Warren County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Abattis
Description:A town and post office in the northwest part of Bridgeport Township. The post office was established in 1886 and discontinued between 1905 and 1910. The town still appears on the map in the Montgomery Atlas, but is not found on later maps and seems to have disappeared. No record or explnation of the name has been found. The word "abatis" is defined in the Oxford Dictionary as "A military defense constructed by placing felled trees lengthwise one over the other with their branches towards the enemy's line, and piling them up until a shelter is obtained." Perhaps, since the town was in a wooded region, it was so named for a fancied resemblance to such a wooded breastwork. One other explanation that has been tentativley suggested locally is that the place may have been named in honor of the Italian fresco painter, Niccolo dell' Abbate (1512-1571), but no reason for such a transfer has been found. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1901; MONTGOMERY ATLAS 1918; OED; Webster's NEW INT.; A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:American Legion Hall
Description:A large wooden building in the central part of Charrette Township, near Charrette Creek and the former site of Kite's Bridge (q.v.). The hall was built about 1931 and named for the American Legion, an association of World War veterans. (Herman J. Muench; Forrest Hughes)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:American Legion Park
Description:A wooded picnic ground in the central part of Charrette Township, near Charrette Creek. The park surrounds the American Legion Hall, for which it is named. (Herman J. Muench; Forrest Hughes)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Andrew Eisenmayer Hall
Description:A three-story men's dormitory at Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton. The hall was built in 1900 at a cost of $15,000 from funds supplied by the family of Andrew Eisenmayer, of Trenton, Illinois, for whom it was named. It is also known as Eisenmayer Hall. (WARRENTON BANNER, June 5, 1914, 2; IBID., Dec. 18, 1914, 19)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Antioch Church
Description:A Baptist Church which once "met and held services in private homes near the present location of Warrenton." It was organized prior to 1828 and was disbanded about 1837 because a few members had allowed dancing and fiddling in their homes and had "countenanced horse racing." The name is Biblical in origin and was doubtless given for the city where the disciples were first called Christians (ACTS 11:26). (Duncan, 205-206; Missouri BAPTIST BIOG. IV, 9; Miss Anna R. Sharp; John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Archer Cemetery
Description:In the east-central part of Elkhorn Township, north of Truesdale. The origin of the name has not been ascertained. (WARRENTON BANNER, Oct. 16, 1908, 1, "Mrs. James Crismer")
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bailey Branch
Description:A creek which rises in the northwest part of Camp Branch Township and flows west into Camp Branch, or Camp Creek, east of Clear Branch. The name is probably personal in origin. (Benj. Frick; A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ball School
Description:An elementary school once located in the western part of Elkhorn Township. It was named for Hampton Ball, on whose farm the school was located. He was born in Virginia in 1830 and died about 1926. He was a farmer and miller and owned about 3,000 acres of land. (83RD REPORT; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 724-725; J.G. Wessendorf; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; Dr. A.W. Eueling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Barrett's Creek
Description:See Perruque Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Barringhaus Branch
Description:A creek which rises in the southwest part of Charrette Township and flows south into the Drainage Ditch. It is so named for Joseph Barringhaus, former associate county judge, southern district. He lived near Concord Hill and died about 1936 or 1937. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Walter Rottman; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; H.J. Muench; F.W. Kehr; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Barrock Creek
Description:See Perruque Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bates Island
Description:See Rush Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bear Creek
Description:This stream, sometimes called North Bear Creek to distinguish it from South Bear Creek (q.v.), rises in the northern part of Bridgeport Township and runs north through Bear Creek Township in Montgomery County, and then into Lincoln County, where it empties into the West Fork of Cuivre River. There is still a third Bear Creek in Warren County, a variant sometimes used for Perruque Creek (q.v.). For name, cf. above. Tradition gives Presley Anderson, an early settler in Montgomery County, the honor of bestowing this name after an adventure he had with some bears. (COUNTY ATLAS 1899; Bryan & Rose, 236; HIGHWAY MAP 1940; Miss Leech's thesis; George Luppold; Andy J. Brown)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bear Creek [1 of 2]
Description:See South Bear Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bear Creek [2 of 2]
Description:See Perruque Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beatties Branch
Description:A small stream which rises in the northeast part of Hickory Grove Township and flows north into Camp Branch. The name may be personal in origin. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 17)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beaver Slide
Description:See Case
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beef Island
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bernheimer
Description:A small postal village in the southern part of Pinckney Township, on the northern bank of the Missouri River on the M.K. & T. Railroad. The post office was established here about 1894, discontinued by 1897, reestablished by 1899, and continued until the present. It was named for Joseph Bernheimer, a prominent buisnessman from St. Louis. (Postal Guide; Hevenor, WARREN COUNTY; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Besley
Description:See Pendleton.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethlehem School
Description:A rural elementary school in the south-central part of Pinckney Township, close to Smith Creek, near Bernheimer. Cf. above (83RD REPORT; Smith's BIBLE DICT.; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Herman J. Muench; F.W. Kehr; Mrs. J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bierbaum School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Charrette Township. It is named for Henry H. Bierbaum (April 30, 1843 - Oct. 31, 1924), who owned the land where the school was built. The schoolhouse was constructed in 1876. It was formerly known as Schwartze's School (perhaps Schwarze's School), in honor of a A Mr. Schwarze who once lived in that section. (83RD REPORT; Herman J. Muench; F.W. Kehr; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bierbaum's Custom Mill
Description:See Bierbaum's Steam Grist and Saw Mill.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bierbaum's Steam and Grist Mill
Description:See Bierbaum's Steam Grist and Saw Mill.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bierbaum's Steam Grist and Saw Mill
Description:An old mill in the central-east part of Charrette Township, on Emmaus Creek. It was earlier known as the Schaaf Mill in honor of C.H. Schaaf, who started the mill in 1841 or 1843 as the first horse mill in the county. In about five years, he changed to an ox mill, which he ran for nearly twenty years. In 1854 or 1855, this was replaced by the first steam mill in the county. He came to America from Germany in 1834, sold his steam mill to his son-in-law, Henry H. Bierbaum, in 1860, and later established another mill at Augusta in St. Charles County. Henry H. Bierbaum's mill bore the descriptive names, Bierbaum's Steam and Grist Mill, Bierbaum's Steam Grist and Saw Mill, or Bierbaum's Custom Mill. It was closed in 1907. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 13; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1033; WARRENTON BANNER, May 17, 1907, 1; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Creek
Description:A large stream which rises in the central part of Elkhorn Township in Warren County, flows north and northeast into the southwestern part of Clark Township in Lincoln County, and then east into the Cuivre Township. Cf. above. An earlier name was Eagle Fork, conferred by Adam Zumwalt, the first settler on its banks in Lincoln County. Zumwalt is said to have complained that he could not raise hogs because the eagles caught them. (Walmsley, 464; Wetmore, 245; HIST. LINCOLN, 204; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 131, 964; Campbell, 626; PORT. AND BIOG. REC., 406; HANDBOOK OF MISSOURI, 176; Hevenor, LINCOLN COUNTY; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Andy J. Brown; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Four School
Description:A rural elementary school which was built in 1921 in the northern part of Bridgeport Township. It was so named because four influential farmers organized the district from parts of four other districts. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Road
Description:See Boone's Lick Road
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blattner School
Description:In the eastern part of Hickory Grove Township, southeast of Wright City. Named for the Blattner family, which had many prominent members in this section. Andreas Blattner, who was born in Kuttigen, Canton Aargau, Switzerland, settled within the present limits of the school district with his family in 1843. He purchased 240 acres of land here and later gave each of his three children adjoining farms of 640 acres each. His sons were Frederick and Judge Henry Blattner. Andreas Blattner was accidentally killed during the Civil War when a faithful servant mistakenly shot him for a bushwhacker when he came to his own barn. Judge Henry Blattner was born in Aargau, Switzerland, in 1831 and came to this country with his parents when he was twelve. He served as a county judge for eight years and as a public administrator for four years. Frederick Blattner was born in Switzerland and ran the Blattner Store in Hickory Grove Township. He died in 1888. (PORT. AND BIOG. REC., 164-165; 83RD REPORT; WARRENTON BANNER, Jan. 6, 1904, 1; Mrs. Fred Lohman; Mrs. J.G. Wessendorf; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blattner Store
Description:A general store which was formerly located in the central part of Hickory Grove Township. It was named for the Swiss-born Frederick Blattner (see Blattner School), who was its proprietor for about fifteen years, and who died in 1888. (PORT. AND BIOG. REC., 164; Forrest W. Hughes; Mrs. George Luppold; William Hollenbeck)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Block School
Description:A rural elementary school in the northwest part of Elkhorn Township. It was named for the Block family. George Block, Sr., was County Clerk of Warren County, and died about 1891. His son, George Block, Jr., moved to California. (83RD REPORT; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; F.W. Kehr; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. Anna Schaper; Mrs. J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boar Creek
Description:See Frank's Branch.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeuf Island
Description:An island in the Missouri River, south of Peers. According to the present boundaries, all the island is in Warren County, in the southern part of Charrette Township, except the southwestern tip (about one-eighth), which belongs to Boeuf Township in Franklin County. The original French name appears on the newly discovered Evans, or Mackay, Map of 1795 or 1796 as "Isle au Boeuf," with the English form annexed of "Beef Island." When the Lewis and Clark explorers passed it on May 26, 1804, Clark writes (I. 29): "passed Beef Island and River on Lbd Side," but a correction in another hand adds "a large island called Buffaloe Island separated from the land by a small channel into which Buffaloe Creek empties itself." Buffalo Island, is of course, a better rendering of the French name (see under Beouf Creek). Later travelers, such as Brackenridge (EWT VI. 36) and Maximilian (EWT XXII. 239) revert to the French forms Isle au Boeuf, or Isle aux Boeufs (EWT V. 42); and today the compromise form Boeuf Island has prevailed, more or less anglicized in pronunciation. The original name was doubtless given for its position at the mouth of Boeuf Creek in Franklin County. Two other islands, Parke (or Park) and Red Top Island, are now merged with Boeuf Island. Parke Island was named for a Mr. Parke who lived south of the river. Red Top Island may have been named for its covering of reddish wild grass (Agrostis vulgaris), also called "English grass" or "herd's Grass," which is highly valued for pasture. (L&C, ed. Thwaites, and EWT, pp. cited; COUNTY MAP, 1908; Benj. Frick; E.C. Kehr; F.W. Kehr; H.J. Muench; A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeuf Island School
Description:A rural elementary school in Charrette Township on what was formerly part of Boeuf Island. It is named for the island. (Eli F. Mittler; F.W. Kehr; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; H.J. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone Lick Road
Description:See Boone's Lick Road
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone's Grave
Description:The original burial place of Colonel Daniel Boone, the famous Indian fighter, in the Bryan Cemetery (q.v.), southeast of Marthasville. It was named for Colonel Boone, whose body was buried here in 1820 but was removed in 1845 and re-interred in Kentucky. He was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania in 1732, 1734 or thereabouts, came to Missouri and settled on Darst's Bottom in 1795, and was made commandant of the Femme Osage District in 1800. He served in this capacity until 1804 when the region was transferred to the United States (COUNTY MAP 1908; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 18; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 12-15; H.J. Muench; Walter Rottman; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone's Knoll
Description:One of the highest elevations in the county and probably located between Concord Hill and Hopewell in the central part of Charrette Township. Named for the famous pioneer and Indian fighter, Colonel Daniel Boone (cf. Boone's Grave). (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 229; Willian Van Studdiford; Mrs. William Dothage; A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone's Lick Road
Description:Originally an old Indian trail or trace which led from St. Louis via St. Charles westward into the wilderness of Boone's Lick. Daniel Boone and his sons, Nathan and Dan M., made trips over this road to the famous lick in Howard County. In 1806 or in 1807, Nathan and Dan M. Boone moved out to Boone's Lick over the approximate line of the road, evaporated salt, sealed it in hollow logs, and floated it down the river to St. Louis. MISSOURI CROSS-STATE HIGHWAY says that the road was the first state road to be surveyed and that Daniel Boone did the work in 1814, but the same authority also states that Colonel Nathan Boone surveyed, marked and straightened the road. In 1815, the road ran 154 miles from St. Charles to Old Franklin in Howard County. The first stagecoach was established over the road in 1819. Daniel Boone led its blazing along this length. Other variants of the name are: Boone's Lick Trail, Boonslick Road, Boons' Lick Road, Boonslick Trace, Boon's Lick Road, Boonslick Trail, and Boone Lick Road. It was named for Daniel Boone (see above) or for Boone's Lick. The road was also called Big Road in ante-bellum days as a tribute to its importance. (Wetmore; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; Bryan & Rose, 48; HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES, 961; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 568; PORT. AND BIOG. RED., 498; Stevens II, 670; CROSS-STATE, 1-2; OLD TRAILS; SHOW ME, 61; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 12-15; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; W.G. Davis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boon's Lick Road
Description:See Boone's Lick Road.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boons' Lick Road
Description:See Boone's Lick Road.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boonslick Road
Description:See Boone's Lick Road.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boonslick Trace
Description:See Boone's Lick Road
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boonslick Trail
Description:See Boone's Lick Road
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Borgmann School
Description:See Maple Dale School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boston
Description:A former town in the southern part of Charrette Township about six miles southeast of Warrenton near the present town of Hopewell. Upon the formation of Warren County, this town was suggested as the county seat, but in 1836, Warrenton was selected instead. In 1837 Wetmore lists Boston as a new town. HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES calls it New Boston. Old settlers think Boston was the earlier name although they remember the place as Boston instead of New Boston. There has been no store there for about thirty years. Boston is a stock name for American towns, being found in at least twelve other states. All, of course, are ultimately borrowed from Boston, Massachusetts, which in its turn was taken from Boston, England. It is much more likely that the place was first called New Boston, when it was new, then shortened to Boston, its present name. If it was first Boston, then New Boston, then changed back to Boston, we should have two changes. (Bryan & Rose, 205; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 8, 9; Wetmore, 225; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1030; H.J. Muench; Walter Rottman)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brandt School
Description:In the eastern part of Elkhorn Township, east of Warrenton. It was named for Captain John Brandt, who was born June 3, 1838 in Warren County on the Upper Charrette, was appointed Captain of the Home Guards, Company H., Warren County Regiment, in October, 1862, and died November 5, 1910. He was one of the charter members of the Warren County Schuetzen Company. (cf. Schuetzen Company Hall), which was organized in 1858. (83RD REPORT; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; Mrs. Anna Schaper; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. Eugenia Hedemann; F.W. Kehr; Mrs. Eugenia Hedemann (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brandt's Rock Spring
Description:A spring in the southwest part of Hickory Grove Township, a few miles south of the former town of Pitts. For name cf. Brandt School. (Parker, map 1; COUNTY ATLAS 1877; 14; Mrs. Eugenia Hedemann (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bridgeport
Description:A very old town in the southern part of Bridgeport Township, near Loutre Slough, and about a mile west or northwest of the present town of Case (q.v.). The name is recorded at least as early as 1804, and Bridgeport Landing, doubtless used for the landing on the slough nearby, must have been even earlier. In 1833, when the new county of Warren was organized into townships, Bridgeport was evidently the most important place in this part of the county, for Bridgeport Township was named after it. There was a post office there from 1876 to 1893. The old town apparently began to decline upon the establishment of Case, however, in 1894, perhaps because it was not on the railroad, and has now almost disappeared. The name must have been borrowed from outside the state. Bridgeport is a stock name for American towns, being found in at least twenty other states. The most important of American Bridgeports is Bridgeport, Connecticut; but there is no record to show which of them gave its name to the little Missouri river-town. Loutre Slough must have been a lively place in the days of steamboating. Two humorous nicknames, Gunboat and Slingtown, both alluding to habits of heavy drinking, may have been applied to old Bridgeport or Bridgeport Landing; but it seems more likely that one of them was used for the landing at Case and the other at Gore (q.v.). Another early name recorded for Bridgeport was Kosse's Store, for its proprietor, Julius Kosse, who is said to have established a store there in 1850. (Postal Guide; Pike, ed. Coues, 368; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1062-4; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 1; E.C. Kehr; Mrs. George Luppold; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bridgeport Cemetery
Description:A burial ground in the southern part of Bridgeport Township near Case. It was doubtless named for the old town of Bridgeport (q.v.), which was formerly here. (Hevenor, WARREN COUNTY; WARRENTON BANNER, May 3, 1907, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bridgeport Landing
Description:See Bridgeport.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bridgeport Township
Description:In the extreme western part of the county. It is bounded on the north and west by Montgomery County, on the south by the Missouri River, on the southeast by Pinckney Township and on the northeast by Elkhorn Township. It was created in 1833 when the county was organized, and named after Bridgeport, which was then evidently the most important place in this section of the country. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; Pike, ed. Coues)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brinkman School
Description:A rural elementary school in the south-central part of Charrette Township. It was named in honor of the Brinkman family that formerly lived here. Mr. Brinkman has been dead since about 1891. The name is also spelled Brinkmann. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; H.J. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brinkmann School
Description:See Brinkman School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bruner Hollow
Description:A depressed area in the northern part of Bridgeport Township. It was named for a Mr. Bruner. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Mrs. Caroline McCarty)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brush Creek
Description:Rises in Montgomery County near High Hill, and flows east until it reaches Lincoln County, where it empties into the Cuivre River. Cornelius Howard settled on the stream in 1816; in 1818 he moved and settled on South Bear Creek, where he died many years later. Cf. above. (Bryan & Rose, 213; COUNTY ATLAS 1899, 7; Andy J. Brown; William Van Studdiford)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brush Creek Presbyterian Church
