Texas County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Alice
Description:A village in Morris Township. A post office since 1888. Named after Alice Embree, daughter of J.M. Embree, a settler from Tennessee. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931), C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Alice School House
Description:In Morris Township. Named from the post office. (MSTR; Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Anderson Cave
Description:A large cave in Boone Township which is said to have been inhabited by early man. Named for the family who owns the cave. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Antioch Church [1 of 3]
Description:A Methodist Church in Cass Township. Cf. above. (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Antioch Church [2 of 3]
Description:A Methodist Church in southeastern Current Township. Cf. above. (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Antioch Church [3 of 3]
Description:A Methodist Church in Lynch Township. Cf. above. (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Antioch School
Description:In Current Township. Named for the church. (Tourist Map; Mrs. K. Woolfork)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Armstrong's Store
Description:In central Morris Township. A tourist supply store on Highway 17. Named for the owner, C.H. Armstrong. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Arrol School
Description:District No. 3, near Summerville. Named from the village. (MSTR)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Arroll
Description:A village in Date Township. A post office from 1900 to 1915; reestablished in 1934. When the office was opened the name Carroll was suggested, but the Department found that was used, so they clipped of the C and named the office Arroll. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Arthur's Creek
Description:In Lynch Township; winds a short way into Piney River. Named for George H. Arthur, an early settler. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Arthur's Creek School
Description:District No. 43 in Lynch Township. Named from the creek. (MSTR; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ashley Cave
Description:A post office estrablished in 1937 in Current Township. Named for the cave, which is a landmark in the community. (Postal Guide; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ashley Cave
Description:A large cave in Current Township. Named for William Henry Ashley, fur trader, who used the cave as a post for this trade. Ashley (1785- 1839), was a dashing and picturesque character who combined the rugged pioneership of Boone and the polished manner and drawing-room accomplishments of a gentleman of old Virginia. Originally a merchant and surveyor in St. Louis, he entered the fur trade after the American Fur Company was well established. He was successful in establishing fur trading posts across the country, making it a rule to deal with white men only. With the Sublette brothers, Robert Campbell, and Jim Bridger, he established the Rocky Mountain Fur Company. (Conard, vol. 1, pp. 68, 69; Covert; MISSOURI MOTHER OF WEST, p. 429; Levi Pettibone, MISSOURI HIST. R., Jan. 1900, vol. 2, no. 1, p. 46)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ashley Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church in northeastern Current Township. Named for the creek. (Tourist Map; Luther Curry)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ashley County
Description:See Texas County
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ashley Creek
Description:See North and South Ashley Creeks.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ashley School
Description:In northeastern Current Township. Named from the church. (Tourist Map; Luther Curry)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bado
Description:A village in Morris Township. It was established during the Civil War (c. 1863), by Mr. Clabe Grose. The present postmaster has always lived within a mile of the office and has heard that it was so called because it was settled during the bad years. The name was used long before it became a post office in 1888. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; Albert Coats)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Baldridge
Description:A discontinued farmer's post office (1915-1926), about seven miles north of Houston in Lynch Township. Named by a grandson, J.M. Baldridge, in honor of Carter Baldridge, an early settler whose house was the first county seat. (Postal Guide; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Baldridge Mill
Description:See Ware Mill
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ballard Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Upton Township. The name was transferred from the school. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ballard School
Description:District No. 126 in Upton Township. Named for John C. Ballard, landowner in the district. (MSTR; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bat Cave
Description:A cave in Lynch Township. Named because many bats live in it. Also called Slagger Cave after farmers who live near it. (Leland Farley; Tourist Map (1936)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Baxter School
Description:District No. 30 in Sherrill Township near Licking. Named for W.C. "Bill" Baxter, who was president of the board for years. (MSTR; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bearclaw Cave
Description:See Bearclaw Cave.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bearclow Cave
Description:A cave in Ozark Township. Named for the family named Bearclow who owns the farm. Locally referred to as Bearclaw Cave, a variation due to "popular etymology." (Leland Farley; Tourist Map (1936)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bearclow Spring
Description:A large spring in Ozark Township. Named for the family who owns the farm on which it is located. (Cf. above)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bell School
Description:District No. 2 in Carroll Township. Named for Warren Bell, who lived near the school. (MSTR; Mrs. Flora E. Scott)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bend
Description:A post office in a farm house in Roubidoux Township in 1879. Named because it was located on a bend of Roubidoux Creek. (Missouri Gaz. (1879), p. 109; Mrs. Kate Geers)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bendavis
Description:In southeastern Morris Township. A post office since 1910. Named by James J. Burns who hoped to build a town at the place and at the same time advertise the Ben Davis apple which he grew in his large orchard. The town existed only on paper, however. An elaborate plat is recorded in the county seat, but only a store and post office mark the place. The Ben Davis is a southern apple, hardy and able to stand shipping and packing, but generally regarded by apple men as of poor quality. The origin of the apple will probably never be known; it is credited to Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia. It was a common type before the Civil War, and apple men set the date for its origin about 1800. (Postal Guide; Platbook (1931); C. Covert; Beach, THE APPLES OF NEW YORK, vol. 1, p. 70; Downing, A.J., THE FRUITS AND FRUIT TREES of America, p. 93)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Benton Township
Description:See Cass Township
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A Baptist Church in central Carroll Township. Cf. above. (Tourist Map; J.T. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bethel Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Church in northeastern Sherrill Township. Cf. above. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bethel Church [2 of 2]
Description:A Baptist Church in Cass Township. Cf. above. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bethel School
Description:In northeastern Sherrill Township. A Bible name, transferred from the church in the neighborhood. (Tourist Map; L. Curry)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bethlehem Church
Description:A now defunct Methodist Church in central Sherill Township. Cf. above. (S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bethlehem School
Description:In central Sherrill Township. Named from the now defunct church. (Tourist Map; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Big Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A large stream of water which rises in Ozark Township and flows northeast to Dent County and ultimately into Current River. (R. McN.; State Highway Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Big Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A village in Ozark Township. A post office from 1876 to 1904. Named after the creek on which it is located. (HIST. TEXAS (1889), p. 491; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Big Creek School
Description:District No. 19 near Tyrone in Ozark Township. Named for the stream. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Big Piney Creek
Description:The largest stream in the county; it rises in the southern end and flows north in a winding course out of the county and finally into the Osage Fork of the Gasconade. Named for its size and the pine trees which are still numerous along its banks. (Campbell (1873); HIST. TEXAS, p. 430; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Black Jack School
Description:District No. 128 in Robidoux Township. Named for the type of timber grown in the vicinity. It is a small oak tree which grows in the southwest, and is considered especially good for heating purposes. (MSTR; W.D. Tilley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Blankenship Cave
Description:A cave in Piney Township. Named for Dr. John Blankenship, who had a health resort in the vicinity in the 1880s. (Tourist Map; Mrs. Charles Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Blankenship Springs
Description:A number of mineral springs in Piney Township north of Houston. Named after John R. Blankenship, who had made the region into a successful resort until a fire destroyed his hotel. It is claimed that there are over fifty springs within a radius of three miles in this district. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 481; Mrs. Charles Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Blue Moon
Description:See Mitchell's Store
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Boiling Spring
Description:A spring in Lynch Township. C.H. Depriest and his father built a dam on a branch of Big Piney. After a few rains the water formed a little lake, and after a particularly heavy rain, the water and the stream disappeared leaving the dam. A few miles down the creek, close to Big Piney, they found a new spring which boiled out of the ground with much force. They concluded that this was the lost mill pond. The term "boiling" is descriptive of the manner in which the water rises from the ground. It does not refer to the temperature of the water. (Tourist Map; C. Covert; C.H. Depriest)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Boone Creek
Description:Rises in Lynch Township and flows northwest to Big Piney. Named for Daniel Boone (1735-1820), famous pioneer, who came to the region about 1816. (Tourist Map; Delbert Johnson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Boone Creek Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Sherrill Township. Named for its location near Boone Creek. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Boone Township
Description:In the north-central section of the county; established in June, 1845. Named for Daniel Boone who lived in the county for a while (at Licking). (HIST. TEXAS (1889), p. 442; Sam Hiett)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Brandon Cave
