cabin. On the Sabbath we occupied Bowman's Chapel near the dwelling, but the cold weather and smoke operated against us." No one in the county recalls the change, or knows the reason for the earlier name, for this church has been called Dees Chapel since 1840. (Goodspeed 536, 544, McGhee, Sam Manning, Duncan) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dees Chapel School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Williams Township, named from nearby Dees Chapel (q.v.). The school was organized in 1878, and the first teacher was Isom Dalton. (Manning, Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dees Town
Description:A rural community in the eastern part of Williams Township, where three brothers, Elijah, Henry, and Davy Dees settled. The "Town" is a mocking term. (A.J. Stokley, (Mrs. Rhodes) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Depner Branch
Description:A small branch of McKenzie Creek in the southern part of Benton Township, named for a pioneer family who owned land there. Henry Depner was one of three brothers who owned land in this community. (Rhodes, E.L. Evans) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Devil's Washboard
Description:A rocky ridge or bluff along Stanley's Creek in the southeast part of Jefferson Township in Union School District. The rough, uneven, or ridged effect of the bluff suggested the washboard to the pioneer hunters and fishers. (de Celis, Ward) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Diesel Cemetery
Description:In Benton Township. Not an old burial ground, on land now owned by George Diesel, who came from Oklahoma. (E.L. Evans, G. Diesel) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dixon Cemetery
Description:In Cowan Township. Named for a pioneer landowner, Thomas Dixon, who came from North Carolina in the 1830s or 1840s. Now generally known as the Hiram Cemetery for the former village of this name (q.v.). (Mrs. Irene Crites, H.B. Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dixon Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the southern part of Cowan Township on Tom Dixon's farm. It was named for Dixon. (Smith, Davis, Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Doney Gap
Description:A gap or opening through Doney Mountain (q.v.), from which it is named. (Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Doney Mountain
Description:A spur of Aley Mountain (q.v.) in the eastern part of Logan Township, named for L.M. Doney, who came from South Carolina in 1832. (Wilkinson, Bunyard, Davis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Doney's Branch
Description:See Camp Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Doney's Creek
Description:See Camp Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Creek
Description:A creek which rises in Reynolds County, enters Wayne County in the west part of Mill Creek Township, and empties into McKenzie Creek south of Piedmont. The name suggests that the creek is dry during the summer. (Bennett, Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Creek Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1816 in Bethel Association, and named for the nearby stream. (Houck III 218)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Creek School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Mill Spring Township, named from Dry Creek (q.v.), on which it is located. (Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duckett Church
Description:See Williamsville Baptist Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duncan Graveyard
Description:In Mill Spring Township one mile from Mt. Pleasant Church (q.v.). It was started as a family burial ground, but was deeded to the public by Andrew A. Duncan in 1872 to take the place of the Wallis Graveyard (q.v.) which was filled. Joseph Duncan, father of the donor, was a pioneer minister who came from Tennessee in the 1830s. (A. Duncan, Mrs. Maggie Duncan) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durrow Branch
Description:A small stream named for the landowners John B., John H., and James Durrow. (Estes, Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eads Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the southern part of Mill Spring Township, named for the pioneer Jack Eads, on whose land the cemetery was started. (Nunn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eads Creek
Description:A stream in Mill Spring Township, flowing into Black River, named for Jack Eads, pioneer, who settled there about 1870, having come from Tennessee. The first steam sawmill in the county was on Eads Creek. (Duncan, Bennett, J.M. Nunn) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eads Creek School
Description:A rural school in the east-central part of Mill Creek Township, organized about 1900 and named for Eads Creek (q.v.). on which it is located. (Nunn, Wilkinson, Duncan, John Warren) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eagle Bluff
Description:A bluff on the south side of Black River in the southern part of Mill Spring Township, so called from the eagles which nested there. (Sallars)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Earwood Spring
Description:A well known spring in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, named for Tom Earwood who with his half-brother, Ed Sherwood, owned land in the region of the spring. Water was carried from this spring on the backs of mules. (Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:East Prong
Description:A fork or prong of Bear Creek in the southeast part of Cowan Creek from the east to form a prong. It is also known as Glover Prong, from Samuel Glover, a pioneer farmer, and Collier Prong, from Drew Collier, who also owned land along the stream. (Twidell) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:East Prong of Lick Creek
Description:A prong or branch of Lick Creek in the southern part of Jefferson Township, also known as Brown Branch, from a family who live on the creek. (McGhee, de Celis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eaton Graveyard
Description:About six miles northeast of Piedmont, it was started as a family burial ground on land entered by John R. Eaton, from Kentucky, in 1857. (Mr. & Mrs. I. Rhodes, W.C. Eaton) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edgar Branch
Description:See Williams Branch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edgar Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church built about 1915 and named for George Edgar, who deeded the land for the church. (G.P. Hillis, Manning)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edgar School
Description:See Lone Star School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edwards
Description:A station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the southwest part of St. Francois Township established in 1916 for the sawmill camp then operated in Pleasant Valley. Holliday operated the sawmill and store and named it for Aunt Polly Edwards, who lived there. The place disappeared when the sawmill was moved. It was sometimes called Edwardsville. (Rhodes, Collins, Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edwardsville [1 of 2]
Description:See Edwards.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edwardsville [2 of 2]
Description:A railroad station south of Greenville on the now abandoned Wms.-Greenville-St. Louis Railroad, established as a log loading station by the Holliday Company, and named for Alex Edwards, who settled here before the Civil War. The station was abandoned before the railroad in 1916. (Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ellis Spring
Description:See Cold Water Spring.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm Prong
Description:A branch or prong of Bear Creek in the western part of Cowan Township, near Twidell Cemetery, named for the elm trees growing there. (Twidell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:English Graveyard
Description:A rural cemetery in the northern part of Logan Township, named for the English family who came here as early as 1849 and settled near the spring. (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:English Spring
Description:A spring in the north-central part of Logan Township, named for the family who owned the land. Cf. above. (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eskew Hill
Description:A large hill in the eastern part of Jefferson Township, where an early settler by the name of Eskew lived. The man died of neglect. (Stilts) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Estes Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in the southern part of Black River Township, named for John Estes, Union soldier and pioneer farmer in the community. Estes gave the land for the cemetery. (Estes, Noldge) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Estes Ferry
Description:A ferry on the St. Francois River in the southwest part of Black River Township. It was on the Estes farm and operated in 1880 by Harris Estes, for whom it was named. (Davis (I.J.), McGhee)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Exist
Description:See Burch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ferry's
Description:See Ferry's Switch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ferry's Switch
Description:A railroad switch on the Frisco Railroad, where a sawmill was established in 1904 by Thomas and Tuthill. It was so named because it was near a well-known ferry on St. Francois River. The possessive ending indicates that it was thought to be a personal name. (Sallars, Rhodes, Wallis, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Finley's Mountains
Description:Two small mountains in the center part of Benton Township, near Piedmont, named for H.H. Finley, who owned land here before the Civil War. Finley was a doctor and tried to open a health resort, but was unsuccessful. One of the mountains was formerly called Bunyard Mountain for John Bunyard, and elderly gunsmith, who lived here before the Civil War. (Wilkinson, Evans) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flatwoods
Description:A region in the southeast part of Cowan Township, known as The Barrens or later The Flatwoods because there was no timber except little brush and very scattering trees in this section in pioneer days. These conditions prevailed in 1810 when Hugh McGhee pioneered here. (Tom McGhee)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flatwoods Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in the eastern part of Logan Township, in the region called descriptively The Flatwoods. R.L. Meader was a pioneer preacher here. (Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flatwoods School
Description:See Scowden School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flint
Description:A post office maintained in 1897. Neither the location of the place nor the origin of the name can be ascertained. (Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flynn Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery east of Greenville, named for a pioneer family. The land is now owned by Wm. Shumate. (Owenby, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flynn Hill
Description:A large hill east of Greenville in the eastern part of St. Francois Township, very steep and one-half mile long. It was named for a pioneer family. Cf. above. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fort Benton
Description:See Patterson.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frank White School
Description:See Burlington School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frazier's Creek
Description:A small stream flowing into Bounds Creek in the northern part of St. Francois Township, named for a pioneer landowner. (Ward, Bennett, Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frisco
Description:A log loading station on the Frisco Railroad, from which it was named, in the west-central part of Black River Township. (McGhee, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fronabarger Church
Description:See Corinth Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frye Church
Description:A church on the same grounds as Frye School (q.v.), from which it was named. (Ward, Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frye School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Jefferson Township, established in 1887 and commonly called Oklahoma School, because it was "considered so far from everywhere, as remote as Oklahoma." The name Frye was given for Tillman Frye, an earlty settler and public spirited man. (Bennett, E.A. de Celis, Sallars, Ward (W.T.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gad's Hill
Description:A village in the northwest part of Benton Township, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, on a high elevation, famous because it was the scene of the James brother's hold-up and robbery in 1875. The village was established in 1871, when the railroad was built. The town was platted in 1872 by George W. Creath, and named for the country home of Charles Dickens. At Gadshill in Kent three miles northwest of Rochester was located Gadshill Place, residence of Dickens till his death June 9, 1870--just two years earlier. A post office was maintained from 1886-1887, when the name was changed to Zeitonia post office was discontinued, and Gad's Hill restored. There is a story, not prevalent and obviously folk etymology which suggests that the name came from "a family who lived there before the railroad was built who would not work but gadded about all the time." (Wilkinson, Forbes, Evans, Eaton, Lucy, Conard, Duncan, Campbell 1873) (Pottenger, Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garrison Graveyard
Description:A cemetery in the Lone Rock community in the southern part of Black River Township, named for John Garrison, landowner. (Forbes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gaylor
Description:A switch and sawmill village on the Missouri Southern Railroad west of Leeper in the western part of Mill Spring Township, formerly known as Chilton or Chilton's Crossing for Isaac Chilton, who owned the farm through which the railroad ran. The name was changed because confusion often occurred in freight shipments with Chilton in Carter County on the Frisco Railroad. (Radtke) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gill's Mill
Description:A pioneer corn grist mill (now gone) on Clark's Creek in the western part of Logan Township, operated by William Gill, who was one of the pioneer families of the Virginia settlement. (F.M. Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gipsy River
Description:A small stream which rises in the eastern part of Cowan Township, flows east into Bollinger County where it empties into Turkey Creek near Gipsy, from which it is named. (Hopkins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gizzard Creek
Description:A branch of Turkey Creek in the eastern part of Cedar Creek Township. Perhaps this is a map maker's error and the name should be Buzzard Creek (q.v.) named from the buzzards. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glad Tidings Church
Description:A General Baptist Church in the eastern part of Black River Township organized January 15, 1896 by Elder James Robins. Jaspar Chatman, father of Mrs. Dan Moore, suggested the ideal name. The church is also known as the Rucker Church for William Rucker, a landowner. (Mrs. Dan Moore, John Harmon, Rhodes) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glover Graveyard
Description:A rural cemetery in the southeast part of Cedar Creek Township, named for Samuel Glover on whose farm it is located. (Kelly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glover's Prong
Description:See East Prong.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Good Hope Church
Description:See Williamsville Baptist Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A stream in the western part of Cowan Township, flowing into Bear Creek; named by pioneer hunters who found wild geese in the marshes along the creek bed. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A small stream in the northern part of Benton Township, named by pioneer hunters for the wild geese which were found there. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gossett's Ford
Description:A ford on Logan Creek in the central part of Mill Spring Township named for a pioneer family who operated a brick kiln here. They were also landowners. Calvin Gossett is a son of the pioneer. (Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Graham Cemetery
Description:In Mill Spring Township, northeast of Leeper. The very old burial ground was begun on Wm. Graham's land. Because of the low land and the small plat allowed, another was begun after several years one mile upon the hill on Frank Graham's farm, a brother. (Mrs. Maggie Duncan, A. Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grangerville
Description:A village with a population of fifty in 1874 on Bear Creek in the eastern part of Cowan Township. The place no longer exists. The name came from the farmers' organization known as the Grangers. Mr. McGhee says his stepfather belonged to the organization and that it was quite important for a number of years. (Parker, 1867, Campbell, 1874, McGhee)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Granite Bend
Description:A railroad station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the central part of Williams Township established in 1910 for the granite quarry. The quarry was operated in 1888 by Timothy O'Keefe of the Stifel and Ruckert Granite Company, an immense business employing four hundred men. A large shaft was sunk perpendicularly eighty-five feet with two chambers branching from the bottom each twenty feet long. Powder was placed in the chambers and shaft--three car loads--and the resulting explosion shook the entire hill, uprooting thousands of tons of granite, sufficient to last for years. Paving blocks were made of this granite and a thriving business carried on over the railroad until the use of concrete lowered the demand for granite. (Duncan, Goodspeed 1140, Rhodes, Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Granny Branch
Description:A stream in the southern part of Logan Township, also known as White Creek, named for Aunt Cassie White, who died at the age of one-hundred years. She was known as "Granny" to many people, and doubtless the creek was thus called, though Hal Bennett suggests the name may refer to a kind of fish called granny which was in the creek. (Twidell, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Graphite
Description:A station on the Williams-Greenville Railroad in the northeast part of Cedar Creek Township. It was first a logging camp known as Camp 33, and was the site of the Pioneer Cooperate Stave Company. Ben Whitener and Tom Meyers had a store there. A post office was maintained from 1910-1911. Some of the mineral known as graphite was found, but was not imported commercially. (Twidell, Jno. W. Stroup, Wagner, Hinchey) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grassy Creek
Description:A creek in the western part of Benton Township, near Grassy Mountain (q.v.) from which it is named.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grassy Mountain
