Stoddard County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Achar Creek
Description:A small creek which empties into Duck Creek in the southern part of Duck Creek Township; probably named for an early settler or hunter. (Campbell, Munger, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Acorn Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of New Lisbon Township, named for the settlement known as Acornridge. (cf. above) (Clodfelter, Davis, Wilson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Acornridge
Description:A small village in the eastern part of New Lisbon Township, where a post office was maintained from 1867-1904, then reestablished in 1921 and continued until 1929. The name was written Acorn Ridge from 1867-1893 and the school which is maintained there now is still so designated. It was named from the acorns of the oak trees which grew on this slightly elevated land. (Postal Guide, Davis, Wilson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Advance
Description:A small town in the northern part of Pike Township, established in 1910 when the Houck Railroad was built in this section. Houck had built the road to Lakeville and wanted to extend (advance) the road to the county line and thence to Cape Girardeau, but the excessive price of land deterred him for some time. He finally advanced the road one mile to the settlement which he called New Lakevillie, because it was near the old settlement known as Lakeville (q.v.). Mr. Flynn, the first postmaster, suggested the name Advance, indicative of the advance made in the railroad. (Davis, Houck, Houck Mss., Dexter Statesman 1928)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Aid
Description:A small village in the western part of Castor Township, where a post office was established in 1910. The place was laid out by J.M. Cooper, landowner, and named for his son Aid. (Hearn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ajax
Description:A small community and station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the northern part of Liberty Township, established about 1918, and named for the famous figure of classical literature. Ajax was the bravest, save Achilles, of the Greeks who beseiged Troy, and in Homer typifies brute strength. (Maps 1918-1930), Tucker, Webster)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alhambra
Description:A small settlement in the western part of Castor Township made about 1904 and named for the famous Moorish temple in Granada, Spain, by Mr. Crumb, who was a classical scholar. (M.H.R. 13:68, Tucker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Altha
Description:An early settlement in the southwest part of Elk Township, maintained in 1877 and named for his daughter Altha by Mr. Geo. S. White. (Alexander)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the western part of Castor Township, which was organized in 1867 and named for the New Testament Church at Antioch where the disciples were first called Christians. (Clodfelter, Duncan 383, Acts XI:26)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Aquilla
Description:A small town in the northern part of Castor Township, which was named by Mr. D.S. Crumb, a classical minded landowner and railroad builder. Mr. Giboney Houck says he named the town from the Latin word aquila, which means eagle; and Judge Tucker says he named it from the Bible character, Aquila, who with his wife Pricilla, aided the apostle Paul. (Acts 18:2) Why it has come to be both misspelled and wrongly accented is unknown. (Davis, Houck, Houck Mss., Tucker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ardeola
Description:A village and railroad station in the eastern part of Pike Township. A post office was established in 1891. The name is said to have been coined from the names of several men, but who these men were has been forgotten. (Davis, Munger, Evans, Alexander, McKearley)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Asherville
Description:A small village in the western part of Duck Creek Township. The early name (1865) was St. Francoisville, named for the stream on which it is located. This name could not be used for the post office which was established in 1876, because of a town in Butler County. Asherville was named for an early settler. (Campbell 608, Goodspeed 470, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atlantic and Pacific Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Avert
Description:A station on the Frisco Railroad in the western part of Castor Township where a post office was established in 1891. The name of the railroad station was Day, named for L.B. Day who settled there in 1889, but when a post office was applied for Day was preempted by a town in Taney County, and the government officials gave the name Avert, suggestive of the fact that thus they would avert confusion of the mails. The accent has been shifted to the first syllable in local usage. (Davis, Munger, Tucker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barnard
Description:A switch on the Frisco Railroad in the western part of Castor Township maintained in 1908, for Mr. Barnard, the mill owner. (Munger, McKearly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beattietown
Description:An old settlement in the central part of Liberty Township on Little Lick Creek, made in 1867 and abandoned about 1874. It was probably named for the Beattie family, pioneers. (Nicely, Campbell, Hall, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beech Grove School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Castor Township, named for the natural surroundings, a grove of beech trees. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bell City
Description:A small village in the northeast part of Pike Township, where a post office was established in 1891, and named for R.S. and G.A. Bell, who operated a sawmill there. (Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Benton Township