Description:A large cave in Piney Township. Named for the family who owns the cave. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Brown Hill School
Description:Locally known as Short Log School. District No. 42, in Lynch Township. Named for the family on whose farm the school stands. The legend for the Short Log name is that a dispute arose over the location of the building and one group went ahead with preparations for the house-raising and placed the logs ready on the ground. The rival group came and sawed the logs into shorter lengths, thinking to stop the building, but the people went ahead and built the school with the short logs. (MSTR; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bucyrus
Description:A village in Piney Township. A post office since 1899. The village was first called Odd (1895-1897), by Ransom D. Lynch who thought the name a distinctive one. The postal authorities objected, and the name was changed to Bucyrus after the town in Ohio which had been Mr. Lynch's birthplace. Ransom D. Lynch was for many years a leading citizen in Texas County. Before his death in 1937, he was the oldest living native resident of the county. According to Gannett, the city of Bucyrus, Ohio, was named by Colonel James Kilbourne. He gives two explanations for the Colonel's choice. Two women, daughters of Samuel Norton, say that he named it after his favorite character, Cyrus, King of Persia, to which the "bu" was prefixed referring to the beautiful country. An old citizen, F. Adams, says that it was named by Colonel Kilbourne for Buisiris in ancient Egypt. The latter seems to be more likely the origin of the name. (Postral Guide; Platbook (1931); Eaton, vol. 13, p. 69; Mrs. Mary E. Lynch; Ransom D. Lynch; Gannett, PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES, p. 60)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Burdine Township
Description:Established in 1858 in the south-central section of the county. Named after Reuben Burdine to whom most of the land in the township was patented by the United States government. (Campbell (1873); C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Burkhart Mill
Description:An early sawmill built on the Big Piney about 1826. Named for Josiah L. Burkhart, owner. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 420)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Burnett Spring
Description:In Lynch Township. Named for N.S. Burnett, who owned the spring. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bushwhacker Cave
Description:A small cave in Roubidoux Township. Named because bushwhackers are reputed to have used the cave as a meeting place in the early days of the Civil War. Bushwhacker, literally, one who beats the brush, was a term applied to irregular combatants, or guerrillas, during the Civil War, because they took to the woods. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Buzzard Cave
Description:In northern Boone Township. A large cave, named for the buzzards which roost in the trees around its large but tree and rock- choked entrance. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cabool
Description:A railroad town in Burdine Township. Established in 1882 and a post office since that date. Named for the capital of Afghanistan, now spelled Cabul or Kabul, by Ralph and Frances Walker, who were real estate promoters. Mrs. Walker never came to Cabool, and Walker left as soon as the enterprise was underway. The dedication of streets and alleys was made at Springfield, 100 miles away. A local legend asserts that the town was named after an Indian chief, Cabool, who kidnapped the daughter of Chief Pomona. When her father brought his braves to seek vengeance, Cabool and the maiden Tahassie plunged to their deaths over a cliff rather than be separated. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 488; Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 69; C. Covert; Cabool ENTERPRISE, May 18, 1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cantrell Church
Description:A Christian Church in Lynch Township which was organized in 1885 in the schoolhouse, but is now disbanded. (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST IN TEXAS COUNTY, p. 7)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cantrell School
Description:In Lynch Township. Named for Ben Cantrell, who aided in organizing the district. (MSTR; Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Carlisle
Description:A post office listed in 1867. Probably named after the family of R.W. Carlisle, who lived near Licking. He was an influential farmer. (Postal Guide; HIST. TEXAS, p. 429; Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Carroll Township
Description:An eastern township, one tier from the southern boundary. Established in 1845. Named for E.G. Carroll, an early settler. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 441; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cass Township
Description:In the second tier of townships from the southern boundary, Cass is one tier removed from the western boundary. It was first organized in 1845 and named Benton after Thomas Hart Benton (1783-1838), famous Missouri Senator who represented the state for thirty consecutive years. The township was renamed Cass in 1850 after General Lewis Cass (1782-1866), who was Democratic nominee for President against Martin Van Buren in 1848. (Campbell; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Casto Valley
Description:See Casto
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cavanass School
Description:District No. 48 in Sherrill Township near Licking. Named for C.L. (Bud) Cavanass, whose house is close to the school. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cedar Bluff
Description:A post office in Clinton Township from 1852 to 1882. The office was located just about a mile from Cabool, and when the railroad came through the section and Cabool was established, this office was closed. Named for its location on a cedar bluff. (Postal Guide; R.D. Lynch; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cedar Bluff Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church founded by the Reverend Posey Freeman, southeast of Cabool in 1859. The church has been disbanded for years. Named for its location near the old village of Cedar Bluff. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 437; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cedar Grove Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Morris Township. Named for a grove of cedar trees in which the church stands. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cedar Valley Church
Description:A Christian Church in Morris Township. An environmental name. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Central Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Piney Township, four miles east of Houston. Named for its location. An attempt was made to build the church near the center of the membership. (Tourist Map; Mrs. Susan Hiett)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Centre
Description:A post office in 1867. An office which lasted only a few years; so named because it was half way between Houston and Plato. (Postal Guide; R.D. Lynch; Goodwin (1867), p. 50)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cherry Point School
Description:District No. 137, near Mt. Grove in Clinton Township. Named for a small cherry orchard nearby. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Chestnut
Description:In Roubidoux Township. A post office from 1899 to 1901. Named for a grove of trees near the office. (Postal Guide; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Chimney Rock
Description:A cliff in Date Township which is so named because of its chimney-like shape. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Chimney Rock Cave
Description:In southeastern Date Township. Named for a limestone pinnacle on the bluff above the entrance to the cave. (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Chimney Rock Spring
Description:In southeastern Date Township. Named for the cave from which it issues. (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Clara
Description:A village in Piney Township. A post office since 1902. Named for the wife of Haden Lynch, postmaster and prominent citizen. He was a grandson of John Lynch, one of Texas County's first settlers. (Postal Guide; Platbook (1931); John R. Blankenship; HIST. TEXAS, p. 1127)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Clear Spring [1 of 2]
Description:A village in Pierce Township. A post office since 1880; it was listed as Clearspring from 1897 to 1910. Named for the unusually fine spring in the vicinity. (Postal Guide; Platbook (1931); Leland Farley; Missouri Gaz., (1883), p. 272)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Clear Spring [2 of 2]
Description:A large spring in Pierce Township. Named for the crystal like quality of the spring pool. (Tourist Map; Jean Malcolm)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Clear Springs School
Description:In Pierce Township. Name borrowed from the village. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Clearspring
Description:See Clear Spring.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cleveland Church
Description:A Christian Church in Piney Township. Name transferred from the school which is across the road. (Tourist Map; Mrs. Charles Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cleveland School House
Description:In Piney Township. Named in honor of President Grover Cleveland (1837-1908). Locally known as Possum Trot because of the roughness of the countryside. (MSTR; Mrs. Charles Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Clinton Township
Description:In the southwest corner of the county. The township was established in 1848. Formed from Benton Township, it was named for DeWitt Clinton (1769-1828), who had been governor of New York and distinguished himself as a friend of the West and an advocate of internal improvement. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 442; W.C. Leavitt; Tourist Map; Campbell)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Clyde
Description:A proposed village in Pierce Township. Surveyed in 1871. The name was selected by an old merchant named Ira Martin, but no one remembered why he had chosen the name. There was never a village or a post office at the place. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 492; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Coffee School
Description:District No. 79, near Dyke, in Morris Township. Named for John Coffee, who gave the school land. (MSTR; John R. Blankenship)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cold Spring
Description:A small spring in Piney Township. Named from the temperature of the water. (Tourist Map; Mrs. Charles Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Concord Baptist Church
Description:A Christian Church in Sherrill Township. An ideal name. (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Concord Church
Description:An early Baptist Church south of Cabool. An ideal name. (HIST. TEXAS (1889), p. 446; Mrs. Mary Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cork Mill
Description:See Ormsby Mill
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Coulstone
Description:A village in Sherrill Township on the Dent County line. Listed in Texas County from 1883 to 1918; in Dent since 1926. Named for W.R.E. Coulstone, merchant. (Postal Guide; Platbook; J.T. Keys; Missouri Gaz. (1883), p. 291; Postal Guide; Grosse; HIST. DENT, p. 597)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Counterfeit Cave
Description:A small cave near the Pulaski County line in Roubidoux Township. Many years ago a counterfeiters equipment was seized in the cave. (Tourist Map; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Covert
Description:A village in Lynch Township. A post office in 1915. Named for J.A. Covert, postmaster. (Postal Guide; Platbook (1931); C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Craddock School House