Description:A country church in Bridgeport Township near Brush Creek. The original site was once a field which belonged to Cornelius Howard, who lived there from 1816-1818. Mr. Howard cleared a field here and raised two crops of corn. Some years later a forest of vigorous young oaks had taken possession of the former corn field. The church was doubtless named for Brush Creek (q.v.). The building was in existence as late as 1885. (Bryan & Rose, 213; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1062; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 1; William Van Studdiford)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bryan Cemetery
Description:The original burial place of Colonel Daniel Boone and his wife in the southeast part of Charrette Township overlooking the Missouri River. The body of Mrs. Boone (nee Rebecca Bryan, born 1737) was placed here in 1813 and that of Colonel Boone (cf. Boone's Grave), in 1820. In 1845, after some controversy, the two graves were exhumed in Warren County and re-interred in Frankfort, Kentucky. The choice of the Bryan Cemetery as the burial place for Colonel and Mrs. Boone was a natural one as it was named for and originally owned by her nephew, David Bryan. Mr. Bryan came to Missouri from Kentucky in 1800 and settled near Marthasville. He reserved one-half acre of land near his house for the burial ground. (Bryan & Rose, 132-133; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 8, 14, 15; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bryant Creek
Description:See Lost Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bud
Description:See Case.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buffalo Island
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buffaloe Island
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bungalow Tavern
Description:A road-house in the northwest part of Elkhorn Township on Highway 40. It was built by Ray E. Litsch in 1933 and was so named on account of its architecture. (Mrs. Ray E. Litsch)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buzzard's Cave
Description:A natural cave on Charrette Creek near Spoon Hollow. The name is descriptive. (William Hollenbeck; A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Calaway's Post
Description:See Callaway's Post.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Callaway Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the southwestern part of Hickory Grove Township, flows south into the extreme northeastern part of Charrette Township, thence east into St. Charles County. It was named for the family of Flanders Callaway, who came here with the Boones at the close of the 18th or the beginning of the 19th century and established Callaway's Post (q.v.) shortly before the War of 1812. (Bryan & Rose, 99-100; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 958, 961, 974, 1029; COUNTY MAP 1908; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 659; Bryan, MISSOURI HIST. SOC. COLLECTIONS VI, 1-18; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 8; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 1; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; E.C. Kehr; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Callaway Post
Description:See Callaway's Post.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Callaway's Fort
Description:See Callaway's Post.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Callaway's Post
Description:A fort and settlement built in the southern part of Charrette Township, several miles west of the present Marthasville, before the War of 1812. This post was the first American colony to be established within the limits of the present Warren County. The exact date of settlement is hard to ascertain as 1795, 1799, and 1801 are all recorded. However, the date that seems most definite is that of October, 1799. The settlement was made by Flanders Callaway (Dec. 9, 1752 - Aug. 9, 1824), son-in-law of the renowned Colonel Daniel Boone, who also came to Missouri at this time. The post was built on an 800-arpent grant given by the Spanish Government. In order to protect themselves from the dangers of the Indians, the colonists built a fort shortly after the place was settled. Here, again, the date is uncertain as two dates, that of 1798 and that of about 1801 are both offered. It seems undoubtedly to have been named for Flanders Callaway as he was one who established the post; but some authorities suggest it was named for his son, Captain James Callaway, a well-known Indian fighter, who was born in 1783 and was only about sixteen years old at the time of the building of the post. Captain Callaway was killed in an Indian skirmish in 1815. Its name-father, Flanders Callaway, seems to have been a gentlemanly but courageous type of frontiersman. He was handsome, dauntless, ambitious, and religious. However, he was little interested in politics or formal military life. Rather, he liked hunting in the wilderness or skirmishing with the Indians but evaded serving in the army on account of its restrictions. In company with Daniel Morgan Boone, his brother-in-law, and William Lamme, his son-in-law, he trapped beaver as far west as Nebraska. The original pioneer church of this section, the Friendship Baptist Church, first held services in his home in 1819 or earlier. This colony also appears as Calaway's Post, Callaway Post, and Callaway's Fort. (Bryan & Rose, 99-100; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 659; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 8; Bryan, MISSOURI HIST. SOC. COLLECTIONS VI, 1-18; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914; 1; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; E.C. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Branch
Description:A creek which enters Warren County from Montgomery County in the northwestern part of Elkhorn Township and runs north and northeast through Camp Branch Township into Lincoln County, where it empties into Cuivre River. It is named for Joseph Camp, who was born in Virginia in 1787. He pioneered in Carolina, came to Missouri in 1832, and died in Montgomery County in 1866. The stream also has been known as Camp Creek; it is to be distinguished from Indian Camp Creek in Hickory Grove Township, sometimes also known as Camp Creek or Camp Branch. (Campbell, 626; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 962; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5, 7; HIST. LINCOLN, 453; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; Hevenor, WARREN COUNTY; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Branch [1 of 2]
Description:A post office in 1867 in the central-west part of Elkhorn Township near Montgomery County on the Boone's Lick Road. Lemuel (or Samuel) Price, who came to Missouri from North Carolina in 1814 and lived in a fort until 1815, was the first settler in this vicinity. Indians were troublesome here at that time. The post office was doubtless named for the creek (Camp Branch, not Indian Creek). (Goodwin; Bryan & Rose, 222; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 102; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 2; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; Frank Yocum)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Branch [2 of 2]
Description:See Indian Camp Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Branch Cemetery
Description:In the central-west part of Elkhorn Township, four miles east of Jonesburg on Highway 40. It is named either for Camp Branch or for Camp Branch Church. (Mrs. A.W. Ebeling; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; Mrs. Belle Gerdemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Branch Church
Description:A Northern Methodist Church in the central-west part of Elkhorn Township. It was named for Camp Branch, the creek. It has been out of existence since about 1876. (Mrs. Belle Gerdemann; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Branch Township
Description:Bounded on the north and east by Lincoln County, on the south by Elkhorn Township, and on the west by Montgomery County. It was one of the original townships when the county was organized in 1833. It is named for Camp Branch, the stream. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1129; Frank Yocum)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Creek
Description:See Indian Camp Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Creek Baptist Church
Description:See Little Bethel Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Ground Church
Description:A Methodist institution, originally German Methodist, in the extreme southeast part of Camp Branch Township. The building was built around 1861, and was so named because there were big camp meetings there for many years. It is also called the Steinhagen Methodist Church, or Steinhagen Church, for its location near the former post office. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7, 28; Miss Lula May Schulze; E.S. Aydelott; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Oscar J. Luelf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Ground School
Description:A rural elementary school in the extreme southeast part of Camp Branch Township. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7, 28; F.W. Kehr; Mrs. Ed Schulze; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; J.W. Harper; Miss Lula May Schulze; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Sandy Creek
Description:Rises in the eastern part of Bridgeport Township and flows south into Masse's Creek. The name is probably descriptive. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Case
Description:A town and post office in the southern part of Bridgeport Township, on Loutre Slough, about a mile east of old Bridgeport. It is a railroad town, and was established about 1894, when the M.K. & T. Railroad was laid out by the county surveyor, Squire Morris. It was probably named for some stockholder in the railroad who did not live here. The post office at Case was started in October, 1893, is first listed in 1895, and has since continued. An earlier post office in approximately the same place, which disappears from the list just as Case begins to appear, was Bud (post office 1866-1893). The name Bud can be traced back as far as 1880, but its source is unknown. The place was previously known as Luppold's Landing, for Matthias Luppold, who settled there in 1868. He was a blacksmith and a native of Wittenburg, Germany, who came to America about 1854 and died in 1894. A nickname applied to the place in early days was Slingtown, apparently alluding to habits of heavy drinking there. The Americanism "sling" or "ginsling" was used for a drink made of spirits, especially gin, with water, sugar, and lemon, served either hot or cold, and very popular on the Western frontier, as is amply attested in the writings of Mark Twain. A similar humouous nickname that may have been used for Luppold's Landing is Gunboat, said to have been borrowed from the name of a saloon; but it seems more likely that Gunboat and Gunboat Landing were a little lower down the slough, at or near the present town of Gore (q.v.). The site of Case was also formerly known as Beaver Slide, obviously a humorus descriptive name. (Pike, ed. Coues, 366; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1062-4; Benj. Frick; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; George Luppold; Mrs. George Luppold; F.W. Kehr; E.C. Kehr; A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Case School
Description:A rural elementary school in the southern part of Bridgeport Township. It was formerly called Gotting School in honor of the Gotting family. About 1901 the school was renamed because it was then built on a new site that was nearer Case and the center of the district. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Casner Branch
Description:Rises in the central-east part of Hickory Grove Township and flows northeast into Perruque Creek. Named for Judge John C. Casner, who was born in Brook County, West Virginia, March 8, 1828, and died March 17, 1905. He was the son of James and Elsie (Kerr) Casner. He came to Warren County in 1865 and engaged in farming and stock raising until 1874 or 1875 when he was elected presiding Justice of the County Court, an office which he held eight years. He owned 320 acres of land in Hickory Grove Township and lived there for over twenty-five years until he moved to Warrenton in 1893. (PORT. & BIOG. REC., 340; COUNTY MAP 1908; WARRENTON BANNER, Mar. 24, 1905, 1; William Hollenbeck; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Forrest W. Hughes; Mrs. George Luppold; W. Schmidt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cave Creek
Description:A northern tributary of Charrette Creek, which rises in the eastern part of Elkhorn Township, flows southeast into Hickory Grove Township, then southwest into Charrette Township, where it enters Charrette Creek. It is so named on account of the numerous caves in this section. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Grove School
Description:A rural grade school in the central part of Charrette Township. It was formerly named Kite School in honor of Martin Kite, the miller (see Kite's Mill). About 1891 or 1896, the name was changed on account of the cedar trees on the hills in that vicinity. (Bryan & Rose, 218; 83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Oscar J. Luelf; Walter Rottman; H.J. Muench; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Valley School
Description:A rural school in the south-central part of Charrette Township. The name is descriptive of its location. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Oscar J. Luelf; Walter Rottman; H.J. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Central Grove Cemetery
Description:In the center part of Camp Branch Township. The first burial here was that of the Carico boys who were killed in the Civil War. There is no grove here although there is timber in this section. The name is probably descriptive of its wooded setting and its central location in the township. (J.E. Harper; John Mason; E.S. Aydelott; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Central Grove Church
Description:A Methodist institution in the center part of Camp Branch Township. Services were first held in the Dutton School House. The church was built about the 1870s, and was named for Central Grove Cemetery, which is older than the church. (Dr. A.W. Ebeling; J.G. Wessendorf; E.S. Aydelott; John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Central School
Description:A rural grade school in the center part of Bridgeport Township on Masse's Creek. It is so named because of its location near the center of the district. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Mrs. George Luppold; Mrs. A.W. Ebeling; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Central Wesleyan College
Description:A Methodist, originally German Methodist, school in Warrenton. The institution was opened in 1864 as a school and orphan asylum for children of dead soldiers. During the Civil War, students were required to do military duty to guard the town against the attacks of bushwhackers. In 1865 a charter was obtained from the Missouri General Assembly incorporating the institution under the name Western Orphan Asylum and Educational Institute. In March, 1870, the charter was amended by the General Assembly, and the name was changed to Central Wesleyan College and Orphan Asylum. The course of study has been extended to include classical, scientific, normal, theological, bookkeeping, and musical departments. In 1878 the college boarding department was separated from the orphan asylum. The two institutions were given separate charters as Central Wesleyan College and as Wesleyan Orphan Asylum in 1884. Years ago the Warrenton Academy was a part of the college. The educational institute was also known as the Western Educational Institute. Central Weleyan College received the name "Central" probably because it was located in the central part of the United States, the Middle West; and it was given the title "Wesleyan" in honor of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism. The variant names Western Educational Institute and Western Orphan Asylum were also descriptive of location. Warrenton Academy was named in honor of the town. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1050, 1070-76; Webster's NEW INT.; WARRENTON BANNER, June 24, 1904, 1; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 24; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. Anna Schaper)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Central Wesleyan College and Orphan Asylum
Description:See Central Wesleyan College.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Charet Creek
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Charette
Description:See Charrette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Charette Creek
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Charette Township
Description:See Charrette Township.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Charette's Creek
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Charette's River
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Charrette [1 of 2]
Description:A post office in the southeast part of Charrete Township, southeast of Hopewell. It was established in 1900 and discontinued in 1903 or 1904. It is to be distinguished from the early French settlement of the same name. The later Charrette was named for Charrette Creek, as was the earlier one which had a different location. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; E.C. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Charrette [2 of 2]
Description:The oldest white settlement in the county, near the present site of Marthasville. Although long since washed away by the Missouri River, it is known to have been located at or a little below the mouth of Charrette Creek (q.v.), from which it doubtless took its name. It is to be distinguished from the later Charrette (q.v.) southeast of Hopewell, which was establihsed in 1900. For the probable origin of the creek name from the French fur-trader Joseph Chorette, see under Charrette Creek. The settlement was originally made by French traders and trappers as early as 1766, according to Thwaites (see EWT V. 42); the county history says as early as on May 25, 1804, it was described by Clark as "a small French Village of seven houses and as many families, settled at this place to be convenient to hunt, and trade with the Indians...The people at this Village is pore, houses small, they sent us milk and eggs to eat." Clark's companions Sergeants Gass, Floyd, Whitehouse, and Ordway add, in identical words, that "This is the last Settlement of white people on this river." On July 21, 1806, the Pike Expedition stopped at "the village of La Charette" and remained there for three days (Coues ed., II. 364). Pike mentions staying in the house of Joseph Chartron, who was syndic of the settlement. When Brackenridge passed, on April 8, 1811 (EWT VI. 36) the place had grown to "about thirty families, who hunt and raise a little corn. A very long island (the ISLE AUX BOUEFS) lies in the bend in which the village is situated." Bradbury stopped there in the same year (EWT V. 42); he describes meeting Daniel Boone there, and also mentions that the "river Charette falls into the Missouri about a mile above the village." Compare Washington Irving's account, in his ASTORIA (ed. 1861, p. 146), of how Boone was met here in January, 1811 by the overland party of "Astorians." When the War of 1812 began, however, many of the inhabitants left, and shortly after it was over the old settlement seems to have disappeared. The last recorded event was the death at La Charrette, on September 26, 1820, of Daniel Boone, who was buried nearby at Boone's Grave (q.v.). The original French form of the name seems to have been La Charrette, which was soon shortened to Charrette or Charette, and later took on the Americanized form of Sharrett or Sharrett Village. The curious circumstances that La Charrette was apparently known to Clark's companions, though not to Clark himself, as St. Johns raises the problem of whether the worthy sergeants had confused the place with St. Johns across the river, or whether in actual fact the Warren County settlement was so called at one time. For a full discussion of this difficult question, which is tied up with the exact location of the old Spanish fort known as "Fort San Juan del Misuri," see under Saint Johns in Franklin County. (L&C, & Pike, ed. Coues; L&C, and EWT, ed. Thwaites, pp. cited above; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 152, 956- 7; Conard I, 564; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 91, 95; Violette, MHR XXX, 442; H.J. Muench; Mrs. George Luppold; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Charrette Bend
Description:A turn in the Missouri River near the mouth of Charrette Creek, from which it takes its name. It is mentioned by Pike. (Pike, II, 365, ed. Coues)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Charrette Creek
Description:Rises in the southwest part of Hickory Grove Township, and flows through the central part of Charrette Township into the Missouri River. The name is also spelled Charette, Charet, Cherrette, and Chorette or Choritte. It also appears as Cherrette River. On the newly discovered Evans (or Mackay) Map of 1795 or 1796, it seems to be written "R. a Chorette," with the English rendering annexed "Charrette's River," though one cannot be entirely sure of the old handwriting. The Perrin du Lac Map of 1802 has "R. Charrette." When the Lewis and Clark Expedition passed on May 25, 1804, Clark writes in his original diary: "Camped at the mouth of a Creek called River a Chouritte," which is corrected in another hand to "La Charrette." As Coues notes in his edition of the Pike Expedition (II. 361), the name is written "Charette's village and creek" in the "Summary Statement of Rivers and Creeks" prepared later by Lewis, which shows it to have been a personal name. A reasonable conjecture may be advanced that this very early name is derived from Joseph Chorette, a French fur trader of St. Louis, who is mentioned in Trudeau's JOURNAL of 1795 as accompanying him on his expedition up the Missouri River, and as being drowned on July 10 of that year while swimming in the river. He was then 37 years old, and had for years been an active trader and trapper. His name as written in old documents has the variant forms Choret, Charet, and Charrette. (Evans, of Mackay, Map; Perrin du Lac; L&C, ed. Coues; L&C, ed. Thwaites; Pike, ed. Coues; Brown's GAZ,; 181; Wetmore; Campbell, 626; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5, 14; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1029; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; Miss Atchison's thesis under Rush Creek)
Source:Atchison, Anne. "Place Names Of Five West Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1937.

