Taney County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Antioch
Description:A Baptist Church organization, now discontinued, formerly situated where Antioch School is now, named for the city where "the disciples were first called Christians" (Acts 11:26) (Colonel Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Antioch School
Description:A transferred name from a church or hollow, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Baird Mountain (later Magic Mt.)
Description:A mountain named for "old man" Baird, a miner who lived and died upon the mountain. (W.H. Johnson; Chas. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bald Knob School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Barger
Description:A post office established in 1910 and named after the Barger family, an influential family of the community. (Mrs. Chas. Moore; Chas. Moore)
Source:Adams, Orvyl Guy. "Place Names In The North Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Barger Hollow
Description:Named for a family of Bargers, early settlers who lived there in the middle of the 19th century. (Mrs. Chas. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bauff (later Dit, then Nance)
Description:An old post office established long before the Civil War and discontinued in 1880. The why or wherefore of the name is lost. (T.P. Wright; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bay Creek
Description:A small creek named for the bay trees which grow on its banks. (T.P. Wright; A. Blunk)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bay Creek Township
Description:A township organized in 1837 and named for Bay Creek (q.v.) which runs through it. (J.W. Blankenship)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Beaver Creek
Description:A creek named for the many beavers who lived in it. The beavers built dams across the creek and were constantly changing its course. (W.R. Adams; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Beaver Township
Description:A township organized in 1837 and named for Beaver Creek (q.v.), which runs through it. (Chas. Groom; J.W. Blankenship)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bee Creek
Description:A creek named during the pioneer days of the country from the many wild bee trees on its banks. (Chas. Groom; Chas. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bee Creek School
Description:A transferred name from a stream or spring.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Big Caney Creek
Description:The larger branch of Caney Creek, named for the canes and marsh grass that grew on its banks. (Chas. Groom; W.R. Adams)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Big Creek
Description:Named by early settlers "Big Creek" because of its size; it is one of the largest streams in the county. (Colonel Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Big Creek School
Description:A transferred name from a stream or spring.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bilew Creek
Description:A creek emptying into Swan Creek takes its name from a family of Bilews who settled on its bank during the early part of the 19th century. (Judge Wright; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bluff
Description:A post office on Bull Creek near Gravelly Hollow, established in 1897 and named for its situation on a bluff overlooking the valley. (W.K. Adams)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Boston Center School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Boston Road (later Wilderness Road)
Description:An old highway, the earliest in that section, from Harrison, Arkansas to Springfield, Missouri. It derives its name from the fact that it passes through the Boston Mountains in Arkansas. (Mrs. Hugh Wilson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bradleyville
Description:An early post office sixteen miles northeast of Forsyth which was established before the Civil War and named after the Bradleys, an early family who settled there during the first half of the 19th century. (Colonel N. Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Branson (later Lucia, then Branson again)
Description:A town named after R.S. Branson, the first postmaster, in 1881. The town was incorporated in 1912. In 1902 it was changed to Lucia because of a dislke for Rube Branson and his family, but in 1908 it was renamed Branson. (T.P. Wright; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Branson School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Brown School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Brownbranch
Description:A post office established about 1849 and named for Brownbranch Creek. (Colonel Ford; W.R. Sharp)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Brownbranch Creek
Description:A creek which took its name from a family of Browns who came during the first part of the 19th century and settled on the creek banks. (Chas. Moore; W.R. Sharp)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Brownbranch School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Brushy Creek
Description:Sometimes called Brush Creek on government maps, but the real name is Brushy; so called because of the rank growth on its banks. (Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Brushy Creek School