Description:In Boone Township. Named for W.E.R. Craddock, early settler. The school is one of the oldest in the county. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Crow Church
Description:A Christian Church in Sherrill Township. Named for W.J.G. Crow, early settler and one-time sheriff. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Crow School
Description:A rural school in Sherrill Township near Kimble. Named from the church. (MSTR; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Current River
Description:The largest river in the region rises in Dent County at Montauk and enters Shannon County in the northwestern corner. It winds south and merely touches the border of Texas County but cuts through the greater part of Shannon and finally enters Reynolds County on the east and ultimately flows into Black River. An unusually beautiful river, which W.A. Dorrance in his book, THREE OZARK STREAMS, describes as "a river so clean, so full, so broad, so swift that it has forced four races to name it current." The French name was "La Riviere Courante" (literally, running water) and the Spanish, "Rio Corrente." Mr. Dorrance says the name was originally conferred by the "native red men;" but he does not give the Indian form, and I have found it nowhere recorded. (Plat Book (19230); Dorrance, p. 37; Wetmore, p. 245)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Current River
Description:The largest river in the region rises in Dent County at Montauk and enters Shannon County in the northwest corner. It winds south and merely touches the border of Texas County but cuts through the greater part of Shannon and finally enters Reynolds County on the east and ultimately flows into Black River. An unusually beautiful river, which W.A. Dorrance in his book, THREE OZARK STREAMS, describes as "a river so clean, so full, so broad, so swift that it has forced four races to name it current." The French name was LA RIVIERE COURANTE (literally, running water) and the Spanish, RIO CORRENTE. Mr. Dorrance says the name was originally conferred by the "native red men;" but he does not give the Indian form, and I have found it nowhere recorded. (Plat Book (1930); Dorrance, p. 37; Wetmore, p. 245)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Current Township
Description:In the southeast section of the county, formed from Jackson Township in September, 1852. Named for Current River. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 444; C.T. Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Date
Description:A post office from 1893 to 1896. (Postal Guide)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Date Township
Description:Formed from Carroll Township in 1896. Doubtless named from the town. (Platbook; P. Elmore)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:David
Description:A post office from 1896 to 1904, in Piney Township. Named for David Zellweiger, storekeeper and postmaster. (Postal Guide; John R. Blankenship)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dent
Description:A village in Boone Township. A post office since 1901. The village was named for the Dent family, who were prominent in the district. (Postal Guide; Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 69; C.T. Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dunn
Description:See Impo
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dunn School
Description:District No. 63 in Lynch Township. Named for David Dunn, who gave the land on which the schoolhouse is built. (MSTR; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dunsmore School
Description:In Morris Township. Named for the family who donated the school site. (MSTR; Paul Cleaver)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dykes
Description:A village in Morris Township. A post office since 1876. Named for John Dykes, who settled there in the early days. (Postal Guide; Platbook (1931); Floyd Dykes; HIST. TEXAS, p. 491)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ebbing Springs
Description:See Success Spring
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Edanville
Description:In northwestern Boone Township. A post office from 1893 to 1927. Named because of the beauty of the countryside. The region is a very lonely section and will ultimately become part of the National Forest. In the Texas County Platbook it is apparently misspelled Evansville. The spelling Edanville is probably a misspelling for Eden. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; Platbook (1931); W.D. Tilley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Elk Creek
Description:A village in Cass Township. A post office since 1867. Named for the moose or wapiti, locally called elk, that once roamed over that part of the county. Settled by Virginians, the village has always been considered the cultural center of Texas County. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 491; Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 70; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ellis Prairie
Description:A village northwest of Houston in Lynch Township. A post office since 1879. Named for Washington Asa Ellis, a pioneer in the region. It is located on prairie land. (HIST. TEXAS (1889), p. 491; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ellsworth
Description:The first hamlet in the county was located in Lynch Township in 1837. It was a post office in 1860. Named for an old pioneer who had a general store there before the war. (Postal Guide; J.H. Lilly; MISSOURI GAZ. (1860)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Embree
Description:A post office from 1889 to 1923, in Upton Township. Named for Tom Embree, the postmaster. (Postal Guide; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Eunice
Description:A village in Carroll Township. A post office since 1891. Named Eunice after the wife of W.B. Cooper, first postmaster. (Postal Guide; R. McN. (1937); N.O. Walling)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Evansville
Description:See Edanville (Platbook Texas)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Eveningshade
Description:A village in Roubidoux Township. A post office since 1901. A name given the region by J.C. Davis because of the idyllic nature of the countryside. (Postal Guide; Platbook (1931); R. McN.; Leland Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Excelsior School House
Description:In southern Clinton Township. A "motto" name, signifying "ever upward." It has been adopted as the motto for the state of New York. (Tourist Map; W. Johnson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Flat Rock
Description:See Roubidoux
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fourt's Mill
Description:An early mill, located in what is now Clinton Township, named after John J. and D.L. Fourt who owned it. D.L. Fourt was an early county judge, and John was one of the first road commissioners. It was first known as Nesbitt's Mill after the man who built the gin mill. (C. Covert; HIST. TEXAS, p. 430)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fowler
Description:A village in Morris Township. A post office from 1890 to 1923. Named for C.A. Fowler, merchant. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Freedom Church
Description:A Freewill Baptist Church in Sargent Township. Named because it was established by Freewill Baptists, a less strict sect than the "hard-shelled" Baptists. (Tourist Map; Jean Malcolm)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Freedom School
Description:District No. 26 in Sargent Township, near Willow Springs. Named from the church which is across the road from the school. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Freely Give School
Description:In Burdine Township. So named because the original schoolhouse was erected by public subscription. (Tourist Map; Paul Cleaver)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:French School
Description:In Cass Township. Named for the French family on whose farm the school was built. Locally known as Nubbin Ridge because the ground on which the school is built is so poor only "nubbins" grow there. ("Nubbin" is an Ozark term for an imperfect ear of corn.) (MSTR; P. Cleaver; J. Malcolm)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Friendship School
Description:District No. 102, near Raymondville in Jackson Township. An ideal name. (MSTR; Mrs. Flora Scott)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Frisco
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fruitfield
Description:Located in Morris Township. A post office in 1895. Named because an attempt was being made to promote the section as an apple and peach orchard region. (Postal Guide; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Geers School
Description:District No. 85 in Roubidoux Township. Named for Mrs. Kate Geers on whose land the school was built. (MSTR; Leland Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:German Church
Description:A Lutheran Church in Sargent Township. Named because the congregation is largely of German extraction. (Tourist Map; Luther Curry)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gladden School
Description:District No. 84 in Lynch Township. Named after Joe Gladden, who gave the land for the school. (MSTR; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Goat Cave
Description:A small cave in Piney Township. Named because goats use the cave for shelter as it opens on their pasture. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Graff
Description:A discontined post office (1896-1900), in Sargent Township. Named for Courtney Graff, who secured the office for the community. (Postal Guide; J.H. Lilly)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Grand View Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Piney Township. Named after the school which is close by. (Tourist Map; Jean Malcolm)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Grand View School
Description:District No. 105, near Houston. Named for the scenery. Not especially suitable. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gravel Point
Description:A discontinued post office (1876-1904), in Clinton Township. An early village which grew up at the point where gravel was taken from the West Piney Creek to make roads. (Campbell (1873); Don Gladden)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gravel Point School
Description:In northern Clinton Township. Named for the discontinued post office. (Tourist Map; Don Gladden)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Green Hill School
Description:In Cass Township. Named for its location on a tree-covered hill. (MSTR; Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Griffith School
Description:District No. 5, near Summerville in Carroll Township. Named for the N.W. Griffith family, who lived in the neighborhood. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Grogan
Description:A post office in southeastern Cass Township since 1899. Named for J.E. Grogan, on whose land it was established. Several other members of the same family live on adjoining tracts. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Guild
Description:A post office from 1910 to 1928. Several residents remembered the post office, but no one could offer an explanation for its name. (Postal Guide)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gum Spring School
Description:A rural school in Clinton Township. Named for the spring. (MSTR; W.D. Trail)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Harlow School
Description:District No. 1 near Mountain View. Named for Reuben Harlow, landowner and one of the earliest settlers in the county. (MSTR; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Harmon Valley