Description:A hill in the western part of Benton Township, so named because it is covered with a heavy growth of wild grass. (Evans)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gravel Pit
Description:A pit for which gravel was dug for filling in the railroad bed on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the southern part of Mill Spring Township. It was quite large in 1910, and the trains stopped here for loading gravel. (Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gravelton
Description:A small village in the northeast part of Cedar Creek Township. The first settlement here centered around Moser's Mill, run by J.R. Moser and Whitener in 1873--later Gravelton Roller Mill. The first buildings, a store, a dwelling, and the building for Concordia College opened in 1874, were made of gravel cemented, and when a post office was applied for in 1876, the name was suggested by the buildings. (Myers, Hopkins, Stroup, Wagner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gray's Mountain
Description:A mountain in the northwest part of Benton Township, so named because a man named Gray lived at the foot of the mountain. It is reported that Gray is a strong Christian character and almost daily went to the mountain to pray. (Evans, Ward, Mrs. Kelly) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greasy Creek
Description:A small stream which empties into McKenzie Creek in the eastern part of Benton Township. Two stories concerning the name prevail. Oil collects on pools after rains, and some oil is always present among the shale. According to Mrs. J.J. Van Eaton it was so named sixty or seventy years ago because a man who lived up the creek went so "dirty and greasy all the time." Doubtless the real significance of the name was merely "muddy," a sense which "greasy" had in earlier days among river men; cf. Mark Twain's use (see Mark Twain LEXICON). (Lloyd (N.G.), Ed Henson, Van Eaton) (Pottenger, Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green Hill School
Description:A rural school in the western part of St. Francois Township. Named from a landowner, William R. Green, and a large hill which the school faces. (Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenville
Description:The county seat of Wayne County, until recently in the central part of St. Francois Township; since the Wappapello Dam (q.v.) was built, Greenville has been moved two and a half miles north. The removal was completed in July, 1943, when the courthouse was moved. Greenville was laid out in 1819 as the county seat of Wayne County by David Logan and Elijah Bettis at a place on St. Francois River known as Bettis' Ford. It is believed that the first plan was to locate the seat of justice on the southern side of the river, but Bettis, being a commissioner, took the opportunity for enhancing the value of his land on the north side of the river by placing the town there. The town is said to have been laid out in a cornfield with the streets following the rows of corn. It was named Greenville for the town in Ohio where General Anthony Wayne (for whom the county was named) concluded a treaty with the Indians in 1795. Greenville, Ohio was named by General Anthony Wayne, when he established it as Fort Greenville in 1793, for his friend General Nathaniel Greene (1742-1786), who started General Wayne on his successful military career. Since the moving of Greenville to the new site it is spoken of as the New Town or New Greenville, in contrast to Old Greenville, where the old courthouse remained in use until July, 1943. Possibly these designations Old and New will disappear when the last remaining traces of the original town are obliterated by the lake which is to be formed by Wappapelo Dam. (Houck III 186, Douglass I 167, Bennett, Wm. Settle, Templeton, M.H.R. 24)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenville and Doniphan Road
Description:The first "three notch road" in this section, was made about 1852 and led from Greenville, in Wayne County, to Poplar Bluff, and then over the hills to Doniphan. Main Street of Poplar Bluff is a part of this old road. Tradition has it that this road was measured with a grapevine measure. (THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC, May 15, 1929)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenville and Williamsville Railroad
Description:A railroad extending from Greenville, the county seat, to Williamsville, at the junction of the Missouri Pacific and Frisco Railroads. It was built in 1899 by the Holliday-Klatz Land and Lumber Company, a corporation owning vast acres of timber and operating extensive mills in Wayne County. After the timber was cut, the railroad was useless. It was known for a time as the Ozark Valley Road. After Holliday's death in 1899 the road was abandoned. Later the Holliday Highway took the route of the old railroad. (Dougless I 507, AMERICAN REPUBLIC, Feb. 18, 1933) The road was extended to Cascade in the northeast part of the county as the timber interests extended in that direction and therefore was often called Greenville, Williamsville and St. Louis Railroad. This railroad was locally known as the Holliday Road for Hiram Holliday, president of the company and owner of many acres of land and sawmills in the county. Bruce Gladden helped in the construction of the railroad and ran the first train over it. After the timber was cut, the railroad was useless. It was known for a time as the Ozark Valley Road. After Hollidays' death in 1899 the road was abandoned. Later the Holliday Highway took the route of the old railroad. (Douglass I, 507, AMERICAN REPUBLIC, Feb. 18, 1933)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenville Ferry
Description:A ferry on St. Francois River, established before Greenville was, for a military road. (McGhee)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenville, Williamsville, and St. Louis Railroad
Description:See Greenville-Williamsville Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenwood Valley [1 of 2]
Description:This is the name given to two valleys, Kelo and Webb, in the southern part of Mill Spring Township. Pioneers came to this valley quite early; a post office was established in 1854, and the first school in the county was built here. The name is said to be descriptive by most authorities, but Dr. Davidson believes it is a family name and mentions Mrs. Zella Greenwood as the widow of an early settler. (Rhodes, Duncan, Davidson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenwood Valley [2 of 2]
Description:A post office maintained from 1854-1873 in the southwest part of Mill Spring Township, in Greenwood Valley (q.v.) from which it was named. L. McFadden was the first postmaster. (Goodwin, Hayward, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenwood Valley Creek
Description:A small stream in the western part of Mill Spring Township, named from Greenwood Valley (q.v.), through which it flows. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenwood Valley School
Description:See Shady Nook School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gribbler Creek
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Jefferson Township, flowing into McGhee Creek. Also known as Hare Creek for the number of rabbits found there by pioneer hunters. It is officially Gribbler Creek from two brothers, John and Alvin Gribbler, who own land along the creek. (McGhee) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grisham Store
Description:See McGee.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gulf, The
Description:A deep chasm which according to reports was explored by two men who could not plumb its depth. It is five miles south of Mill Spring in the southern part of Mill Spring Township. A settlement was made near the gulf in 1870 by Jesse Williams. (Ijames)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Halbert Branch
Description:See Williams Branch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hale College
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Benton Township, established in 1877. It is now only a rural elementary school, but retains the name given when J.H. Hale, a graduate of William Jewell College at Liberty, Missouri, returned to his native county and established the institution as a private school. He sold out about 1885 and now the original building is used for a barn. (Manning)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Haney Branch
Description:A small stream flowing into Black River in the central part of Williams Township, named for Sam Haney, pioneer, through whose farm the branch flows. The farm now belongs to Mr. Warren. (Harmon, Manning)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hare Creek
Description:See Gribbler Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harmon Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the southern part of Black River Township, named for Patrick Harmon, who came from Ireland and settled near Cool Spring, in the neighborhood known as Harmon Settlement in pioneer days. (Barnhill, O'Manns)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harmon Settlement
Description:See Harmon Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harmon's Store
Description:See Taskee.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickman Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the western part of St. Francois Township, on land belonging to Harrison Hickman. It was started about 1890. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Grove Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the eastern part of St. Francois Township at the site of Old Hickory Grove Church (q.v.), from which it was named. (H. Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Grove Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of St. Francois Township, near Clubb, so named by its founders in 1890 for its location in a grove of black hickory trees. It has since been moved two miles southwest of its old location. (Noel Twidell, Collins, Owenby)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Grove School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Lost Creek Township, so named because it was built in a grove of black hickory trees, a common growth, especially along Lost Creek. (Crites, Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Highland
Description:See Burbank.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Highland Orchard
Description:See Burbank.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hillis School [1 of 2]
Description:See New Prospect School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hillis School [2 of 2]
Description:See Lone Star School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hiram
Description:A post office and community in the southern part of Cowan Township, established in 1901 for the sawmill of Hiram Holliday, president of a lumber company, and operator of many mills in the county. (Postal Guide, Hinchey, Koszegi, Beaty)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hiram Switch
Description:See Hiram.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hixon's Store
Description:See Damon.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hog Eye
Description:See Lowndes.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hog Eye Creek
Description:See Andy's Branch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hog Eye Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill established by Joseph Burk on Bear Creek in the southern part of Cowan Township, about 1826. Later it was bought in turn by Thomas Hopkins, Keel, and finally Ben Whitener in 1870. The name, Messrs. Smith and Ward believe, is a pioneer expression signifying loafing. "What you been doing?" "Nothing; just hog eyeing," the pioneers might say. However, C.F. Hopkins, son of the mill owner, who was born at Hog Eye Mill, says the name was suggested by the topography, Bear Creek curving about the hill to suggest a hog's head with this mill site and the small lake created by the mill dam as the eye. (Stilts, McGhee, W. Smith, Hopkins) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hog Eye School [1 of 2]
Description:A rural school, now consolidated with Lowndes, in the southeast part of Cowan Township, named from Hog Eye Mill (q.v.). (Hopkins, Ward) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hog Eye School [2 of 2]
Description:A rural school southeast of Patterson in the southeast part of Logan Township, possibly named from the older school and Hog Eye Mill (q.v.) in the southeast part of Cowan Township. (Rhodes, Bennett, Hopkins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holliday
Description:A railroad station on the Frisco in the extreme southwest part of Williams Township, named for Hiram Holliday, most prominent sawmill man in the county for many years. (Manning, Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holliday Creek
Description:A small stream in the western part of Cowan and the northern part of St. Francois Township, named for Hiram Holliday, greatest lumber and sawmill man of the county. (de Celis, Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holliday Highway
Description:A highway extending from Cascade in the northeast part of Cedar Creek Township, to Greenville in St. Francois Township, thence southwest to Williamsville in Williams Township, following the old Greenville-Williamsville Railroad. Construction began in 1918 and the road was named by the people of Wayne County in honor of Hiram Holliday, the man whose commercial activity made possible; first, the construction of the railroad which preceded the highway; second, the development of adjacent territory; and third, the establishment of a highway from Williamsville to Cascade, a distance of almost fifty miles. Hiram Holliday came from Madison County in the 1860s, set up a sawmill on a vast tract of land he had bought near Greenville, and began sawmill operations which extended throughout the county. He is said to have operated the largest chain of sawmills in the world. He also built the railroad from Williamsville to Cascade to tie his timber interests together. (Julian, Bennett, de Celis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holliday Road
Description:See Greenville-Williamsville Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holmes Cave
Description:A cave in the western part of St. Francois Township, on the farm belonging to Ben Holmes, a pioneer and once sheriff of the county, for whom it was named. (Wallis, Williams (1904)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holmes Chapel
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the northern part of Lost Creek Township, established in 1892 by Rev. John Abram, and named for B.F. Holmes, who gave the land for the church. The congregation now worships in the school building. (Smith, Crites, Kelly) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holmes Chapel School
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hovis Branch
Description:A small stream flowing into Big Creek in the southern part of Cedar Creek Township, named for a pioneer family from North Carolina, who owned the land. Arthur Hovis now owns part of the Hovis grant. (Stroup)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hovis School
Description:See Mount Hope School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hubble Creek
Description:A tributary of St. Francois River in the northern part of St. Francois Township, named for an early settler who received in 1823 a Spanish land grant when his father-in-law's land, the Domatelli grant, was litigated. (SPANISH LAND GRANTS RECORD)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hubert
Description:A railroad station and post office in the southern part of St. Francois Township, named for Hubert Manns, of German descent, who came from Prussia about 1845 and settled here. The post office was maintained from 1910-1918. (Postal Guide, Wayland, Manns, Rhodes, Manning)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hudson Branch
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Black River Township, on land belonging to George Hudson, for whom it was named. (Harmon)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hughes Creek
Description:A small stream in the northeast part of Logan Township on Campbell's Map in 1873. It was named for A.C. Hughes, pioneer landowner. (Campbell, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hughes School
Description:See Bennett School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hunter's Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Cedar Creek Township, flowing into the St. Francois River. It was named for John Hunter, a settler along the creek. (Kelly, Lewis, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hunter's Creek [2 of 2]
Description:See Lodi.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hunter's Tourist Camp
Description:On Highway 67, three miles north of Greenville, established in 1927 by J.L. Hunter. The name was soon changed to River Side because the place was confused with Hunter in Carter County. It is located on the St. Francois River and is a very splendid camping and fishing resort. (Mrs. J.L. Hunter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hurricane Holler
Description:A valley or hollow in the eastern part of Cowan Township, so named because a hurricane or storm swept through the timbered section before the Civil War, leaving great trees uprooted and other signs of havoc. (Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ijames Church
Description:See Carson Hill Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ijames School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Mill Spring Township, named for Judge Matthew N. Ijames. Two brothers, Matthew and Beal Ijames, came from Wales to North Carolina in 1760. Matthew N., son of Beal, came to Wayne County just after the Civil War. He bought land and became a prominent citizen. He was the first teacher in the Ijames school, and later became judge of the County Court. (John Ijames, Duncan, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Graveyard
Description:See Williams Graveyard.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Irish Mountain
Description:A large mountain in the northwest part of Benton Township, so named because a large number of Irishmen were employed here in the quarries, from which granite for paving blocks were taken. (E.L. Evans)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ishell's Store
Description:See Patterson.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ivy
Description:See Clubb.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ivy Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in the western part of Cowan Township, near the Clubb community, named for Cora Ivy, a pioneer. (Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jefferson Township
Description:In the southeast part of the county. It is one of the oldest townships, listed in the United States Census reports since 1840. Named for Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States. (Stilts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jewell Switch