Description:One of the four townships organized in 1850 and disbanded in 1853 when the county was redistricted. It was named for Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858), one of the first senators from Missouri. (Goodspeed 358-9, Munge)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bernie
Description:A town in the southern part of Elk Township, built in 1890 by George S. Crumb and named for his daughter Bernice, called Bernie. (Wilson, Mrs. R.L. Ladd)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bess Slough
Description:A large slough running north and south in the western part of Elk Township, which was named for Christian Bess, whose family was the seventh white family to come to the county. They came from North Carolina when Bloomfield was still an Indian village, about 1825. The slough has been drained, but the neighborhood is still so called. (Campbell, Munger, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bess Slough Bridge
Description:A bridge built by order of the county court in 1893 over Bess Slough (cf. above), from which it was named. (County Court Record, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethany Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the southwest part of Liberty Township, named from Bethany Church (q.v.). (Dexter Statesman 1910, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethany Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the southwest part of Liberty Township, constituted in 1853 and named for Bethany, a small village on the Mount of Olives, where Lazarus lived. It is no longer in existence. (Goodspeed 557, Ency. Brit.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:See Old Bethel Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Field
Description:A large swamp, comprising 2000 acres, in the northeastern part of Pike Township. It was called Cypress Swamp because of the cypress trees growing there, or Big Field because of the vast size of the swamp, by the early settlers. Open Lake is in this swamp. (Goodspeed 470, Ency. History)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Mingo
Description:A slough or bayou which rises in Wayne County and flows into the St. Francois River on the western side of Stoddard County through the swamp known as Mingo Swamp (q.v.). It was named from the swamp and the black or dark water of the stream. (Munger, Goodspeed 219)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bloomfield
Description:The county seat, located in the central part of Castor Township. It is the site of an ancient Indian village first settled by white people in 1824. The site was selected and the town laid out in 1835 by John McComb, Michael Rodney, and Henry Shaner who named the town Bloomfield because of the fact that they found a large field of flowers there. (Douglass I 295, M.H.R. 13:68, Goodspeed 470)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bluff
Description:A station on the now abandoned Frisco Railroad in the northeastern part of Pike Township. It was maintained from 1913-1918, and named from a rocky range of hills or bluffs in the neighborhood. (Frisco Map, Doubleday Map, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bollard
Description:A small settlement in the eastern part of Pike Township, established in 1889 as a sawmill camp. It was named for Mr. Bollard, the mill operator. (Colton, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bottomless Pond
Description:A pond in the eastern part of Duck Creek Township, named from an exaggeration of the depth of the pond. The name grew up about 1908. (Houck 1908, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boyd School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Elk Township, organized in 1890 and named for J.T. Boyd, a prominent farmer. (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boyt School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Elk Township, named for Tom Boyt, a farmer in the community and a pioneer. (Hux)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brady School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Liberty Township. A flagstop known as Bradyville was maintained on the Frisco Railroad from 1913 until 1920. It was named for a land and mill owner, a Mr. Brady. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bradyville
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Braley's Mill
Description:An early sawmill in the western part of New Lisbon Township, operated by Ed Braley, for whom it was named, from 1890-1899. (Munger, Dexter Statesman 1899).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridge Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the north-central part of Richland Township, named from the Bridge Church (q.v.). (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridge Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the northeastern part of Richland Township, named for the Bridges Community and School (q.v.). (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridge School
Description:A rural school in the north-central part of Richland Township, named for the old settlement of Bridges; the singular form of the word, according to Mr. Hall, grew up because of a bridge over a slough near the school. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridges
Description:A rural post office from 1901-1904 in the north-central part of Richland Township, named for James Bridges a farmer of the community. The Zeta post office is a successor to the Bridges post office. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Broadwater Bridge
Description:A bridge built in 1895 over a drainage ditch which had been dug to drain Bess Slough in Elk Township. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck Horn School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Castor Township, which was named for the S.E. Newhouse estate, Buckhorn Ranch (q.v.). (County Court Record, Caverno)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck Horn Slough