Description:A fertile valley in central Boone Township; named for the F.A. Harmon family who had a large farm there. (C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Harmon Valley School
Description:In central Boone Township. Named for its location in Harmon Valley. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hartshorn
Description:A village in southeastern Current Township. It has been a post office since 1892. Named for the first postmaster, Hartshorn Cole. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); Mrs. Katie Woolfork; Mrs. Flora Scott)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hastings
Description:See Success
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hattie
Description:A village in southeastern Pierce Township. A post office from 1893 to 1932. Named for the wife of John Cross, landowner in the district. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hazleton
Description:A village and discontinued post office (1891-1932), in Boone Township. Named from the mill which is an old landmark in the county. (Postal Guide; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hazleton Mill
Description:In south- cental Boone Township. Merely the ruins remain of a mill which was operated by J. Hazleton. (Leland Farley; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hazleton Spring
Description:In south-central Boone Township. A large spring belonging originally to J. Hazleton and named after him. (Leland Farley; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hickory Spring
Description:An early trading post and post office in Lynch Township. The store was opened about ten years before the Civil War. The place was a post office in 1860, but it is now non-existent. Named for its location. (Postal Guide; Missouri Gaz. (1860), p. 119; Mrs. Mary Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:High Point School
Description:District No. 21, near Raymondville. Named for its location on a high ridge. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Houston
Description:The county seat is located in Piney Township in the geographical center of the county. The town was incorporated June 29, 1857, and postal service was extended the next January. The town was completely destroyed during the Civil War, but it was rebuilt as soon as the war was over. Named in honor of Sam Houston (1793-1863), who was twice president of the independent state of Texas and United States Senator from Texas. He is chiefly remembered, however, as the hero of the Battle of San Jacinto in which he captured the Mexican general, Santa Anna, and avenged the Alamo massacre and the murders of Bowie and Davy Crockett. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 476; C. Covert; DICT. OF AM. BIOG., vol. 3, p. 274)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Houston School
Description:District No. 15 in Pierce Township. Named after T.J. Houston, who was instrumental in building the school. (MSTR; Duke Hiett)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Huggins
Description:A village in Morris Township. A post office since 1888. Named in honor of Francis M. Huggins, first postmaster, a justice of the peace and a merchant. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); Eaton, Missouri H.R., vol. 13, p. 70; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hurst
Description:A village in Morris Township. A post office from 1901 to 1921. Named for the Hurst family, who had a store there. (Plat Book (1931); Postal Guide; Mrs. Mary Fredericks)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Impo
Description:A post office in Clinton Township since 1921. The name is a shortenend form of Important which was given the post office when the Department refused to take the name of Dunn by which the settlement had been known. Only the post office is known as Impo, the town still keeping the name of Dunn, which was the family name of the original settlers. (Postal Guide; Tourist Map; L.C. Rust)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Indian Cairns
Description:Two Indian rock cairns, one of which is close to Highway 17. The other is near Eveningshade. Said to have been erected by the Shawnee Indians. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:A small stream that rises in Ozark Township and flows east to the Big Piney. Named for the Indians (Shawnees), who had a village on the stream bank. (Tourist Map; Leland Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Indian Creek School House
Description:In Cass Township. Named for the stream which is close by. (MSTR; Tourist Map; Leland Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Indian Paintings
Description:Indians' pictographs, now almost obliterated, on the White Rock Bluffs near Houston in Piney Township. (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Indian Village Site
Description:There are six sites of former Indian villages in the county, one at Chimney Rock and the others in the center and northwest portion of the county. The largest is on the Roubidoux in northwest Morris Township. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jack's Fork
Description:A discontinued post office (1860-1902), in Pierce Township. Named for the river. (Postal Guide; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jack's Fork of Current River
Description:A large stream which rises in Texas County and enters Shannon County from the west, flowing north and east until it empties into Current River in the east-central section of the county. The river flows through land which is very wild and forbidding. Mr. Covert of Houston says that a favorite early joke was to offer a criminal his choice of five years in the state prison or one year on Jack's Fork. The river today is becoming a favorite resort for fishermen. Named for an old Indian, John Jacks, who lived near the head of the stream. (R: Plat Book (1933); C. Covert; L.D. Shuck; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jack's Fork of Current River
Description:A large stream which rises in Texas County and enters Shannon from the west, flowing north and east until it empties into Current River in the east central section of the county. The river flows through land which is very wild and forbidding. Mr. Covert of Houston says that a favorite early joke was to offer a criminal his choice of five years in the state prison or one year on Jack's Fork. The river today is becoming a favorite resort for fishermen. Named for an old Indian, John Jacks, who lived near the head of the stream. (R: Plat Book (1933); C. Covert; L.D. Shuck; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jack's Fork Township
Description:Formed of a portion of Carroll Township, southwest of Spring Valley, in June, 1852. Named for the river. (HIST. TEXAS (1889), p. 443; Elmore)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jackson Township
Description:On the western boundary of the county, one tier from the northern boundary. Established in June, 1845. Named after Jackson D. Trusty, at whose home the organization was made. (HIST. TEXAS (1889), p. 443; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Johns School House
Description:In northern Date Township. Named for W.E. Johns, school director on whose farm the school stands. Formerly called Pearl Smith School, after a teacher who was popular in the community. (MSTR; Mrs. Flora Scott; Leland Farley; Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Kell School
Description:District No. 7 in Carroll Township. Named for a prominent farmer of the region, Esco Kell. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Fredericks)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Kimble
Description:A village in Sherrill Township. A post office since 1899. Named for C.H. Kimble, who had the store there. (R.D. Lynch; Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Kinder Post
Description:A village and discontinued post office (1910-1932), in Boone Township. Named by Columbus C. Bradford to signify that it was a place for children. Bradford, still living although blind, was a native of Texas County who went to the theological seminary and became a noted minister in Chicago. He wrote a book expounding a theory about souls asleep for which he was expelled from his pulpit. He returned to Texas County and established this town with the idea of being kind to children by getting them out of the city and on to little tracts of land. He was very sincere in the project, but it failed. Mr. Bradford is an extremely well educated man and would be familiar with German. The use of the German word in Kindergarten might have suggested the foreign word. (Plat Book (1931); C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Kinserlow
Description:Located in northern Lynch Township. A post office from 1910 to 1915. Named for Ike Kinserlow, who had a mill there. (Postal Guide; County Plat; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Kinserlow Mill
Description:In Lynch Township. A mill which was operated by Ike Kinserlow on the Big Piney, but now abandoned. (C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ladd
Description:A village in Roubidoux Township. A post office from 1893 to 1921. J.C. Davis, a prohibitionist and preacher, named the office after his son Ladd. (Plat Book (1931); C. Covert; J.C. Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Laidley School
Description:District No. 10 in Carroll Township. Named for Joe Laidley, from Pennsylvania, who settled there and gave land for the school building. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:District school No. 33, near Willow Springs. An ideal name. (MSTR; Mrs. Katie Woolfork)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Licking
Description:A town in Sherrill Township, a post office since 1860. The town was incorporated in 1878, but the country around was settled as early as 1826 by Joel Sherrill, William Thornton, and Cartes Baldridge. Boone and Paddies, two frontiersmen, had lived in the region for a time as early as 1816. Locally referred to as The Lick, the town was named for a buffalo salt lick which is within 1/4 mile of the town. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 485; Conard, vol. 4, p. 177; Campbell; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Liedy School
Description:District No. 8 in Carroll Township. Named for the William H. Liedy family, who live near the schoolhouse. (MSTR; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Little Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in Clinton Township and flows southeast into Douglas County. So named because of its size. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Little Creek School
Description:District No. 89 in Clinton Township. Named for a nearby stream. (MSTR; Leland Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Log Cabin Park
Description:In south-central Sherrill Township. A tourist supply post on Highway 63, so named because the filling station and sleeping cabins are constructed of log siding. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Logan School
Description:District No. 92, near Huggins, in Morris Township. Named for the John T. Logans who formerly lived in the community. (MSTR; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lone Star Mill
Description:An abandoned mill in Piney Township. Named because of its location near Houston in Texas County, which is named for the Lone Star state. The mill was used to supply electric power and light until the recent installation of more modern power plants in Houston. (Tourist Map; Gladys Snider)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Long Hollow
Description:A narrow valley in Roubidoux Township. Named for its size. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Long Hollow Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Roubidoux Township. Named for the hollow. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Long Hollow School