Description:A railroad switch in the southeast part of Black River Township, on the Frisco Railroad. It was named for the Jewell Iron Company from Ohio, which came here in 1905 and mined a number of carloads of iron ore, the first in the county. The venture did not pay, however, as the ore was in pockets. The company abandoned operations in 1912, but for a time the switch was maintained for loading logs. (Moore, Sallars) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jim Town
Description:See Lowndes.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jockey Creek
Description:See Turkey Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:John's Branch
Description:A stream in the southern part of Lost Creek Township, named for Felix John, who owned land there about the time of the Civil War. (Beaty, Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Joiner Hill
Description:A hill in the southern part of Black River Township. An old road leads over the hill, over which Civil War soldiers marched on the way to Georgia. It is named for Josiah Joiner, who lived at the foot of the hill, on whose farm the soldiers camped. Old bullets and war relics are still found there occasionally. (Moore) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Joiner Pond
Description:A pond at the foot of Joiner Hill (cf. above), which covers about one-half acre and is said to be bottomless. (Bennett, Moore) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Julian Branch
Description:A small stream in the northwest part of St. Francois Township, flowing into Lake Creek; named for the Julian family, who lived there. (Bennett, Julian) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keelo Valley
Description:See Kelo Valley.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keener
Description:A small village on Black River about five miles south of Williamsville in the southern part of Williams Township, established as a sawmill camp, and doubtless named for the family who operated the mill. The village has disappeared, though Keener Cave and Keener Spring are well known. (State Map, McGhee)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keener Cave
Description:A well- known cave in the southern part of Williams Township. Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keener Spring
Description:A large spring in the southern part of Williams Township. See Keener.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kelley Cemetery
Description:In Mill Spring Township on land now owned by Charles Madkin. It was named for Joseph Kelley, an earlier resident whose baby was the first person buried there. It was used by the public for many years but now discontinued. (Mr. & Mrs. F. Chilton, Mrs. Maggie Duncan) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kelly Hill [1 of 2]
Description:A hill one mile south of Lodi in the southern part of Cedar Creek Township, named for John Kelly, a pioneer. (Lewis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kelly Hill [2 of 2]
Description:A hill in the northern part of St. Francois Township, named for William Kelly, who came here from Kentucky and settled about 1876. (Ward, Kelly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kelly Spring
Description:A spring in the northern part of St. Francois Township, named for William Kelly, landowner. (F.M. Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kelo Valley
Description:A large valley about five miles long in the western part of Williams Township, named for Joseph Kelo, pioneer, who settled there about 1885 on some seven hundred acres of land. It is drained by Kelo Valley Branch. It is sometimes spelled Keelo, which corresponds to the sound. (Duncan, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kelo Valley Branch
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kemper Creek
Description:See Camp Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kentucky Hollow
Description:See Oscar Hollow.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kentucky Spring
Description:See Lurker Spring.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kerrigan
Description:The post office for Granite Bend in the north-central part of Williams Township, established in 1886 on the Iron Mountain Railroad (now Missouri Pacific), and named for the General Superintendant of the railroad, William Kerrigan of St. Louis. From this place were shipped granite paving blocks for St. Louis streets. (Wayland, Hinchey, Rhodes, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kime
Description:A post office maintained from 1908-1938 in the southeast part of St. Francois Township, named for Samuel Kime, a landowner and General Baptist preacher. The place originated in a country store operated by D.L. Garrison, Sam Kime's stepson. The goods for the store were furnished by Lin Grisham of Bollinger County who operated a chain of stores in this section of the country. (D.B. Baker, Beaty, Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kime Baptist Church
Description:The Baptist Church in the village of Kime in the southeast part of St. Francois Township, first organized in 1836, with Henry Y. Mabrey as pastor; it was named Oak Grove Church from its location in a grove of oak trees and near Oak Grove School. The old Oak Grove Cemetery is still there, but the church was moved into Kime about 1914 and took the name of the village. (Collins, Douglass Hist. of Missouri)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knox Branch
Description:A small stream in the northern part of Black River Township, possibly named for a landowner. (Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kyles
Description:A small village in the northwest part of St. Francois Township. A post office was maintained from 1892-1934. The postmaster was John Wilcox. The name Kime was suggested for Samuel Kime who owned the timber and store, but since Kime had already taken his name he suggested Kyles. Mr. Wilkenson says he coined the name from Wylie Wilcox, but what system of coinage was used is certainly not clear. Messrs. Hinchey and Wallis say it is a family name and that Kyles was a postmaster in the early 1890s. (Manning, Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ladero
Description:A signal stop on the Frisco Railroad in the southern part of Black River Township. The station was established by Jack Sheridan, a railroad conductor. According to some authorities, he had the station put in so he could stop at home; according to others so school children could go to Williamsville. He selected the name, but for what reason is unknown. (Sallars) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake Creek
Description:A small stream in the northwest part of St. Francois Township, flowing into St. Francois River. The name suggests the many small lakes which were the source of the creek. (Wayland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake Creek School
Description:A rural school near Kyles in the northwest part of St. Francois Township, named from Lake Creek (cf. above). (Black, Wayland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lander's Creek
Description:See Middle McGee Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lawson Branch
Description:A small stream named for John Lawson who owned the land through which the creek flowed. (Noel Twidwell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lebanon Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in the southern part of Benton Township, organized in 1874 under an elm tree. A new building was erected in 1882. The name was suggested by the founders for the mountain range which formed the northwest boundary of the Promised Land. The name (Hebrew) means "white," "snowy." (Dt. 1:7, Bible, HISTORY OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS 301, Eaton, Kelly, Rhodes, Bunyard)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leeper
Description:A post office and village in the south-central part of Mill Spring Township. The town was laid out in 1874 by Sid Leeper and named in honor of his father, Colonel W.T. Leeper. A post office was established in 1881. The place was also called Leeper's Station until 1891, for it remained little more than a station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Colonel William T. Leeper moved to Wayne County in 1857 and purchased 225 acres of land. In 1858 he was elected County Surveyor and served until the beginning of the Civil War. He organized Company D. of the Twelfth Regiment of Missouri Militia and was made captain. Before the close of the war Leeper returned to his farm, became representative of Wayne County 1868- 1872. It is said that Colonel Leeper persuaded (or forced) the Iron Mt. Railroad to go through his property (where Leeper is now) in spite of the fact that it meant cutting through two mountains. This was in 1871. (Postal Guide, Douglass I 392, Campbell (1873) Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leeper Graveyard
Description:A rural cemetery one-half mile southeast of the village of Leeper on land belonging to Sid Leeper, son of Colonel Leeper, for whom it was named. (Nunn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leeper's Ford
Description:A ford, now replaced by a bridge, on the St. Francois River in the southern part of Mill Spring Township. It was so named because here Colonel Timothy Reeves of the Confederate Army chased Colonel Leeper and members of his company of Federals across the river during the Civil War. Leeper and his company swam their horses over the swollen river as Reeves fired on them during one of the skirmishes which occurred in Wayne County. The place retained the name. The skirmish must have occurred during General Sterling Price's famous Missouri Expedition of Aug. 29 to Dec. 2, 1864; cf. the account of Colonel Timothy Reeves under Reeves Station in Butler County and Battle Hollow in Ripley County, as given in Miss Pottenger's thesis. (Davidson, Wallis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leeper's Station
Description:See Leeper.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewis Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery located on land deeded by Thomas Lewis, in 1874. (Lewis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Hill Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the central part of St. Francois Township, organized in 1875 when a log building was erected. After this building was abandoned the congregation met in the school building. In 1932 the church was reorganized. The ideal name was given by the founders. (Collins, Douglass HIST. OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS 301)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Hill School
Description:A rural school in the central part of St. Francois Township, named from Liberty Hill Church (q.v.). (Collins, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lick Branch
Description:A tributary of McKenzie Creek in the southern part of Benton Township, named from a salt lick. (Evans, Eaton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lick Creek
Description:A creek in the southern part of Lost Creek and Jefferson Townships, flowing into Mingo Swamp. It was named by the pioneers for the salt licks found along the stream. Tom McGhee says he has often seen deer along the stream. (McGhee) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lick Valley Springs
Description:A group of springs and valley in the southern part of Jefferson Township, so named from the saline deposits or deer licks found by pioneers. The springs were claimed to possess medicinal values in 1904. (Williams 1904, Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Linville Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, a very old cemetery, named for L.H. Linville, once sheriff of Wayne County, who deeded the land. (Paullus, Owenby)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Brushy
Description:A small branch of Big Brushy Creek (q.v.).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Brushy Baptist Church
Description:Near the creek of that name in St. Francois Township.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Brushy Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in St. Francois Township, named from Little Brushy Creek, a tributary of Brushy Creek (q.v.). (Hillis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Brushy Creek
Description:See Brushy Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A small branch of Lost Creek in the northern part of Lost Creek Township. It was first called Butts Branch for Isaac Butts, who owned land there long before the Civil War. Later the stream was called Little Creek from its size. (Wilkinson, Myers, Powers) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A small stream in northeast Cedar Creek Township, which flows east into Castor River. (Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Flock Church
Description:A disbanded Baptist Church in the central part of St. Francois Township, organized about 1880, with Henry Y. Mabrey the pastor. It was disbanded about 1920. The comparison of a congregation to a flock, with Christ as the Shepherd, is a common one. "Fear not, little flock..." (LK. 12:32). (Wallis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Lake Church
Description:A rural Missionary Baptist Church organized in 1876 in the north-central part of St. Francois Township, and named for Little Lake Creek (q.v.) on which it was located. (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Lake Creek
Description:A creek in the southern part of St. Francois Township, which dried up in summer except in large pools (or little lakes). (Manning)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Lake School
Description:A rural school in the north-central part of St. Francois Township, named from Little Lake Creek (q.v.). (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lizard's Lick School
Description:See Rowland School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lodi
Description:A post office and community in the southern part of Cedar Creek Township. The pioneer community was called Hunter's Creek, because the abundance of game in the territory made this a hunter's paradise. In 1893 when a post office was established, Dr. W.B. Wilkinson and W.J. Kelly, in whose store the post office was located, selected the name. Mr. Owenby says Dr. Wilkinson reversed the word Idol; but Thomas Lewis and Mrs. Cassie Kelly say Dr. Wilkinson, who clerked in Kelly's store, found the name on a piece of calico and suggested it for the post office. Ultimately, of course, it must be derived from the city in Italy, scene of Napoleon's famous victory of May 10, 1796, and adopted as a place name by fifteen other American towns. (Owenby, Lewis, Kelly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lodi Nazarene Church
Description:This church in the present village of Lodi was first organized in Coldwater School House about 1880 by the Wilkinson, Greer and Costner families and named Mt. Nebo Christian Church. Nebo is a mountain east of the River Jordan and its summit was the scene of Moses' death. The church was moved to the village of Lodi about 1924 and used as a Union or Community church; now it belongs to the Nazarene denomination. (Paullus)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Log Cabin Church
Description:A Pentecostal Church on Mill Spring, organized in 1933. It is built of logs. (Mrs. Nettie Nichols) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Logan Township
Description:In the northwest part of the county organized before 1840 and named for the prominent Logan family who had Spanish grants there. Cf. Logan's Creek. (U.S. Census Report, Wallis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Logan's Creek
Description:A large creek formed by the junction of Camp Creek and Clark's Creek near Patterson in the eastern part of Logan Township. It empties into the St. Francois River. The name is that of a family of early settlers, Robert, Charles, and David Logan, who came from Kentucky in 1800 and settled on Spanish grants. (Wallis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Logan's Creek Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in the southern part of Logan Township, a charter member of the Wayne County Association when it was formed in 1875, and previously a member of the Cane Creek Association in 1857. Named from the creek on which it was located. Cf. above. (Douglass HIST. OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS 301)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lon Sander's Canyon
Description:A scenic spot, formerly known as Piedmont Canyon because it is only one mile north of the village, in the southern part of Benton Township. It has also been called McKenzie Canyon because McKenzie Creek flows through the granite canyon, and Bates Canyon for Dr. S.A. Bates, pioneer doctor, who owned the farm on which the canyon is located. The tract of land--some five or six hundred acres was purchased by Lon Sanders, of St. Louis several years ago. He had a nearby pioneer house built by Joseph Stakeley in 1812 restored by William Carter in 1931, and he made plans to make a resort, but the plans were abandoned. (Lucy, Wilkinson) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Rock
Description:The site of an old mill, known first as Cutler's Mill, on Asher's Creek in the southern part of Black River Township. Hiram Holliday bought the mill from Cutler and the name suggestive of the location near a lone rock or bluff came into use. (Davis, Manns, Moore, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Rock Church
Description:A Union Church erected about 1900 in the southern part of Black River Township, and named for Lone Rock (q.v.). The Methodist congregation is the only one which now uses the buildings. (Wagner, Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Rock Mill
Description:See Lone Rock.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Rock School
Description:See New Liberty School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Star Church
Description:A General Baptist Church organized in 1880 by Rev. Stratton, on land deeded by John and G.P. Hillis. A favorite emblem name. (Hillis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Star School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Williams Township, first known as Edgar School for James, George, and Bill Edgar, landowners, then as Hillis School for John and G.P. Hillis who bought the farm in 1886 and deeded the land for the school, and also as Lone Star School because of Lone Star Church (q.v.). Both the latter names are in common use. (Hillis, Collins, Burton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lonesome Ridge
Description:A pioneer community in the southeast part of St. Francois Township, where Henry Mabrey settled during the Civil War. The name was suggested by the lonely wooded region where few people lived. The community later took the name of the rural school, Center Ridge School (q.v.). (Estes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lonesome Ridge School
Description:See Center Ridge School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lost Creek [1 of 2]