Description:A large slough in the northern part of Castor Township, which was named by the early settlers for the horns of the deer (buck) which were plentiful in that region until recently. Buckhorn Slough Bridge was built over the slough in 1897 by order of the county court. (County Court Record, Clodfelter, Caverno)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck Horn Slough Bridge
Description:See Buckhorn Slough.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckhorn Ranch
Description:The estate of S.E. Newhouse, who bought the land in 1907 and named it for old Buckhorn Slough (q.v.) and placed the antlers of deer over his fireplace, as an emblem for his estate. (Caverno, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buffington
Description:A station and country store on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the eastern part of Richmond Township. It was established before 1881 as a sawmill camp by a Mr. Buffington, and purchased by the Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company in 1881. A post office was maintained from 1886-1904. Since the timber has been cut and the mill moved, it has become another ghost town, that is, there is no longer a town there. (Polk, Postal Guide, Himmelberger, Munger, Hux)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buffington Mills
Description:See Buffington.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bunker Hill School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Liberty Township, named for Bunker Hill of Revolutionary War fame. It is on an old Indian mound. (Bailey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cairo and Fulton Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cairo, Arkansas and Texas Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Ridge
Description:An old ridge in the southeastern part of Elk Township so designated in 1879 because of the cane which grew thickly on this slightly elevated ground which extended into New Madrid County. (Cram 1789, Kochtitsky 1879)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caroline Dowdy Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the Dowdy community in the northern part of Liberty Township, named for Caroline Dowdy, wife of J.W. Dowdy, who settled the community in 1891. (Clodfelter, Dexter Statesman 1928)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor
Description:A small early settlement in the western part of Duck Creek Township on Castor River. The first settlement was the site of a water power flour and grist mill and was known as the village of Castor. A post office was established in 1837. In 1875 the place was known as Castorville, after which it was abandoned. It was named for Castor River (q.v.). (Campbell, Wetmore, Wilson, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor Creek
Description:See Castor River.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor River
Description:Castor River rises in St. Francois County, flows south through Madison County near the eastern boundary, then for a short distance along the boundary line between Wayne and Bollinger. It enters Bollinger in Fillmore Township and flows southeast through Wayne Township into Stoddard County, and thence into New Madrid County, where it empties into Little River. Prior to the white man's coming the region in what is now the southern part of Madison and the western part of Bollinger counties was a mass of canebrakes where pools of water collected in rainy seasons. Here beavers built dams and held back the water coming down from the St. Francois hills to the north. When heavy rains came, the beaver dams were broken and the water formed a channel. After many repetitions of this process a river was formed, and it was called Castor, a word meaning beaver, by the French who came to the Mine LaMotte district (in Madison County) near the source of this stream in 1725. Schoolcraft in 1818 refers to this branch as Crooked Creek. (Present Crooked Creek is a few miles east and joins Castor River in New Madrid County). Beck calls the river Castor or Crooked Creek in 1823; Wetmore calls it Castor in 1837, but the name Crooked Creek is not entirely separated from this branch until 1873. (Conard, Douglass I: XII, XIV, Schoolcraft, Beck, Wetmore, Long's Voyage, Campbell, Hopkins, Miss Hamlett's thesis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor River
Description:A large river flowing through the central part of Stoddard County and south into New Madrid County, where it flows into Little River. It was called Crooked Creek, probably because of its winding or crooked appearance, by the early settlers. It is so called by Schoolcraft in 1818; and in 1823 is designated Castor or Crooked Creek by Beck. In 1837 Wetmore refers to it as Castor River, but it continued to be known as Crooked Creek until 1873. Castor is a French word meaning beaver, and the name was doubtless given by the early French settlers in St. Francois County where the river rises. (Thwaites 17:38, Wetmore, Beck Schoolcraft, Long's Voyage, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor Slough
Description:A large slough east of Castor River running almost into New Madrid County on the south in flood seasons. It was named from Castor River (q.v.). (Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor Township
Description:In 1820 the Cape Girardeau court organized two townships in what is now Stoddard County. One was Castor which included all the territory west of Castor River; the other was Pike Township. In 1835 when the county court of Stoddard County met first, four townships were organized from the original two. Castor Township was thus divided and reduced in size. In 1853 further changes were made in the townships and Castor again reduced in size. In 1868 the county was redistricted and a new township added so that Castor was given its present boundaries. It was named Castor from Castor River (q.v.). (Douglass I 304, Goodspeed 359)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castorville
Description:See Castor
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cat Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Charteroak