Description:District No. 87, near Evening Shade in Roubidoux Township. Named for the hollow. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Long Valley
Description:A narrow valley in Upton Township. Named for its size. (Tourist Map; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Long Valley School
Description:District No. 93 in Upton Township. Named for the region; the schoolhouse sits at the head of a long narrow valley. (MSTR; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Louisa
Description:A village and abandoned post office (1910-1922), in Pierce Township. Named for the wife of Jim Embree, storekeeper and postmaster. (C. Covert; Postal Guide)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lower Bean Creek
Description:Rises in Sherrill Township and flows east and north to Big Creek in Dent County. Named for the bean vines that grew along its banks. The term lower distinguishes it from another branch also called Bean Creek. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lower Bean Creek School
Description:District No. 26, near Licking in Sherrill Township. Named from the creek. (MSTR)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lundy
Description:A village and abandoned post office (1892-1921), in southwestern Piney Township. Named for John Lundy, who had a water mill there. (Postal Guide; Plat Book; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lundy Mill
Description:A ruined mill in Piney Township. Named for John Lundy, owner. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lynch Township
Description:Established in the north-central section of the county in 1854. Named after John Lynch, an early settler. (Campbell (1873); C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mahan
Description:A hamlet and abandoned post office (1904-1915), in Upton Township. Named for Sam Mahan, whose wife was postmistress. (Postal Guide; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Malone
Description:An abandoned farmer's post office (1909-1910), in Current Township. Named for P. Malone, a farmer who had the office in his home. (Postal Guide; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Maples
Description:A village in Sherrill Township. A post office since 1891. Named in honor of J.J. Maples, postmaster and merchant. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 70; John R. Blankenship)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Marvin
Description:A post office in Current Township in 1901. Named for Marvin Chapel. (Postal Guide; R.D. Lynch; Bryan & Rose, PIONEERS, p. 416)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:McWilliams Spring
Description:A large spring in Roubidoux Township. Named for the family on whose land it is located. (Tourist Map; J.C. Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Merrill School
Description:In Boone Township. Named for Alford "Jake" Merrill, an early settler in the district. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mill Creek School
Description:District No. 95, near Turley. Named for its location near an abandoned mill on Roubidoux Creek. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mineral Springs
Description:A group of springs in Piney Township, north of Houston. Named because of the mineral content of the water. About fifty springs are in the group, some containing iron, some sulphur, and some magnesium. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 429; John R. Blankenship)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mineral Springs City
Description:An addition to Houston in Piney Township which was named because of the presence of mineral springs. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 481; Mrs. Charles Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mitchell's Store
Description:A highway store in Lynch Township. Named after the owner, T.N. Mitchell. Also known as Blue Moon, a name given a dance hall built by the store. Blue Moon, the owner says, is a common name for dance halls, expressing the enchantment of the dance. (Tourist Map; T.N. Mitchell)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Montreal
Description:A village in Clinton Township before the Civil War. There is no trace of the settlement left, except the county record showing that it was surveyed in 1857. No one could give a reason for the name selected, but it was probably borrowed from Montreal, Canada. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 492)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mooney Hollow
Description:A narrow valley in Boone Township. Named for the Joseph H. Mooney family, who settled in the region. (MSTR; R.N. Johnson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mooney Hollow School House
Description:In Boone Township, near Kinderpost. Named for the school's location. (MSTR; R.N. Johnson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Moore's Chapel
Description:A Baptist Church in Pierce Township. Named for J.N. Moore, who built the original church. (Tourist Map; Paul Cleaver)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Morgan Cave
Description:A small cave in Cass Township. Named for the family on whose land it was discovered. (Tourist Map; Paul Jones)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Morris Township
Description:Formed from Cass Township in the southwestern part of the county in 1852. Named for Macajah Morris, an early settler and road commissioner. (Campbell (1873); R.D. Lynch; County Records)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mount Olive Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Pierce Township. A Bible name (Acts 1:12); the Mount of Olives was the mountain from which Christ ascended into heaven. (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mount Olive Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Burdine Township. A Bible name (Deut. 34:1) for the mountain from which Moses saw the promised land. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mount Pisgah Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Burdine Township. A Bible name (Deut. 34:1) for the mountain from which Moses saw the promised land. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mount Zion Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Morris Township. Cf. above. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mountain Store
Description:A trading post which stood a few miles east of the present Mountain Grove. After the Civil War the site was moved across the county line into Wright County and called Mountain Grove. No trace is left of the old trading post. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 456; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mt. Vernon School
Description:In Jackson Township. Named in honor of George Washington's home. (Tourist Map; Delbert Johnson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mt. Zion School
Description:In Morris Township. Named for the church. (MSTR; Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Murr School
Description:In Morris Township. Named for N.M. Murr, who gave the land on which the school is built. (Tourist Map; L.C. Russ)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nagle
Description:A discontinued post office (1902-1925), in Ozark Township. Named for the family of C. H. Nagle, who owns land in the vicinity. (Postal Guide; Eaton, Missouri H.R., vol. 13, p. 70; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nagle Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Ozark Township. Named for the post office. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nagle School
Description:In Ozark Township. Named for the post office. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Near Home Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Cass Township. Built by a group who had been attending church at Elk Creek. The new church was near their homes and was so named. (Tourist Map; Luther Curry)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nesbitt Mill
Description:See Fourt's Mill
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nile
Description:A discontinued post office (1892-1915), and trading post in Current Township. Named for the river in Egypt. Given the name possibly because it is on Big Creek. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 70; Mrs. Katie Woolfork)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nile School
Description:In Current Townshnip. Named for the town. (MSTR)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nirvana
Description:A discontinued post office (1891-1902), in Ozark Township. Named for the word which means the Buddhist heaven. The highest religious state which can be achieved, when all desire for existence is destroyed and the soul becomes one with its creator. Probably used here as a humorous name for a quiet place. (Postal Guide; W. Leavitt)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:North Ashley Creek
Description:A tributary of Current River which winds through Jackson and Sherrill Townships. Named for the famous fur trader (see Ashley Cave). (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:North Fork
Description:A long stream which rises in central Texas County and flows southeast into Jack's Fork. Named for its location. (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nubbin Ridge
Description:See French School
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Number One School
Description:District No. 80, near Upton. So named to signify that the school was an excellent one. (MSTR; Leland Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oak Grove School [1 of 2]
Description:District No. 68, near Mt. Grove in Clinton Township. Named for its location in an oak grove. (MSTR; W.A. Edmundson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oak Grove School [2 of 2]
Description:In Cass Township. Named for the oak grove in which it is built. (MSTR; W.A. Edmundson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oak Hill Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Piney Township. Named from the school nearby. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oak Hill School [1 of 2]
Description:In Piney Township. Named for the timber and the school's location on a hill. (MSTR; Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oak Hill School [2 of 2]
Description:In Pierce Township. Named for its location on an oak-grown hill. (MSTR; Tourist Map; Paul Jones)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oak Ridge School
Description:In Carroll Township. Named for its location on an oak-timbered ridge. (MSTR; Katie Woolfork)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oakdale School
Description:In central Cass Township. Named for its location in an oak glade. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Odd
Description:See Bucyrus
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Onyx Cave
Description:In Clinton Township. Named from the alternating bands of yellow and white stone which form the walls of the cave. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ormsby Mill
Description:A sawmill on the Big Piney, above Houston. Owned and operated by John Ormsby in 1828; hence the name. Ormsby bought the mill from Thomas Cork, who built it. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 430)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oscar
Description:A village and discontinued post office (1880-1915), in Jackson Township. Named by T.N. Bradford after his oldest son Oscar. Bradford was an important citizen politically in Texas County. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); C. Covert; Missouri Gaz. (1883), p. 738)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark Mountains