Place name:Charrette Township
Description:Bounded on the northeast by Hickory Grove Township, on the east by St. Charles County, on the west by Pinckney Township, on the south by the Missouri River, and on the northwest by Elkhorn Township. It was in this township that Flanders Callaway came to build his post, that Daniel Boone was buried, that the first church in this section of the country was established, and that the first permanent seat of justice was located. The early spelling of Charette has now given way to Charrette. It is named for Charrette Creek. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1029-30; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; COUNTY MAP 1908; F.W. Kehr; E.S. Aydelott; H.J. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chenal a Loutre
Description:See Loutre Slough.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cherette River
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cherrette Creek
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad
Description:Crosses the extreme northern part of Warren County, the southern half of Lincoln County, and the northern edge of St. Charles County to West Alton in this section. This great system of roads extends from Chicago westerly, reaching St. Paul and Minneapolis, St. Louis, Kansas City, Omaha, Denver, Cheyenne, Black Hills, South Dakota, and Billings, Montana. The railroad was organized in 1849. In June 1864, it was consolidated and since merged the Chicago, Burlington, & Northern; Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs Railroad; the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad commenced at Hannibal in the fall of 1851. It received one and a half million dollars worth of bonds in 1851 as a grant from the State Legislature. By the autumn of 1855, about 100 miles of road were in the process of construction. Although very little railroad building was done during the Civil War, the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad was completed; and except during 1862, it met its interest payments. In St. Charles and Lincoln Counties, the road forms a junction with the M.K. & T. Railroad, and runs northwest up the Mississippi River. In 1904 the road was built from Old Monroe to Mexico, Missouri. It forms a short line between St. Louis and Kansas City. It has been jointly used by the Burlington & Chicago & Alton Railroad for passenger service. The road was named for its terminal points. It is often called the Burlington Railroad, and was formerly known as the St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern Railroad. All names the railroad has borne have been given for termini on the railroad. (HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES, 228; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 404; RED BOOK 1913-14, 349; HIGHWAY MAPS, 1940; MHR Oct., 1920, 146-153; R. & I. COMPENDIUM, May 29, 1941, 54; Miss Welty's thesis; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; E.S. Aydelott; Andy J. Brown; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chorette Creek
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Choritte Creek
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clarks Hollow
Description:In the northeast part of Pinckney Township. It was named for the Clark family. (County Map 1908; E.C. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clear Branch
Description:Rises in the central-southern part of Pinckney Township and flows south into the Missouri River. It is so named on account of the clear water which flows over a rock channel. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Coleman Cemetery
Description:In the west-central part of Elkhorn Township, near Pendleton. The name is probably given for an early settler. (WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 11, 1908, 1
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:College Methodist Church
Description:A religious institution connected with the Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton. The former college church was Jubilee Chapel, or Jubilee Building, which was erected in 1886 at a cost of $15,000, and was so named for the rejoicing which was occasioned by the unprecedented era of prosperity which followed the separation of the college and the orphan asylum two years earlier. The term is Biblical. Moses directed that each fiftieth year should be observed as a year of "Jubilee" or rejoicing (Leviticus, Chap. 25). By 1912 or 1913 the chapel was becoming inadequate to serve the needs of the students and worshippers, so plans were made for a new modern church with necessary rooms. The new building was dedicated in April, 1913, as College Methodist Episcopal Church, New Church, or College Methodist Church. The last term is always used since the union of Methodist Churches in 1939 although the name was often used before this date. The names are given to show the relation of the church to Central Wesleyan College. (PORT. & BIOG. REC., 156; WARRENTON BANNER, June 5, 1914, 2-3; IBID., June 24, 1904, 8; IBID., Dec. 18, 1914; 19; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:College Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:See College Methodist Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Concord Hill
Description:A village in the southwest part of Charrette Township near Charrette Creek, about a mile northwest of Peers. It is on a hill, and it has been conjectured that the "Concord" part of the name was given because Concord grapes are much grown in the vicinity. More probably, however, it was the idea of concord that has made the name a general favorite in the United States, which has over forty Concords and Concordias in thirty different states, including one of each in Missouri. The village was formerly called Eckelkamp, or Ecklekamp's Post Office, in Honor of Joseph Eckelkamp, who was borm in Germany in 1830 and came to America when he was thirteen years old. In 1854 he came to this neighborhood from St. Louis and became a merchant. The post office of Ecklekamp was established in 1892. Shortly afterwards, however, when the M.K. & T. Railroad was completed some distance away, the importance of Ecklekamp declined. The post office was discontinued in 1895, and the same year one was established at Peers, which was on the new railroad. Mr. Ecklekamp became the first postmaster at Peers, where he was also president of the Henneken Garden Plow Clompany. A few years before 1895, his son Louis Ecklekamp associated himself with his father's business, and the present proprietor, Mr. H. Ecklekamp, is a descendant of Joseph Ecklekamp. (Postal Guide; PORT. & BIOG. REC., 283-4; COUNTY MAP 1908; COM. ATLAS 1936; HIGHWAY MAP, WARREN 1936; WARRENTON BANNER, Apr. 7, 1911, Dr. A.W. Ebeling; H. Ecklekamp; H.J. Muench; F.W. Kehr; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Concord Hill Church
Description:See St. Ignatius' Catholic Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Concord Hill School
Description:A village school at Concord Hill. It was organized before 1887 and named for the town. The building is rented to the Catholic Church. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cow Town
Description:See Holstein.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crow Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the northeast part of Elkhorn Township and flows northeast into the northern part of Hickory Grove Township and then east into Indian Camp Creek. It was probably named because there are so many crows in the vicinity. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Garrett Hollman)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cullom Branch
Description:Rises in the southeast part of Bridgeport Township and flows southeast into the Missouri River near Gore. It was named for Gram (Granvel?) Cullom, an early settler. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Mrs. George Luppold; E.C. Kehr; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Custer School
Description:See Upper Charrette School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Darden Creek
Description:See Dardenne Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardene River
Description:See Dardenne Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne Creek
Description:Once a splendid mill stream which rises in the southeastern part of Hickory Grove Township and flows east into St. Charles County, where it runs in a northeastern direction until it enters the Mississippi River in the northern part of the county. In the early documents the name appears as Dardonne Creek, Darden Creek, Dardenne River, or Dardonne River. In Houck's history of 1908, Dardene River is also found. Some authorities suggest that the name was derived from "Terre d' Inde," which they say means "Turkey Land." Since "Turkey Land" in French is "Terre des Dindons," the above explanation is not plausible. A better explanation is that the name was borrowed from the Dardenne family, early pioneers in the Mississippi Valley. "A Touissant Dardenne from Montreal, Canada, married Marie Francoise Lever, 'veuve de feu Michal Vieu,' at St. Anne de Fort Chartres, November 21, 1747. One of these Dardennes may have first camped and hunted on this creek and thus given it his name." One of the earliest settlers on the Dardenne was Jean Baptiste Blondeau, who was also found on the Perruque. (Wetmore; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 97; COUNTY MAP 1908; Hevenor, ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Mrs. George Luppold; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne River
Description:See Dardenne Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardonne Creek
Description:See Dardenne Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardonne River
Description:See Dardenne Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dean Hollow
Description:At the Gill Spinner Farm. It was so named because a Mr. Dean was murdered there by a negro, who was hanged for the crime about 1870 or 1875. (Buck Edwards)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Devil's Boot Cave
Description:A boot-shaped cave in the southern part of Charrette Township, two miles north of Marthasville. The top entrance to the "leg" of the "boot" is about 25 ft. across, and the "leg" itself is about 30 ft. deep. Tradition says that the Devil stepped into a hole and left the impression of his boot. Doubtless it was once an underground stream. The name is fanciful or humorous and is suggestive of the shape of the cave. (COUNTY MAP 1908; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 963; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; H.J. Muench; J.G. Wessendorf; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Devil's Den Hollow
Description:A side canyon on Lost Creek in the northeast part of Pinckney Township. The name is humorously descriptive. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 963; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Devil's Wash Basins
Description:Three washed out places in the rock in the southern part of Charrette Township. The formations are also called Wash Bowl Hollow. Both names are humorously descriptive. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick; F.W. Kehr; Mrs. George Luppold; Walter Rottman)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dreyer School
Description:A rural elementary school in the central part of Charrette Township, northwest of Hopewell. It was named for an old settler. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; H.J. Muench; J.G. Wessendorf; Oscar J. Luelf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Drunert Branch
Description:See Rock Branch.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Branch
Description:A tributary of Big Creek in the northeast part of Camp Branch Township, cf. above. (J.E. Harper)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Fork
Description:Rises in Elkhorn Township and flows south into Charrette Creek in Charrette Township. It is also known as Dry Fork of Charrette Creek. Both names are descriptive. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 962, 1065; COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; H.J. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Fork of Charrette Creek
Description:See Dry Fork.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Duden's Hill
Description:A high elevation in the southeast part of Charrette Township near Dutzow. This is the alleged spot where Gottfried Duden wrote his "Report," which appeared in Elberfeld in 1829 and was instrumental in inducing the first German settlers to come to this section. This "Report" was the first German account to somewhat accurately picture conditions in Missouri. Duden was born in Remscheid, Duchy of Berg, Rhine Province, Germany, in 1785. His father was a wealthy apothecary. Young Duden attended the Gymnasium at Dortmund and studied law in Dusseldorf, Heidelberg, and Goettingen from 1806-1810. He was a soldier of the Napoleonic Wars and was then Justice of the Peace in Muehlheim until 1823. He came to what is now Warren County in 1824 and lived there until 1827, the date of his rteturn to Germany. The hill was named in honor of Mr. Duden. (WARREN CENTENNIAL, 16; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914; 2; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; H.J. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dug Knob
Description:Mentioned by Mr. Wehmeyer but not otherwise identified. (A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Duke Creek
Description:See Tuque Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Duque Creek
Description:See Tuque Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dutton School House
Description:An early school located in the central part of Camp Branch Township, near Central Grove Church. The name is given for an early settler. (John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dutzow
Description:A town on the M.K. & T. Railroad in the southeast part of Charrette Township. It was laid out in 1835 by William Bock and has had a post office at least since 1876. Father Dames suggests that the early settlement here was named Dutzow for Gottfried Duden's native town in Pomerania, Germany, and offers as his authority, a Mr. Kenkel, of St. Louis, who gave this information to him at Washington, Missouri, in 1923. No such place appears on the German Map, at least today. The name may have been personal in origin. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1030; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 675; SOUVENIR ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CHURCH; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 1; Miss Minnie Totsch; H.J. Muench; Rev. J. Dames (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dyer Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the northern part of Elkhorn Township and flows northeast until it enters Camp Branch Township, where it goes north and east until it enters Big Creek in the southern part of Camp Branch Township. It was named for the Dyer families in the community. Dr. Coleman Dyer lived here. (COUNTY MAP 1908; William Van Studdiford; E.S. Aydelott; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; J.E. Harper)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:E.H. Winter Bridge
Description:A bridge which spans the Wabash Railroad tracks on Highway 47 in Warrenton. The structure is 126 ft. long and was built in 1928 at a cost of $22,000. It was named in honor of E.H. Winter, Lieutenant Governor of Missouri and a former resident of Warrenton. (WARRENTON BANNER, Nov. 16, 1928, 1; Ibid, Nov. 23, 1928, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eagle Fork
Description:See Big Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:East Fork of Camp Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the south-central part of Elkhorn Township and flows north into Camp Creek. It is so named for its location on the creek. (COUNTY MAP 1908; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ebenezer Baptist Church
Description:In the south-central part of Hickory Grove Township on Tuque Prairie. It was organized in 1886 by Rev. R.E. McQuie and dedicated in 1887. It was sold for taxes about May, 1940, and burned about October of the same year. The congregation has been disorganized since about 1931. Cf. above. (W.G. Davis; Miss Anna R. Sharp; Mrs. Perkins Pringle; Mrs. Allean Hasenjaeger)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ebenezer Methodist Church
Description:Probably located in the south-central part of Hickory Grove Township. It was built by John Owings, a veteran of the War of 1812, who came to Warren County in 1816 in a cart drawn by two horses, one before the other. He kept the cart for many years and used it on his farm. He had fifteen children and was a devout Methodist. The church has been gone since about 1871. A Biblical name; cf. above. (Bryan & Rose, 221; Mrs. Carrie Gerdemann; A.H. Jurgensmeyer)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eckelkamp
Description:See Concord Hill.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eckelkamp's Post office
Description:See Concord Hill.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eisenmayer Hall
Description:See Andrew Eisenmayer Hall.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elkhorn Township
Description:One of the original townships which is bounded on the north by Camp Branch Township, the southern corner of Montgomery and the southwest corner of Lincoln Counties, on the east by Hickory Grove Township, and on the south and west by Pinckney and Bridgeport Townships. It was established during the first session of court in August, 1822. No record or memory of the origin of the name could be discovered. But Elkhorn is rather a stock name for American places, being found in a dozen other states. Moreover, there is an Elkhorn Creek in Montgomery County to the west. Evidently the Missouri name is borrowed from some other place of that name. No doubt its original signification referred to the finding of elk or deer horns in the neighborhood. (Bryan & Rose, 76; Montgomery Atlas 1878; 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1065-66; Hevenor, Warren County)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Emmal's Sanitarium
Description:See Emmaus Institute.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Emmans Asylum for Epileptics and Idiots
Description:See Emmaus Institute.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Emmaus Asylum
Description:See Emmaus Institute.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Emmaus Creek
Description:A stream which flows west from the eastern border of Charrette Township. It was probably named for Emmaus Institute. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Benj. Frick; Mrs. George Luppold; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Emmaus Home
Description:See Emmaus Institute.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Emmaus Institute
Description:An Evangelical institution for epileptics in the northeast part of Charrette Township, northeast of Marthasville. In 1850 a seminary was founded here for the training of young men who wished to prepare for the ministry in the Evangelical Synod. This school was given the descriptive German name, Evangeliches Predigerseminar. By 1877 the school appears in the COUNTY ATLAS under the Anglicized cognomens, Missouri Evangelical College and German Lutheran College, which were also descriptive names. In 1883 the institution was closed on account of the opening of a new seminary in St. Louis. Ten years later the Evangelical Church repaired some of the former college buildings and used them to house a sanitatium for epileptics, feeble- minded, and insane. The place was renamed Emmans Asylum for Epileptics and Idiots. Other variations of the name have been Emmal's Sanitarium, Emmaus Asylum, and Emmaus Institute. The sanitarium is now known as Emmaus Institute, Emmaus Home, or Emmaus Asylum, although it is now devoted to the treatment of epileptics alone. There is a branch of this home at St. Charles. Both institutions are governed by the same board, but they have separate superintendents. All the names applied since the place has become a sanitarium have been given in honor of the Biblical name, Emmaus, which means "hot springs," a village near Jerusalem (LU. 24:13). (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 13; PORT. & BIOG. REC., 354; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; COUNTY MAP 1908; HIGHWAY MAP 1936; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Rev. G.A. Roedder)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Evangelical Church
Description:See Immanuel Evangelical and Reformed Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Evangelical Friedens Church
Description:See Friedens Evangelical and Reformed Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Evangelical-Harmonie Church
Description:See Harmonie Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Evangelical-Harmony Church
Description:See Harmonie Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Evangelisches Predigerseminar
Description:See Emmaus Institute.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fallen Timber Branch
Description:See Falling Timber Branch.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Falling Timber Branch
Description:Rises in the east-central part of Charrette Township and flows south into Charrette Creek, northwest of Marthasville. It was probably so named because of the cottonwoods which fell along the creek at an early day. "Falling" here has the sense of "fallen," a dialectal usage which is found exactly expressed in the slightly variant name Fallen Timber Branch, a name which is also used for the stream. (HIGHWAY MAP 1936; WARRENTON BANNER, Jan. 7, 1910, 1; H.J. Muench; E.C. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Faulconer Hotel
Description:See Old Faulconer Hotel.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Femme Osage Creek
Description:A creek that rises in southeastern Warren County, near the headwaters of the Dardenne and Perruque, and flows east through Femme Osage Township in St. Charles County, to empty into the Missouri River near Hamburg. This is one of the oldest and most puzzling French names in the state. It puzzled the exploreres of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, who passed its mouth on May 23, 1904, and they attempted to translate the French name in various ways, none of which seemed to have survived them. Clark writes (I. 27); "...to the mouth of a Creek on the Stbd. Side called Osage Womans R, about 30 yds. Wide, opposite a large Island and Settlement. On this creek 30 or 40 famlys are Settled." Floyd calls it "the wife of Osage River;" and Ordway (Quaife's ed., p. 80) says "passed the wife or faim of the Hoozaw River." For Ordway's spelling "Hoozaw" for Osage, cf. Whosau Trace, below. A fuller description of the stream is given by Lewis in his "Summary View of Rivers and Creeks" (VI. 30): "at the distance of nine miles higher up" (i.e., above Bonhomme Creek), "we pass the mouth of the OSAGE WOMAN'S river, which discharges itself on the north side; it is thirty yards wide at it's entrance, heads with two small streams which discharge themselves into the Mississippi a small distance from the mouth of the Illinois River, is navigable for perogues some miles during the spring season, and waters a fertile well timbered country inhabited by about fifty American families. This part of the country is generally called Boon's settlement, having derived its name from its first inhabitant Colo. Daniel Boon, a gentleman well known in the early settlement of the state of Kentucky." Cf. the note by the editor Thwaites: (I. 27) "The American settlement referred to...was the Kentucky colony recently founded on Femme Osage River, about six miles above its mouth; among these settlers was Daniel Boone, who in 1798 had obtained a grant of land there from the Spanish authorities, whereon he resided until 1804. His death occurred at Feeme Osage, on September 26, 1820." The original French name must, of course, have been much older than Lewis and Clark, although no earlier published example has been found. Its ultimate origin is, indeed, lost beyond recall. There have, of course, been imaginative attempts to supply an explanation, such as that the stream was named from the finding in it of the body of a drowned Osage squaw, or else that the French so named it because they saw an Indian woman there when they first reached its banks. Similar stories have been invented to explain the similar and equally early French names Bon Homme Creek and Bonne Femme Creek, for a nearby stream which also empties into the Missouri River. Very probably all three names were French translations of the original Indian appellations. (L&C, ed. Thwaites; Ordway JOURNAL, ed. Quaife; EWT. ed. Thwaites; Conard II, 422; Barns, 173; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 681; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Miss Leech's thesis; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Femme Osage River
Description:See Femme Osage Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fitz School
Description:See Martin School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Forest Grove School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Charrette Township. It is so named because it is in the edge of an oak grove or forest which contains 300 or 400 acres of timber. (83RD REPORT; Mrs. Allean Hasenjaeger; Forrest W. Hughes; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fort Clemison
Description:See Fort Clemson.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fort Clemson
Description:A military post on Loutre I., in the southwest part of Bridgeport Township. Captain James Clemson (or Clemison) commanded a company of mounted U.S. soldiers who built the fort under his supervision probably in 1808, although one authority delays the building until 1812. The fort covered one-half acre. From about 1808 until 1816 there was quite a colony here. From it came the settlers for Boone's Lick in Howard County. Thomas Massey came to the fort in 1809. Captain Clemson maintained it until after the War of 1812-1815. It was abandoned some time afterward because it was too remote from the main settlements. It was named for Captain Clemson, who was also instrumental in the building of Fort Osage in Jackson County. He was a second of Charles Lucas in a duel with Thomas H. Benton. The name also appears as Fort Clemison. (Pike II, 397, ed. Coues; Barns, 172; Bryan & Rose, 95; Stevens I, 154)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fort San Juan del Misuri
Description:See Saint Johns.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Frank's Branch
Description:A stream at Case, in the southern part of Bridgeport Township. The name is evidently a personal one. The creek is sometimes called Boar Creek, a name which is apparently given for the animal. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1064; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Freedom Church
Description:An early Baptist Church which stood on Loutre Island. The name is doubtless idealistic. (Duncan, 205, 573; Miss Anna R. Sharp)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:French Trail
Description:An early road which led from St. Charles to old Charrette. It was so named because it was used by the early French settlers. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Friedens Evangelical and Reformed Church