Description:A transferred name from a stream or spring.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bryant School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Bull Creek
Description:There is a legendary story that in the early days of the Ozarks several hunters killed some buffalo bulls on the creeks and named it from these. (Jim Barnes)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Camp Izaak Walton
Description:Some hunters established the camp on Bee Creek in the interest of bird and game protection about 1900. It is obviously named fore the famous English writer on the angler's sport. (Mrs. S. Wright; C.W. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Caney Creek
Description:A creek named for the pipe stem cane which grows on its banks. On government maps always called Cane Creek, but universally known as Caney by the natives. (Chas. Moore; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cedar Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A stream named afteer the cedars which grew on its banks. (Mrs. Mahnkey; Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cedar Creek [2 of 2]
Description:The post office was first established about 1862 near where Oasis is now, but in 1886 it was moved to the present location. It was called Cedar Creek because it was on the bank of the creek. (Mrs. Mamie Mahnkey; Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cedar Grove School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cedar Springs School
Description:A transferred name from a stream or spring.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cedar Township
Description:An early township formed in 1837, derives its name from Cedar Creek (q.v.), which runs through it. (Chas. Groom; J.W. Blankenship)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cedar Valley [1 of 2]
Description:A post office estabished in 1875 and named for the district of Cedar Valley. (Willie Moore; Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cedar Valley [2 of 2]
Description:Named from the topographical aspect of the country. This section of the country has been called Cedar Valley ever since the earliest settlers came in. (Colonel Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Cedar Valley School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Chula Vista
Description:A high point and lookout five miles from Branson; named for the city of Chula Vista, California, in 1930 by G.E. Seay. Chula Vista means "beautiful view" in Spanish. Mr. Seay says he chose the name both because it suited the spot and because he formerly lived in the California town. (G.E. Seay)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Clevinger Branch
Description:Named for Judge Clevinger, a Civil War veteran who lived there about 1860-1870. (Colonel Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Clevinger Hollow
Description:Named for the creek, Clevinger Branch (q.v.), which ran through the hollow. (Colonel Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Coffin Spring
Description:A spring near Kirbyville which was either by chance or purpose walled up in the shape of a coffin. (Mrs. C.P. Mahnkey)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Comoville
Description:A post office at Longbeach or Lake Taneycomo, which took its name from the last part of Taneycomo; established in 1920. (Colonel N. Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Conner
Description:A post office, established in 1882 and discontinued about 1891; named for a family of Conners who lived in the community. (Chas. Groom; J.W. Blankenship)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Coon Creek
Description:A creek which derives its name from the raccoons which are around there. (Mrs. Sarah Wright; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Day (also Whack-er-dam, q.v.)
Description:A post office, established in 1891, and named for Captain Madison Day, the first postmaster. (Colonel Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dewey Bald
Description:A post office named for Dewey Bald Knob (q.v.). (Chas. Groom; Mrs. Hugh Wilson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dewey Bald Knob
Description:A knob named for "old man Dewey," a picturesque character who spent his life searching for gold there, shortly after the gold rush of 1849. The knob figures prominently in Harold Wright's novel, THE SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS. (Mrs. Hugh Wilson; Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dewey Grove School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dickens (earlier Taney City)
Description:A post office earlier known as Taney City (q.v.), but discontinued and reestablished by John Dickenson in 1894. It is generally agreed that he dropped the last syllable of his name and called the post office Dickens. The shortening may have been influenced by the enormous popularity of the great English author Dickens, who died in 1870 after a successful lecture tour in America. (Colonel Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dickens School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dit (earlier Bauff; later nance, q.v.)