Description:See Shook.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lost Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A large stream in the southeast part of the county, chiefly in Lost Creek Township, flowing into St. Francois River. East Prong and West Prong flow together to make the main stream of Lost Creek, and Hal Bennett and Dr. John Wagner say it is the fact that East and West Prong are usually dry; that is, they lose themselves before they reach the main stream, which gives the creek its name. W.C. Beaty tells the story of a man named Jim McAlister who was lost in the woods so long he became insane and had to be run down like an animal. The creek ran through the region where the lost man roamed and was so named. Mrs. Estes says her half-sister was washing on the creek in pioneer days when a stranger who had lost his way asked her the name of the creek. When she told him "Lost Creek" he was quite angry, thinking she laughed at his predicament. (Beaty, Bennett, Estes, Wagner) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lost Creek School
Description:See Clubb School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lost Creek Township
Description:In the southeast part of the county, organized in 1872 from part of St. Francis Township, and named for the principal stream in its boundaries. Cf. above. (U.S. Census of 1880, 247)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lower Camp Creek School
Description:See Camp Creek School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lower Cedar Creek School
Description:See Paullus School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lower Coldwater School
Description:See Paullus School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lower Turkey Creek School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Cowan Township, so named because it is south of Upper Turkey Creek School on Turkey Creek (q.v.), from which it is named. (Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lowndes
Description:A post office and village in the southeast part of Cowan Township. The first settlement here was made by Richard D. Cowan in 1817, the third permanent settlement in the county. The community was known as Hog Eye Mill (q.v.) or Hog Eye for many years. Robert McCullough was the first postmaster. The post office was established in 1836 some miles north of the present site of Lowndes, where Hog Eye village was located, then moved to Charles Brill's farm. The village was also called Jim Town for Jim Grisham, who owned the first store, which he placed in his dining room. Lowndes was named for state Congressman Lowndes Davis, who helped get the post office for the town. (Bennet, Smith, Hopkins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lowndes Cemetery
Description:This cemetery in the village of Lowndes, by which name it is now known, was once called the McCullough Graveyard. It stood near the site of a Methodist Church established before the Civil War. The first church services were held in McCullough's house. (Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lurker Spring
Description:A small spring in the southern part of Jefferson Township, in Oscar Hollow, named for the landowner Oscar Lurker, who settled there in the early 1890s. It was once called Kentucky Spring. Cf. Kentucky Hollow. (de Celis, McGhee)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Luther's Creek
Description:A small stream in the southeast part of St. Francois Township, on Campbell's Map of 1873, named for Luther Coleman, who owned the farm through which the creek flows, in the 1870s. (Wallis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Madensburgh
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mallow Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill near the present site of Mill Spring in the southern part of Mill Spring Township, operated by a family named Mallow, who lived in Greenwood Valley. The mill was abandoned by 1887. (Nichols, Cole)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Manning Cabin Branch
Description:See Peter's Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Manning Cabin Hollow
Description:A squatter named Manning built a cabin one-quarter mile north of McGee in the northeast part of Jefferson Township in the valley of McGee Creek. The cabin was destroyed by the elements by 1881, but the name persisted for the valley. (McGhee, Fronebarger) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Manning Cemetery
Description:A public cemetery in the northern part of Williams Township, named for David Manning who gave the land. Manning came from Illinois in the 1840s and settled in Butler County, and shortly afterward came to the neighborhood of Dee's Chapel, where he settled. (Manning, Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Markham Mill
Description:See De Haven Mill.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Markham Spring
Description:A spring in the southwest part of Williams Township, which rises in a small natural lake and flows into Black River one-half mile away, named for M.J. Markham. (McCance 24) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Markham's Mill Pond
Description:A pond in the southwest part of Williams Township, on land belonging to M.J. Markham, for whom it was named. The pond was formed from a spring in order to run the turbine for the Markham Mill (q.v.). (Sallars) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mars Hill Baptist Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church west of Williamsville in the southwest part of Williams Township, organized before 1847, when the Black River Association met with this church. The moderator on this occasion was Carter J. Graham and the clerk was Elisha Landers. It was doubtless named for Mars Hill in Athens, scene of the Apostle Paul's famous sermon about the Unknown God (Acts 17:16-34). (Douglass I 471, W.W. Settle, Acts 17:22)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marshville
Description:A railroad stop in the northern part of St. Francois Township, maintained in 1912 for a sawmill camp. The name doubtless came from the swampy or marshy land on which the camp was located. (Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McAllister Graveyard
Description:See Davis Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McBride Mill
Description:A grist mill in the western part of St. Francois Township, owned by Alexander McBride, for whom it was named. (Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCabe Creek
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Lost Creek Township, also known as Hickory Flat Branch. The latter name is suggested by the hickory trees growing on the flat or low country. McCabe is the name of a landowner, who settled near the head of the stream. (McGhee) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCorm Spring
Description:See McCullough Spring.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCullough Graveyard
Description:See Lowndes Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCullough Spring
Description:A large spring one-half mile west of Lowndes in the southern part of Cowan Township, also known as McCorm Spring. For the name cf. McCullough Graveyard, now Lowndes Cemetery. The source of the name McCorm Spring could not be discovered. (Paullus)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McFadden Mountain
Description:A large mountain in what is now the Sam A. Baker Park in the southwest part of Cedar Creek Township. The mountain was named for Andrew McFadden, pioneer landowner from Virginia, whose land embraced the mountain. (Black)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McGee
Description:A village in the eastern part of Jefferson Township. A store was established here in 1910 by Lin Grisham of Bollinger County, who operated a chain of stores for the sawmill camps. For a time it was known as Grisham's Store or Davis Store, for it was operated by Marshall Davis. In 1913 the store was moved two miles north to its present site and a post office was established. Marshall Davis selected the name to honor Tom McGhee, assistant postmaster. The McGhee family was prominent in this community, three brothers having settled on a stream which came to be known as McGee Creek (q.v.). The change in spelling occurred when Marshall Davis submitted the name to postal authorities. He spelled the name as it is pronounced, omitting the silent "h." (Stilts, de Celis, Noldge, Fronebarger, McGhee) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McGee Church
Description:See New Hope Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McGee Creek
Description:A large creek in the northeast part of Jefferson Township, named for Tom, Uriel, and Hugh McGhee who lived along the creek. The creek was also called McGinnis Creek for Daniel McGinnis who lived there before 1860. (Beaty, de Celis, McGhee) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McGee School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Jefferson Township. It was formed in 1882 when McGinnis School was divided into McGee and Stilts Schools. McGinnis School was named for a pioneer, Daniel McGinnis, who came long before the Civil War. In 1882 when the new school was created, Tom Haddock said, "We have to have a name, so why not call it McGhee, for there are more McGhee's than anyone else?" (McGhee, de Celis, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McGinnis Creek
Description:See McGee Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McGinnis Graveyard
Description:An abandoned cemetery in the southwest part of Jefferson Township, named for Boone McGinnis, a teacher and landowner in the community. The land was never deeded for the cemetery and has now reverted to farmland. No monument was ever erected in the cemetery. (Stilts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McGinnis School
Description:See McGhee and Stilts Schools.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McKenzie
Description:See Platow.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McKenzie Canyon
Description:See Lon Sanders Canyon.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McKenzie Creek
Description:A large creek in the northwest part of the county, flowing into Black River in Mill Spring Township north of Clearwater; named for an early settler. (Campbell, 1873, Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McKenzie Creek Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in the southern part of Benton Township, near Piedmont. It was organized prior to 1875 when it became one of the churches in the Wayne County Association. It was named from McKenzie Creek (q.v.) on which it was located. (Collins, HIST. OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS, 301, MINUTES OF WAYNE COUNTY A)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McKenzie School
Description:In the northern part of what is now the town of Piedmont, on an island formed by McKenzie Creek, which gave the name, stood this school, a log building and one of the first in the county. The building, used for church as well as school, is no longer here. On the site is located the city water works. (Wayland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Meador Valley
Description:A valley east of McKenzie Creek in the southern part of Benton Township, where Henry Meador settled in the 1890s. (Evans, Rhodes) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Melger Graveyard
Description:A family cemetery in the southern part of Cedar Creek Township, belonging to Melger Ward, for whom it is named. (H. Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Melton's Tourist Camp
Description:A pleasure resort and fishing camp near the St. Francis River on Highway 67, near Silva. Established in 1932 by J.W. Melton, a businessman of Flat River. (C.L. Willingham)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Brushy Creek
Description:See Brushy Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle McGee Creek
Description:A small stream in the southeast part of Jefferson Township. Until 1881 the creek was known as Lander's Creek because from 1810 or 1812 until 1881 a man named Landers, who lived on Bear Creek in Cowan Township would drive his cattle down into what is now McGee Community to winter on the cane along the creek. Later the creek was given its present name for its location in regard to McGee Creek (q.v.) proper. (Tom McGhee) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Creek
Description:A small creek two miles long, in the southern part of Mill Spring Township, which empties into Crane Pond Creek in the Hubble Land Grant, so named from a pioneer grist mill for which the stream provided power. (Nunn, Wallis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Creek Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery located near Mill Creek (q.v.) from which it was named, in the southern part of Mill Spring Township.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Creek School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Mill Spring Township, established about 1874 and named for Mill Creek (q.v.). (Nunn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Dam Creek
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Black River Township, so named because of a dam erected for a pioneer grist mill. Whitlock operated the mill about 1884 and then Elijah Dees operated it until 1904. It was known by the names of the owners. (Sallars, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Dam Hill
Description:A hill in the southern part of Black River Township, named from Mill Dam Creek (q.v.), which flows at the foot of the hill. (Sallars, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Spring
Description:A post office and railroad station on the Missouri Pacific in the southern part of Mill Spring. It was named from a large spring which furnished power for a pioneer mill. The Indians called the spring Big Spring for its size and a legend sprang up about the water of the spring, which relates that the water is poisonous. It is a mineral spring. It is said that a roving band of Osages captured several Delaware youths in Tywappity Bottoms (probably from the village in Cape Girardeau County), who had gone out from their camp late in the afternoon to bring in the horses. The Osage killed all but one of the youths. He was the chief's son, and they tortured him, allowing him to have no water. He kept asking for water as they fled west, and finally when the band reached the Big Spring (now Mill Spring), they tied him in such a way that he could hear the water of the spring, could see it, but could not touch his lips to the drink he needed. Thus they left him and fled. The Delawares followed the trail among them the young chief's mother. When the boy's body was found and the cause of death evident the mother's grief knew no bounds. Some of the tribe stooped to drink from the spring, but she exclaimed, "Would you drink of the water whose music tortured your brother? From this day may these waters be accursed. May all, beast and man, who drink of this spring sicken and die." Allan Hinchey, who wrote an account of this legend in the MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW in October, 1929, adds: "Whether the curse of the grief stricken mother still hangs over the spring we cannot say, but the 'Big Spring,' now known as Mill Spring, still runs plentifully, and its water is cool and clear but the inhabitants will tell you that disease lurks in it, and the cattle and wild animals shun it always." The town was laid out in November, 1871, by the Iron Mountain Railroad Company. (Goodspeed 460, M.H.R. 24, Eaton, Douglass I 393)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Spring Creek
Description:A creek flowing from Mill Spring (q.v.), from which it is named, into Black River. (Chilton, Nunn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Spring Township
Description:In the western part of the county, named for the principal settlement, Mill Spring (q.v.). It was organized in 1872 from a part of Benton Township. (U.S. Census of 1880, 247)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller Creek
Description:A western tributary of Black River in the western part of Williams Township, named for Ezekiel Miller, pioneer, who settled in the valley near the creek long before the Civil War. He built a brick house on his land when other settlers had log cabins. John Miller was a descendant and reared a large family on the old farm. (Rhodes, Hunter, Bennett, Sallars) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller Creek School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Williams Township, named from its location near the mouth of Miller Creek (q.v.). (Rhodes, Harmon)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mingo
Description:A post office in the southeast part of Jefferson Township, operated in the year 1896 and named from Mingo Swamp (q.v.), in which it was located. The post office was established by David Fronabarger. (Rogers, Stilts, Fronabarger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mingo Creek
Description:A small creek in Mingo Swamp (q.v.), from which it is named, in the southern part of Jefferson Township. (Beaty)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Minopola Lake
Description:See Minopolis Lake.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Minopolis Lake
Description:A small lake in the eastern part of Jefferson Township, formed by McGee and Lick Creeks. It is in Mingo Swamp and the name was suggested by the fact that it is in the middle of Mingo Swamp, according to informants; but this is obviously a mere guess. The name is sometimes written Minopola, and erroneously Monopoly Lake. (de Celis, Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri Southern Railroad
Description:A railroad built as a road to connect sawmills and to haul lumber. It extended from Bunker in Reynolds County, across the county to Leeper in Mill Spring Township in Wayne County, where it connected with the Iron Mountain (now Missouri Pacific) Railroad. A name of location. (Douglass I 508)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Monopoly Lake
Description:See Minopolis Lake.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Montgomery Branch
Description:A small stream in the southwest part of Cowan Township, emptying into the west prong of Bear Creek, named for Thomas Montgomery, through whose farm it flows. (Hampton Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Montgomery Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the north-central part of St. Francois Township, organized in 1894 with Rev. Lightfoot of Illinois as pastor. Mr. and Mrs. F.M. Ward and B.F. Montgomery were leading charter members. Mr. Montgomery gave the land for the church, which was named for him. (F.M. Ward, D.M. Evans)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Montgomery School
Description:A rural school in the north-central part of St. Francois Township, named for Frank Montgomery, farmer, who gave the land for the school. (H. Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moore Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill in the southern part of Black River Township, on what is now Mill Dam Creek. It was operated by a man named Whitlock in 1884 and known as Whitlock Mill. Elijah Moon purchased the property from Whitlock and operated the mill until 1904. (Sallars, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moser Branch