Description:In Warrenton. The institution was organized in 1877 or 1888. Some of the original members were: John G. Schrantz, Mrs. John G. Schrantz, Fred Fahrmeyer, Mrs. Fred Fahrmeyer, Fritz Sievert, Mrs. Fritz Sievert, James Drewer, Mrs. James Drewer, and William Fahrmeyer. The church was known as Evangelical Friedens Church until 1936 when the Evangelical synod united with the Reformed Church and the resultant church was named the Friedens Evangelical and Reformed Church, a name which shows the union of the two churches. "Friedens" is the genetive case of the German "Friede," peace, tranquillity, --an idealistic name. (Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 666; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Rev. G.A. Roedder)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Friendship Church
Description:See Union Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Garrett Cemetery
Description:In the southeast part of Camp Branch Township near Palmyra Church. This is evidently a personal name, for there are Garretts in Warren County. (WARRENTON BANNER, Apr. 16, 1909, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Geiers Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the southeast part of Bridgeport Township and flows south into the Missouri River. It was named in honor of the Geiers family. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Benj. Frick; William Van Studdiford)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gerdemann School
Description:See Upper Charrette School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gerdemann's Store
Description:In the northwest part of Elkhorn Township, near Pendleton. The place has been under the management of the same family for about ninety years. The store was established between 1850 and 1853 by Herman Henry Gerdemann (or Gerdeman), who was born in Prussia on January 6, 1821. He came to America at the age of seventeen and located in St. Charles County. In 1850 he came to Warren County and settled on the Boone's Lick Road near Pendleton. Shortly afterward, he established the original Gerdemann Store on Camp Creek about one mile west of the present store. In 1877 the business was moved to the new site. He operated the store until 1887. His son, Edward Gerdemann managed the place from 1887 until 1916; and his grandsons, Marion and Carl Gerdemann, supervised it from 1916 until the poresent. The grandfather died in 1904 and the son about 1921. Although Williams spells the name "Gerdeman's Store," the Gerdemanns prefer the spelling "Gerdemann's Store." (COUNTY MAP 1908; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 676; WARRENTON BANNER, Jan. 6, 1904; Forrest W. Hughes; Mrs. Belle Gerdemann; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gerdeman's Store
Description:See Gerdemann's Store.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:German Church
Description:See Immanuel Evangelical and Reformed Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:German Evangelical Church
Description:At Marthasville. It was organized in 1864 with Herman Branns, Fred. Budke, Herman Schulte, Henry Hilgedick, and others as members. A frame building was constructed in 1864. The name is apparently descriptive of the nationality of the congregation. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1011-1012)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:German Evangelical Congregation of Lippstadt
Description:At Lippstadt in Elkhorn Township. Reverend John Will is said to have begun his missionary labors here shortly before 1850. The probable date of organization was 1848, a date supplied by the church records, although other authorities vary from Pentecost Monday, 1853, until soon after the Civil War. About 1856, the original building was moved about two miles south of its first location and rededicated. The first bell was brought in 1863 and inscribed "Rev. John Will: Einigkeit macht stark"--"Unity makes strong." The cornerstone for the present brick building was laid June 13, 1877. The instituion is also known as the Lippstadt Church. Both names are descriptive. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1012; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 667; WARRENTON BANNER, Oct. 12, 1928, I; Rev. G.A. Roedder; William Hollenbeck)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:German Evangelical Friedens Germeinde
Description:See Wright City Evangelical Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:German Lutheran College
Description:See Emmaus Institute.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gibson School
Description:A rural grade school in the northern part of Hickory Grove Township, northeast of Wright City. It was named for a Gibson family, probably that of W. Gibson, who owned land here in 1877. It has also been known as the Schwier School for a Schwier family, doubtless that of Henry Schwier, who owned land here in 1901. Although local authorities seem to think that Schwier was the former name, the atlases prove otherwise. Perhaps both names are in current use. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 17; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gilkey School
Description:See Godt Spring School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Goat Ranch
Description:A farm in the central-north part of Bridgeport Township, in Lepp Hollow. It was so named because its 1500 or more acres of land were used for goat pasture. (George Elmore)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Goat Spring School
Description:See Godt Spring School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Goddin Island
Description:See Rush Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Godt Spring School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Hickory Grove Township. It was formerly known as Gilkey School in honor of a Mr. Gilkey who gave the land for the original site. The present schoolhouse was built in 1918 when the Gilkey School was moved 1/2 mile to Godt Springs, a location more nearly in the center of the district. Since that date the school has been known as Godt Spring School for the springs of that name. It is sometimes spelled Goat Spring School, an obvious folk etymology. It has also been known as Pleasant Hill School, a descriptive and idealistic name. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Garrett Hollman)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Godt Springs
Description:In the northwest part of Hickory Grove Township, northwest of Wright City, on Indian Camp Creek. It was named for the Godt families. (Benj. Frick; Mrs. Anna Schaper; William Van Studdiford; Garrett Hollman)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gofeld
Description:A post office in the eastern part of Pinckney Township which was established in 1900 but discontinued by 1904. Mrs. W. Schmidt says it was originally Hofelt and then Gofelt, but no other authority has listed these names. The source of the name could not be discovered. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; F.W. Kehr; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. W. Schmidt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gofelt
Description:See Gofeld.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gore
Description:A village in the southeast part of Bridgeport Township, on Loutre Slough, about two miles downstream from Case (q.v.). It has had a post office since 1894. The river landing there or nearby was known as Gunboat Landing, and Gunboat seems to have been an earlier name for Gore itself. It was a humorous nickname, said to have been taken from a nearby tavern. It is possible that the name Gore, for which no other source has been discovered, was a similar nickname for the "red" liquor which seems to have flowed freely in the old days all along Loutre Slough; such names as the "Bucket of Blood" or the like for a saloon were common in the frontier. Cf. the name Slingtown, probably for the neighboring rivertown now known as Case (q.v.); see also under Bridgeport, above. (COUNTY MAP 1908; HIGHWAY MAP 1936; BROWN'S MANUAL FOR MISSOURI, 903; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. A.W. Ebeling; E.C. Kehr; George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gore School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Bridgeport Township. It was probably named for the town. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gotting School
Description:See Case School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grand Canyon
Description:An unusual topographical formation in the center part of Charrette Township, on Charrette Creek, near American Legion Hall. It was so named for its fancied resemblance to the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River. (E.C. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grange Hall
Description:A building which once stood in the southern part of Camp Branch Township, near Dyer Branch. It was so named on account of the grange meetings held there. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 39; COUNTY MAP 1908; Miss Lula May Schulze; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; E.S. Aydelott)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Green Building
Description:See the Old Green Building.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Green Gables
Description:A filling station in the southern part of Charrette Township, south of Marthasville. It was built in 1936 and named for its green, gabled roof. The name may have been suggested by the title of the novel, ANNE OF GREEN GABLES, by Lucy Maud Montgomery, published in 1908, which was extremely popular in the Middle West. (G.H. Mittler)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Greenhill School
Description:See Happy Hill School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Groveland
Description:See Lake Farm.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gunboat
Description:See Gore.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gunboat Landing
Description:See Gore.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hancock's Bottom
Description:A lowland in the southern part of Charrette Township, near Marthasville, and in the southwestern portion of Femme Osage Township, near Augusta. It was settled by William and Benjamin Hancock and named for them. William Hancock was a pioneer of both Kentucky and Missouri and came to what is now Warren County about 1798. He was a jovial man. He and Anthony Wyatt and David Darst are said to have made a trip to a Mississippi River town where they decided to earn a little extra money. They showed David Darst a wild man of the forest and realized a tidy compensation for their efforts. Wyatt and Hancock were both candidates for the Legislature, but the election resulted in a tie. A second ballot was taken, but still the tie remained. Hancock withdrew, and Wyatt accepted the office. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 143, 235, 959, 1030; COUNTY MAP 1908; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 660; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 1; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad
Description:See Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Happy Hill School
Description:In the extreme northeast part of Camp Branch Township, northeast of Morsey. It was established about 1903 or 1904 when the Burlington Railroad was built and the Greenhill District was divided into New Truxton and Happy Hill. Happy Hill is an idealistic name of location. Greenhill School is also a descriptive name. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; E.S. Aydelott; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Happy Hollow
Description:A low area in the extreme northern part of Bridgeport Township, one-half mile south of Jonesburg. It was so named because this rugged region was formerly the scene of a thriving "moonshine" liquor business which caused its patrons to become "happy." (Buck Edwards)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Harmonie Church
Description:A rural church in Hickory Grove Township, southeast of Pitts. The congregation was organized in the fall of 1843 as Evangelical- Harmony (Harmonie) Church. The original members were: George H. Wahlbrink, Dr. Brandt, E. Theermann, H.H. Kirkhof, F. Waltsmath, Henry Bockhorst, E.H. Subre, and others. It was also known as Harmony Church or Harmonie Church, idealistic terms. "Harmonie" follows the German spelling of the word. The church is also known as Strack's Church in honor of the colorful Karl Strack, who came from Germany and preached very liberal sermons here for about forty years. He is also said to have founded the church. Formerly, the church was independent, but it now belongs to the Evangelical Synod. It also sometimes bears the name Strack's Evangelical Church in honor of its illustrious founder. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1011; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 667; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 29, 1911, 1; IBID., June 7, 1912, 1; IBID., Dec. 18, 1914, 28; Rev. G.A. Roedder; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; William Van Studdiford; H.J. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Harmony Church
Description:See Harmonie Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Harper School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Camp Branch Township, about six miles north of Warrenton on Highway 47. It was named for Allen Smith Harper (Dec. 30, 1835 - Jan. 28, 1915), who helped organize the school about 1876. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; J.E. Harper; F.W. Kehr; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Henley's Hollow
Description:A valley in the western part of Charrette Township, along a tributary of the Dry Fork of Charrette Creek. No positive reason for its name has been found, but it was probably so named for an early settler. (COUNTY MAP 1908)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Branch
Description:A tributary of Big Creek about five or six miles northeast of Warrenton. The name is probably descriptive. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 964)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Grove
Description:A post office in the eastern part of Hickory Grove Township. The first post office in the county was established here in 1823 and was kept by Nathan Pringle. It was in existence as late as 1837, but was not listed by Hayward in 1853. Old settlers say it has been gone since about 1870 or earlier. It was so named for Hickory Grove Prairie or for the hickory groves in this region. (Wetmore; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; Perkins Pringle; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; William Hollenbeck; W. Schmidt; John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Grove Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the central-east part of Hickory Grove Township and flows north into Perruque Creek. It was probably so named for Hickory Grove Prairie. (COUNTY MAP 1908; William Hollenbeck; W. Schmidt; John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Grove Prairie
Description:A level region in the eastern part of Hickory Grove Township near Hickory Grove. Cf. above. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1014; William Hollenbeck; Benj. Frick; Perkins Pringle; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Grove Settlement
Description:An early colony in the eastern part of Hickory Grove Township probably on the Boone's Lick Road. The settlement was made in 1819 when four families, those of Norman Pringle, Hiram Shaw, David Sherman, and Enoch Perkins came to this region. Pringle and Sherman reared large families. It was probably so named for the prairie. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; Benj. Frick; Perkins Pringle)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Grove Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Montgomery County, on the east by St. Charles County, on the south by Charrette Township, and on the west by Elkhorn and Charrette Townships. It was set off from Elkhorn Township in 1839, or six years after the county was organized. John Chambers, an Irishman, who first located in St. Louis County in 1798, was later an early settler in the township. His sons, Thomas and Alexander were soldiers in the War of 1812. The township was named either for Hickory Grove, the post office, or for Hickory Grove Prairie. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1120; COUNTY MAP 1908; Perkins Pringle; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Lick Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the southern part of Elkhorn Township and flows northeast and north through the township until it enters Lincoln County. The name is descriptive. (COUNTY MAP 1908)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hines Bank
Description:See Hine's Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hine's Mine
Description:A coal mine in the northwest part of Elkhorn Township, five or six miles northeast of Warrenton on Big Creek. It was also called Hines Bank; and was named for a Mr. Hines, who was presumable the owner. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 964, 1065; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 10; William Van Studdiford; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hofelt
Description:See Gofeld.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hollman's Cave
Description:A natural formation in the southeast part of Camp Branch Township. It was named for a Mr. Hollman, probably William Hollman, who owned the land there. (Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hollman's Store
Description:A second post office and store named Hollman's Store and located in Steinhagen. It succeeded the post office and store of the same name operated by William Hollman (See Hollman's Store); but it was owned by Judge August Hollman, a brother of the former. Judge Hollman was born in Minden, Prussia, Germany, in 1841 and came to America at the age of five. He enlisted in the Missouri Cavalry in the Civil War and served two terms as Judge of the County Court. He died in 1922. The store was named for him. (Campbell, 627; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; WARRENTON BANNER, Mar. 3, 1922; 1; Mrs. Ed Schulze; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; J.E. Harper)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hollman's Store
Description:A general store and post office in the southwest part of Camp Branch Township. The post office was established by 1876 and discontinued by 1891 when it was succeeded by another store and post office of the same name but different management. The first Hollman's Store was named for its owner, William Hollman, who sold his business in the late 1880s or early 1890s and went to California. The name was also sometimes spelled Holman's Store. (Campbell, 627; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914; 17; Mrs. Ed. Schulze; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; J.E. Harper)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Holman's Store
Description:See Hollman's Store.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Holstein
Description:A town in the southwest part of Charrette Township. It was formerly known as Lehmberg's Store. Ernest Lehmberg was the first merchant at the site, and established a store there in 1843. He was born in Westphalia, Germany, October 18, 1807. He married Miss Charlotta Tiamann on March 3, 1837, and came to what is now Warren County in that year. He was the first postmaster at the new community, and held the position for thirty years. He was also one of the twelve founders of the Holstein Evangelical Church. Goodwin lists the post office as Holstein in 1867. It is said by some authorities to have been named for the province of Holstein, Germany, by early settlers who came from there. The important northern province of Holstein, which formerly belonged to Denmark, was annexed by Prussia in 1867. It is perhaps the most famous for its breed of large black and white dairy cattle known as Holsteins, and this may have had something to do with the name, for there are many cattle of that breed in the section. The local pronunciation of the name has been Americanized. It is possible that the town was named, not for the German province, but for H. Holstein, who with his brother-in-law, William Kunze, built the mills at Holstein in 1871 and operated them for ten years, according to the BIOG. RECORD. Ernest Lehmberg, the founder, did not come from Holstein but from Westphalia. However, the dates would indicate that it was named Holstein before Mr. Holstein came. Another early settler, Frederick Kock (for whom cf. Kock's Branch, below), was also a native of Germany, part unknown. The nickname Cow Town is also applied to the place, evidently on account of the association of the name, Holstein. (Goodwin; Eaton; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1030, 1042-3; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 675; PORT. & BIOG. REC., 324; 972; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Holstein High School
Description:A third-class high school at Holstein. It is named for the town. Holstein School, for the lower grades, is in the same building. (87TH REPORT; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Holstein School
Description:See Holstein High School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Holy Rosary Church
Description:See Holy Rosary Parish.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Holy Rosary Parish
Description:A Catholic church at Truesdale. In the early 1860s, a Jesuit father held services here. Among its early members were: Michael Kelly, Michael McShane, Patrick Ryan, and Thomas Ryan. The first church was erected in 1868. This building continued in service until 1882 when it was sold and another church was built at this time under the pastorate of Rev. Father Head, who was quite resourceful in filling his appointments. He is said to have owned an old-fashioned hand-car which he used to carry him down the railroad track from one church to another. In this manner he is reported to have been able to make two or three churches each day. The church was formerly known as St. Mary's Catholic Church and was so named for the Blessed Virgin. Later the name was changed to Holy Rosary Church or Holy Rosary Parish in honor of the Catholic sacred aid to prayer. This change was probably made to avoid confusion with the many other Catholic churches named for the Virgin. (PORT. & BIOG. REC., 515; WARRENTON BANNER, May 14, 1920, 1; Father W.B. Sommerhauser; Father Michael A. Channing (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hoozaw River
Description:See Femme Osage Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hopewell
Description:A village in the west-central part of Charrette Township. It was one of the first settled towns in the county, but the exact date of settlement is not known. It was established by 1876 as Hopewell Academy to distinguish it from Hopewell in Washington County. The post office of this name was discontinued sometime between 1904 and 1910. Hopewell is a stock name for American towns and may have been borrowed from any one of the Hopewells in a dozen different states. The ultimate origin must have been idealistic. The choice of "Academy" may have been made because it is thought that an academy was proposed here about the time of the establishment of the post office, but the school was never built. It is now usually known as Hopewell, although the longer form is sometimes still heard. This shortening is a natural one since there is no longer any post office to cause confusion. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 27; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1030; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; COUNTY MAP 1908; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 675; F.E. Buescher)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hopewell Academy [1 of 2]
Description:See Hopewell School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hopewell Academy [2 of 2]
Description:See Hopewell.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hopewell School
Description:An elementary school in the west-central part of Charrette Township, near the village of Hopewell, for which it is named. It is also known as Hopewell Academy, the earlier name for Hopewell. No academy was ever here. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; 83RD REPORT; Walter Rottman; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Horse Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the northeast part of Charrette Township and flows southeast into Charrette Creek. It is the present Anglicized form of the original name, Horst, which was given in honor of a Mr. Horst (or possibly Hearst). (COUNTY MAP 1908; Benj. Frick; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Horst Creek
Description:See Horse Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Howard Branch
Description:See West Fork of Dry Charrette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hughes School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Hickory Grove Township. It was named for Thomas Hughes on whose land the school was built. He died about 1893. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Forrest W. Hughes)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Immanuel Evangelical and Reformed Church
Description:A church at Holstein. The institution was organized about 1848 as a result of the efforts of Joseph Riegen. The congregation first worshipped in a log building which burned in 1855, but a new church was erected the same year. In 1884 this structure was torn down and replaced by a new brick building. During its early history, it was generally known as the Evangelical Church, a descriptive name. Since 1936 when the Evangelical and Reformed Churches united, it has been called the Immanuel Evangelical and Reformed Church. Immanuel is a Biblical name for Christ and means "God be with us" (cf. MAT. 1:23). It is also called the German Church for the nationality of most of its congregation. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1011, 1046, 1047; Rev. G.A. Roedder; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Camp Creek
Description:A large stream which rises in the eastern part of Elkhorn Township and runs north and east into Hickory Grove Township, east into St. Charles, and then into Lincoln County, emptying into the Cuivre River. During 1810 and for several years following, many settlers came to what is now Warren County. At this time Nathan Clever and James Dickson settled on this creek about five miles northeast of Wright City. The stream is also known as Indian Creek, Camp Creek, or Camp Branch. All names are given for the Indian camp which was once along the creek. (Campbell, 626; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 10; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 959; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; COUNTY MAP 1908; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 661; Hevenor, LINCOLN COUNTY John Mason; Forrest W. Hughes; W. Schmidt; William Hollenbeck)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Camp Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the northeastern part of Warren County and flows into Big Creek in the northwestern part of St. Charles County. It is named for a former Indian camp. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 131; Mrs. P.O. Foristell)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Cemetery
Description:In the southeast part of Charrette Township. It is doubtless so named for the Indians, who once had a settlement in this section. (COUNTY MAP 1908; E.C. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:See Indian Camp Creek
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Village
Description:An Indian camp which was once in the center part of Charrette Township on Tuque Creek. Cf. above. (E.C. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Isle a Loutre