Description:A post office established in 1900 by George Goldberry and named after his daughter, Dit. No one seems to know whether Dit was her real name, or whether it was merely a nickname. It was discontinued and later renamed Nance (q.v.). (Chas. Groom; S.B. Sharp)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Dobbs Hollow
Description:Named after the Dobbs family who lived there during the early settlement of the county. (Chas. Groom; A. Blunk)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:East View
Description:A post office established and named in 1902 by S.W. Dickson, the first postmaster. It takes its name from its location on the mountains. The post office was discontinued in 1929. (Chas. Groom; W.R. Adams)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:East View School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Edward's Hollow
Description:A hollow named after the Edwards family, early pioneers who settled there. (Chas. Groom; Chas. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Elbow Creek
Description:A creek which makes a sharp turn in the direction of its course and is named for this peculiarity. (W.R. Sharp; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Flag
Description:A post office whose name, it is generally agreed, was given for patriotic reasons. However, Mrs. Hugh Wilson thinks that it was a flag station where they dropped the mail. (Judge Wright; Chas. Groom; Mrs. Hugh Wilson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Flag School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Flint Hill School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Forsyth
Description:The county seat, situated on the north bank of White River. It was settled about 1838 and named for the Honorable John Forsyth of Georgia, Secretary of State 1834-1841. Forsyth was an outstanding figure in the Democratic party, and most of the early settlers in Taney were Democrats. (Colonel Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Forsyth School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Fox Creek
Description:Named for the Fox family which lived on its bank in Fox Creek Hollow (q.v.). "Old man" Fox is buried on the neighboring mountain. (A. Blunk; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Fox Creek Hollow
Description:Named for Fox Creek (q.v.), which runs through the hollow. (J.W. Blankenship; A. Blunk)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Free Jack Spring
Description:A spring on the old Mahnkey farm south of Kirbyville. It took its name from Jack, a negro slave who was freed by the Snapps, an early family, and sent to live at the spring and care for their range cattle. (Mrs. C.P. Mahnkey)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Garber School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Getman Hollow
Description:A hollow which takes its name from the Getmans, a pioneer family who lived there about the middle of the 19th century. (Chas. Groom; Colonel Ford)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Gieske Hill
Description:A hill named for Mr. Gieske who owned the property in 1907. (Mrs. Sarah Wright; Chas. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Gimlin Hollow
Description:A hollow named for the Gimlin family, early pioneers who came in about 1860 and settled in the hollow. (W.R. Adams; A. Blunk)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Glory School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Gobbler's Knob School
Description:A humorous name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Goodloe
Description:A post office, established in 1894 and discontinued in 1912; named for the Goodloe family, who had the first post office. (Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Granny Hole
Description:A deep hole in Turkey Creek near Hollister was named after Granny Fortner who, with her son, lived about 1902 upon the land where Hollister is now located. "Granny" did her washing in this hole and since then it has been known as Granny Hole. (J.W. Blankenship; Mrs. Chas. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Gravelly Hollow
Description:So called, as far back as can be remembered, from its many rocks and stones. (T.P. Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Greenleaf
Description:A post office, established in 1894 and discontinued in 1900, which was named for the Greenleaf family that owned the land upon which the post office was located. (W.R. Sharp)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Groom
Description:A post office, established in 1904 and named for Chas. Groom, a lawyer in Taney County, where he has lived since 1876. The post office was discontinued in 1912. (Postal Guide, 1904; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Haworth
Description:A post office, established in 1899 and discontinued in 1891; named for a family of Haworths who were prominent people in the county. (Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Helphry School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hercules
Description:A post office in Kentucky Hollow. This section has been known as Hercules since the coming of its earliest settlers. It is commonly rumored that some traveller coming in was impressed by the rugged strength of the topography and called it Hercules after the Greek god. The post office was established about 1891 with A.D. Hunter as its first postmaster. (Judge T.P. Wright; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hercules School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hester School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hickory Grove School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hilda