Description:See Stroup Branch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moser's Mill
Description:See Gravelton.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moss Ferry
Description:A ferry on Black River in the southern part of Williams Township, operated by Arnold Moss, an old settler from Tennessee. (Baily, Wayland, Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Hope School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Cowan Township, formerly named Hovis School for John Hovis, on whose land it was built about 1906. The building was moved in 1914 and renamed. The ideal name, suggested by its location on a hill, was given by C.E. Burton. (Burch, H. Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Nebo Christian Church
Description:See Lodi Nazarene Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Pisgah Church
Description:See New Prospect Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Pleasant Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in the eastern part of Mill Spring Township, organized in 1820 and added to Black River Association. A laudatory name for the location. (Duncan, Goodspeed 556, Douglass HIST. OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS 301)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Zion Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church with a familiar Bible name.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mountain View School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Benton Township, first called Upper Camp Creek School because of its location north of another school on Camp Creek. The name was suggested by Dr. John Wagner and Professor Burton because of the high hill and lovely view in the neighborhood of the school. (John Wagner, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Olivet Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in the southern part of Benton Township. Organized in 1840, it was named by its founders for the famous mountain "a sabbath day's journey" (Acts 1:12) from Jerusalem. (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Pisgah Cemetery
Description:See Mt. Pisgah Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Pisgah Church
Description:A General Baptist Church in the northern part of St. Francois Township, organized first on the southeast prong of Bear Creek on Andy Secrest's land about four miles from its present site, about the year 1884. As was the custom in pioneer days, a cemetery was located near the church and given the church's name, which was taken from the Biblical mountain from which Moses viewed the Promised Land. (Collins, Paullus, Evans, Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Pleasant School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Mill Spring Township, named for Mt. Pleasant Church nearby. (Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mud Lick Canyon
Description:A canyon in Sam A. Baker State Park in the northwest part of Cedar Creek Township, named from Mud Lick Creek which cuts the canyon in Mud Lick Mountain. (Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mud Lick Creek
Description:A stream in the northwest part of Cedar Creek Township, now in Sam A. Baker State Park. It is also known as Mud Lick Branch, and was so named from the deer licks in which mud collected during rainy seasons. (Wood, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mud Lick Mountain
Description:A mountain in Sam A. Baker State Park in the northwest part of Cedar Creek Township, named from the creek. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nachitoches Path
Description:An Indian path or trail leading from St. Anthonys on Ste. Genevieve County, in a southwestern direction through Wayne County, near Greenville, and on to Nachitoches, one of the Spanish posts of Mexico, now Louisiana. This path connected with the Virginia Warrior's Path and with a path leading north to the Osage. After the country was settled, the Nachitoches path became the military and wagon road of the immigrants to Arkansas, crossing the Mississippi River at Bainbridge or Cape Girardeau, thence moving to the St. Francois, crossing at the Indian ford, thence to Black River crossing near Poplar Bluff and Current River at what was known as Pittman's ferry. (Houck I 227- 228)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ned's Branch
Description:A stream in Cedar Creek Township, flowing into Cedar Creek. Uncle John Wakefield, on whose land the stream was located, always called it Ned's Branch, for what reason is unknown. There was a pioneer expression which designated as Ned's Branch any indefinite place. When the pioneer host had no milk to serve to his guests, he held up a glass of water with the apology, "the cow has been wading Ned's Branch." (Paullus, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Neely's Mill
Description:The first important flour mill in the county, established about 1879 by Frank Neely near the present village of Patterson on Clark's Creek. The mill did not remain in operation long, as the lake formed by the mill dam made unhealthy conditions for the village of Patterson. (Owenby, Duncan, Neely) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Greenville
Description:See Greenville.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Home Cemetery
Description:See New Home Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Home Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the western part of Cowan Township, organized about 1890 by members of the old Dixon Church (about seven miles north) who called it their "new home." Uncle Sidney Burch was one of the founders. In the churchyard is New Home Cemetery. (Ward, Burch, Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Hope Church [1 of 2]
Description:A General Baptist Church in Silva in the north-central part of St. Francois Township, organized about 1919, one mile northeast of Silva. The building was moved in 1933. The ideal name is a common one for churches. (F.M. Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Hope Church [2 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Church one quarter mile north of McGee. Rev. H.A. George held a meeting during which the church was constituted. Mrs. Arizona Hefner suggested the name. Most of the members felt that the church should be called McGee Church, for the post office and community, but Mrs. Hefner insisted and the name was recorded, but the name McGee Church is commonly used also. (de Celis, Fronabarger) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Liberty School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Black River Township, established about 1850. It is also known as Lone Rock School from its location near Lone Rock (q.v.). New Liberty or Liberty is a common idealistic school name. (Rhodes, Wagner, Estes, Thomas) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Life Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in the village of Wappapello in the southeast part of Black River Township, organized in 1897 by Rev. B.E. Kingen, pioneer preacher. An ideal name. (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Prospect Cemetery
Description:See New Prospect Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Prospect Church
Description:A rural Missionary Baptist Church in the northern part of St. Francois Township, first organized in 1857 by Rev. Allison Twidell from Tennessee, and named Bounds Creek Church because it was located on Bounds Creek and organized in Mother Bound's home. Later when a new building was erected about one mile distant from the first log structure, the name was changed to the idealistic New Prospect. (Rhodes, Mrs. C. Kelly, Owenby, Collins, T.A. Ward, F.M. Ward, Wallis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Prospect School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Mill Spring Township. It was first known as Hillis School when it was established about 1875, because it was on the land grant entered by Alex Hillis. The school was moved about 1895, and the name changed to the idealistic New Prospect. (Harmon, Hillis (G.P.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Town
Description:See Greenville.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nigger Creek
Description:A small stream in the part of St. Francois Township, so named from the fact that Dr. Ward had a large number of negro farm hands on his land. (Hampton Ward, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Creek
Description:See Clark's Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Dale Church
Description:See Oakdale Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove Church [1 of 2]
Description:See Corinth Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove Church [2 of 2]
Description:See Kime Baptist Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of St. Francois Township, near Kime, named from its location in a grove of oak trees. Oak Grove Church was organized in the school building soon after the Civil War. (Rhodes, Davis, Stokely)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakdale Cemetery
Description:See Oakdale Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakdale Church
Description:A Freewill Baptist Church and cemetery two miles west of Gravelton in the northeast part of Cedar Creek Township organized 1919-1924 by Rev. Daniel Robins. The name also written Oak Dale is descriptive. A rural cemetery is located on the church grounds. (Stroup)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ojibway
Description:A village in the south-central part of Black River Township, first known as Dee's Switch. A large number of Dees lived in the community and when the railroad was being built there was a race to see who could get in the first load of railroad ties. One of the Dees was first and the place was so designated. Later it was called Moore's Switch because it was located on Dan Moore's farm. Dan's father John Moore had entered the land in the 1850s, having come from Tennessee. Moore's Mill at Moore's Switch was owned by William Dudley Moore, Dan's brother. When the railroad was completed and a post office established in 1888, the name Ojibway was suggested by Louis Houck, railroad builder. It is an Indian name, said to mean "to roast till puckered up," referring to the puckered seam on their moccasins. The Ojibways were numerous, their tribe ranging from Lake Huron to North Dakota. They were not prominent in history because of their remoteness from the frontier. A post office was established in 1902, abandoned in 1905, and restored in 1927. (Hodge, Schoolcraft, Bennett, Postal Guide, Moore, Harmon)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Camp 27
Description:A sawmill camp, numbered 27, in the northern part of Cowan Township. (Twidell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Graveyard, The
Description:See Patterson Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Greenville
Description:See Greenville.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oliver Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the southern part of Cowan Township, started as a burial ground by James Oliver, pioneer from North Carolina on his land. (Henry B. Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oliver Spring
Description:A spring located on James Oliver's farm in the southern part of Cowan Township. Cf. above. (Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oscar Hollow
Description:A valley in the southern part of Jefferson Township, first known as Kentucky Hollow, doubtless because of pioneers from Kentucky who settled there. Later Oscar Lurker, German, moved there and the valley became Oscar Hollow.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Otter Branch
Description:See Otter Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Otter Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A large creek flowing into St. Francois River, in the southern part of St. Francois Township; it was called Otter's Branch on Colton's Map of 1855, but the present name appears more frequently. The name was probably given by the early settlers because of the otters which were found there. W.C. Eaton testifies that otters would often cut a ten-inch sapling to make a dam. The first settlers here were Elijah Matthews, Wm. Alston, and Ezekiel Ruebottom. (Eaton, S.D. Manning, Wallis, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Otter Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A post office in the north-central part of Williams Township, maintained from 1854-1889. James Farrell was the first postmaster. When the railroad (now Missouri Pacific) was built, Otter Creek became a station and in 1873 was described as having "three stores, two hotels, one sawmill, and a population of 250." After the decline of the lumber industry the village became extinct. It was named from the stream. Cf. above. (Hayward, Goodwin, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Otter Creek Baptist Church
Description:A pioneer Baptist Church established in 1875-1878 on Otter Creek in the southern part of St. Francois Township, named from the stream. The church was abandoned long ago. (Goodspeed 559, Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Otter Creek Township
Description:Listed as one of the seven townships in the 1840 Census. It had disappeared by the United States Census of 1860, but its exact dates and location have not been ascertained. Doubtless it was named for the stream. (U.S. Census of 1840 & 1860)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ozark Valley Road
Description:See Greenville-Williamsville Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Park Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Cowan Township, flowing into Castor River, on Campbell's map in 1873, doubtless named for a family. (Campbell 1873)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Patterson
Description:A village in the central part of Logan Township. The place was known as Isbell's Store in 1854, for Isbell kept the only store. In 1886 when the post office was established the name Patterson was given for George and William Patterson. William and Elija Patterson came from Virginia to Wayne County in 1835 and bought 640 acres of land where Patterson now is "and the town was named in their honor." George is the son of William. He was a farmer and according to Eaton, who says the town was named for George, "a dealer in farm implements." George R. lived on his father's farm, which he called Fort Benton, where federal troops camped. In 1863 a raid was made on the camp, several persons were killed and Mr. Patterson's house was made a hospital. The first settlement near Patterson was made in 1800 by Joseph Parish, Thomas Ring, Francis Clark, Ephraim Stout, and Joseph Doublewye. (Eaton, Goodspeed, 460, 1140, Davidson, Douglass I 273)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Patterson Cemetery
Description:A very old cemetery in the present village of Patterson, for which it is named. It was called The Old Graveyard before the Civil War, because it was filled at least fifteen years before the outbreak of the war. The rails which formed the fence were burned by the soldiers, who are said to have used the slabs at the graves for tables. (A.N. Ellis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Patterson Creek
Description:A small stream in the northwest part of Cedar Creek Township, named for the pioneers William and Elija Patterson. It flows southwest into Big Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Paullus Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, first known as the Powers Cemetery for P.L. Powers, on whose farm it was located. The later name is for James S. Paullus, landowner and public-spirited citizen. (Paullus)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Paullus School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Cedar Creek Township, first known as Lower Cedar Creek School because of its location south of Cedar Creek School; then as Lower Coldwater School because it was south of Coldwater (q.v.) and finally as Paullus School, named for J.C. Paullus who gave the land for the school. (Paullus)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peach Tree Fork
Description:A tributary of Clark's Creek in the southern part of Logan Township, named for Peach Tree Spring (q.v.). John R. Eaton from Kentucky entered the land in 1857. (Eaton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peach Tree Spring
Description:A spring in the southern part of Logan Township, named from a large peach tree planted by the Indians at the spring. The spring gives rise to Peach Tree Fork which flows into Clark's Creek. (Eaton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peachtree Fork School
Description:See Peachtree School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peachtree Graveyard
Description:A rural cemetery in the northwest part of Logan Township, which was originally known as Street Graveyard for Samuel Street, landowner. Later when the school name was changed to Peachtree School (q.v.), the cemetery name was also changed. (Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peachtree School
Description:A rural school in the east-central part of Logan Township, four miles southeast of Gad's Hill. It is also known as Peachtree Fork School from the nearby stream. The school was established in 1872, and called Street School for Samuel Street who owned the land nearby and taught the first school--subscription--here. (Eaton, Wilkinson) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peoples' Hollow
Description:A hollow or valley in the southern part of Black River Township, named for Walker Peoples, who settled there. Peoples shipped walnut logs from his tract of timber to Fisk (in Stoddard County). He plugged a hollow log to make it weigh heavier. When the circular saw struck the plug, it flew out, killing the head sawyer. Peoples was jailed. (de Celis, McGee, Ward, Rhodes) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perkins Holler
Description:A valley in the western part of Cowan Township, named for John Perkins, a squatter and cabinet maker. The "holler" is drained by the East Prong of Bear Creek. (H. Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Persimmon Branch
Description:A branch of Lake Creek in the northwest part of St. Francois Township, named for the persimmon trees growing along the course of the stream. (Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peters Branch
Description:A branch of Hubble Creek flowing into St. Francois River in the northern part of Logan Township, named for William Peters, landowner. (Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peter's Creek
Description:A small stream in the southeast part of Jefferson Township, flowing into McGee Creek. It was first known as Manning Cabin Creek because it flowed through Manning Cabin Hollow (q.v.). Later it took the name Peter's Creek from "Uncle" Peter Ward, who lived on the creek until about 1926. (Wagner, McGhee, Manns, Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Phillippi Church