Description:See Loutre Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Isle au Boeuf
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Isle aux Boeufs
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:J. Louis Kessler Hall
Description:A building at Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton. It was so named in honor of J. Louis Kessler, teacher of theology and philosophy, who was fatally injured in his attempt to extinguish the fire which burned the Old Ladies Home on the night of commencement in June, 1893. The shortened name, Kessler Hall, is also used. (PORT. & BIOG. REC., 370; WARRENTON BANNER, June 24, 1904, 1, 8; IBID., Dec. 18, 1914, 19; Mrs. Anna Schaper)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Johnson School
Description:See Martin School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Johnson's School House
Description:See Martin School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jones
Description:A post office in the southern part of Charrette Township. It was established in 1899 and discontinued between 1904 and 1910. It is probably a family name; cf. Jones School. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jones Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the extreme southwest part of Pinckney Township and flows southwest into the extreme southeast corner of Bridgeport Township, where it enters the Missouri River. It may have been named for an early settler, possibly James Jones, for whom Jonesburg just across the border in Montgomery County is named, for W.P.H. Jones, owner of Jones Landing in Montgomery County, or for Giles Jones, an Englishman who settled in Warren County in 1817. Dr. Jones was married to Minerva Callaway, daughter of Flanders Callaway, and grand-daughter of Daniel Boone. He was a celebrated physician who took a prominent part in ferreting out the counterfeiters and horse thieves which infested the county from 1815 until 1844 when the "Slicker" organization stopped marauding. The fierce measures Dr. Jones used in dealing with the gang incurred their enemity. January 22, 1842, he was shot and killed in his own yard by an assassin who was concealed in the woods near his home. The guilty person was never apprehended. The "Slickers" were so named because of their manner of inflicting punishment. They tied the culprit to a tree and then "slicked" or whipped him with hickory withes. (COUNTY MAP, 1908; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 1; Miss Leech's thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jones School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Camp Branch Township. It was probably built about 1865 or 1870 and was named for the Jones families who lived near the school. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; J.E. Harper; F.W. Kehr; Lula May Schulze)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jubilee Building
Description:See College Methodist Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jubilee Chapel
Description:See College Methodist Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kennedy's Fort
Description:A military post in the north-central part of Hickory Grove Township, one and a half miles southeast of Wright City. It was named for Major Thomas Kennedy, a soldier of the Revolutionary War, who settled in the township in 1808 or 1809 and built the fort in 1811 or 1812 to serve as protection against the Indians in the War of 1812. The fort was one of the most noted places of the period. Major Kennedy's experience as a leader made him a valuable man among the little group of settlers, and he planned well for their welfare and safety. He was a county judge and a member of the legislature. (Bryan & Rose, 205, 218; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 17; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 152, 958, 1120-21; COUNTY MAP 1908; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 137; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 672; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 1; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kessler Hall
Description:See J. Louis Kessler Hall.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kite School
Description:See Cedar Grove School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kite's Bridge
Description:A former historic landmark in the center part of Charrette Township, near the present site of the American Legion Hall. It was named for Martin Kite, a Virginian, who came to Warren County in 1835 and built a mill that year (cf. Kite's Mill). (Bryan & Rose, 218; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5, 9; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1031; Benj. Frick; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kite's Mill
Description:A mill that once stood in the southern part of Charrette Township, on Charrette Creek. It was named in honor of Martin Kite, for whom cf. above. The lumber from which most of the flat-boats of that period were built was sawed at Kite's Mill. (Bryan & Rose, 218; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5, 9; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1031; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 1; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Klusmeier's Landing
Description:A landing place on the Missouri River in the central-southern part of Pinckney Township. It was evidently named for a Mr. Klusmeir (or Klusmeier), probably H. Klausmeir, who owned the land in 1877. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5, 31; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kock's Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the southeast part of Pinckney Township and flows south into the drainage ditch. The creek formerly entered Schlapper's Lake. It is named for the Kock family. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kosse's Store
Description:See Coonz's Fort.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Krueger's Bluff
Description:A natural formation in the northeast corner of Charrette Township. It is named for its owner, Herman Krueger, of near Hopewell. (Mrs. Anna Schapper; Oscar J. Luelf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kruegerville
Description:A town located in the southern part of Pinckeny Township, on the north bank of the Missouri River. It stood on the former site of the old town of Pinckney, (also known as Pinkney, Pinckney, Pinckney Landing, or Pinckney's Landing, and Pickneyville), which was the first seat of justice in what is now Warren County. Pinckney was the county seat of Montgomery County, which then included the present territory of Warren. The land upon which Pinckney was built was first deeded to John Meek by the Spanish government, but later reverted to the United States. The town was laid off in 1819, and Pinckney was named for Miss Atossa Pinckney Sharp, daughter of Benjamin Sharp, the first clerk of the county and circuit courts of Montgomery County. She married Captain John Wyatt, a soldier of the War of 1812. The various forms of the name were descriptive of the various stages in the growth of the town. It remained the county seat from 1818 to 1824. Not many years after 1824, Pinckney disappeared, most of the original site having fallen into the Missouri River. Pinckney's successor, Kruegerville, was organized about 1885 or 1886, and occupied what was left of the old site. The new name was taken from the Krueger family, prominent residents. The post office there was established in 1885 and discontinued by 1910, the new town having gone the way of the old one. It has entirely disappeared since 1911. To be distinguished is the other Pinckney (q.v.), about four miles from the original site, which borrowed the name of the former town. (Thwaites, EWT XXII, 240; Pike, ed. Coues II, 365; Campbell, 628; Postal Guide; Bryan & Rose, 205, 228; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 960, 1059; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 663-4; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Oscar J. Luelf; Benj. Frick; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kruegerville School
Description:An elementary school in the northwest part of Pinckney Township. It was named for the town. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:La Charette
Description:See Charrette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:La Charrette [1 of 2]
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:La Charrette [2 of 2]
Description:See Charrette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ladies Home
Description:See Old Ladies Home.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ladies' Home
Description:A woman's dormitory at Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton. It was erected in 1893 to replace the Old Ladies Home burned in June of that year. The new dormitory was remodeled in 1910. It contains rooms for fifty women and has a dining room with a capacity of 150. The name is descriptive. (WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1814, 19)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Creek
Description:A historic stream which flows into the southeastern part of Charrette Township from St. Charles County. It is misspelled Lick Creek on the 1908 map, but it has long been known as Lake Creek as proved by a letter written by Gottfried Duden in 1825. It is so named because high water sometimes forms lakes in the low places. (Campbell, 627; HIGHWAY MAP 1936; MHR XII, 258; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Creek School
Description:A rural grade school in the southeast part of Charrette Township. It was named for Lake Creek (q.v.). (83RD REPORT; Walter Rottman; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Farm
Description:In the northwest part of Elkhorn Township. So named because it has a twenty-acre pond or lake on it. This lake was formerly known as Tank Pond, now McNair's Lake (q.v.), because it was used until recently as a watering place for the Wabash Railroad. The farm was formerly called Tank Farm, from the pond. Since the railroad has ceased to use it, about five years ago, it has acquired the somewhat more high-sounding name of Lake Farm. Still earlier it was known as Groveland, a descriptive name conferred by its owner Dr. Thomas J. McNair. He acquired the property, then a farm of 1,100 acres, in 1871, but left it and moved to California by 1890. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1107; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Latin Settlement
Description:An early community in the southwest part of the county settled by highly educated men, "Akademikers," led by Frederick Muench, a pastor, and Paul Follenius, a lawyer. This society was influential in bringing many German settlers to the county in the 1830s and perhaps later. It was doubtless so named because of their delight in Latin as a language of culture. (Culmer, 256-257; Herman J. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Legamann Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the southeast part of Charrette Township and flows south, and then southeast, into Tuque Creek southeast of Marthasville. It is named for the numerous Legamann families here. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lehmberg's Store
Description:See Holstein.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lepp Hollow
Description:A depressed area in the central-north part of Bridgeport Township. It was named for a Lepp family who formerly owned the land which now belongs to the T.W. Garland Association. (WARRENTON BANNER, Nov. 26, 1915, 1; George Elmore)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Liberty Grove School
Description:A rural school in the east-central part of Charrette Township. The name is idealistic. (83RD REPORT; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; F.W. Kehr; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lichte School
Description:In the northeast part of Pinckney Township, on Pinckney Road. Named for Julius Lichte, who was born in Pinckeny Township in 1855 and was the eldest son of Hermann and Caroline (Smeder) Lichte, who were natives of Germany. Julius Lichte gave the land for the school in 1883. Formerly known as Polston School in honor of James Polston, who came from Kentucky and resided in Warren County from 1860 until 1884. (PORT. & BIOG. REC., 504; 83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Mrs. W. Schmidt; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lick Creek
Description:See Lake Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lierman Cave
Description:A large cave on the top of a high hill in the western part of Charrette Township, three miles west of Holstein. It was formerly a hiding place for bears, panthers, etc. Jno. Wyatt, one of the earliest settlers, is said to have tracked a bear to the entrance of this cave. It was named for Ernst Liermann who owned the cave in 1885. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1025; COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lily Dale
Description:See Pendleton.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lime Kiln School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Elkhorn Township. The present building was built about 1876 and was so named for an old lime kiln in this district. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Mrs. Anna Schaper; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lippestadt
Description:See Lippstadt Community.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lippstadt Church
Description:See German Evangelical Congregation of Lippstadt.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lippstadt Community
Description:A German settlement in the extreme southern part of Elkhorn Township. It was so named because the early settlers came from the province of Lippe-Detmold in Germany. They spoke Low German and originally spelled the name Lippestadt. Lippe or Lippe-Detmold is a small German principality lying between Westphalia and Hanover. Lippstadt is a neighboring city in Westphalia on the Lippe River. Also known as Lippstadt. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1034; ENCY. BRIT., 11th Ed.; Rev. G.A. Roedder; Benj. Frick; William Hollenbeck; Mrs. Anna Schaper; E.S. Aydelott; W. Schmidt; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lippstadt School
Description:A grade school in the west-central part of Elkhorn Township. It is named for Lippstadt. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Litchel's Lake
Description:An artificial fish-lake in the south-central part of Hickory Grove Township. It covers two and a half or three acres and was named for Mr. Litchel, a St. Louis merchant, who built the lake since the World War. (Forrest W. Highes; George Davis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Bear Creek
Description:A tributary of South Bear Creek (q.v.) in the southwest part of Bridgeport Township. It borrows its name from the larger stream which is usually called Bear Creek. This Bear Creek is to be distinguished from the one in Hickory Grove Township, better known as Perruque Creek. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Bethel Church
Description:An early Baptist Church in the northwest part of Camp Branch Township, near Lincoln County. It was organized about 1843 as Camp Creek Baptist Church and was named for its position on the creek. It was later called Little Bethel Church in honor of the Biblical Bethel. The original Bethel meant "house of God" and was a little village twelve miles north of Jerusalem (GEN. 28:19). The adjective "Little" may have been used to describe the congregation or to save confusion with Bethel Baptist Church in a nearby county. (Duncan, 205; William Van Studdiford; John Mason; Mrs. J.E. Harper; J.E. Harper)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Camp Creek
Description:A stream which rises in Montgomery County and flows into the southwest part of Warren County, then north and northeast until it enters Camp Creek in the northwest part of the county. The name is descriptive. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; William Van Studdiford)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Charrette Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in the southeast part of Elkhorn Township and runs southeast until it enters Charrette Creek, for which it is named. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Dardenne Creek
Description:A branch of Dardenne Creek in Hickory Grove Township. It is also sometimes known as Sweet Water Creek. Both names are descriptive. (Perkins Pringle)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Loss Creek
Description:See Little Lost Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Lost Creek
Description:A small stream which rises south of Pendleton and flows southwest into Loss or Lost Creek near the western part of Pinckney Township. It is so named because it is a branch of Loss or Lost Creek. Both names seem to be used. (Campbell, 626; Walmsley, 424; Mrs. George Luppold; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frack)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Rocky Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the center part of Hickory Grove Township and flows north into Perruque Creek. The name is descriptive. (COUNTY MAP 1908; William Hollenbeck)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Village
Description:A settlement in Elkhorn Township, about four miles east of Warrenton and on Highway 40. It is named for its small size. (Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Locust Grove School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Hickory Grove Township, west of Wright City. It was probably so named for a grove which is thought to have formerly been here. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Forrest W. Hughes)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Logan Courthouse
Description:A post office in 1837. Caleb Williams was postmaster at that time. The origin of the name is unknown, although a William Logan settled on Tuque Creek in 1810 or shortly thereafter and his brothers, Hugh and Alexander and Henry Logan, settled near Marthasville, about the same time. (Wetmore; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Loss Creek
Description:See Lost Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lost Creek
Description:Rises in the southern part of Elkhorn Township and flows southwest through Pinckney Township into Bridgeport Township, emptying into the Missouri River. Lost Creek is a descriptive name, probably given because the stream runs partially underground in places and is easily lost from view. The variant Loss Creek reflects a common phonetic loss in Missouri pronunciation, as in "eas'" for east, "wes'" for west, "ghos'" for ghost, etc. Other earlier variant names for the stream were Bryant Creek, found as early as 1801, of unknown origin, probably personal (perhaps for some member of the Bryan family; see Bryan cemetery); and Ramsey Creek, for Captain William Ramsey. Captain Ramsey was a Revolutionary soldier at the Battle of Yorktown, and commanded a company of rangers in the Indian fighting during the War of 1812. He made a settlement here in 1799, known as Ramsey's Lick, where he had a hunting camp. (Wetmore; Bryan & Rose, Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 94, 100; COUNTY MAP 1908; Walmsley, 464; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1062; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Loutre Cemetery
Description:A burial ground near Case. It was probably named for Loutre Island. (WARRENTON BANNER, Oct. 16, 1908, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Loutre Island [1 of 2]
Description:A post office and settlement which was once located on the island in the southwest part of Bridgeport Township. Settlers came here as early as 1807 or 1810. The McLanes were among the first-comers. Jacob Coil settled here in 1817. He was born in Pendleton County, Virginia, in 1770 and died in 1845. Colonel Ben Cooper made a settlement here previous to 1818 and afterward made himself conspicuous in the settlement of Howard County. He moved from Loutre Island in 1820. The family of Irvine Pittman and two families of Talbots remained at Loutre Island and formed the nucleus of what afterward became a flourishing colony. Goodwin lists a post office here in 1867, and the Postal Guide places it in Montgomery County in 1876. The settlement here has been gone since about 1890. It was named for that island. (Goodwin; Bryan & Rose, 207; Barns, 173; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; HIST. VERNON COUNTY 1887, 29; Conard IV, 123; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI III 144-45; George Luppold; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Loutre Island [2 of 2]
Description:A well-known island in the Missouri River, at the mouth of Loutre River. Part of the island is in Montgomery County, and part of it is in the southwest part of Bridgeport Township in Warren County. There were settlers here by 1807 (q.v. Loutre Island, the post office and settlement). The original French name was Isle a Loutre. It was named for Loutre River. (Pike II, 366-7, ed. Coues; Barns, 173; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; Conard IV, 123; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI, 145; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Loutre Island Brick Church
Description:A very old church in the southwest part of Bridgeport Township at Case. It was originally Methodist but has belonged to a cemetery association which bought it about 1905. The church was organized in 1841. The original building, which was built on land given by a Mr. Talbot, still stands and is said to be the second oldest Methodist building west of the Mississippi River. It was named for the island. (Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Loutre Island Road
Description:An early road which ran from the eastern line of Montgomery County south to the east end of Loutre Island, in the southwest part of Bridgeport Township. Cf. above. (George Elmore; Buck Edwards)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Loutre Island School
Description:A rural school in the extreme southwest part of Bridgeport Township. It was so named for its position on Loutre Island. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Loutre Slough
Description:A channel seven or eight miles long, running from the mouth of the Loutre River in Montgomery County through the entire southern part of Bridgeport Township in Warren County, and cutting off the southwest corner of Bridgeport Township to form the large "island" known as Loutre Island. It was formerly the mail channel for river boats, and has on its banks the old landings at the places now known as Bridgeport, Case, and Gore (q.v.); but it is now dry except in time of high water. The original French name was Chenal a Loutre, of which Loutre Slough is a partial anglicization. The variant form Loutre Slough is also found, and formerly the completely translated English form Otter Slough. It takes its name from the river in adjoining Montgomery County, called by the French Riviere a Loutre, i.e., "River of the Otter;" so called because many otters were found there and in the slough. (L&C I, 29, ed. Thwaites; L&C I, 9 & Pike II, 366, eds. Coues; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1062; COUNTY ATLAS 1901; COUNTY MAP 1908; Miss Leech's thesis; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Loutrie Slough
Description:See Loutre Slough.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Low Gap Hill
Description:See Low Cap Ridge.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Low Gap Ridge
Description:An elevated area in the western half of Pinckney Township. It is also called Low Gap Hill. Both names are given for a low gap in a ridge of hills. (Benj. Frick; William Hollenbeck)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Low Gap Ridge Road
Description:A road which runs from Pendleton in the west-central part of Elkhorn Township and follows Low Gap Ridge to the Loss Creek Road. It is named for the ridge. (Oscar J. Luelf; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Luppold's Landing
Description:See Case.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Macedonia Church
Description:A Methodist, originally Southern Methodist, church in the north-central part of Pinckney Township, on Pinckney Ridge near the Lichte School. It is a Biblical name for the Greek province which was first in Europe to receive Christianity by the missionary labors of St. Paul (Acts 16:9). (Mrs. W. Schmidt; William Hollenbeck)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Macedonia Neighborhood
Description:A community in the north-central part of Pinckney Township, near the Macedonia Church, for which it is evidently named. (Mrs. W. Schmidt; W. Schmidt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maple Dale School
Description:A rural school in the south-central part of Charrette Township. It was so named on account of the numerous sugar maples and many valleys in this region. Maple sugar was formerly made here. The school was discontinued about 1939. It was formerly known as the Borgmann School for a Borgmann family, but it was re-named about 1911 because the family was no longer here. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Walter Rottman)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Market Street Methodist Church
Description:A religious institution, formerly a Methodist Episcopal Church, South, on Market Street in Warrenton. It was established in 1840. The name is descriptive of its location. (MHR, July, 1941, 125)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marthasville
Description:A town in the southern part of Charrette Township, near the Missouri River. It is close to the former site of Charette (q.v.), the oldest white settlement in the county. It is believed to have been settled about 1818. Dr. John Young, Benjamin Young, and Aaron Young are thought to have come here in 1818 or 1819. Benjamin Young is ascribed with having started the first store. There has been a post office there since 1824. The town was named for a young woman whose identity is somewhat uncertain. Some say she was Martha Bryan, a granddaughter of Daniel Boone. The Bryan family came from Kentucky, and Daniel Boone's wife was a Bryan (cf. Bryan Cemetery, above). But Miss Maggie Bryan, who is a relative of the Daniel Boone and Bryan families, denies this. The best explanation seems that the young lady in question was Martha Young (nee Martha Fuqua), the wife of Dr. John Young, who laid out the town. However, one informant thinks she may have been the daughter of Mr. Young; but that she was the founder's wife, not his daughter. (Pike II, 364, ed. Coues; Campbell, 628; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 13; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 152, 956-57, 1029; Conard I, 564; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 91, 95; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 675; Eaton; Violette, 42; MHR XXX, 442; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914; E.C. Kehr; F.W. Kehr; H.J. Muench; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Miss Maggie Bryan; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marthasville School