Description:Named after the wife of Tom Mosely, a Baptist preacher, and the first postmaster. The post office was established and named in 1896. (T.P. Wright; W.R. Adams)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hill Top School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hollister
Description:A small town established on White River by W.H. Johnson, begun in 1908 and incorporated in 1911. Named after Hollister, a Missouri Pacific official. Mr. Johnson says he chose the name because Mr. Hollister was a friend of his and very popular in the community. (W.H. Johnson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hollister School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hollywood Hills
Description:A real estate development which was named in 1927, by a group of agents, "Hollywood Hills" because of its general resemblance to the hills of Hollywood. (Vernon Tood; Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Hughes Hollow
Description:A hollow named for the Hughes family, early settlers who lived in the hollow. They settled here soon after the county was organized, about 1840. (Mrs. Bill Cox; Chas. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Iron Mountain
Description:A mountain near Forsyth where iron was found during the early part of the 19th century and some mining done. The vein was small, however, and it was soon abandoned. (Mrs. M. Mahnkey; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Jasper Township
Description:A township formed in 1837 and probably named for a family of Jaspers who lived in the community. However, it may have been named for Sergeant William Jasper (1750-1779), of Revolutionary fame, who replaced the fallen flag on Fort Moultrie, June 28, 1776. (Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Johnson School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Kentucky Hollow
Description:A district which was settled about 1855 by numerous families from eastern Kentucky. Ever since the district has been called Kentucky Hollow. (Chas. Groom; Colonel Ford)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Kentucky Hollow School
Description:A transferred name from a church, or hollow.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Kickapoo Camp
Description:A camp established in 1927 by C.L. Ford; named for the Kickapoo tribe of Indians. (Chas. Moore; Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Kings Branch
Description:A creek which is said to take its name from Joel King and Nancy King, his wife, who located on its banks about 1844. (Turnbo (34), p. 42)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Kirbyville (earlier Warnersville)
Description:A town eight miles southwest of Forsyth which contains about three hundred inhabitants. Earlier it was Warnersville (q.v.), but the post office was taken away and then started again and named for Kirby, its first postmaster, about 1870. In Campbell's GAZETTEER OF MISSOURI (1874) it is listed as Kerbyville, but Mr. Groom said that was the fault of Tom Layton, a recorder, who always spelled it with an "e" for some unknown reason. (Campbell's Gazetteer (22), p. 618; Chas. Groom; W.R. Adams)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Kirbyville School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Kissee Mills
Description:A post office and small village named after A.C. Kissee, miller and merchant and one of the earliest settlers. (Mrs. C.W. Moore; Eaton (46) V, p. 69)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Kissee Mills School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Kuggaho Camp
Description:A camp for boys established in 1930 by C.L. Ford, who claimed to have named it for the Kuggaho tribe of Indians. This tribe may be an invention of Mr. Ford's. (Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Layton
Description:A post office, established in 1889 and discontinued in 1890; named for a family of Laytons, early settlers who came from Virginia. (Chas. Groom; Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Lime Kiln Mountain
Description:A mountain which was the scene of early mining for limestone. As early as 1860 lime was burned there, but for the last fifty years nothing has been done. (A. Blunk)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Little Beaver Creek
Description:The smaller branch of Beaver Creek (q.v.). (W.F. Reynolds)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Little Caney Creek
Description:The smaller branch of Caney Creek; the larger is called Big Caney (q.v.). (Chas. Groom; Colonel Ford)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Loafer's Glory (later Glory)
Description:An early schoolhouse whose name was suggested in jest while it was being built because it was the "loafers" hangout or "glory." (Mrs. E. Parnell)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Lone Pilgrim School
Description:A transferred name from a church or hollow, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Lottie Lawless Hollow
Description:A hollow in which Lottie Lawless hanged herself has ever since been known as the Lottie Lawless Hollow. (Mrs. Mamie Mahnkey; Geo. Hunt)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Lucia (earlier and later Branson)
Description:A post office and town, named after the wife of E.P. Brice, the postmaster. The earlier name Branson (q.v.) was changed to Lucia in 1902 because of the widespread dislike for Rube Branson and his family, reputed Bald-Knobbers, but in 1908 the old name Branson was resumed. (T.P. Wright; W.R. Adams; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Magic Mountain (earlier Baird Mt.)