Description:A rural Missionary Baptist Church in the central part of Benton Township, organized prior to 1875, when it was one of the churches forming Wayne County Association. It is named for Phillippi in Macedonia, one of the churches to which Paul wrote his epistles (Phil. 1:1). (Rhodes, Collins, Henson, Evans)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Phillippi School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Benton Township, constituted before 1875. It was named for Phillippi Church (cf. above) which used the school as a meeting place. (Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Piedmont
Description:A town in the southwest part of Benton Township laid out by the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company when it was built in 1871. The first settlement here was known as Danielsville for the James Daniels family, early settlers, but the railroad officials gave this name of French derivtion, "pied," foot and "mont," mountain referring to its location at the foot of Clark's Mountain. A post office was established in 1886. The Piedmont Methodist Church was established in 1876, the Baptist Church in 1887. (Stahley, Wallis, Goodspeed 459, Douglass I 273, Piedmont Banner (1919), Davidson, Eaton 73, WAYNE COUNTY JOURNAL, Campbell, Hinchey, Carey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Piedmont Canyon
Description:See Lon Sanders Canyon.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pierson
Description:A railroad stop and sawmill camp northeast of Greenville in the eastern part of St. Francois Township, maintained in 1916.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pig Cemetery
Description:See Womack Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pine Grove Church
Description:See Shock Baptist Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pine Grove School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Lost Creek Township, one of the oldest in the county. It was named from its location in a pine grove. Pine logs were used to make the wooden benches as well as the walls of the building. (Ward, Crites, de Celis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pine Hill Branch
Description:A small branch of McKenzie Creek north of Piedmont in the southern part of a pine covered hill. (E.L. Evans)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pine View
Description:A settlement in the southeast part of Mill Spring Township, in 1912; named for the view of pine trees which the place afforded. (Parker 1912)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pink Root Hollow
Description:A valley in Lost Creek and Jefferson Townships near the west prong of Lick Branch; it is named from the plant known as pinkroot which grows there. The root was boiled for tea which was supposed by pioneers to have medicinal properties. (McGhee)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pink Root Hollow School
Description:See Bethel School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pistol Branch
Description:A branch of Peach Tree fork in Logan Township. The name arose from the fact that J.B. Eaton, landowner through whose farm the stream flows, had so many pistols. (W.C. Eaton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pittman Spring
Description:A spring near the mouth of Dry Creek in the southern part of Benton Township, named for James Pittman, who owned the small farm at the mouth of Dry Creek about 1864. (Duncan, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Platow
Description:A station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, in the western part of Benton Township. The name applied to this station from 1891-1910 was McKenzie, from its location on McKenzie Creek (q.v.), but in 1910-1911, the name was changed to Platow or Platow Switch; it was used for loading logs and lumber from the sawmills. The source of the name has not been ascertained. (Hinchey, Rhodes, Bennett, Evans)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Grove Baptist Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church on Leeper Creek in the southern part of Mill Spring Township, established before 1875 when it was a charter member of the Wayne County Association. The founders gave it this laudatory name. (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the southwest part of Black River Township, organized in 1907 and named from Pleasant Hill School (q.v.). The church disbanded about 1924 and the building was later used for the school. (Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Black River Township, organized about 1900 and given this laudatory name by the founders. The school building burned about 1930 and for several years the nearby church building was used, the congregation having disbanded. (Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Point School
Description:At Courtois post office, in Harmony Township. Indian Creek and Courtois Creek form a point at Courtois post office. The school was built at the point; hence the name. (D.P. Cole; Fred L. Cole; Mr. & Mrs. G.D. Evans)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Valley
Description:A valley in the southwest part of St. Francois Township, the name was given by the pioneers who settled here about 1860. (Owenby)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of St. Francois Township, named for Pleasant Valley in which it is located. (Estes, Owenby)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plum Branch
Description:A small stream in the eastern part of Jefferson Township, also known as Bob Myric Branch, for Bob Myric who lived there about 1890. It is now better known as Plum Branch because of the wild plums which grow along the stream. (Stilts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plum Branch Holler
Description:A valley in the eastern part of Jefferson Township, through which flows Plum Branch. The valley, branch, and spring are named from the wild plums which grow in the valley. (Stilts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plum Branch Spring
Description:See Stephens Spring.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plunket's Mill
Description:See De Haven Mill.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pollard Ferry
Description:A ferry on St. Francois River in the northern part of Black River Township, named from the owner and operator Dr. Pollard. (Horn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pond
Description:A railroad station on the Frisco in the extreme southwest part of Black River Township, also known as Pond Switch when it was maintained in 1910. The name was given by railroad men who made a dam in the little valley, creating a pond of water. (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pond Creek
Description:This stream is a small branch of Lake Creek in the western part of St. Francois Township; it appears on Campbell's map of 1873. It is now known as Slash Branch because of the marsh through which it flows. Doubtless the earlier name indicated its source was a pond or small lake. (Wilkinson) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pond Switch
Description:See Pond.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Possum Creek
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Lost Creek Township, flowing into the St. Francois River. It was named by the pioneer hunters for the opossums which frequented the stream. (W. Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Powers Cemetery
Description:See Paullus Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Powers' Mill
Description:See Price's Mill.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Price's Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill, sawmill, and carding mill on Cedar Creek in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township. The mill was first called Power's Mill because it was owned by P.L. Powers. Peter Price purchased it about 1885 and his name was used to designate the mill. (Paullus, Owenby)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Punch Bowl Pond
Description:A small lake or pond in the southeast part of Mill Spring Township, so named because the pond is bowl shaped, being narrow at the top and widening toward the bottom. (Wallis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Punch's Ferry
Description:A ferry across St. Francis River from the old three notch road in the southern part of St. Francois Township. Originally it was operated by Hugh Redman and called Redman Ferry. The Punch family took control of the ferry about 1900. (Bennett, Horn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Redman's Ferry
Description:See Punch's Ferry.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reece's Creek
Description:A stream in the southeast part of St. Francois Township, named for Ed Reece, who owned the land and had a samill there in Civil War days. (Wilkinson, Davidson, Bennett, Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reece's Mill
Description:A small mill on Reece's Creek (cf. above) in the southeast part of St. Francois Township. (Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reed Chapel
Description:A rural church in the northeast part of Black River Township, named for the Reed family, who were prominent members. Andrew Reed had received a Spanish land grant. (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rhodes Mill
Description:A sawmill in the southeast part of Logan Township west of Kime post office, operated in 1896 by Charley and John Rhodes. (Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rhodes Spring
Description:A large spring near Patterson in the southeast part of Logan Township, named for Sherman Rhodes, who owned it. The spring was originally called Blue Spring because of its blue water. (Templeton, Duncan, Noldge, Beaty)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ring's Creek
Description:A small stream, branch of Logan's Creek, in the southern part of Logan Township, named for Thomas Ring, who had a Spanish grant here in 1800. (Goodspeed, Sp. Land Grant Records, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ring's Creek Mountain
Description:A mountain in the southern part of Logan Township. (cf. above).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ring's Creek School
Description:A rural school, now belonging to Patterson Consolidated District, in the southern part of Logan Township. The land was given by Old Johnny Morris, but the school was named from Ring's Creek (q.v.). (Eaton, Black)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Creek
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Polk Township, running north into Stout's Creek. Mr. McFarland, former surveyor, says the name is an appropriate one, for the region through which the creek flows is rocky. He adds that the descriptive name might be appropriately applied to many streams in the county. (McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rocky Creek
Description:A small creek crising in the west-central part of Wayne Township and entering Wayne County where it empties into Lost Creek. It is named from the rocks through which it flows. (Wiggs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rocky Grove Church
Description:A General Baptist Church in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township. It was first organized by the Missionary Baptists in 1907 under the direction of Rev. John Summers and members of the Beulah Church. The name was derived from the rocky limestone ledge. In 1928 the church became a General Baptist organization. (Collins, Morris, Paullus)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rodger's Cemetery
Description:See Boals' Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rodgers' Spring
Description:See Boals' Spring.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Pond
Description:A pond in the southern part of Lost Creek Township also known as Spaugh Pond. The name Spaugh was suggested by a family of pioneers in pre-Civil War days; Round Pond is descriptive. (McGhee, Stilts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Pond
Description:A small lake or pond in the western part of Lost Creek Township, which covers two or three acres. The pond is round in shape, hence the name. (Stilts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rowland School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Cedar Creek Township, named for C.B.L. Rowland who lives there. The school also has the name Lizard Lick, a common pioneer mocking name. (Paullus, Collins, Lewis, Barrow)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ruble Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in Benton Township, named for Peter Ruble, whose family moved there about 1880. The land is now owned by the heirs. (Evans)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rucker Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the southern part of Black River Township, near Glad Tidings Church (q.v.), also called Rucker Church. The cemetery was first known as Ward Cemetery because it was selected by Meshack Ward as his burial place. Meshack's wife, Elizabeth, was the first person buried there. Ward died in 1885. The cemetery came to be known as Rucker Cemetery for William Rucker, whose name was prominent in the community in 1896. (Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rucker Church
Description:See Glad Tidings Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rucker School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Black River Township, organized in 1896 and named for William Rucker, landowner. (Rhodes, Moore, Harmon)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sam A. Baker State Park
Description:A state park in the northern part of the county in northwest Logan Township, established in 1916 and named for former Governor Sam A. Baker under whose administration (1924-1928) the park system of the state was developed. Baker was born in Wayne County. (WHERE TO GO IN THE OZARKS, Bennett, W.P.A. GUIDE 531)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sawyer
Description:A railroad stop and logging camp in the southwest part of St. Francois Township, named for Alec Sawyer, who operated the sawmill. It was maintained in 1916. (Wilkinson, Rhodes, Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schmaltz
Description:A railroad stop maintained since 1910-1912 on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the southern part of Benton Township. Thw switch or railroad stop was maintained for the granite quarries belonging to a St. Louis man named Schmaltz. (Hinchey, Rhodes) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schular Chapel
Description:An abandoned General Baptist Church in the southeast part of Cowan Township, on land owned by George W. Schular, for whom it was named. Daniel Schular was the pioneer of this family who came here from North Carolina. Several members of the family, George, Peter, and Frank live near the chapel. It was established for one of the Holliday Camps about 1910 and abandoned about 1930. (Rhodes, Crites)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scowden School
Description:A rural school, now consolidated with Lowndes, in the northeast part of Lost Creek Township, established in 1883-1884 and named for Sim Scowden, who gave the land for the school. It is also known as Flatwoods School because of its location in the region known as the Flatwoods. (de Celis, Ward, Fronabarger, Crites)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Screw-Auger Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill on the Black River in the southeast part of Williams Township, established before the Civil War. The name refers to the type of machinery used. (Rhodes, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scrogen
Description:A railroad stop in the northern part of St. Francois Township, maintained in 1912 on the Holliday line; probably a family name. (Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seitz Branch
Description:A small stream in the eastern part of St. Francois Township. The stream was called Beaver Creek in 1855 for the beavers which were found in great abundance here; later it was Bollinger Branch, probably for some neighboring landowner, and is now Seitz Branch, named for E.B. Seitz, a prominent man in the community. (Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shade Dell Spring
Description:A spring and valley near Greenville in the southern part of St. Francois Township, a splendid camp site containing twin bridges over the flow from the spring. The name is descriptive. (Twidwell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shady Dell Fur Farm
Description:A fur farm northeast of Silva in the northern part of St. Francois Township, started by a Mr. Snider and maintained two years. It was established for trapping and selling the fur of muskrats, opossums and raccoons. A descriptive name. (Twidwell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shady Nook School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Mill Spring Township. It was first known as Greenwood Valley School from its location in Greenwood Valley, but in 1884 when a new building was erected the literary society of the community selected Shady Nook as a more euphonious name. The name was descriptive in as much as the building was erected in a little nook near the hill which provided shade. (Tyrey, Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sheets Branch
Description:See Wet Branch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelton Gap
Description:A gap on the northern side of Camp Creek Basin through Davey Mountain, so called because Joe Shelton came here from Kentucky in 1832 and settled near the gap. (Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shiloh Baptist Church
Description:See Shook Baptist Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shiloh Church
Description:See Shook Union Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shook
Description:A small village in the southeast part of Jefferson Township. The first post office established here in 1876 was called Lost Creek, from its location on the stream. This post office run by William A. Davis was abandoned in 1887. In 1908 a new post office was established by Hugh Anderson who ran a store for Grisham Mercantile Company. Anderson named the post office for George Shook, a nearby elderly landowner. This post office continued until 1920 and was then discontinued until it was restored in 1930 through the efforts of Albert Ward, who also restored the old name. There are several stories of the type known as folk etymology to explain the name. A number of people say the name refers to the fact that Mr. Anderson "shook so hard before he got the post office established" that he chose that name. Others think it refers to the stave mill term shook, meaning a hogshead of staves and headings. (de Celis, Ward, Davis, Hinchey, Beaty) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shook Baptist Church
Description:The General Baptist Church of the village of Shook in the southeast part of Jefferson Township. It was first organized about 1862 in the schoolhouse called Pine Grove and was known as Pine Grove Church until it was moved about 1874 and named Shiloh Church, a common name for churches, signifying "rest." Shiloh was a town in Ephraim and the seat of the Tabernacle until the time of Samuel. About 1898 the church was moved to Shook and is now generally called Shook Church. (Moore, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shook Creek