Description:At Marthasville, for which it was named. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Martin School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Pinckney Township. It was known until 1910 or 1920 as the Fitz School in honor of the person on whose land it was built; but when oil was discovered on a creek nearby, the school was moved and re-named for the Martin family, who owned about 1000 acres of land in this vicinity. The Martins have since moved to California. The school was also formerly known as Johnson's School House or Johnson School. These names were also probably given in honor of a former resident. (MANUAL, STATE OF MISSOURI, (1891-1892, 58; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Oscar J. Luelf; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marvin Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church which once stood in Warrenton. The building was erected in 1855 and was named for Bishop Enoch Mather Marvin, who was born in Warren County, June 12, 1823, joined the Southern Methodist Church in 1839; was ordained deacon in 1842, elder in 1845, and bishop in 1866. He died Nov. 26, 1877. (Bryan & Rose, 418; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1068; CENTENNIAL OF MISSOURI METHODISM, 10; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 11; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Massas Creek
Description:See Masse's Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Masses Creek
Description:See Masse's Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Masse's Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the southwest part of Elkhorn Township and flows southwest into Bridgeport Township, where it enters Loutre Slough, near Case. It was probably named for Peter Massie, a pioneer, who was killed by the Indians near Case. However, one informant who is contradicted by the others, suggests it was named for a Massie (or Massey), who was a steamboat captain on the Missouri River. The name is also spelled Massas Creek, Massey's Creek, Masses Creek, and Massie's Creek. (Wetmore; Bryan & Rose, 218; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5, 10; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1052; COUNTY MAP 1908; Mrs. Caroline McCarty; Buck Edwards; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; William Van Studdiford; George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Masse's Creek Road
Description:A winding road which follows the general course of Masse's Creek between Jonesburg in Montgomery County in Case in the southwest part of Bridgeport Township in Warren County. It is named for the creek. (Oscar J. Luelf; William Van Studdiford; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Massey's Creek
Description:See Masse's Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Massie's Creek
Description:See Masse's Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McNair's Lake
Description:A twenty-acre lake in the northwest part of Elkhorn Township, northwest of Pendleton. It was named for Dr. Thomas McNair, a physician who practiced in St. Louis from 1840 until 1870 when he returned to his 1100 acre farm named Groveland (now Lake Farm, q.v.). Another name in common usage until the last five or six years was Tank Farm, given because the lake supplied water for the Wabash Railroad tank. In 1845 Dr. McNair founded the St. Louis MAGNET, a magazine devoted to electricity. He moved to California before 1890. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 37; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1106, 1107; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meyer Grove
Description:A picnic ground east of Marthasville. The name was probably given for its owner. (WARRENTON BANNER, June 26, 1914, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Miller's Island
Description:In the Missouri River, near Marthasville. On this island in 1918, Frank Heidler fatally shot Henry Ecklekamp during a quarrel over the division of a crop. The shooting is said to have been done in self defense. The name is doubtlessly given for its owner. (WARRENTON BANNER, Apr. 25, 1919, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missionary Baptist Church
Description:An early church in Warrenton. It was organized in 1855 with Mr. and Mrs. Albert Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. William Harper, and others as members. A church was built in 1866 and used for church services. After several years, the building was sold to the Warrenton Board of Education for use as a school. The name is denominational, characterizing that variety of Baptists who believe in foreign missions, as opposed to the Anti-Mission, Old School, or Hard-Shell Baptists, who disbelieve in all active measures to convert others. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1010)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri Evangelical College
Description:See Emmaus Institute.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri River
Description:This mighty stream forms the northern boundary of Franklin County, the southern boundary of Warren County, and the south and southeastern boundary of St. Charles County. Eminent authorities are convinced that had this river been discovered before the Mississippi, the latter would have been considerd the tributary of the former and consequently the name "Missouri" would have been applied to both streams. The erroneous popular conception that the name means "muddy water" arose from the fact that Marquette gave the Indian name "Pekitanoui" ("muddy") to the stream. Early white explorers first called the river Missouri after a tribe of Indians who lived on its banks. "Missouri," in the Indian language, means "People with wooden canoes." These Indians who paddled up and down the Missouri in their canoes were the first of many who used the long river for their thoroughfare. Though this word has been pronounced in various ways, the pronunciations listed in the appendix are taken from Mr. Read's summary of the defensible pronunciations based upon Missouri usage. The Spanish form is Rio Missouri. Early names for the river were also River St. Philip and River St. Louis, given in honor of patron saints. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Hevenor, ST. CHARLES COUNTY; SHOW ME, 11-12; Chappell, HIST. MISSOURI RIVERS, 1, 6-7; Read PRONUN. OF THE WORD MISSOURI, 22FF.; MHR XVII, 377-8; IBID. XII, 81; Conard IV, 412, 432; Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad
Description:This great transportation line has northern terminal at St. Louis, Kansas City and Junction City, Kansas, and extends southward across the Oklahoma and Texas cotton belt to tidewater at Galveston and to San Antonio, Texas. In St. Charles and Warren Counties, it was originally chartered as the Union Pacific Railroad, Southern Branch. Its earliest unit dated from incorporation in Kansas on September 29, 1865. By 1870 it had reached Emporia and came under control of the Missouri-Kansas and Texas Railroad. It extended to St. Charles and Warren Counties about 1894, and was so named for the states it serves. It is more commonly known as the Katy, a word made by combining the initial letters of Kansas and Texas (K-T). (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; Conard VI, 379; DMH III, 427-28; Riegel, 102; HIGHWAY MAPS, ST. CHARLES & WARREN 1940; R & I COMPENDIUM, May 29, 1941, 128; Miss Welty's thesis; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Morsey
Description:A former post office, store, and blacksmith shop in the northern part of Camp Branch Township. The post office was established in 1882 and discontinued between 1904 and 1910. The store and blacksmith shop were abandoned about 1904. The village was named either for Frederick Morsey, or for his son, "Colonel" William Morsey. The former settled in the county in the 1830s and was an educated, gifted man who first served with the Union Army and later as a civil engineer and surveyor. The latter was born on Smith's Creek, November 21, 1849, and died in 1918. In 1873 he associated himself in the law business with his father. He was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Warren County in 1874 and held that position for sixteen years. In 1888 he was a delegate to the national convention which nominated General Benjamin Harrison for President. He was deputy U.S. District Attorney and was U.S. Marshal eight years. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; WARRENTON BANNER, Aug. 19, 1904; 1; IBID., Dec. 18, 1914, 4; IBID., Mar. 28, 1918, 1; William Van Studdiford; John Mason; E.S. Aydelott; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Morsey School
Description:An elementary school in the north-central part of Camp Branch Township, so named for the town. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mt. Airy Baptist Church
Description:A church which was formerly in the central-west part of Hickory Grove Township, four miles south of Wright City. It originally belonged to the Quivre Association of Baptist Churches and went out of existence before Ebenezer Baptist Church was organized. It is said that the Mt. Airy Baptist Church (see Miss Leech's thesis) in Monroe County is an outgrowth of the Warren County Church of the same name. It was built by James Welch, the pioneer Baptist minister. The name is a very common place-name as it has been used for towns in nine other states (Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Virginia), either spelled as above or Mountairy. The height of the site may have been instrumental in causeing the choice of this name. (WARRENTON BANNER, Aug. 7, 1908, 1; W.G. Davis; Miss Anna R. Sharp; Mrs. Mary Wittnaben; Forrest W. Hughes)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mt. Airy Cemetery
Description:An old cemetery in the central-west part of Hickory Grove Township, near the former site of Mt. Airy Baptist Church, from which it was named. (WARRENTON BANNER, Aug. 7, 1908, 1; W.G. Davis; Miss Anna R. Sharp; Mrs. Mary Wittnaben; Forrest W. Hughes)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Murder Hollow
Description:In the northern part of Bridgeport Township. Through it runs a tributary of South Bear Creek. So named because it was the site of a sensational murder. There have been no fewer that three atrocious murders in this general vicinity, according to old settlers, which have served to fasten the name upon the place. One of them is probably too recent to have originated the name. A second happened forty-five or fifty years ago: Hawkins, a mulatto, murdered a farm woman out of revenge for something she had told about him years before; he was tried and acquitted. The earliest of the three, and the one thought by the oldest citizens to have suggested the name, happened a hundred or more years ago: the murderer killed two men and buried them, but so shallowly that their bodies were discovered; he was tried and convicted. (COUNTY MAP 1908; George Elmore; Benj,. Frick; Mrs. Caroline McCarty; Mrs. Belle Gerdemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Music Field
Description:A large pasture in the west-central part of Camp Branch Township. It is noted as a fertile bottom field, and stock have been grazed here from all over the county. It is now owned by Mr. Harry Howell. It was originally settled, more than a hundred years ago, by the celebrated Captain David Musick of Cap au Gris, who distinguished himself at the Battle of the Sinkhole (q.v.) on May 24, 1815. Captain Musick resided near Florissant, where he lived to a good old age. (Houck, HIST. MISSOURI III, 131, 135; E.S. Aydelott; John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Boston
Description:See Boston.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New College Church
Description:See College Methodist Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Truxton
Description:A postal village in the extreme northern part of Camp Branch Township. It was laid out by the Burlington Railroad in 1904 and has been established between 1904 and 1910 and is still in existence. The town was so named to distinguish it from Truxton (q.v.) in Lincoln County. (Eaton; COM. ATLAS 229; HIGHWAY MAP 1936; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914; 6; J.E. Harper; Oscar J. Luelf; E.S. Aydelott)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Truxton School
Description:An elementary school in the extreme northern part of Camp Branch Township. It is so named for the town. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Niedringhaus Memorial Building
Description:A gymnasium and science hall erected in 1909 at Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton. It was named in honor of William F. Niedringhaus, who contributed $10,000 of the $17,000 of the cost price of the building. (WARRENTON BANNER, June 5, 1914, 2)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Nimrod Darnell Farm
Description:A pioneer farm which was probably in Hickory Grove Township. It was named for its owner, Nimrod Darnell, who was an early settler of the county and who was one of the men who favored Warrenton as the county seat in the early 1830s. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; E.S. Aydelott)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:North Bear Creek
Description:See Bear Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:North Missouri Railroad
Description:See Wabash Railroad
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:North Washington Landing
Description:A boat landing in the southeast part of Charrette Township, on the northern bank of the Missouri River. It is so named for its position opposite Washington in Franklin County. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Northern Watershed
Description:The north side of a ridge which runs through the county from east to west, from the 91st meridian on the east to Jonesburg in Montgomery County. It discharges the water toward the Mississippi River through Camp Branch, Big Creek, Indian Camp Creek, and Perruque Creek. It is so named on account of the direction of its water flow. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 10; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Dale School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Hickory Grove Township. It was formeely known as Quincy School in honor of a Mr. Quincy, doubtless H.G. Quincy, whose house was in the path of the tornado of 1883 which also damaged the school. It has been known as the Old Oakdale School-House or the Oakdale Schoolhouse and, more recently, as Oakdale School or Oak Dale School. The names are descriptive of the heavy oak timber which grew there until recently. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1014; 83RD REPORT; Forrest W. Hughes; J.G. Wessendorf; Oscar J. Luelf; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove Church
Description:A Methodist church in the northern part of Bridgeport Township. It was so named for the numerous oaks in the vicinity. (J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Bridgeport Township. The name is descriptive of the oaks in the region. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oakdale School
Description:See Oak Dale School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oakdale Schoolhouse
Description:See Oak Dale School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oaklawn Camp
Description:A tourist camp in the northeast part of Elkhorn Township, west of Warrenton. The name is descriptive of the setting. (WARREN CENTENNIAL, 24; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oetting's Grove
Description:A picnic ground in Gore. The name is probably given in honor of its owner. (WARRENTON BANNER, Aug. 18, 1911, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oil Spring
Description:A spring in the western part of Pinckney Township. It is so named because a Mr. Bolton employed a Mr. Guntrie to drill here for oil about a half a century ago, but the attempt was unsuccessful because the driller broke his drill. (Buck Edwards)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oil Spring Hollow
Description:A valley in the west-central part of Pinckney Township. A stream flows through it west and south until it enters Lost Creek in the southwest part of Pinckney Township. Oil Spring, for which it is named, is discussed above. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Buck Edwards)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Baptist Church
Description:An early church in Warrenton. This is probably the same as the Old Missionary Baptist Church known to have been established here in 1855. (Bryan & Rose, 222; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1010)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old City Cemetery
Description:An early burial ground at Warrenton. It was formally abandoned by the City Board of Aldermen in 1920. Cf. above. (WARRENTON BANNER, June 11, 1920, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Faulconer Hotel
Description:A well-known hostelry which once stood on Main Street in Warrenton. It was a regular stage stop and was visited by Stephen A. Douglass and many other important persons. The inn was opened about 1850 by Frank Skinner and was known at that time as Skinner's Hotel or Skinner Hotel in honor of its owner. The establishment was then put under the management of Thomas Williams, a school teacher. About the time of the close of the Civil War, Judge John H. Faulconer bought the building. Before he took possession, soldiers occupied a part of the hotel and had their commissary in the west room. Judge Faulconer formally named the establishment "Olive Hotel by John H. Faulconer" and placed his sign on a pole about fifteen feet high. It has not been ascertained just why he called the inn Olive Hotel, but in the course of years, it became known as the Faulconer Hotel, and finally, when the building began to deteriorate, as the Old Faulconer Hotel, in honor of its former owner. Co. William Morsey bought the building and had it razed in 1931. With its going went the oldest landmark in Warrenton. (WARRENTON BANNER, Nov. 29, 1929, 1; IBID., May 29, 1931, 1; Miss Lula May Schulze; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Green Building
Description:A large hall which was once a part of Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton. This old wooden building was torn down shortly after 1900. It was also known as the Green Building. The term "old," was descriptive of its age, but no positive explanation can be found for the name "Green." Perhaps it was given in honor of some person of that name. (WARRENTON BANNER, June 5, 1914, 2; IBID., Dec. 18, 1914, 19)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Ladies Home
Description:A women's dormitory in Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton. It was built at a cost of $12,000 in 1884 and burned in June, 1893 (cf. J. Louis Kessler Hall). The name is descriptive of its purpose and age. Earlier known as Ladies Home. (WARRENTON BANNER, June 5, 1914, 2)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Oakdale School-House
Description:See Oak Dale School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Red Building
Description:A former gymnasium at Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton. It was moved from Truesdale to the campus and was destroyed by fire in 1908. The name is probably descriptive as was its earlier name, the Red Building. (WARRENTON BANNER, June 5, 1914, 2; IBID., Dec. 18, 1914, 1, 19)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Rock Church
Description:See St. Paul's Evangelical Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Union Church
Description:An early church in the northern part of Camp Branch Township, about nine miles north of Gerdemann's Store. Joseph Camp, who came to the county in 1832, organized the church by 1833. It has been out of existence about seventy-seven years. It was so named because it was interdenominational. (Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; Mrs. Belle Gerdemann; John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Western House
Description:Formerly a hotel in Truesdale. It is still standing, but is now a producer's exchange. It was so named because the Wabash Railroad once maintained a western terminus and turntable there. (Miss Lula May Schulze; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Wyattom Cemetery
Description:A very old burial ground in the northwest part of Charrette Township, northwest of Hopewell. It is thought to be the cemetery used by the family of Captain John Wyatt, one of the earliest settlers. Captain Wyatt was a veteran of the War of 1812 and married Atossa Sharp. He is said to be buried on his farm under an apple tree which he carried from Kentucky in his saddle pocket and successfully transplanted. He died in 1855 at the age of 96. His place of burial is thought to be not more than forty feet from where the first regular court of Warren County was held. His wife and three daughters are also buried here. The graveyard is also known as the Wyattom Cemetery. If the identification is correct, it is named in honor of Captain Wyatt and his family. The peculiar form "Wyattom" remans unexplained. It may possibly have arisen as a phonetic misinterpretation of "Wyatt Home Cemetery." (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 26; Bryan & Rose, 290; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1053; F.W. Kehr (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Olive Hotel
Description:See Old Faulconer Hotel.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Osage Woman's River
Description:See Femme Osage Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oscar E. Setz Memorial Building
Description:A building at Emmaus Home near Marthasville. It was dedicated October 2, 1927, and named in honor of the Setz family of St. Louis. (WARRENTON BANNER, Sept. 23, 1927, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Otter Slough
Description:See Loutre Slough.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Owl Creek
Description:A stream that rises in the northern part of Charrette Township, and flows southeast until it enters Charrette Creek. The name is thought to be descriptive. (COUNTY MAP 1908; E.C. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Painter's Store
Description:See Tuque.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Palmyra Baptist Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in the southeast part of Camp Branch Township. It was organized by the Rev. Samuel L. Palmer about 1900. He was born in the 1870s and died about 1939. Services were first held in the schoolhouse, and later a church was built under Palmer's leadership. The building has now been wrecked and the church disbanded. Palmyra, the ancient city of Syria, The Tadmor of Scripture, is an appropriate church name and a favorite in Missouri, probably because it is a symbol of wealth and fertility. According to II Chronicles 8:4, it was founded or enlarged by King Solomon in the wilderness, in the 10th century B.C.: "And he built Tadmore in the wilderness, and all the store cities, which he built in Jamath." The old Palmyra stood in the midst of a palm grove, and the site was chosen for its springs. It was for this reason that the name was selected for the Marion County City of Palmyra, which like the ancient capital stood in the midst of the fertile Two Rivers Country (See Miss Elliott's thesis). For much the same reasons it may have seemed appropriate for the Warren County church in the rich farming land between the two greater rivers Missouri and Mississippi. Several of the surviving church members, some of whom helped to build the church declare that it was named for their beloved pastor, the Rev. Mr. Palmer. Possibly there was an association of sound, a sort of "contamination," which suggested the name and led to its selection; but it is more likely the association came to their minds later. (WARRENTON BANNER, Jan. 13, 1905, 1; IBID., Dec. 18, 1914, 28; Miss Lula May Schulze; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. Ed Schulze; John Mason; Hyder Wilson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Park Island
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Parke Island
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Patton's Landing
Description:A boat landing on the northern shore of the Missouri River, in the extreme southeast part of Charrette Township. It is also called Patton's Point. It was probably named for a Patton family who settled at the mouth of Loutre about 1812. Later Dr. Lock owned the place. (Pike II, 365, ed. Coues; F.W. Kehr (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Patton's Point
Description:See Patton's Landing.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peace and Harmony Congregation
Description:See Wright City Evangelical Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peers
Description:A village in the southern part of Charrette Township, in the southern part of the county. It was laid out after the completion of the M.K. & T. Railroad in 1892. Henry Massman was the first citizen to locate here. The post office was started about 1894 or 1895. Named for Judge Charles E. Peers, who was born in Troy, Missouri, May 2, 1844 and was the son of Major Edward J. and Cytha (Stone) Peers. He came to Warrenton in 1865 and became editor of the WARRENTON BANNER. He was admitted to the bar in 1866, and elected to the state legislature in 1872. He was attorney for the Wabash Railroad and for the M.K. & T. Railroad. (PORT. & BIOG. REC., 285, 486-88; HIGHWAY MAP 1936; William Chiles; George Closemeyer; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pendleton
Description:A town in the west-central part of Elkhorn Township, six miles west of Warrenton. An old town called Pendleton's, doubtless the same as the present Pendleton, existed as early as 1837, when it is listed as a post office by Wetmore. It was evidently named for the postmaster, J.W. Pendleton. The present Pendleton is recorded to have been laid out by the Wabash Railroad authorities in 1858. This was no doubt a refounding of the old town with a simplification of the name. Goodwin lists Pendleton as a post office in 1867 and it has remained on the lists of the postal guides ever since. Curiously enough, the postmaster when Pendleton was laid out was also named Pendleton (George). He is said to have given land for the town, and was perhaps a relative of the former postmaster. Other settlers in the new town were Job Price, Captain J.W. McFadden, George Wright, and A.S. Wood. About seventy years ago, the town was briefly known as Besley, for George Besley, postmaster and station agent at the time. It was also loosely and briefly known years ago as Lily Dale, for a tavern of that name that stood opposite the site of the present tool house in the town. (Wetmore; Goodwin; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1083; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 676; Miss Martha Chiles; Miss Anna Chiles; William Chiles; Mrs. Belle Gerdemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pendleton School
Description:A grade school in the western part of Elkhorn Township. It was named for the town. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Mrs. Anna Schaper)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pendleton's
Description:See Pendleton.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Perruque Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the central part of Hickory Grove Township, Warren County, and flows east into St. Charles County, where it forms the boundary line between Cuivre, Callaway, and Dardenne Townships, finally emptying into the Mississippi River. Settlement on the creek was made in St. Charles County in 1796 by French Canadians. Louis Marchant, Andrew and Jean Baptiste Blondeau dit Duzey (or Drezy), made a settlement at a place they called La Perruque. In 1811 High Liles and Joshua James settled on the stream above Kennedy's Fort in Warren County. Barns conjectures that it was named because the wig (Perruque) of an early French settler became entangled while he was crossing the stream. This is obviously an imaginative invention: it is much more likely to have been a French personal name or "dit" name, although no such French-man has been actually discovered. The name is often spelled, less correctly, Peruque. The variant name Barrock Creek is also found, possibly a folk etymology or contamination form used by American speakers. Another variant may be Varrett's Creek, which has not been otherwise identified. Locally it is also known as Bear Creek, a still more drastic attempt at folk-etymology. It also appears as Perruque River. (Campbell, 626; Barns, 173; Bryan & Rose, 147; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5, 17; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 959; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 96; Eaton; W. Schmidt; Perkins Pringle)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peruque Creek