Description:A mountain near the site of new Table Rock dam that is to be built. It was earlier Baird Mountain (q.v.), but it was changed in 1930 by a group of promoters to advertise and to make people ask questions. (W.H. Johnson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Maine Orchard
Description:Post office and flag station where the town of Hollister is now situated. It took its name from the club house which a group of St. Louis men bought; this building was the State of Maine building at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904. It was placed near a large pear orchard; hence the name. (Mrs. Sarah Wright; Mr. W.H. Johnson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:McClurg
Description:A post office named for Governor Joseph Washington McClurg about 1872. Governor McClurg, Republican, was elected to office in 1869; he was very popular in this section. (Mrs. Sarah Wright; Mr. Sharp)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:McFarland
Description:A post office, established in 1902 and discontinued in 1905, was named for a Mr. McFarland who owned the land on which the post office was built. (A. Blunk; Chas. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Meadow Middleton School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Melba School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Melva
Description:A post office and town named in 1906 for the daughter of the roadmaster of the Missouri Pacific Railroad when the railroad was being built. (John Moore; Chas. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Middleton Hollow
Description:A hollow named after the Middleton family, who settled there early in the 19th century. (Colonel N. Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mildred
Description:A post office named about 1906 after the youngest daughter of the first postmaster, B.B. Price. (Chas. Groom; Mrs. C.W. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mincy
Description:One of the oldest settlements in the country, named after a family of Mincys who came there about 1840. The name appears in CAMPBELL'S GAZETTEER (1870) and later in the Postal Guide. (Mrs. Hugh Wilson; CAMPBELL'S GAZETTEER (22); Postal Guide 1876)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mincy School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mountain Grove School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mountain View School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mt. Olive School
Description:A transferred name from a church or hollow, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mud Socket School House
Description:A crude schoolhouse, built about the middle of the 19th century; so named by the people of the community because of its situation in a rather low, muddy valley. It has been discontinued and torn down. (Mrs. Mamie Mahnkey)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Murder Rock
Description:A ledge of rock on the old Harrison-Springfield Road; in early days it was a favorite spot for highwaymen to rob travelers, and several people were killed there. (Givans Lacy; John Crockett)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mutton Hollow
Description:A hollow near Marble Cave (in Stone County), named for the sheep which used to graze there. (Chas. Groom; Chas. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Nance (earlier Bauff, then Dit)
Description:A post office named for Jeff Nance, a county official. It was previously called Dit (q.v.), then it was discontinued and later renamed Nance in 1925. (Chas. Groom; Colonel Ford; J.W. Blankenship)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Nance School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Needmore Store
Description:A store and community on Little Caney which derives its name from an expression of Willie Jenkins, the storekeeper. He was accustomed to say that he needed more goods and more money; if he had more money he would have more goods. (C.B. Sharp; W.R. Adams)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Newton
Description:A township organized in 1837 and named for the Newton family that lived in the community. (J.W. Blankenship; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Oak Ridge School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Oasis (earlier Cedar Valley)
Description:A post office located where the old Cedar Valley post office (q.v.) was situated. E.E. Stikes bought the property in 1897 or 1898 and established the post office. Mrs. Mahnkey says that he named the post office Oasis because a marriage, recently contracted, made him regard this period as "an oasis in his life." Mr. Groom thinks it is a descriptive term for the valley in which the post office is situated. (Mrs. Mamie Mahnkey; Chas. Groom; Colonel Ford)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Old Branson School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Oliver Township
Description:An early township which was named for the Oliver family, early settlers of the region. (Chas. Groom; W.R. Sharp)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Osaka
Description:A post office, established about 1908 and discontinued in 1917, was named for Osaka, an important city in Japan. (W.R. Sharp)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Ozark Beach
Description:A post office and resort established during the building of the dam in 1912; it takes its name from the mountains and the situation. (Chas. Groom; Colonel N. Ford)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Peg-Leg Hollow
Description:A hollow a few miles east of Oasis, named for Captain Randolph, a Civil War veteran with a wooden leg, who, lived there from 1889-1890. (Mrs. C.P. Mahnkey)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Peg-Leg Point