Description:A mountain range of great antiquity and beauty which embraces all five of the counties in this thesis. The name is of French and Indian origin and a result of a misunderstanding by the English. It means literally "at the (country, river, or place of the) Arkansas." The Indians of Siouan stock who migrated westward called themselves Quapaw (down stream people) but they were called, before and after their migration, the Arkansas by the Illinois. Early 18th century maps by G. De l'Isle show that both the Ohio and Wabash rivers were called the Arkansea. Father Gravier in the JESUIT RELATIONS in 1700 writes: "It is called by the Illinois and the Oumiamis the river of the Arkansea because the Arkansea formerly dwelt on it." It was the custom of the French colonists to abbreviate the long, difficult Indian geographical names; hence les Arkansea became les Arcs. In the French archives at Jefferson Memorial in St. Louis, Mr. W.A. Dorrance states, the phrase "aux arcs" appears many times, meaning on the river, at the post, or in the country of the Arkansas. The abbreviated phrase "aux arcs" was mistaken by the English for one word and they spelled it Ozark. The word is found on a map by Bradbury in 1809. In 1816 it was spelled Osark by Kerr. Schoolcraft in 1819 spelled it Ozark. (Dorrance, W.A., THREE OZARK STREAMS, appendix 1; JESUIT RELATIONS, vol. 65, p. 107)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark Mountains
Description:A mountain range of great antiquity and beauty which embraces all five of the counties in this thesis. The name is of French and Indian origin and the result of a misunderstanding by the English. It means literally "at the (country, river, or place of the) Arkansas." The Indians of Siouan stock who migrated westward called themselves Quapaw (down stream people) but they were called, both before ands after their migration, the Arkansas by the Illinois. Early 18th century maps by G. De l'Isle show that both the Ohio and the Wabash rivers were called the Arkansea. Father Gravier in the JESUIT RELATIONS in 1700 writes: "It is called by the Illinois and the Oumiamis the river of the Arkansea because the Arkansea formerly dwelt on it." It was the custom of the French colonists to abbreviate the long, difficult Indian geographical names; hence les Arkansea became les Arcs. In the French archives at Jefferson Memorial in St. Louis, Mr. W.A. Dorrance states, the phrase "aux arcs" appears many times, meaning in the river, at the post, or in the country of the Arkansas. The abbreviated phrase "aux arcs" was mistaken by the English for one word and they spelled it Ozark. The word is found on a map by Bradbury in 1809. In 1816 it was spelled Osark by Kerr. Schoolcraft in 1819 spelled it Ozark. (Dorrance, W.A., THREE OZARK STREAMS, appendix 1; JESUIT RELATIONS, vol. 65, p. 107)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark School [1 of 2]
Description:In Sherrill Township. Named for the mountains. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark School [2 of 2]
Description:In Piney Township. Named for the Ozark Mountains. (Tourist Map; Mrs. S. Hiett)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark Township
Description:In the south-central part of the county, the township was formed from Jackson, Carroll, and Pierce in 1860. Named for the Ozark Mountains. The name is a favorite one in the district. (Campbell (1873); W. Leavitt)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Paddy Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in Lynch Township and flows east to the Big Piney. Named for the Paddy or Patton family, who came to the county with Daniel Boone about 1816. (R.D. Lynch; Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Paddy Creek Chapel
Description:A long disbanded Methodist Church in Lynch Township. Named for the creek. (R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Paddy Creek Chapel School
Description:In Lynch Township. Named for the church which formerly met there. (MSTR; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pea Vine Creek
Description:Rises in Piney Township and flows east to Big Piney. Named from wild peas growing on its bank in early days. There are none there now. (HIST. TEXAS (1889), p. 447; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pearl Smith School House
Description:See Johns School House.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Peter's Ranch
Description:See Ranch Cave
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pettit's Mill
Description:This sawmill, on the Big Piney, was built in 1819 and named after its owner. It was probably the first in the county. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 430)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pierce Township
Description:In the southeastern corner of the county; the township was originally organized in 1852 as Jack's Fork, being named after the stream. In 1854 it was named Pierce after J.W. Pierce, a prominent early settler in the region. (Campbell (1873); W. Leavitt)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pigeon Creek
Description:Rises in Sherrill Township and flows southeast to Big Piney in Dent County. Named for the wild pigeons who frequented the district in the early days. (Tourist Map; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pigeon School
Description:In Sherrill Township. Named for Pigeon Creek. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Creek
Description:A small branch which rises in Pierce Township and flows east to Jacks Fork. Named for the trees growing along the streams banks. (R. McN.; Leland Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Creek School
Description:In Pierce Township. Named for Pine Creek. (MSTR; Leland Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Flat School
Description:District No. 129, near Summerville in Carroll Township. Cf. above. (MSTR; J.W. Clark; W.F. Trail)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Hollow
Description:A narrow valley in Roubidoux Township. Named for the trees which grow in the vicinity. (W.D. Tilley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Hollow School
Description:In Roubidoux Township. Named for the hollow in which it stands. (MSTR; W.D. Tilley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Ridge School
Description:In Piney Township. Named for the pine ridge on which it is built. (MSTR; R.D. Lynch; Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Piney Township
Description:In the center of the county, established in 1845. Named for the Big Piney River which flows through it from north to south. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 442; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pinkston
Description:A post office in northeastern Lynch Township in 1910. Named for Obe Pinkston, landowner in the neighborhood. In the Plat Book for 1931 it is misspelled Pirkston. (Postal Guide; Mrs. Isabel McCoy; Plat Book (1931)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pirkston
Description:See Pinkston
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pisgah Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Upton Township. Cf. above.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pisgah School
Description:In Upton Township. A Bible name transferred to the school from the church which is near. (MSTR; Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pisgah School
Description:In Roubidoux Township. Named for the church which is across the field. (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Plato
Description:A village on Roubidoux Creek in Roubidoux Township. Established August 22, 1874, it has been a post office since 1888. The office is listed in Goodwin's in 1867, however. The town was named for Plato, the Athenian philosopher, by John Largent, Ed Harris, and William Cook. They planned an ideal community governed by thinking men, the type of community Plato described in his REPUBLIC. (Missouri H.R., vol. 13, p. 70; R.D. Lynch; Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); HIST. TEXAS, p. 489; Goodwin's (1867), p. 49)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Grove School
Description:In central Burdine Township. An environmental name. (Tourist Map; Leland Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:In Cass Township. An environmental name. (Tourist Map; Leland Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Ridge
Description:A hamlet and discontinued post office (1883-1904), in Upton Township. Named to describe its location. The countryside is unusually beautiful, but a little wild to be described as "pleasant" perhaps. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); Mrs. Isabel McCoy; Missouri Gaz. (1883), p. 772)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Ridge School
Description:In Upton Township. Named for the discontinued post office, Pleasant Ridge. (Tourist Map; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Plum Valley
Description:A discontinued post olffice (1867-1910), and trading hamlet in Piney Township, now completely abandoned. Named by William Wilson, who found wild plums growing in the region. He later planted more trees. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); Goodwin (1867), p. 50; Campbell (1873), p. 33; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Possum Trot School [1 of 2]
Description:In Carroll Township. Named because of the wildness of the region. A common name for schools in remote districts. (Tourist Map; L.C. Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Possum Trot School [2 of 2]
Description:See Cleveland School House.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Prairie Point Church
Description:In Upton Township. A Christian Church organized in 1880 at the Prairie Point School, from which it takes its name. (Mrs. Don Gladden)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Prairie Point School
Description:Near Roubidoux in Upton Township. Named for its location on prairie or flat land, which is rather unusual in this section of the county. (MSTR; Mrs. Don Gladden)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Prescott
Description:A village in Lynch Township; a post office since 1899. Named for Valentine Prescott, first postmaster. (Plat Book (1931); W.D. Tilley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Primitive Baptist Church
Description:In Sherrill Township. Named for the religious denomination that built it. (Tourist Map; Mrs. C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Raftville
Description:A village in Lynch Township. A post office from 1918 to 1933. So named because the village was the starting place for floating ties down Big Piney River to the railroad. (C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ragsdale School
Description:District No. 75 in northern Morris Township. Named for Jessie Ragsdale, who gave the school land. (MSTR: C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rattlesnake Cave
Description:In Ozark Township. Named because of the number of rattlesnakes in the cave. (Tourist Map; Paul Jones)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Raymondville
Description:A village in Jackson Township which has been a post office since 1876. Named by Joseph W. Brackett for his old home in Raymond, Maine. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); Mrs. Flora Scott; W.F. Trail)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Red Banks
Description:Now called the Narrows. A very scenic section along the Piney, a deep narrow cut in the clay hills. (HIST. TEXAS (1889), p. 443; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Riley School
Description:A rural school near Summersville in Carroll Township. Named in honor of the Riley family who aided in organizing the district. (MSTR; Mrs. K. Woolfork)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Roaring Spring
Description:In Boone Township. A small spring which is named from the manner in which the water issues from the ledge. (Tourist Map; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Roby