Description:See Perruque Creek
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peter's Grove
Description:A picnic grove in the southeast part of Charrette Township, near the Warren County boat landing. The name is probably given for its owner. (WARRENTON BANNER, Aug. 19, 1932, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pin Oak
Description:An early post office in the center part of Camp Branch Township, thirteen miles north of Warrenton. It is listed as a post office by Goodwin in 1867, but does not appear in the Postal Guide of 1876 or later. Although John Mason says the post office was organized before 1853, Hayward does not list it. Bellville in Montgomery County took its place. The name is descriptive of the trees in the vicinity. (Goodwin; Hayward; Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pin Oak Cemetery
Description:An old burial ground in the west-central part of Camp Branch Township, near Pin Oak Church at the site of the former Pin Oak. The cemetery was instituted after the organization of the Pin Oak Church (q.v.) in the 1860s. It was named for the church. (J.E. Harper; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; John Mason; E.S. Aydelott)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pin Oak Church
Description:A Methodist institution in the west-central part of Camp Branch Township. It was built between 1862 and 1867 and is still in existence. It was named for the post office. (J.E. Harper; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; John Mason; E.S. Aydelott)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pin Oak Community
Description:A rural vicinity in the west-central part of Camp Branch Township. It was named either for the town or for the church. (E.S. Aydelott; John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pin Oak School
Description:An elementary school in the northwest part of Camp Branch Township. It was probably named for the church, which it is likely was established before the school. There are many pin oaks in this region. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; 83RD REPORT; Oscar J. Luelf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney [1 of 2]
Description:A town and former post office in the southeast part of Pinckney Township, about four miles north of the site of the original Pinckney. The post office was established by 1867, discontinued in 1895, reestablished in 1896, and again discontinued by 1910. It was named for the early Pinckney. (Goodwin; Postal Guide; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 960, 1059; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 663, 664; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney [2 of 2]
Description:See Kruegerville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney Bottom
Description:See Pinckney Bottoms.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney Bottoms
Description:A lowland near Pinckney in the southwest part of Pinckney Township, about two miles from the Missouri River. Its first settler, a German named John Tice, who was an uncle of the celebrated Professor Tice of St. Louis, came here about 1809. It is also known as Pinckney Bottom. Both names are descriptive. (Bryan & Rose, 223; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1000, 1059; William Van Studdiford)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney Cemetery
Description:A burial ground at Pinckney from which it probably takes its name. (WARRENTON BANNER, Apr. 10, 1908, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney Community
Description:A rural community in the southeast part of Pinckney Township, north of the site of the second Pinckney. It is named for the town. (WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 4)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney Landing
Description:See Kruegerville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney Point
Description:This was doubtless the point of land extending into the river near the town from which it took its name. (Pike, II, ed. Coues, 365)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney Ridge
Description:A natural elevation which extends from the southwest part of Elkhorn Township into the central part of Pinckney Township. It is probably so named for the town. (Benj. Frick; Mrs. Anna Schaper; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney Ridge Road
Description:A road which runs from Warrenton to Kruegerville, which was formerly known as Pinckney or Pinckney Landing. The name is descriptive. (Benj. Frick; Oscar J. Luelf; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney Township
Description:One of the original townships; bounded on the north by Montgomery County, on the east by Elkhorn Township and Charrette Township, on the south by the Missouri River, and on the west, by Montgomery County. It was created by order of the county court at its first session in 1833 held following the organization of the county. It is named for Pinckney (a.v.). (EWT XXII, 24, ed. Thwaites; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1062; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckney's Landing
Description:See Kruegerville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinckneyville
Description:See Kruegerville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinkney
Description:See Kruegerville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pitts
Description:A village once located in the central-west part of Hickory Grove Township, four miles east of Warrenton. A post office was located here in the early 1860s and was listed by Goodwin in 1867. It was discontinued in 1903 or 1904 when the rural mail route was established. About that time the village was also abandoned except as a farm residence section. It is said to have been named for a Dr. Pitts. (Goodwin; Postal Guide; Campbell, 628; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1011, 1122; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 676; John Mason; George Luppold; Henry Pitts; William Hollenbeck)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pitt's Landing
Description:A boat landing which was probably at Gore. The name may have been personal. (George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pitts School
Description:In the central-west part of Hickory Grove Township. Named for the former town. (83RD REPORT; Oscar J. Luelf; Henry Pitts; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pitzer's Landing
Description:A boat landing on the northern bank of the Missouri River, in the southern part of Bridgeport Township, near the present town of Case. The name was probably given in honor of James Pitzer, the first surveyor of Warren County, who settled in Bridgeport Township, east of Loutre Creek and became one of the prominent men of the times. (HANDBOOK OF MISSOURI, Map I; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 968, 1062)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:See Godt Spring School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Polster Addition
Description:A suburban section in Warrenton. The lots were offered for sale about 1929 and were named in honor of their owner, Edward J. Polster. (WARRENTON BANNER, Oct. 4, 1929, 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Polston School
Description:See Lichte School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Poppelmeyer Branch
Description:See West Fork of Dry Charrette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie View
Description:See Prairieview.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairieview
Description:A former postal village in the central part of Camp Branch Township. The post office was established in 1901 and discontinued in 1903 or 1904. Felix Carrico gave ten acres of land to Dr. C.O. Foreman to induce the latter to practice medicine there. A Mr. Brockman once had a store in the village. The name, which is also written Prairie View, is probably descriptive. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 17; John Mason; E.S. Aydelott; Benj. Frick; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Price's Branch
Description:See Price's Spring Branch.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Price's Spring
Description:A spring which was probably located in the southwest part of Elkhorn Township. It seems to have been named for its early owner, Sam Price, a Kentuckian, who has been dead since about 1861. He is said to have settled originally on Camp Creek, but moved to a location near the spring because he was bothered with travellers who were passing through the country. Miss Gallop says it was named because General Sterling Price, the Confederate leader, camped there. Although General Price was in Warren County on his last famous raid of 1864, the former explanation seems more reasonable. (William Van Studdiford; John Mason; Benj. Price; Miss Pauline Gallop)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prices Spring Branch
Description:See Price's Spring Branch.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Price's Spring Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the southwest part of Elkhorn Township and flows southwest until it enters Little Lost Creek. It is also called Price's Branch and Prices Spring Branch without the apostrophe. It was doubtless named for Price's Spring (q.v.). (COUNTY MAP 1908; William Van Studdiford; John Mason; Benj. Frick; Miss Pauline Gallop; Wardie Jones Ebert)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Progressive School
Description:A rural school which was organized about 1911 in the northern part of Bridgeport Township.The name is idealistic. (83RD REPORT; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pump Spring
Description:A spring in the central-northern part of Bridgeport Township. It was opened by Charles Harper over 100 years ago. It received its name because there was a pump at the spring. (George Elmore; Buck Edwards)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Quincy School
Description:See Oak Dale School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ramsey Creek
Description:See Lost Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ramsey's Lick
Description:A settlement on Ramsey Creek (now Lost Creek) in Pinckney Township. Captain William Ramsey had a hunting camp here about the beginning of the nineteenth century. (Bryan & Rose, 207; Houck, HIST. OF MISSOURI II, 94, 100)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Red Building
Description:See Old Red Building.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Red Hill Bridge
Description:An early railroad crossing on the North Missouri Railroad west of Warrenton. The bridge was burned in 1861 by guerrillas to keep Union troops from being sent over it to St. Louis. This act, coupled with a similar burning of every other bridge and culvert in 100 miles of the railroad, was instrumental in arousing the patriotism and subsequent enlistment in the Union Army of many northern sympathizers. The bridge was so named on account of its location near a hill of red clay. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 990; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 24; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Red Top Island
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rekate's Store
Description:A country store in the southeast part of Pinckney Township, on the Holstein Road about one half a mile east of Smith Creek. It was so named for its proprietor Anton Rekate. Although it was in existence under this name by 1877, it had formerly been owned by a Mr. Ridder. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1059; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 31; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. Anna Schaper; Walter Rottman; Oscar J. Luelf; F.W. Kehr (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rio Missouri
Description:See Missouri River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River Charrette
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River St. Louis
Description:See Missouri River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River St. Philip
Description:See Missouri River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riverview Tavern
Description:At Dutzow. Doubtless so named for its position near the Missouri River. (WARREN CENTENNIAL, 24)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere a Chorette
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere a Chouritte
Description:See Charrette Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere Duque
Description:See Tuque Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere Tuque
Description:See Tuque Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rock Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the northeast part of Camp Branch Township, and flows north into Camp Branch near the Lincoln County boundary. This name is descriptive. It is also sometimes called Drunert Branch, a personal name, although the identity of the person is somewhat obscure. A local authority says it was named for a Dr. Drunert, a geologist; but no record of such a person has been found in this section. However, a Dr. Drunert, who was an anthropologist, once lived in the southern part of Lincoln County. It is probable that the stream received its name in honor of Frederick C. Drunert, who owned land along the stream for many years. He was born in Lippe-Detmold, Germany, September 2, 1838, came to America in 1852, served in the State Militia in 1862, and died about 1918. (HIGHWAY MAP 1936; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 39; WARRENTON BANNER, June 14, 1918, 1; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rocky Ridge
Description:An elevation in the north-central part of Charrette Township. The name is descriptive. (Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rocky Ridge School
Description:In the north-central part of Charrette Township. The school was formerly on Rocky Ridge, but it has been moved. It keeps the name given it for its original location. (83RD REPORT; Dr. A.W. Ebveling; Oscar J. Luelf; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rose Hill
Description:The home of John Welch in the south-central part of Hickory Grove Township, where Salem Baptist Church (q.v.) was organized. Mr. Welch was a brother of James Welch, a pioneer Baptist preacher. The name was probably descriptive. (Miss Anna R. Sharp)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rush Island
Description:An island along the northern bank of the Missouri River, in the southern part of Bridgeport Township. It was so named because its supply of bullrushes was so abundant in early days that cattle and other stock fed on them. The southern end of old Goddin Island merged with Rush Island after the former was washed away. Goddin Island was so named for B.H. Goddin who owned it and lived southwest of Case. Rush Island is sometimes named Bates Island on government maps. This name is probably personal in origin. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; COUNTY MAP 1908; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI III, 147; Walter Rottman; F.W. Kehr; George Luppold; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rush Island School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Bridgeport Township. It is named for its location on the island. (83RD REPORT; Oscar J. Luelf; Walter Rottman; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Salem Church
Description:See Union Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sam's Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the east-central part of Hickory Grove Township, and flows into St. Charles County. No explanation of the name has been found. Perhaps it is to be associated with Sam Price, for whom Price's Spring Branch (q.v.) not far away, was named. It is also currently known as Shiloh Creek for the Shiloh Methodist Church. (Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 506; Mrs. Pierre Foristell)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schaaf Mill
Description:See Bierbaum's Steam Grist and Saw Mill.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schlapper's Lake
Description:In the southwest part of Pinckney Township. It was probably named for the Schlapper family. (Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schmidt Creek
Description:See Smith Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schuetzen Company Hall
Description:In the northern part of Hickory Grove Township, two and a half miles northeast of Warrenton. Named in honor of the Schuetzen Company which was organized in 1858 and originally served as a state militia. The early members were sharp-shooters of German ancestry, and at one time they numbered 185. Every year the organization had a sharp-shooters' picnic, or so-called "Schuetzenfest" on Pentacost Monday for sharp-shooters in uniform. The champion was acclaimed king of the Scheutzenfest and was given the right to claim some girl as his queen. Both honors were coveted. The Schuetzen Company still promotes its annual Schuetzenfest in the form of a big celebration, but the picnic has nothing to do now with the state militia. (Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick; W. Schmidt; Mrs. Eugenia Hedemann (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schuetzen Grounds
Description:Picnic grounds in the northern part of Hickory Grove Township, two and a half miles northeast of Warrenton, on which the Schuetzenfest (see above) was held. The ground covers about three acres and was purchased in 1866. (Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick; W. Schmidt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schwartze's School
Description:See Bierbaum School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schwier School
Description:See Gibson School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shake Rag Community
Description:A rural settlement in the central-west part of Camp Branch Township, north of Grange Hall. This humorous or mocking name is one of the oldest names found in the county. Apparently it goes back to the very early part of the nineteenth century when it was customary for each community to have a nickname. In Montgomery County to the west, those who lived on Elk Horn Creek were known as "heel strings," those on South Bear Creek as "anaruges," and those on Camp Branch as "shake rags." It is significant that South Bear Creek and Camp Branch are also in Warren County, and doubtless the inhabitants in this county bore the same nicknames as they did in Montgomery County if they happened to live along the same stream. Since the Shake Rag Community under consideration is near Camp Branch (or Camp Creek), we can be reasonably sure that it received its strange name long ago. This conjecture is borne out by old settlers who declare that the name has been in existence ninety years or longer. In the early days when a frontier champion desired to test his prowess with that of another champion, he would become intoxicated and then announce that he could whip any "Shake rag," "heel string," or "anaruge" (as the case might be) on the ground. Immediately his challenge would be accepted, and the fighting would begin. Just why the name Shake Rag was given in Warren County, we can merely conjecture that it was used because the people in that section are known to have worn very ragged clothing and to have indulged in considerable dancing. The term has not been heard so much during the last thirty years as it formerly was, but it is still applied to this vicinity. This decreased use of the epithet is probably due to the fact that facilites for entertainment and recreation have improved so much that no modern youth has to taunt someone for amusement nor does he have to start a brawl for some exercise. (Bryan & Rose, 76; Oscar J. Luelf; John Mason; Mrs. Anna Schaper; E.S. Aydelott)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shake Rag Prairie
Description:A prairie section in the central-west part of Camp Branch Township. Cf. above. (Oscar J. Luelf; John Mason; Mrs. Anna Schaper; E.S. Aydelott)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shake Rag School
Description:A rural school in Camp Branch Township, doubtless so named for the Shake Rag Community. (Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Oscar J. Luelf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sharrett
Description:See Charrette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sharrett Village
Description:See Charrette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shaw's Branch
Description:A stream that rises in the southern part of Elkhorn Township and flows west into Lost Creek. It is named for Sidney Shaw, an old settler, who has been dead many years. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shelton School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Elkhorn Township. It was probably named for James W. Shelton, who owned 300 acres of land. He was born in Virginia in 1819, came to Warren County in 1840, and died about 1901. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1115-16; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7, 37; F.W. Kehr; Mrs. J.E. Harper; H.E. Harper; Miss Lula May Schulze; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shiloh Creek
Description:See Sam's Creek
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shiloh Methodist Church
Description:In the extreme eastern part of Hickory Grove Township. The first log structure was erected just across the county border, in St. Charles County, on the farm of Henry Abington, in 1839. The first trustees were Henry Pritchett, Taylor Abington, and Daniel Shermann. The present building was erected in 1872, on Ira Pritchett's land in Warren County. It is a Methodist Church, but other denominations have at times used it. Shiloh is a very popular Bible name for churches either because the name of the ancient sacred place, ten miles north of Bethel, signifies "rest, tranquility," (Joshua 18:1), or because of its special use in GENESIS 49:10, where it is generally held to be a prophetic name for the Messiah. (Smith's BIBLE DICT.; William Hollenbeck, Mrs. Perkins Pringle; F.W. Kehr; Benj. Frick; Perkins Pringle; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Skinner Hotel
Description:See Old Faulconer Hotel.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Skinner's Hotel
Description:See Old Faulconer Hotel.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Skunk Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the center part of Hickory Grove Township and flows north into Perruque Creek. It is named for the many skunks found along its banks. (COUNTY MAP 1908)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Skunk Hollow
Description:Skunk Branch (q.v.), from which it takes its name, flows through it. (Mrs. Perkins Pringle)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Slingtown
Description:See Case.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smith Creek
Description:Rises in the southwest part of Pinckney Township and flows southwest into the Missouri River. It is also called Smith's Creek and is spelled Smithe Creek in the 1877 Atlas. It is perhaps to be identified with Schmidt Creek, in which case the original German name has been Anglicized. It is so named for a Smith, or Schmidt, probably William (Wilhelm) Smith (Schmidt or Smithe). (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 27; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 962; COUNTY MAP 1908; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 28; Benj. Frick; William Van Studdiford; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smith Creek School
Description:In the southern part of Pinckney Township. It is so named for its location on Smith Creek. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Walter Rottman)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smithe Creek
Description:See Smith Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smith's Creek
Description:See Smith Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Bear Creek
Description:Rises in the northern part of Bridgeport Township and flows west into Montgomery County, emptying into Loutre River. It is so named to distinguish it from North Bear Creek, which also rises in Bridgeport Township, but flows north into Bear Creek Township in Montgomery and thence into Lincoln County, to empty into the Cuivre River. Both streams are sometimes called simply Bear Creek. This was a famous country for bear in early days. (COUNTY MAP 1908; William Van Studdiford)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Brush Creek
Description:On a line between Warren and Montgomery Counties. The southern fork of Brush Creek in Montgomery County, which was named for the thick undergrowth along its banks. (WARRENTON BANNER, June 11, 1915, 1; Miss Leech's thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Southern Watershed
Description:The south side of a ridge which runs through the county from east to west from the 91st meridian on the east to Jonesburg in Montgomery County. It discharges water into the Missouri River through Bear Creek, Masse's Creek, Charrette Creek, and Tuque Creek. It is so named for the direction of its water flow. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 10; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spoon Hollow
Description:A valley in the southwest part of Hickory Grove Township and the northern part of Charrette Township. It is so named for its shape. Through it runs a tributary flowing southwest into Charrette Creek. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Oscar J. Luelf; Forrest W. Hughes; Benj. Frick; E.C. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Branch [1 of 2]
Description:A stream which rises in the extreme northwest part of Elkhorn Township and flows southwest into Bridgeport Township, where it enters Masse's Creek. It is so named for the springs along its banks. (COUNTY MAP 1908; William Van Studdiford)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Branch [2 of 2]
Description:Another Spring Branch which rises in Montgomery County, and flows into the northwest part of Camp Branch Township, where it enters Little Camp Creek. Cf. above. (COUNTY MAP 1908)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Anthony's Catholic Church
Description:In the south-central part of Bridgeport Township, one mile east of Case. Cf. above. (Brewster, 70-71; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Ignatius' Catholic Church
Description:At Concord Hill in the southwest part of Charrette Township. The church was first attended by the Jesuits of the Washington Residence: from 1867, however, until 1877 by the Pastors of Dutzow. First known as the Concord Hill Church, it was renamed to honor the founder of the Jesuit Order, St. Ignatius de Loyola (1491-1556), the most illustrious of several saints of the name. He was beatified by Pope Paul V in 1609 and canonized in 1622. His holy day is July 31. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1041, 1043; Brewster, 346-8; COUNTY MAP 1908; Rothensteiner II, 393; H. Eckelkamp; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. A.W. Ebeling; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Johannes' Congregation of the Evangelical Church.