Description:A high point up from Peg-Leg Hollow (q.v.), from which it derives its name. (Mrs. C.P. Mahnkey)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Pelham School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Persimmon Creek
Description:A creek named for the many persimmons which grew on its banks. (Chas. Moore; Mr. A. Blunk)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Pilot Knob
Description:The high point of a ridge that is east of Beaver Creek. It is rumored that it is a signal point of the Bald-Knobbers and was named by this organization. (Mrs. Hugh Wilson; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Pinetop
Description:A post office on a ridge, established in 1904. The name was suggested in jest by Mrs. J.W. Blankenship, wife of the proprietor of the hotel or lodge, in allusion to an obstructing pine tree top which the surveyors had failed to remove. (Mrs. Sarah Wright; Mrs. J.W. Blankenship)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Pinetop School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:A naming approbation.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Point Lookout
Description:The post office of the School of the Ozarks, a Presbyterian mission school, one and a half miles west of Hollister. The post office established in 1930 was named by George F. Bell, teacher of Bible in the school. Mrs. Bell says she chose the name because of the wonderful view from the bluff overlooking White River. (Mrs. George F. Bell)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Possum Trot
Description:A community in the roughest part of the county; the name is probably derived from the many opossums which used to play there. (Chas. Moore; Vernon Todd)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Powers
Description:A post office, established in 1902 and discontinued in 1904; named for the family of Powers. (Chas. Groom; Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Powersite
Description:A settlement and post office established in 1914 after the completion of the dam and Lake Taneycomo. Who named it or why it was so named is unknown but it probably is a euphemism for Damsite; many of the engineers called it the dam-site. (Colonel N. Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Presbyterian Hill
Description:A post office, and assembly ground of the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A., established and named in 1914 by Dr. Stringfield, a Presbyterian minister of Springfield. The post office was not established until June, 1929. (W.H. Johnson)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Protem
Description:Named and established in 1870 by Captain C.C. Owen; there was much controversy over the name, and he rather in jest said, "call it pro tem," i.e. "meanwhile." It remained Protem. (T.P. Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Reuter
Description:A post office named for the first postmaster, about 1880. (Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Reuter School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Rhodes School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Ridge Dale School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Riverview School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Roark Creek
Description:One of the earliest named creeks in the county. The Roark family settled on its banks the first part of the 19th century and it was from this family that the creek took its name. (Judge T.P. Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Rockaway Beach
Description:A summer resort and hotel on Lake Taneycomo built and named in 1915 by a group of promoters. It is evidently a name given for advertising purposes, probably from Rockaway Beach, New York. (Chas. Groom; Colonel Ford)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Roller Hollow
Description:A hollow named after the Rollers, a family who settled there the latter part of the 19th century. (T.P. Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Roller Hollow School
Description:A transferred name from a church or hollow, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Ruthey
Description:A post office established about 1906 and discontinued in 1914, was named for the daughter of the first postmaster. (W.R. Adams)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Sammy Lane Camps and Boat Line
Description:Established by Hobart McQuerter in 1914 and named for the heroine of Harold Bell Wright's SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS. (Mrs. Geo. F. Bell; Mrs. Sarah Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Scott Township
Description:A township formed in 1839 and named for the Scott family, who lived in the township and were influential in the organization of the county. (J.W. Blankenship; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Shadow Rock
Description:No one can remember when or why the name was given, but it was doubtless descriptive. It is a large rock and bluff which overlooks and casts a shadow upon Swan Creek at Forsyth. (Chas. Groom; W.R. Adams)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Shepherd of the Hills Estate
Description:A recent real estate development on the bluffs overlooking Lake Taneycomo above Rockaway Beach, which takes its name from Harold Bell Wright's novel of this section, THE SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS. (Chas. Moore; Vernon Todd)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Skeeterville
Description:A district and school (now discontinued), named because of the many mosquitoes which infest the place. It is in a low, swampy place, and has been known as Skeeterville since its earliest history. O.E.D. says of "skeeter," "a colloquial form of mosquito in use chiefly in thbe United States and Australia." The first use in writing is seen in Harriet B. Stowe's UNCLE TOM'S CABIN (1852). (Chas. Groom; Mrs. C.P. Mahnkey)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:St. James Church