Description:A hamlet in Lynch Township which has been a post office since 1883. Named for Cyrus H. Roby, merchant. (Postal Guide; R. McN., Miss Dora Mace)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Roby Fire Tower
Description:A ranger lookout built by the United States government in 1935 in Lynch Township. Takes its name from the nearby settlement. (Tourist Map; J.C. Combs)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rock Spring
Description:A small spring in northeastern Sherrill Township. A descriptive name. (Tourist Map; Walter Watson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rock Spring Church
Description:A Baptist Church in northeastern Sherrill Township. Named from a small stream which issues from a rock ledge near the church. (Tourist Map; Walter Watson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rocky Branch
Description:A small tributary of the Big Piney River in Piney Township. Named for the abundant supply of rock in the creek bed and along the banks. (Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rocky Branch Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Piney Township. Named for its location on Rocky Branch. (Mrs. Charles Covert; Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rocky Branch School
Description:In Piney Township. Named for the church which was established in the neighborhood. (Tourist Map; Mrs. C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rose Spring
Description:A small spring in Pierce Township. Named for John Rose on whose farm it is located. (Tourist Map; Mrs. Flora Scott)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Roubidoux
Description:(Also spelled Robidoux, Roberdeau). A village in Upton Township which has been a post office since 1860. Named for the Roubidoux Creek which flows through the village. There is a deer lick at Roubidoux. The place is locally known as Flat Rock because of some large rocks along the creek bank. (Postal Guide; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Roubidoux Creek
Description:A large creek which flows northwest through the township and into Pulaski County. Named for the Roubidoux family who pioneered in the section. The best known member of the family was Joseph, who founded the city of St. Joseph. (Postal Guide; Conard; Mrs. I. McCoy; Wetmore (1837), map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Roubidoux Township
Description:In the northwest corner of the county; established in 1845. Named for the stream. (HIST. TEXAS (1889); Plat Book (1931); C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Round Valley School
Description:District No. 12, near Hartshorn in Current Township. Named for its location in a round- shaped valley. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ruth
Description:A post office in Morris Township in 1876. Named for the first wife of J.M. Embree, a Tennessean who was prominent politically in the county. (Postal Guide; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Samoa
Description:A village and discontinued post office (1891-1904), in Piney Township. Named by Uriah L. Upton for Samoa in the South Seas, which had been made prominent by Robert Louis Stevenson's residence there from 1889 to 1894. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sargent
Description:A village and discontinued post office (1888-1932), in Sargent Township. Originally called Stogsdill after the storekeeper, the name was changed to Sargent by the railroad to honor an official. (Postal Guide; Tourist Map; Plat Book (1931); W. Johnson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sargent Township
Description:In the southeast section of the county, established in 1917. Named for the largest village in the township. (Plat Book; W. Johnson; W.P. Elmore)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Shady Grove School
Description:In southern Burdine Township. An environmental name. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sherrill
Description:A village in Sherrill Township which has been a post office since 1874. Named after the township. (Plat Book (1931); Missouri Gaz. (1874), p. 620; Postal Guide; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sherrill Township
Description:In the northeast corner of the county. Established in 1848. Named for John and Joel Sherrill, who were large landowners in the region. John was judge of county court for years, and Joel was county surveyor. (HIST. TEXAS (1889), p. 443; Plat Book (1931); R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Shipp School
Description:District No. 27, near Licking in Sherrill Township. Named for Sherman Shipp, who originally owned the land. (MSTR; Miss Dora Mace)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Short Log School
Description:See Brown Hill School
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sillyman's Store
Description:A trading point in Lynch Township. Named for Dr. John Sillyman, who owns the store and who claims to have a cancer cure. (Tourist Map; C.T. Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Simmons
Description:A village in Cass Township. A post office since 1893. Named for D.L. Simmons, postmaster and merchant. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 70; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Simmons Cave
Description:A small cave in Cass Township. Named for D.L. Simmons, who owned the cave. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Slabtown Spring
Description:In Boone Township. Named for the lumbering industry which prospered there in the early days of railroad building. A camp for the making of railroad ties was located at the spring. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Slagger Cave
Description:See Bat Cave
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Smith Caves
Description:Two small caves on Big Creek in Current Township. Named for the family on whose farm they are located. (Tourist Map; Leland Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Solo
Description:A hamlet in Cass Township. So named by R.A. Lilly, storekeeper, because of its remoteness. (Postal Guide; J.H. Lilly)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:South Ashley Creek
Description:Rises in Current Township and ultimately flows into Current River. Ashley is a common name in the neighborhood. Henry Ashley, the fur trader, is supposed to have had a post near the creek in the early days. (Tourist Map; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:South Fork
Description:A tributary of Jack's Fork which flows northeast from the center of the county. Named for its location. (Tourist Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Split Limb School
Description:In Jackson Township near Raymondville. A large tree with a split limb served to identify the school. Locally the name is explained by the story of a farmer who had a large peach orchard near the school which suffered at the hands of the boys. He offered to allow the boys to eat the fruit which was on the split limbs if they would leave the rest of the trees alone. (MSTR; C. Covert; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:St. Anna
Description:A discontinued post office (1910-1932), in Roubidoux Township. Said to have been named by Bob Williams to honor his wife, Anna, who had died. The place of course is really named for St. Ann or Anna, the mother of the Virgin, and Mrs. Anna Williams was honored indirectly by the honor paid to her patron or "name" saint. (Plat Book (1931); J.C. Davis; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Description:The only railroad in Laclede County; the Eastern Division running from St. Louis to Springfield crosses the county from the northeast corner to the southwest. The Southern Division running from Memphis to Springfield crosses the southwestern tip of Texas County from Sargent to Cabool. A branch line, known as the Current River Division, crosses Shannon County from east to west near its southern border. Named for its proposed terminals. The railroad never reached San Francisco, however. The nickname and commonest name for the road is the "Frisco," a shortened form of San Francisco. The road was originally (in 1869) called the Atlantic and Pacific because it was intended to span the continent. It has never been extended farther than St. Louis on the east, and Paris, Texas, on the west. (R. McN.; Tourist Map; R.L. Johnson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Description:The only railroad in Laclede County; the Eastern Division running from St. Louis to Springfield crosses the county from the northeast corner to the southwest. The Southern Division running from Memphis to Springfield crosses the southwestern tip of Texas County from Sargent to Cabool. A branch line, known as the Current River Division, crosses Shannon County from east to west near its southern border. Named for its proposed terminals. The railroad never reached San Francisco, however. The nickname and commonest name for the road is "Frisco," a shortened form of San Francisco. The road was originally (in 1869) called the Atlantic and Pacific because it was intended to span the continent. It has never been extended farther than St. Louis on the east, and Paris, Texas, on the west. (R. McN.; Tourist Map; R.L. Johnson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:St. Michael's Church
Description:A Catholic Church in Cabool. Named for Saint Michael, the archangel, the patron of the sick and of mariners. Successful in his battle against the bad angels in heaven, he is considered a great aid in protecting souls from the snares of the devil. A prayer addressed to him is included in the group of prayers with which the mass concludes. The most famous church bearing his name is Mont-Saint-Michel in Normandy. (Catholic Register; Catholic Ency., vol. 10, p. 275)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stallcup Cave
Description:A large wet cave in Upton Township. Named for Wright Stallcup, who owns the farm on which the cave is located. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stallman School
Description:In southeast Date Township. Named for Henry Stallman, local farmer. (Tourist Map; Mrs. K. Woolfork)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stanford
Description:A discontinued post office (1860-1902), in Cass Township. Named for Stanford Wommack, the first postmaster. (Postal Guide; Cram (1924); R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Star Union School
Description:In Pierce Township. Two districts consolidated and kept both names. Usually called Union Star, as that name is more euphonious. (MSTR; Mrs. K. Woolfork)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Steely's Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church in Cass Township. Named for the Steely family, who organized the church in 1893. (Tourist Map; Houston HERALD, Nov. 25, 1937)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Steffens Addition
Description:A district in the southeastern part of Houston Township, laid out and named for Joseph and Henry Steffens by Josephine D. Steffens. (HIST. TEXAS (1889), p. 477; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stogsdill
Description:See Sargent
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stouse's Mill
Description:An old mill in Cass Township. Named for the family who built it and operated it. Not in use now. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stubbs School
Description:In Clinton Township. Named in honor of Judge Jesse Stubbs, who lived in the district and was circuit court judge for several terms. (MSTR; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stultz
Description:A village in Cass Township. A post office from 1888 to the present. Named for Lamech Stultz, an early settler. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Success