Description:A small stream in the southeast part of Jefferson Township, named for the nearby post office. Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shook Union Church
Description:A Union Church in the village of Shook, for which it is named. It was first organized by the General Baptists prior to 1881 and named by them Shiloh, a common church name. Billy Davis and William Bennett were instrumental in founding the church. When the church building was moved to Shook it was used by several denominations, hence Union Church. (Beaty, Collins, W.T. Ward, Fronabarger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Silva
Description:A post office and rural village in the north-central part of St. Francois Township. The name is also written Silvia or Sylvia. The first settlement here was made by F.M. Ward, who operated a sawmill for a few years. When a post office was established in 1909, Alpha Ward, first postmistress submitted a list of names to the postal authorities. They chose Silvia, the name of a friend of Miss Ward. The shortened form Silva corresponds to local pronunciation of the name. (F.M. Ward, T.A. Ward, McClain)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Silvia
Description:See Silva.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slab Pond
Description:A pond in Slabtown Valley (q.v.), made by backwater from McKenzie Creek near which the sawmill was located. For the name cf. Slabtown Valley. (Eaton, Evans)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slabtown Valley
Description:A valley at the head of McKenzie Creek in the central part of Logan Township, so named about 1866 when a Mr. Stanchfield set up a sawmill which produced 10,000 ft. per day. Slabtown is a common name for sawmill camps, the name suggesting the slabs produced in cutting the lumber. (Evans, Eaton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slash Branch
Description:See Pond Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snow Creek
Description:A small stream flowing into St. Francois River in the southeast part of Black River Township. The name is doubtless that of a prominent farmer. (Beaty, Moore, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spaugh Pond
Description:See Round Pond.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spout Spring
Description:One of the Cold Water Springs in Coldwater (q.v.), so named because of a wooden trough (or spout) built to run the water from the spring. (Paullus)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Springville
Description:An abandoned village near the present site of Patterson in the southeast part of Logan Township, which existed in 1853, according to Colton's map. It had disappeared before 1873. The name was suggested by a large spring, called Bottomless Spring, which was there. (Hinchey, Wilkinson) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spur No. 2
Description:A railroad station on the Missouri Pacific south of Mill Spring in Mill Spring Township. Spurs were commonly built for logging camps, and this was evidently Spur No. 2 south of Williamsville though no record is found now of a Spur No. 1. (Sallars) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Squirrel Hole
Description:A swimming hole three miles south of Chaonia in the St. Francis River in the southern part of Black River Township. A favorite fishing spot for fishermen from St. Louis, Cape Girardeau and other places. The hole is formed by the swift water which strikes the hills and creates a great swirl in the center of the river. So named because of its resemblance to the squirrel path in a cage, a circular motion. (Sallars)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francois Baptist Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in the northern part of St. Francois Township, organized in 1814 on the banks of the stream from which it was named. Rev. John Farrar from Madison County, Elder James P. Edwards, and Elder William Street, pastor, were instrumental in organizing the church. (Houck III 222, Davis, HIST. OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS 46, 26)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francois Mountains
Description:Within recent years the name St. Francois Mountains has been applied to the hills in St. Francois, Iron, Wayne, and Washington Counties. These hills are among the highest in the Ozark region of Missouri and are perhaps the only true mountains in the state, having been thrust up from beneath by forces within the earth. "In these mountains are exposed the only Azoic rocks in Missouri," Douglass says. They are named from the principal stream in this region. (Douglass I:X)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francois Township
Description:In the central part of the county, organized before 1840 and named for the St. Francois River which flows through it. In 1872 it was reduced in size by the cutting off of Lost Creek Township (q.v.). (De Celis, U.S. Census of 1840 & 1880)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis San Francisco Railroad (Southwestern Branch)
Description:This branch of the St. Louis San Francisco Railroad joins the main line (St. Louis to Memphis) at Cape Girardeau and extends in a southwesterly direction through Cape Girardeau, Bollinger, and Wayne Counties, and on to Hoxie, Arkansas. The first name applied to the railroad was Cape Girardeau and Southwestern Railroad, from its direction. It was built by Louis Houck and was completed to Williamsville in Wayne County in 1886. From Williamsville the road extends through Butler and Ripley Counties and on to Hoxie, Arkansas. This part of the road is called South Missouri and Arkansas Railroad (S.M. and A.). The civil engineer for the road, which was completed in 1880, was Charles McCray. It was a part of the Louis Houck enterprise. (Julian, Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stanley Creek
Description:A small stream in the southeast part of Jefferson Township, which flows into Mingo Creek. It was named for Jaspar Stanley, a pioneer who lived on the creek. He planned to homestead a place there, but grew ill and died soon after settling here. (de Celis, Ward, Moore, Beaty, McGhee)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stephens Spring
Description:A spring in the eastern part of Jefferson Township, sometimes called Plum Branch Spring from the wild plums which grow around the spring. The name Stephens Spring is used because Ed Stevens owns the land. (Stilts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stevens Curve
Description:A distinct curve on the Missouri Pacific Railroad just north of Leeper in Mill Creek Township. It is so named because it is located on the farm of Mrs. Anne Stevens, pioneer. (Radtke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stevenson's Mill
Description:A grist mill and a sawmill operated by John Stevenson before the Civil War. It was located on Otter Creek in the central part of Black River Township. Once this was the largest and most important mill in the southern part of the county. It appears prominently on Campbell's Atlas of 1874, when it was the center of a community of some fifty people. The mill has not been in operation since 1900. (Baker, S.D. Manning, Duncan, Campbell 1874)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stilts Branch
Description:A small stream flowing into Mingo Swamp in the southeast part of Jefferson Township, named for Peter Stilts, pioneer, through whose farm it flows. (Frank Stilts) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stilts School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Jefferson Township established about 1891 at the division of McGinns southern district on land donated by Peter Stilts, who came to St. Louis from Germany in 1846, to Wayne County in 1854, and settled on land in this community. (Frank Stilts) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stony Battery
Description:A gorge or canyon about three-quarters of a mile long between mountains in the northern part of Benton Township. "The stones which in past ages had fallen in to it from the mountain about have been removed and it now serves for the bed of a stream and for a road. It opens at the south into a fertile valley of considerable extent." The place is noted because one of the Civil War skirmishes occurred here. (Jones, Duncan, Hinchey, Parker 554)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stovall Cut
Description:A cut which was made through the mountain when the railroad was constructed. It is in the southeast part of Black River Township, and was named for Robert Stovall, who owned the farm through which the railroad was run. Stovall was a pioneer who came here from Kentucky. (Sallars)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Street Graveyard
Description:See Peachtree Graveyard.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Street School
Description:See Peachtree School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stroud Mill
Description:A mill located at Stroud Spring (q.v.) in the southern part of Lost Creek Township, in Civil War days. It is no longer there. The name is that of the owner. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stroud Pond
Description:A pond formed by a dam across Stroud Spring and the narrow valley to furnish water power for a mill. The pond was long since drained. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stroud Spring
Description:A spring near Wappapello in the southern part of Lost Creek Township, which has a flow of thirty-three million gallons per day. It was named for a pioneer who operated a mill at the spring. (Bennett, Rhodes) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stroud Spring Branch
Description:A branch flowing from Stroud Spring (cf. above) into Asher Creek. (Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stroup Branch
Description:A tributary of Big Creek in the eastern part of Cedar Creek Township. It was first named Moser Branch for P.J. Moser, pioneer from North Carolina in the 1830s, who set up a mill in what is now Gravelton. Later the stream was called Stroup Branch for John W. Stroup, landowner. (Templeton, Stroup)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sullivan Graveyard
Description:A rural cemetery in the southwest part of Jefferson Township, no longer used. It was named for Robert Sullivan on whose land it was located. Sullivan was a prominent farmer and served as prosecuting attorney of the county. (Stilts, Frank & Joe)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sulphur Spring
Description:A spring on Big Creek near Stony Battery in the northeast part of Cedar Creek Township. An attempt was made to open a resort near this medicinal spring, but the attempt was abandoned. (Wilkinson, Pallaus, Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sweazea Branch
Description:See Crow Branch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sylvia
Description:See Silva.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taskee
Description:A village in the southern part of Black River Township, established first as Harmon's Store. Patrick Harmon came here from Ireland and opened a country store. In 1889 Taskee Station was established on the Frisco Railroad. The name Taskee was given by Louis Houck, who was then building the railroad through this section. A post office was established in 1891. Taskee is an Indian name. Tradition says that Louis Houck, who suggested all the Indian names in this section, related that Wappapello was a chief of the Mingos, his wife was Puxico (in Stoddard County), and his sons were Taskee, Ojibway, and Chaonia. This theory fails in many respects in as much as Ojibway is a tribe name, and Wappapello is a general name meaning "chief." However, the fact remains that Louis Houck selected the Indian names. (Estes, Bennett, Hunter) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taskee Station
Description:See Taskee.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor Mill
Description:A large sawmill located in the town of Ojibway in the southeast part of Black River Township. It was operated by H.R. Taylor, for whom it was named, and did much to make the village of Ojibway which numbered 75-100 people at its height. The mill was operated from 1903 until 1915. (Sallars) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ten Mile Branch
Description:A small creek in the southeast part of Black River Township, long since drained. It appears on Colton's map in 1855 and was named by pioneers because it was supposedly ten miles long. (de Celis, Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Theresa
Description:See Blum.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thing Mill
Description:The first sawmill in Wayne County was established on Eads Creek by the Thing family, pioneers. (Duncan) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thing's Branch
Description:A small branch of Ead's Creek in the southern part of Mill Spring Township, named for a family, prominent locally because they brough the first sewing machine to this section of the country. (Duncan) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thompson Holler
Description:A valley in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, one of the first steam mills in the county, the old Bollinger steam mill was located here before the Civil War. The place was also noted as a Methodist Camp Meeting ground. The name is that of a pre-Civil War pioneer. In 1934 this name became well-known because of the establishement of Thompson Holler School (q.v.). (Stilts, McGhee, Wagner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thompson Holler School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, four miles from Gravelton. It was established in 1934 by Rev. Theo. C. Predoehl, pastor of the Gravelton Lutheran Church. At that time eight families lived in the hollow and none of the children had ever attended school because Gravelton was "too far for the young ones to go and when they were older they were too big to go." The school was opened in an old sawmill and all the pupils (ages 5 to 17) were first graders. (AMERICAN REPUBLIC, Dec. 24, 1934, Stilts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thornton Graveyard
Description:A rural cemetery near Oak Grove School in the southeast part of St. Francois Township, named for the landowner who lived there about 1884 when the cemetery was started. (de Celis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tibbs School
Description:See Burbank School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tunnel Cut
Description:A cut through the hill for the railroad in the eastern part of Williams Township, so named because the tunnel which was designed through the hill caved in and the cut was made for the railroad bed. (Sallars, de Celis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek
Description:A large creek which rises in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, flows southeast through Cowan Township, enters Bollinger County, continues to flow southeast and empties into Castor River. It was named by the pioneer hunters who found an abundance of wild turkeys along the stream. On the Hevenor Map it appears as Jackey Creek, but according to informants in the counties this is a map maker's error. (Ward, Duncan, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of Cowan Township, on Turkey Creek, from which it is named. It was organized in 1813 as an arm of Bethel Church (in Cape Girardeau County) by William Johnson, Daniel Johnson, E. Revelle, and S. Baker. (HIST. OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS 26)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Twidwell Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the village of Clubb in the western part of Cowan Township. It was named for Obadiah E. Twidwell on whose land it was located. (Smith, Twidwell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Church [1 of 2]
Description:See Corinth Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Church [2 of 2]
Description:See Cross Roads Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Grove Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the eastern part of St. Francois Township, organized in 1912 by J.O. Tibbs; the name suggests that the church was used by all denominations and that it was located in a grove. (Koszegi, Collins) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Hill School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Lost Creek Township. The district was formed in 1913 from parts of Frye and Wappapello districts. It was named by Professor Burton because the schoolhouse, built on a hill, was used as a church for all denominations. (W.T. Ward) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upalika
Description:A small village in the southern part of Williams Township, established by the South Pine Lumber Company as a sawmill camp and town about 1891 when the Frisco Railroad was built. John B. Eudalay had the first store and served as the first postmaster (post office 1901-1927). The name is said by some to be Indian, by others to be the name of the wife of one of the railroad men. Hodge does not record the name as Indian. It may be another form of Opelika, and Indian name said by Gannett to mean "great swamp," used for a town in Alabama. (Hunter, Hinchey, Postal Guide, Hillis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upper Camp Creek School
Description:See Mountain View School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upper Cedar Creek School
Description:See Burlington School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upper Clark's Creek School
Description:See Dale School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upper Coldwater School
Description:See Burlington School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upper Turkey Creek School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Cowan Township, named from its location near the upper part of Turkey Creek (q.v.). (Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ursa
Description:A community in the east-central part of Cowan Township. A post office was maintained from 1896-1904 in the home of Lee Ward. Miss Zoa Ward was postmistress, and one of the Wards doubtless named the post office for the constellation Ursa Major o Minor. (Wagner, Hinchey, de Celis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Van
Description:A railroad stop in the eastern part of St. Francois Township maintained in 1912 for a sawmill camp.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Virginia Settlement
Description:A community northwest of Patterson at the head of Clark's Creek in the northwest part of Benton Township, established about 1836 by Samuel Black, Bill Patterson, the Woods, McCormicks, Crows, Fultons, and Davises who came here from Virginia; hence the name. (Ellis, Ward, Black, Colton (1867, 1870), Clark (1860) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Virginia Warrior's Path