Description:See St. John's Pinckney Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. John's Islands
Description:A cluster of islands which were passed by the Pike Expedition off St. Johns or Old Charrette. Named for the old Fort San Juan del Misuri. (Pike, II, 364, ed. Coues)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. John's Pinckney Church
Description:An Evangelical Church in the southern part of Pinckney Township, near the Missouri River where old Pinckney was once located. Five acres of the original seven acre tract of land connected with the church have washed into the Missouri River. The institution was organized in 1870 and named St. Johannes' Congregation of the Evangelical Church, in honor of the Apostle. Johannes is the German form of the name, now generally Anglicized to St. John. It is now usually known as St. John's Pinckney Church in memory of the Pinckney community. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1013; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Louis, Kansas City and Northern Railroad
Description:A railway which traversed the counties westward from St. Charles. This was the successor to the Old North Missouri Railroad chartered in 1851. In 1897 it was consolidated with the Toledo, Wabash & Western, and the Lake Erie, Wabash and St. Louis Railroads to become the Wabash Railroad (q.v.). It was so named for its terminal points. A part of this road once led from St. Charles through St. Peters and was known as the St. Louis and St. Charles Railroad, for its originally proposed termini. The road, which was surveyed by 1885, is not in existence. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES, 144; HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES & WARREN 1940; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Mary's Catholic Church
Description:See Holy Rosary Parish.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Paul's Evangelical Church
Description:A stone church in the extreme northern part of Elkhorn Township, in the Steinhagen Community. It was organized in 1865 by Rev. J.C. Stranger. Some of the original members were: William Hollman, Henry Pape, Henry Reese, and Frank Hollman. The present stone building was built in 1875 at a cost of $1,000. It is associated with the Warrenton Friedens Evangelical and Reformed Church since the union of the Evangelical and Reformed Churches in 1936. The church has the following large number of local and current names: Old Rock Church, Stone Church, St. Paul's German Evangelical Church, St. Paul's Steinhagen Church, and St. Paul's Evangelical Church. The first two names are descriptive of the building and the others are in honor of the Apostle. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1012, 1062; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 666; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914; 28; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Rev. G.A. Roedder; Mrs. Anna Schaper; Mrs. J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Paul's German Evangelical Church
Description:See St. Paul's Evangelical Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Paul's Steinhagen Church
Description:See St. Paul's Evangelical Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church
Description:In the southwest part of Charrette Township, one-half mile south of Suzow. It was organized as a mission in 1836 or 1837 with Bartholomew Roesner, Henry Dieckhaus, Francis Krekel, Herman Struckhoff, and others as charter members. In 1842 Father Buschotts dedicated the first chapel here to Saints Peter and Paul; and until 1853, Father Eysvogels and Van Mierlo attended the mission. From 1842 until 1858 the church was known as Sts. Peter and Paul Mission in honor of the two Apostles. July 18, 1858, the Vicar General, Rev. Joseph Melcher, dedicated the new church to St. Vincent de Paul, a great philanthropist who was born in Gascony near the Pyrenean Mountains in 1576, died at St. Lazare, Seprtember 27, 1660, and was canonized in 1737. The present church building is the third which has been built here. The first structure was a mission, the second, a log church, and the third, a brick building which was dedicated in 1875. The variant spelling St. Vincente de Paul is also sometimes used for the name of the present church. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1011; Brewster, 333, 4; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 667; SOUVENIR ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CHURCH; Miss Minnie Totsch)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Vincent de Paul School
Description:A parochial school at Dutzow. The present building was dedicated in 1913. It is also often called St. Vincent School. Both names are given for the church. (SOUVENIR ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CHURCH; 83RD REPORT; Oscar J. Luelf; F.W. Kehr; Miss Minnie Totsch)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Vincent School
Description:See St. Vincent de Paul School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Vincente de Paul Catholic Church
Description:See St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Steinhagen
Description:In the extreme northern part of Elkhorn Township. The post office was established in 1891 and discontinued shortly after 1905. It was earlier known as Hollman's Store, named for its proprietor August Hollman; there is also another Hollman's Store in Camp Branch Township, owned by William Hollman. The post office known as Hollman's Store was discontinued in 1891, just when Steinhagen (also known as Steinhagen Store) was established. Some authorities say that Steinhagen was so named because it was a rocky region, or because it had a rock fence or foundation in it; but this seems merely an etymological conjecture. Mr. Garrett Hollman is probably correct in thinking it was named for a place in Germany. There is a small German town named Steinhagen, about forty kilometers from Osnabrueck in Westphalia, northwest Germany; a juniper berry cordial is made there, called "Steinhager." (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; COUNTY MAP 1908; Baedeker's GUIDE TO N.W. GERMANY; HIGHWAY MAP, WARREN 1940; Garrett Hollman; Mrs. J.E. Harper; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Frank Yocum; Mrs. Ed. Schulze)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Steinhagen Church
Description:See Camp Ground Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Steinhagen Community
Description:A rural community in the extreme northern part of Elkhorn Township. It received its name from the former post office of Steinhagen. (Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Rev. G.A. Roedder; Mrs. Anna Schaper; Mrs. J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Steinhagen Methodist Church
Description:See Camp Ground Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Steinhagen Store
Description:See Steinhagen.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stewart's
Description:Goodwin mentions it as a post office in 1867, but it could not be located or otherwise identified. (Goodwin)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stone Church
Description:See St. Paul's Evangelical Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Strack's Church
Description:See Harmonie Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Strack's Evangelical Church
Description:See Harmonie Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sts. Peter and Paul Mission
Description:See St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stuecken Branch
Description:A creek which flows south along the western border of Charrette Township in the southwest part of the Township and enters the Drainage Ditch east of Treloar. It was probably named for a Mr. Stuecken, who owned a farm here in 1908. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stuermann Branch
Description:A stream which flows south through the western part of Charrette Township. It is named for the Stuermann family, probably that of of Frank Stuermann (or Sturrman) who owned land here for many years. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 26; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 23; COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sunset Camp
Description:A tourist camp in the northwest part of Elkhorn Township. The name is descriptive. (WARREN CENTENNIAL, 20)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sweet Water Creek
Description:See Little Dardenne Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tank Farm
Description:See Lake Farm.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tank Pond
Description:See McNair's Lake.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Teuque Creek
Description:See Tuque Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:The "Y"
Description:A "Y" shaped intersection of Highway 40 and 47 at Warrenton. (Walmsley, 464; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:The Annex
Description:An adjunct to the Ladies Home at Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton. The building was erected in 1910 at a cost of $8,000. The name is descriptive. (WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 19)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Thoroughman Neighborhood
Description:A rural community in the southern part of Hickory Grove Township, on Tuque Ridge, south of Tuque Prairie. It is named for the numerous families of that name who have lived there at various times. Two Thoroughman families, that of Emmett and that of Ora Thoroughman, still reside here. (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 15; Forrest W. Hughes; E.S. Aydelott; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tiralla Bluff
Description:Mentioned by Mr. Wehmeyer, but not otherwise identified. (A.H. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Toque School
Description:See Tuque School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Treloar
Description:A village in the southeast part of Charrette Township. The post office was established in 1899 or in 1900. It is so named in honor of William Mitchellson Treloar, who was formerly a professor of music at Hardin College and who defeated Champ Clark for Congress in 1894. Mr. Treloar was born near Linden, Wisconsin, September 21, 1859, and appointed postmaster at Mexico, Missouri, in 1898, and served until 1904. He engaged in the music business in Kansas City in 1905 and moved to St. Louis in 1915. (Postal Guide; Conard V, 215-16; Stevens II, 444; Eaton; BIOG. DIR. OF CONGRESS 1928; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick; William Van Studdiford)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Trinidad
Description:A suburb of Warrenton in the south-central part of Elkhorn Township. No one in Warrenton seems to have heard of it. Why the name of the West Indian island should have been thus borrowed could not be discovered. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 10; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Truesdail
Description:See Truesdale.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Truesdaile
Description:See Truesdale.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Truesdale
Description:A town in the east-central part of Elkhorn Township, east of Warrenton. The post office was established here in 1890. It was named in honor of William Truesdale (or Truesdail) who platted the town in 1857. He was a civil engineer on the North Missouri Railroad and gave the ground for the Wabash Station and switchyard on condition that the town be given his name. Locally it is spelled Truesdail. It also appears as Truesdaile in the County Atlas of 1877. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES 1071, 1083; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; COUNTY MAP 1908; Eaton; HIGHWAY MAP, 1936; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 11; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 19; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Truesdale School
Description:An elementary school in the central part of Elkhorn Township. It is so named for the town. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Forrest W. Hughes)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tuque
Description:A former store and post office in the south-central part of Hickory Grove Township. The post office was officially known by this name by 1876 or earlier and was discontinued in 1904. It was so named for Tuque Ridge, south of the post office. The place was locally but seemingly not officially known earlier as Painter's Store in honor of Solomon Painter, who was born in Page County, Virginia, December 27, 1826, and died May 12, 1883. The Port. and Biog. Rec. says he started the store about 1860 and operated it for about twenty years; that the post office was established in his store in 1862; and that the name of Tuque suggested by Squire Leeper was adopted. For years Mr. Painter was postmaster and Justice of the Peace. His son, Herman A. Painter, says the post office was established about 1854, but it is not recorded under the name Painter's Store in the Postal Guide. (Postal Guide; Campbell, 628; Bryan & Rose, 222; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; MANUAL, STATE MISSOURI (1891-1892, 59; PORT. & BIOG. REC., 346, 349; Forrest W. Hughes; Herman A. Painter; Mrs. Perkins Pringle; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; W.G. Davis; E.S. Aydelott; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tuque Creek
Description:Rises near the northern border of Charrette Township and flows south into the Missouri River. Joshua Stockdale (or Stogsdill) and several others settled on the creek in 1799. The Pike Expedition passed its mouth in 1806. About 1810, or a few years afterwards, Henry and David Bryan, descendants of Daniel Boone, settled on the creek near the site of the present Marthasville. The early French pioneers named the creek Riviere Tuque, or sometimes Duque. Another spelling variation is Teuque. It is Anglicized as Tuque Creek, Duque Creek, or Duke Creek, the last form being doubtless due to folk-etymology. Coues, editor of the Pike Expedition, suggests that it may be a French personal name, or may be derived from the French word "toque" a flat cap, or hat, of from "Turque," Turk or Turkish. The personal origin seems must the most likely, though it has not been found, either as a surname, or "dit" name, among early French settlers. (Pike II, 364, ed. Coues; Campbell, 626; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 51; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 956, 962; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7, 18, 19; Houck HIST. MISSOURI II, 92-3; COUNTY MAP 1908; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 660; Forrest W. Hughes)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tuque Prairie
Description:A comparatively level region in the south-central part of Hickory Grove Township, through Charrette Township, to the Missouri River. Cf. above. (Forrest W. Hughes; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tuque Ridge
Description:An elevated area which extends from the south-central part of Hickory Grove Township, through Charrette Township, to the Missouri River. Cf. above. (Forrest W. Hughes; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tuque School
Description:In the southern part of Hickory Grove Township. It is named for Tuque, the post office. The name is misspelled Toque in the 83RD REPORT. (83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; Forrest W. Hughes)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ulfers School House
Description:An old school once located one-half mile east of Marthasville. It also served as a church for student ministers from the nearby Evangelical theological seminary, which was where Emmaus Institute now stands. The school was probably named for Judge Hieronymus Ulffers, who lived near Marthasville for half a century. He was born in Varel, Germany, June 9, 1805 and came to Warren County about 1834. In 1866 he was elected a member of the county court, a position which he held for six years. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1057; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 19)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Unanimous School
Description:In the southwest part of Pinckney Township. The name is idealistic and has much the same significance as Concord, Harmony, and the German town Friedens Gemeinde (q.v.). (83RD REPORT; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union Church
Description:An early Baptist Church in the eastern part of Hickory Grove Township. It was successor to Salem Church and was organized July 31, 1843, from the residue of Salem Church and others who had been having differences. It was evidently so named because the members desired unity rather than the disunion they had been having. This organization prospered twenty years. Salem Church was on Tuque Prairie in the south-central part of Hickory Grove Township and was the successor to Friendship Church, which had been at Flanders Callaway's home in the southern part of Charrette Township. Friendship Church was an idealistic name. In May, 1841 or 1842, many members moved their membership to Freedom Church on Loutre Island, twenty miles distant. Salem is a Biblical name which means "peace" and is supposed to have been the original name of Jerusalem (GEN. 14:18; HEB. 7:1, 2). Friendship was the first church in this section. It was organized by Elder James E. Welch at Flanders Callaway's house October 22, 1818; and then continued ten or twelve years until it disolved to form Salem Church. Rev. James E. Welch, who helped Rev. Mr. Peck in religious work in Missouri was born in Lexington, Kentucky, February 28, 1789, joined the Baptist Church in 1810, entered the ministry in 1815, moved to Warrensburg, Missouri in 1875 and died in 1876. (Bryan & Rose, 575; Duncan, 98, 101-103; 205, 573; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 958, 960, 1064; Conard VI, 378; Houck HIST. MISSOURI, 211-217; Mrs. George Luppold; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; George Luppold; John Mason; Miss Anna Sharp)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union Methodist Church
Description:A church at Wright City. The cornerstone for the church was laid in 1918. The name is probably idealistic (cf. Unanimous School). (WARRENTON BANNER, LIV, July 4, 1918, 4)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Upper Charette School
Description:See Upper Charrette School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Upper Charrette School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Hickory Grove Township, southwest of Wright City. It was so named for its location and has been known by this name for fifty years, although several other names have been used from time to time. One informant thinks that is has been called Custer School because it stands on Margaret Custer's land; but another authority, who has known the township for more than a half-century, declares that it has never gone by the name of Custer. It was formerly known as the Gerdemann School because the land where it was built once belonged to William Gerdemann who was born in Femme Osage, St. Charles County, Missouri, March 11, 1845, and died in the Upper Charette vicinity, May 28, 1911. He was a brother-in-law of Captain John Brandt, and was a successful farmer and stockman. The name is misspelled Upper Charette School in the school report. (83RD REPORT; WARRENTON BANNER, June 2, 1911; F.W. Kehr; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Forrest W. Hughes; W.G. Davis; Mrs. Eugenia Hedemann (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wabash Railroad
Description:This railroad operated 2,400 miles of lines in 1941. It traversed Warren and St. Charles Counties from east to west, starting at St. Charles on the east and extending through Warrenton thence northwest to the northwest corner of Warren County. The road is the outgrowth of two originally independent trunk lines--the old Toledo and Illinois and the North Missouri. They were chartered April 25, 1853, and March 1, respectively, the first by the Legislature of Ohio and the latter by the Legislature of Missouri. The route of the North Missouri Railroad was determined October 16, 1854, and the road was to build from St. Louis to St. Charles and then to a junction with the Hannibal & St. Joseph in Macon County, and from there to the northern boundary line of the state, a distance of 228 miles. The first division of the road was open for business in August 1855, and was found to have cost $52,000 per mile. The St. Louis, Kansas City and Northern, successor to the old North Missouri and the Toledo, Wabash and Western, successor to the Toledo and Illinois, and the Lake Erie, Wabash and St. Louis and Pacific in 1879. It is locally known as the Wabash. All the railroads were so named for their principal termini. (Conard, VI, 379; HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES, 1027; HISTORY OF FRANKLIN, 297; MHR, Oct. 1920, 146-153; R. & I. COMPENDIUM, May 29, 1941, 202; E.S. Aydelott; Andy J. Brown)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wabash, St. Louis and Pacific Railroad
Description:See Wabash Railroad
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Bridgeport Township, on Bear Creek. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; F.W. Kehr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Warren County
Description:In the east-central part of Missouri, bounded on the north by Montgomery and Lincoln Counties, on the east by Lincoln, and St. Charles Counties, on the south by the Missouri River and on the west by Montgomery County. Named in honor of General Joseph Warren, who fell at the Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775. He was born at Roxbury, Massachusetts, June 11, 1741, and was graduated from Harvard College in 1759, and later studied medicine in Boston. He took part in a combat which destroyed a British ship of war off Chelsea Beach. He was one of the leaders who opposed the Stamp Act and drafted the Suffolk Resolves, which urged forcible opposition to Great Britain, if necessary, and pledged submission to the Continental Congress, which resolves were passed September 9, 1774. He was a member of the first three provincial congresses and president of the third. He was a volunteer at the Battles of Lexington and Bunker Hill. On June 14, 1775, he was commissioned an American major general, but three days later, and before his commission was made out, he fell mortally wounded. He was Grand-master of all Lodges of Free Masons in the United States at the time of his death. The first white settlement in Warren County was made by French trappers and traders at the village of Charrete about 1763. After the French colonists came David Bryan in 1800, 1801, or 1802, and settled on the Tuque, an elevated land about one and one-half miles southeast of Marthasville. Robert Ramsey, William Ramsey, and Thomss Kennedy came to the county about this time. Warren County was organized by a legislative act in 1833. It was carved out of Montgomery County. (Campbell, 625; Barns, 544; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 956; MONUMENT TO WARREN, 16-17; Conard VI, 337-8; Williams, STATE OF MISSOURI, 573; Eaton; Warren Centennial, 9)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Warrenton
Description:The county seat of Warren County, located in the central part of Elkhorn Township. Authorities differ as to whether a Dr. Bruin made the first settlement on the site of Warrenton in 1818 or whether Mordecai Morgan, a native of Shelby County, Kentucky made it in 1814. As soon as Warren County was created in 1833, different communities began to clamor to have the county seat. The most heated contest developed between New Boston and Warrenton. Finally, a specially appointed commission selected the latter and named it in honor of the new county. In May, 1837, proposals were made for the erection of a courthouse in the victorious town. (Wetmore; Postal Guide; Campbell, 625-6; COUNTY ATLAS, 1877, 5, 9; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1067; Conard VI, 378; Eaton; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 8-10; Frank Yocum)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Warrenton Academy
Description:See Central Wesleyan College.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Warrenton and Truxton Road
Description:A road which was named for its terminal points. (PORT. & BIOG. REC., 522)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wash Bowl Hollow
Description:See Devil's Wash Basin.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wayter Branch
Description:A creek which rises in the southeast part of Pinckney Township and flows southwest into Smith Creek. The name is probably personal. (COUNTY MAP 1908)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Weeks School
Description:In the southwest part of Camp Branch Township. It was named for George W. Weeks upon whose land it was built. Wiley Weeks also lived close to the school. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 39; 83RD REPORT; F.W. Kehr; J.E. Harper; Mrs. Chas. Yocum; J.G. Wessendorf)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wehrmann's Mill
Description:An early mill in Camp Branch Township. The name is doubtless personal in origin. (A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wesleyan Orphan Asylum
Description:See Central Wesleyan College.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:West Fork of Camp Creek
Description:A tributary of Camp Creek which rises in the west-central part of Elkhorn Township and flows northeast into the main stream. The name is descriptive. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:West Fork of Dry Charrette Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the southeast part of Pinckney Township and flows east into Charrette Township, where it unites with Stuermann Branch and flows into Dry Fork of Charrette Creek. It is so named because it is a western branch of Dry Charrette Creek. The stream is now called also Poppelmeyer Branch in honor of Simon and Fritz Poppelmeyer, who owned land along the creek. Simon Poppelmeyer was born in Alverdissen, Germany, October 24, 1852, and came with his parents to America in 1854. He first lived near Concord Hill and later moved to the Charrette vicinity. He died April 19, 1916. His brother, Fritz, survived him. The creek was formerly also known as Howard Branch, probably for J. Howard, who owned land in that section in 1877. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 27; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 21, 23; COUNTY MAP 1908; HIGHWAY MAP 1936; WARRENTON BANNER, April 28, 1916, 1; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Frick)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Western Educational Institute
Description:See Central Wesleyan College.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Western Orphan Asylum
Description:See Central Wesleyan College.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Western Orphan Asylum and Educational Institute
Description:See Central Wesleyan College.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:White Way Camp
Description:A tourist station on Highway 40 in the northeast part of Elkhorn Township. It was so named by J.G. Wessendorf because the road was white and the business was to be done in "the white way." (Oscar J. Luelf; Mrs. Anna Schaper)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Whosau Trace
Description:An early highway which ran westward into the wilderness, or what was then Howard County, from St. Charles. It was almost parallel with Boone's Lick Road. James Kennedy located the road in 1815. Earlier it was known as Whosau Trail and was used by Daniel Boone. There were traces left of the old road as late as 1885. Whosau is probably a primitive form of the tribal name of the Osage Indians, toward whose territory it led. Houck declares that the original Indian form of the name was Wa ca se, Waw sash e, or Wass ash sha. Coronado in 1541 spoke of them as the Haxa or Hayas. Marquette spelled the word Ouchages and Autrechacha. On Franquelin's map it was spelled Zages, and by Penicault Huzzas, Ous, and Wawhas. Du Tissenet in 1719 named the river Ouschage, from which the translation to the usual French spelling Osage was not difficult. Considering these multifarious renderings of the word, it is not difficult to accept Whosau as another attempt, perhaps surviving in oral usage. The nearest form to Whosau is probably Penicault's Huzzas. Cf. Ordway's spelling Hoozaw for Osage in the name of Femme Osage Creek (q.v.). This probably represented fairly well the current pronunication in early days. (Houck, HISTORY OF MISSOURI I, 133, 177-9; Pike II, 371, ed. Coues; Holcombe's HISTORY VERNON 1887, 94; Thwaites EWT XVI, 273; HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES, 1121; Miss Johnson's thesis, under "Osage River;" William Hollenbeck)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Whosau Trail
Description:See Whosau Trace
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wide Awake School
Description:A rural school, probably in the southwest corner of Cuivre River. The name is ideal. (B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wide Awake School
Description:A rural school district in the southeastern part of Hickory Grove Township and probably in the southwestern part of Cuivre River. The name is ideal. (83RD REPORT; Forrest W. Hughes; F.W. Kehr; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wife of Faim of the Hoozaw River
Description:See Femme Osage Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wilson's Branch
Description:A creek which rises in the extreme eastern part of Bridgeport Township and flows southeast into the southwest part of Pinckney Township, where it enters Lost Creek. It is named for George Wilson, Sr., who owned the land there. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Mrs. Caroline McCarty)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Winter School
Description:An early log school in the north-central part of Pinckney Township. It had one window, an earthen floor, and puncheon seats. It is no longer in existence. The name is presumably personal in origin. (A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wolf Creek
Description:A southeast tributary of Tuque Creek in the eastern part of Charrette Township. It was named for Gus Wolf, who owned land along the stream. He was a very tall man and made caskets to order. He died about 1921 at about the age of seventy-five. (COUNTY MAP 1908; HIGHWAY MAP 1936; Walter Rottman; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Woodhull's Creamery
Description:A former cream station in the south-central part of Hickory Grove Township. It was so named for its proprietor, Aaron Woodhull. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1014; E.S. Aydelott; Mrs. George Luppold; Mrs. Perkins Pringle; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wood's Hotel
Description:An early three-story brick building at the Warrenton Railroad Station. It was built in 1861 and was a favorite stopping place for prominent persons. It was named for a Mrs. Woods, who once had a boarding house there. (WARREN CENTENNIAL, 24; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914; 12)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wright
Description:See Wright City.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wright City
Description:A town in the central-east part of Hickory Grove Township. It was platted in 1857 by Dr. Henry C. Wright, for whom it was named. Dr. Wright was born in Augusta County, Virginia, July 18, 1805, served as a state representative and as a state senator, and died May 19, 1880. He was buried in St. Louis. The post office was organized by 1867. The name on the railroad station is Wright, but the town is locally and officially known as Wright City. (Bryan & Rose, 224; Goodwin; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1121-22; Eaton; Miss Anna R. Sharp; Miss Virginia Krome)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wright City Evangelical Church
Description:At Wrigfht City, for which it is named. It was organized September 5, 1880. The original members were: Captain and Mrs. E.F. Ordelheide, William Kamp, Henry Blattner, Florence Ordelheide, Henry Schmidt, and others. At the time of organization, it was known as German Evangelical Friedens Germeinde, which means "congregation of peace." Gemeinde should be the spelling used. This name was soon Anglicized to Peace and Harmony Congregation. Both forms of the name are idealistic. It is now merely called Wright City Evangelical Church. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1013, 1125; Rev. G.A. Roedder)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wright City School
Description:At Wright City, for which it is named. (F.W. Kehr; Mrs. Ann Schaper; Miss Anna R. Sharp)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wyatt Home Cemetery
Description:See Old Wyattom Cemetery.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wyattom Cemetery
Description:See Old Wyattom Cemetery.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Yeater Branch
Description:A creek which rises in the northwest part of Elkhorn Township and flows north into Camp Branch Township, thence north and east until it enters Big Creek in the eastern part of Camp Branch Township. It was named over a hundred years ago for Conrad Yeater, a German, who settled in the region in 1818. During his residence here, he built four flour mills (one run by water, two by horses, and one by oxen) and one distillery. Peter S. Yeater, a very eccentric individual, was also a well-known early settler in this section. A later member of the family, a Civil War veteran, was the Yeater, who, together with his wife, was murdered in 1903 by an adopted son named William Church. Church was hanged after a sensational trial. (Bryan & Rose, 227; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 1129; HIGHWAY MAP 1936; WARRENTON BANNER, Sept. 4, 1904, 1; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Yeater Prairie
Description:In Elkhorn and Camp Branch Townships. It was named for the branch. (Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Mrs. Wardie Jones Ebert; John Mason)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

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