Description:A village in Lynch Township. Settled in 1880, it has been a post office since 1883. The town has been in several locations in the neighborhood. It was first called Hastings after the storekeeper. He took in a partner, Bender, and because there was an unusual spring near the place, Ebbing Spring, they decided to make a resort of it. They gave it the name Success, probably for advertising purposes. Recently the town was moved again, this time to the junction of two highways and renamed Wye City by Ransom D. Lynch because of the shape of the town. The post office, however, retains the name Success. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); C.T. Smith; R.D. Lynch; Missouri Gaz. (1883), p. 1210)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Success Spring
Description:A spring in Lynch Township. Named for the town, which was once close by, but has been moved about five miles to the highway town of Wye City (q.v.). An old name for the spring is Ebbing Spring, which describes the quiet manner in which the large spring issues from the ledge. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); C.T. Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sullens Mill
Description:A sawmill built on the Big Piney about 1820. Named after the family who built and operated it. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 430)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Summersville
Description:A village in Carroll Township which has been a post office since 1874. Named for Jesse and Thomas Summer, early settlers at the town site. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); Mrs. Flora E. Scott; Missouri Gaz. (1874)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sweet Potato Cave
Description:A small cave in Lynch Township. It is used by the farmer who owns the place as a root cellar; hence the name. (Tourist Map; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sycamore Cave
Description:A small cave in Piney Township. Named for the trees which grow near the entrance. (Tourist Map; Luther Curry)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Texas County
Description:The county is located in the south-central and slightly eastern section of the state, in the second tier of counties from the Arkansas line. The region was first settled by Boone, Paddy, Truesdale and others. It was defined as a county in an act approved February 17, 1843, and named Ashley County, after William Henry Ashley, fur trader who later became first lieutenant governor of Missouri (see Ashley Cave, above). On February 14, 1845 an act was approved changing Ashley to Texas in honor of the Repuiblic, later the State of Texas. Many men from the section emigrated to Texas, and many were members of Doniphan's force on his march to Texas. Perhaps the fact that the county is the largest in the state, just as Texas is the largest state in the Union, had something to do with the choice. Texas is an Indian word used by the Hosinai tribes of Angelina and Upper Niches Valley, Texas, to mean "friend." It also means "ally." The word was extended by the Spaniards to include the tirbes and finally the territory in which they lived. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 430; Campbell (1873); MISSOURI H.R., "Some More Lost Counties of Missouri," p. 170, vol. 27, Jan., 1933; Hodge, p. 738)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:The Lick
Description:See Licking
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:The Narrows
Description:See Red Banks
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Theron
Description:A discontinued post office (1921-1926), about whose name nothing could be learned. (Postal Guide)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Tie Slide
Description:A log slide in northern Boone Township, which was used to slide logs into the Piney River in the days when railroad tie making was a principal industry. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Timber Ridge School
Description:District No. 78, near Dyke. Built on a ridge in the timber land, the name is a suitable descriptive one. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Truesdale Mill
Description:An early sawmill built about seven miles north of Houston before 1828. Named for its owner and builder. (HIST. TEXAS (1889), p. 430)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Turley
Description:A village in Upton Township. A post office since 1889. Named by Tom Embree, who was postmaster, after his son, Turley. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); Mr. J.M. Gladden)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Tyrone
Description:A village in Cass Township which has been a post office since 1892. Named by Jeremiah Smock for his hometown of Tyrone, Pennsylvania. According to Gannett, the Pennsylvania town was named for the county in Ireland. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 70; Mrs. Flora Scott; Mrs. Katie Woolfork)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Union Church
Description:A Christian Church in Ozark Township. Named from the fact that two groups united in building the church after some differences of opinion. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Union School
Description:A rural school near Cabool which was named from an early church. (MSTR; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Union School House and Church
Description:In Piney Township. Named because the church and school use the same building and because both Methodists and Christians hold meetings there. (Tourist Map; P. Jones)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Union Star School
Description:See Star Union
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Upper Bean Creek
Description:The same stream as Lower Bean Creek. The name Upper is applied to the northwest section of the stream. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Upper Bean Creek School
Description:In Sherrill Township. Named for the stream. (Tourist Map; Paul Jones)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Upton
Description:A village in Upton Township which has been a post office since 1910. Named for Osias Upton, early settler and merchant. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Upton Township
Description:Formed from Roubidoux Township in June, 1852. Named for Osias Upton at whose home the meeting for organization was held. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 443; Plat Book; Campbell (1873); W.P. Elmore)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Vada
Description:A village in Lynch Township. A post office from 1918 to 1929. The name is a shortenend form of Nevada Jackson, the postmaster's daughter. (Postal Guide; Tourist Map; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Valmar Church
Description:In Jackson Township. Named for the family who organized the church. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Valmar School
Description:District No. 24 in Jackson Township. Name transferred from the church which is across the road. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Varvol
Description:A discontinued post office (1892-1904), in Sargent Township. Named for a family who had the office in their general store. (Postal Guide; Luther Curry)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Varvol School
Description:In Sargent Township. Named from the discontinued post office. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931), R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Venable
Description:A village and discontinued post office (1892-1921), in Lynch Township. Named for P.S. Venable, who had the post office. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1931); R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Venable Cave
Description:A small cave in Lynch Township. Named from the village. (Tourist Map; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Venable School
Description:In Lynch Township. Named from the discontinued post office. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Victor School
Description:District No. 106, near Elk Creek. An ideal name. (MSTR; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:District No. 88, near Mt. Grove. Named for timber in the vicinity. (MSTR; Miss Dora Mace)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Walnut Ridge School
Description:A rural school near Kinderpost in Boone Township. Named for its location in walnut timber. (MSTR; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ware Mill
Description:A sawmill built near Licking in the 1830s. Named for its owner who bought the mill from C. Baldridge, an old settler, who built it. (HIST. TEXAS, p. 430)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Weatherman School
Description:In Clinton Township. Named for the family of Sam Weatherman, on whose land it was located. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Weber Cave
Description:A large cave in central Boone Township. Named for the family who owns the land. (Tourist Map; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:West Piney Creek
Description:A large branch which rises in Clinton Township and flows northeast to the Big Piney near Houston. Named because it flows into the Piney from the west. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:White Rock Bluff
Description:A stretch of river bluff along the Big Piney near Houston in Piney Township. So named from the color of the rock in the bluff. The scenery is very beautiful. (Tourist Map; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:White Rock School
Description:District No. 58, in Piney Township. Named because of its location near a bluff of white stone. (MSTR; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Whitlock School
Description:District No. 49 in Sherrill Township. Named for the G.W. Whitlock family. (MSTR; Leland Farley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Wild Cat Cave
Description:In central Lynch Township. A small cave so named because a wild cat lived in it for some time. (Tourist Map; R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Wildcat Cave
Description:In Ozark Township. So named because a wild cat was shot near the cave. (Tourist Map; Paul Jones)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Wildwood Church
Description:In Carroll Township. Named for its location in a remote section. (Tourist Map (1936); Delbert Johnson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Wofford School
Description:In east-central Pierce Township. Named for the Wofford family, who gave the land for the school. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Wye City
Description:A village in northeast Upton Township incorporated in April, 1933. Land site given by Dr. Ransom D. Lynch. It superseded Success (q.v.). Named because the town is laid out at the junction of Highways 17 and 32 which form a Y. The dedication of streets and alleys is on file in the courthouse and the abstractor's office in Houston. Highway markers are still inscribed Success. This may be only a change on paper, because R.D. Lynch died last winter and it was his development. (R.D. Lynch; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Yates Mill
Description:A large mill in Cass Township. Named for J.B. Yates, who ran the mill. (Tourist Map; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Yukon
Description:A village in Ozark Township which has been a post office since 1900. The postmaster, Shelby Dial, called a meeting of the farmers in the community to select a name for the office. Ben Castleman suggested Yukon. The name was then prominent because of the discovery of gold in Alaska along the Yukon River in 1898. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 70; Mrs. Mary Fredericks)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Yukon School
Description:A district school near Raymondville. Named for the nearby post office. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Fredericks)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

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