Description:See Warrior's Path.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walker Branch
Description:A small stream which empties into Otter Creek in the southern part of Black River Township, named for Hiram Walker, landowner. (Baker, Estes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wallis Graveyard
Description:A cemetery in the eastern part of Mill Spring Township near Mt. Pleasant Church, named for Jesse Wallis on whose farm it was located. When Wallis Graveyard was filled the Duncan Graveyard was started on adjoining land. (Duncan) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:See Mountain View School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wappapello
Description:A small town in the southeast corner of the county in Lost Creek Township. The town was laid out in 1884 by S.R. Kelly, one of the pioneer settlers here, when the Hoxie branch of the Frisco Railroad was being built. Louis Houck, president of the railroad named the town for Wapelillese, a Shawnee Indian chief who was friendly to the whites. The translation of his name is "White Bird." Or, according to another story Houck adopted the name from Wapello, a word which means chief. Wapello was head chief of the Fox tribes; born at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, in 1787, he lived not far from Black Hawk's village. Like Keokuk, Wapello was willing to abide by the treaty of 1804 to move west of the Mississippi River and in 1829 moved to what is now Wapello, Iowa (named in his honor). He went east in 1837 with Keokuk and General Street, to whom he was greatly attached, and made a speech replying to Governor Everett, which was greatly applauded. He died in 1842 while on a hunting trip near present Ottumwa, Iowa. He was buried near General Street and a monument to his memory was erected in Agency City, Iowa. (Goodspeed 385, 460, Eaton, Hodge, Hinchey, Moore, EARLY AM. REPUB. Prag Ed May 26, 1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wappapello Dam
Description:On the St. Francis River in southern Lost Creek Township, about one mile west of Wappapello, for which it is named. It was created by an act of Congress in 1936 to curb the damage wrought in the district by periodic floods, through the formation of Wappapello Lake (q.v.). (F.C. Shoemaker, MISSOURI & MISSOURIANS 1934 II 980)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wappapello Lake
Description:Dedicated on July 4, 1941, a huge artifical body of water created by the Wappapello Dam (q.v.) on the St. Francis River. It is a 6000-acre lake, the second largest in Missouri, surpassed only by the Lake of the Ozarks created by the Bagnell Dam on the Osage River (for which see Mrs. Overlay's thesis). Created purely for flood control, at spillway crest it will have an area of about 23,000 acres, and will include within its irregular shore line nearly a quarter of the county, necessitating the moving of Greenville, the county seat, Chaonia, Taskee, Williamsville, and other towns in Black River, Lost Creek, St. Francis, and Williams Townships. It is named for the town. (F.C. Shoemaker, MISSOURI & MISSOURIANS 1943 II 980)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wappapello Unit of the U.S. Forest
Description:It took its name from the village Wappapello in Wayne County. Approximately 78,000 acres were in Butler, 130,000 in Wayne, and 35,000 in Carter, according to a report of March 27, 1934. Probably more has been added. (THE AMERICAN REPUBLICAN, March 27, 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Warriors' Path
Description:An Indian path or trail known as the Virginia Warrior's Path, leading across the Cumberland Mountains, thence to the falls of Ohio, across southern Indiana and Illinois, through southern Missouri, and on to the Rocky Mountains. Houck says this was a "veritable Indian 'Appian Way' across the continent." The trail crossed the Mississippi River at Grand Tower (Perry County) and/or at Gray's Point (Scott County). Houck believes the path divided at the Mississippi River, the northern branch following Apple Creek and the dividing ridge of the St. Francois and Meramec Rivers, and the lower trail following the allivial St. Francois River, ascending Otter Creek, Big Barren and Pike Creeks to the Ozark plateau. Either or both of these trails led through the southern part of Wayne County, crossing the St. Francois River in the neighborhood of Betis Ford (now Greenville). Here it was joined by the Nachitoches Path (q.v.) from St. Michael, which was a military road. Now generally shortened to Warriors' Path. (McCormick, Houck I 227, Hinchey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Watervalley Presbyterian Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church organized in Wayne County on May 24, 1879 by Reverend George W. Harlan, Reverend B. Rubey, and Elder Samuel Black. The membership was thirteen in 1879 and twenty in 1888. Just where the church was located is unknown, but Mrs. Ellis believes it was near Patterson in Logan Township, in the valley of Peachtree Creek. (Ellis, Goodspeed 572, Douglass I 491) (pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wayne County
Description:Organized by an act of the Territorial Legislature in 1815, dividing the county of New Madrid, and establishing the county of Lawrence... In December, 1818, an act was passed for erecting the southwest part of the county of Cape Girardeau and the eastern part of the county of Lawrence into a separate and distinct county: "Beginning at the southeast corner of the county of Madison, running south on the ridge which divides Crooked Creek and Castor until it strikes the edge of the "Big Swamp," between Jenkin's Creek and Castor; thence down the main channel of said river until it strikes the New Madrid County line, thence south so far that a due west line will leave the plantation of Ed. N. Matthews on the north, thence west to the Osage boundary line, thence north with said line so far that a due east line will intersect the place of beginning." The new county was named Wayne and because of its great size was often spoken of as the "State of Wayne," or "Mother of Counties." Commissioners appointed to fix upon a site for the public buildings were Overton Bettis, James Logan, Solomon Bollinger, William Street, and Ezekiel Rubottom. Courts were held in the home of Ransom Bettis. A county or territorty formed in 1818 from New Madrid, one of the counties of the Missouri Territory. From it was cut off Taney County in 1837, and Ozark in 1841. Named for General Anthony Wayne of Stony Point, of Revolutionary fame, who died December 15, 1796. (Eaton (46) V, p. 72) The first settlements in the county were made in 1800 near the present site of Patterson and Greenville. Joseph Parish, Thomas Ring, Francis Clark, Joseph Doubleway, and Ephraim Stout settled near Patterson. Jacob and Isaac Kelly, Charles, David, and Robert Logan, and E.O. and R. Bettis near Greenville. These men obtained Spanish Land grants while Missouri was still a part of the Spanish territory of Louisianan. The name was given in honor of General Anthony (Mad Anthony) Wayne (1745-1796), of Revolutionary War fame. Wayne was born in East town, Pennsylvania in 1745. He served in the Revolutionary War, when he was associated with General N. Greene. His greatest military work, however, began in 1792 when President Washington appointed him General-in-chief and he organized a company of settle Indian troubles in the Northwest territory. He built Forts Recovery (1793), Fort Adams, Fort Greenville, Fort Defiance, and Fort Wayne (1794). General Wayne terminated a generation of warfare in the Ohio Valley by the treaty of Greenville which was signed August 3, 1795. Wappapello Dam has just been finished (1943), reducing the land area of Wayne County by several thousand acres, but providing protection from St. Francois River floods. (Campbell 437, Bennett, Douglass I 80, Goodspeed 336)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938. Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Webb Branch
Description:A stream emptying into Logan' Creek in the southern part of Mill Spring Township, named for William and James Webb, pioneers from Tennessee. (Duncan, Chilton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Webb Valley
Description:A valley four miles long below Logan's Creek in the southern part of Mill Spring Township, named for William and James Webb, pioneers from Tennessee. (Duncan, Chilton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wellsdale
Description:See Chaonia.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Branch of Lost Creek
Description:See Lost Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Prong of Bear Creek
Description:See White Holler Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wet Branch
Description:A small stream in the northwest part of St. Francois Township, so named because it has a fairly constant flow of water in contrast to the branches which are dry in summer. It is also known as Sheets Branch for Uncle David Sheets, landowner. (Collins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wet Fork Branch
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Black River Township, flowing into Otter Creek through the Moore farm. It is so named because there is water in the branch most of the time in contrast to many "dry" branches which have no water except in rainy seasons. (Moore, Baker) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wet Lake Creek
Description:A stream in the northwest part of St. Francois Township, flowing into Big Lake Creek. Its source is a lake or slough and is so named because the water stands here all year except in seasons of unusual drought. (Collins) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Cemetery
Description:A family cemetery on J.W. White's farm, which was known as Carter Graveyard when Andy Carter owned the farm. It is in the southern part of Cedar Creek Township, near Lodi. (Lewis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Holler
Description:See White Hollow.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Holler Church
Description:See Bear Creek Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Holler Creek
Description:A small stream, also known as West Prong of Bear Creek from its location, in the eastern part of Cowan Township, named for Luke White from North Carolina and for Uncle Murphy and Aunt Cissie White who moved there in the 1850s. (Twidwell, H. Ward) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Hollow
Description:A region in the valley of Bear Creek in the western part of Cowan Township, so named because Frank White is the most prominent man there. The name is usually pronounced White Holler in the community. (H. Ward) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Hollow Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery near old Bear Creek or White Hollow Church in the western part of Cowan Township, named for White Hollow (q.v.) in which it is located. (Collins, Twidwell, Wallis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Hollow School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Cowan Township, named from its location in White Hollow (q.v.). (Barrow, Ward, Twidwell) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whiteacre Spring
Description:A spring in the southern part of Lost Creek Township, named for Alec Whiteacre, a Union soldier and later farmer who owned the farm on which the spring is located. (de Celis, Ward) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whitlock Mill
Description:See Moore Mill.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Widow's Branch
Description:Also known as Widow's Creek, this stream flows into Otter Creek in the southern part of Black River Township. Eliza Friend, a widow, lived on the creek and it is believed by many people that this fact explains the name. Others insist that three Civil War widows lived there when the name was applied. (Forbes, Moore, Dunn) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Widow's Creek
Description:See Widow's Branch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilkinson Mountain
Description:A mountain near Coldwater in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, named for John M. Wilkinson, who patented the land in 1852. (Morris, Wilkinson) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Willard Graveyard
Description:A rural cemetery in the southern part of Black River Township, named for Jack Willard, a farmer who lived nearby. The cemetery was started about 1840 with a row of graves of the Willard family. (Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Willford Graveyard
Description:A cemetery in the western part of Jefferson Township, named for the landowner Jim Willford. (Ward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williams Branch
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Williams Township. It was first known as Edgar Branch for James, George, and Bill Edgar who bought land here in 1886. Later it was known as Halbert Branch for a landowner who succeeded the Edgars, and about 1895 became Williams Branch when John Williams purchased two or three hundred acres of land here. (Hillis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williams Graveyard
Description:A rural cemetery in the southern part of Williams Township, established as early as 1835 and named for John Williams, on whose land it was placed. Because of its age it is sometimes called Indian Graveyard, the people thinking Indians were buried there. This is not true so far as can be ascertained. (Hillis, Bennett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williams Mill
Description:See De Haven Mill.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williams Township
Description:In the southwest part of the county, established in 1872 from part of Black River Township, and named for the first settler, who attained great prominence as a farmer and citizen, William Williams. (Bennett, U.S. Census (1880) 247)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williamsville
Description:A town in the central part of Williams Township, at the junction of the Missouri Pacific and Frisco Railroads. William Williams homesteaded in the early 1860s the land on which Williamsville was laid out in 1871. The town was named for William Williams or for his son Asa E. Williams to whom half the homestead was deeded. The other half went to a son-in-law, Harvey Biggerstaff. The town was laid out by Asa E. Williams in 1871 when the Missouri Pacific Railroad was built and a post office established in 1872 in James A. Lee's store. The Frisco Railroad was built through the town in 1886 and the first incorporation was made in 1887 by Mayor James F. Powers. (Mrs. Mary Julian, Hillis, DAILY AMERICAN REPUBLIC Feb. 11, 1935, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williamsville Baptist Church
Description:The Baptist Church of Williamsville was first established as Good Hope Church in 1867 about one mile west of the town. It was also called Duckett Church, for it was in the Duckett community. When the railroad right- of-way was cut, the building had to be moved, so it was moved into the village. (Collins, Rhodes, McGhee)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wills
Description:A post office maintained from 1908-1919 in the northeast part of St. Francois Township. It was kept by Mrs. Irene Crites in her home and named for Watson Wills, a farmer whose land joined that of Mrs. Crites. (Crites, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wills Church
Description:See Cross Roads Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilson Ford
Description:See Wilson's Switch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilson's
Description:See Wilson's Switch.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilson's Switch
Description:A switch on the Frisco Railroad in the southern part of Black River Township, put in in 1895 for loading logs at the request of Nathaniel Wilson, landowner, for whom it was named. The switch was near Wilson Ford on the St. Francois River, which was abandoned when the railroad was built. The place is also known as Wilsons. (Sallars) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wolf Branch
Description:A small stream in the western part of St. Francois Township, flowing into Big Lake Creek. It was named by pioneer hunters for the wolves which frequented the region. (Rhodes) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Womack Cemetery [1 of 2]
Description:A rural cemetery in the western part of Jefferson Township, named for T.M. Womack, who owned land there before the Civil War. Some Civil War soldiers were the first people buried in the cemetery. (Beaty, Moore) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Womack Cemetery [2 of 2]
Description:A rural cemetery on Otter Creek in the eastern part of Mill Spring Township. It was first called Pig Cemetery about 1890 because the landowner who gave the land was Matthew Pig. The name was changed to Womack, for another prominent family, because of the connotation of the former name. (Rhodes, Duncan)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Womack Spring
Description:A spring near Stanley Creek in the eastern part of Lost Creek Township, named for the Womack family, pioneer landowners. (Ben Stilts, de Celis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Woods Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the southern part of Logan Township, near Woods School (q.v.) from which it is named. (Jno. Black)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Woods School
Description:A rural school now consolidated with Patterson School. It was established in 1857 and named for James Monroe Woods, pioneer doctor and landowner, who gave the land for the school. (Wm. Wood)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Yokum School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Lost Creek Township, named for Ed. Yokum, a farmer. Ed. Yokum and Dan Briscoe, community leaders, each donated an acre of land for the school. (Ward, de Celis) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:York
Description:A station on the Greenville-Williamsville Railroad in the southern part of Cowan Township. It was first established as a logging camp and called Camp No. 8. Later the York family purchased the land and continued to operate the sawmill camp, which came to be known as York. (Jno. Kozegi) (Pottenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zeitonia
Description:See Gad's Hill.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized prior to 1851. Cf. above. (Douglass I 476)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:In the town of Gravelton, organized about 1857 by Rev. John R. Moser, a native of North Carolina, with a membership of twenty-five. The first services were held some three miles distant. Among those influential in organizing the church were Judge L.A.W. Cloninger and Major M.N. Abernathy. In 1878 a splendid church building, still standing, was erected. In 1885 Concordia College was erected by Pastor Wagner. A familiar Bible name. (Goodspeed 580-81, 1139, Douglass I 481, Hopkins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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