Description:An early Baptist organization which was, of course, named after James, the disciple. (Mrs. Hugh Wilson; Chas. Moore)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:St. James School
Description:A transferred name from a church or hollow, etc.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Swan
Description:A post office, established in 1883, named for Swan Creek (q.v.). The post office and store is on the banks of this creek. (Chas. Groom; W.R. Adams)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Swan Creek
Description:Mr. Blunk says that it was named for a pioneer family of Swans who lived on its banks about 1845. It must, however, have arisen much earlier, for Schoolcraft in 1818 mentions it in his history. (A. Blunk; Schoolcraft (2), p. 103)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Swan Township
Description:A township formed in 1839 and named for Swan Creek, which flows through the township. (W.R. Sharp; Colonel N. Ford)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Taney City (later Dickens)
Description:A post office, established in 1889 and discontinued in 1894, which takes its name from the county. (Colonel N. Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Taney County
Description:The first permanent settlement was made in 1827 by two brothers Youchuim (sic), three Dentires, and a McAdo, who located on White River and commenced farming. The county was organized January 16, 1837 from old Wayne County which reached from close to the Mississippi on the east to the Missouri line on the west; and from the Arkansas line on the south to the Missouri River. Named in honor of Chief Justice Taney of Maryland of the Supreme Court. Taney was appointed Secretary of State in 1833 and nominated Chief Justice of the United States March 15, 1836 just when the county was beginning to be organized. The change of pronunciation was formally ordered by the County Court about 1870, according to several old citizens (county records were all burned in 1885). (Eaton (46) V, p. 69; Haswell (ii), p. 19; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Taneyville
Description:A post office established in 1893 and named for the county. (Colonel Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Taneyville School
Description:A transferred name from a town, township, or post office.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Three Johns School
Description:A humorous name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Tidwell
Description:A discontinued post office, named for a family of Tidwells who had the first post office. It was established in 1891 and discontinued in 1895. (W.R. Sharp; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Trigger Creek
Description:Trigger Creek, "quick on the trigger" to rise, was named by early settlers. (Judge T.P. Wright)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Turkey Creek
Description:A creek named from the many wild turkeys which used to roost in the trees on its banks. (Judge T.P. Wright; Vernon Todd)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Union Hill School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Victor School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Walnut Shade School
Description:A name of situation or description.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Warnersville (later Kirbyville)
Description:A discontinued post office that was a name for a family of Warners, early settlers. The post office was not established until 1866, though the district had been called Warnersville since 1850. (Colonel Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Wayside
Description:A post office, at the head of Roller Hollow, established by S.A. Mott in 1907, and discontinued in 1912. No explanation as to how it obtained its name has been found, but it was doubtless called "Wayside" because of its location by the side of the road. (A. Blunk)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Weatherman Hollow
Description:Named for a family of Weathermans who lived in it. (Colonel Ford; Chas. Groom)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Whack-er-dam (also Day)
Description:A mill at Day post office owned by Captain Day. The name was given by Captain Day and others on account of its odd appearance. Often transferred in current usage to the entire community, in place of Day (q.v.). (Chas. Groom; Colonel Ford)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:White River
Description:The largest river in the Ozarks was first called the "Unica" (White) river by the Cherokee Indians because of the water's extreme clearness. It was translated as "Rio Blanco" by the Spaniards, "Riviere au Blanc" by the French, and White River by the English. (1) (1. Schoolcraft (2), p. 113; Chas. Groom; J.C. Harlin)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Who'd a Tho't it School
Description:A school near Protem, now discontinued; one of the first schools in the country. The name jestingly refers to its rough and crude appearance. (Mrs. Mamie Mahnkey)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Wilderness Road (earlier Boston Road)
Description:An old trail which was once known as Boston Road (q.v.); named for the rank brush that surrounded it. (Mrs. C.P. Mahnkey)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Wilderness Road Spring
Description:A spring on Wilderness Road (q.v.), from which it takes its name. (Mrs. M. Mahnkey)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Wilson School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Wolf's Branch
Description:A small stream in Taney County which takes its name not from the animal, as is usually assumed, but from a family of Wolfs who were early settlers and lived on the banks of the creek. (W.R. Adams)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

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