Description:A small settlement in the eastern part of Elk Township established as a stop on the Frisco Railroad about 1900 and named by Louis Houck for the Charteroak Land and Lumber Company of Lawrence, Kansas. (Davis, Houck Mss., Tucker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cholohollay River
Description:See St. Francois River.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clay Township
Description:One of the four townships organized in 1850, and disbanded in 1853 when the county was redistricted. The name was given in honor of Henry Clay (1777-1852), who was a prominent figure in national life, and who was largely responsible for the famous compromise of 1850.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cline's Island
Description:A small island in Castor River in the northern part of Richland Township, which was named for Martin V. Cline, who came to the county in 1839 from North Carolina and purchased 1600 acres of land in this community. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cline's Island School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Richland Township, which was named for Cline's Island (cf. above), near which it is located. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clolinger School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Pike Township, named for A.M. Clolinger, a landowner, of the community. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clubb School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Duck Creek Township, organized about 1900 and named for Scott Clubb, a landowner. (Clodfelter, Dexter Statesman 1915)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cobb School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Duck Creek Township, organized about 1910, and named for Cobbs, cf. above. (Clodfelter, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cobbs
Description:A station, also known as Cobb's Station, on the Frisco Railroad in the northwest part of Duck Creek Township, named for N.M. Cobbs, a mill owner and lumberman who shipped timber from this place. (Clodfelter, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cobb's Station
Description:See Cobbs
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crackskull
Description:See Leora
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crooked Creek
Description:See Castor Creek
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cross Roads
Description:An early settlement, made about 1873, in the central part of Pike Township, named from the crossing of two county roads. A rural school is now located there. (Hux, Campbell 1873)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cross Roads School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Pike Township, named for the location at the crossing of two roads. (Hux, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Curdton
Description:A small community in the southwest part of Duck Creek Township, established about 1918 and named by combining the name of Sam Curd, an early settler, with the common suffix "ton." (Munger, Dexter Statesman 1918)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cypress School
Description:In the northeastern part of Liberty Township, established about 1890 and named from cypress trees. (Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cypress Swamp [1 of 2]
Description:See Big Field.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cypress Swamp [2 of 2]
Description:A large swamp in the northeastern part of Pike Township, which received its name from the cypress trees growing in the swamp. The name appears on the map of 1873. The swamp was destroyed by the cutting of timber and drainage of the surface about 1900. (Campbell, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cyrus
Description:A rural post office maintained in 1904 in the south-central part of Liberty Township, named from a mill owner in the community. (Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Delaware Camp
Description:This is merely a name now to indicate the place where the Delaware Indians had a small encampment near the city of Bloomfield as late as 1835. (Goodspeed 237, Houck, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Delaware Creek
Description:A small creek in the western part of New Lisbon Township, which appears on the map of 1844, and has been drained since 1898. It was named for the Delaware Indians. (cf. above) (Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Delaware Creek Bridge
Description:A bridge built over Delaware Creek (cf. above) in 1893.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dennington School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Castor Township, which was named for a prominent landowner. (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dex Creek
Description:A creek running through the town of Dexter on which Mr. Dex lived prior to the laying out of the town in 1873. The creek was named for Mr. Dex. (Ladd)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dexter
Description:A town in the central part of Liberty Township, which was laid out in 1873, and named in honor of a famous race horse, which was owned by Mr. Dex, who named the horse Dexter for his family. Dex Creek, also named by Mr. Dex, flowed through the town. The town was known as Dexter City from 1873-1888 when the city was omitted and the place known since as Dexter. (M.H.R. 13:68; Campbell 608, Hearn, Ladd)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dexter Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Description:The Cumberland Presbyterian Church of Dexter was first organized March 21, 1870 as the Mount Union Church, with Abner Warren, John Sutton, and D.W. Mays as elders. The founders probably named it because of its location on a hill (mount) and added the common church name. (Goodspeed 575, Munger, Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dickerson School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Elk Township, named for J.D. Dickerson, who owned land there in 1882. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dowdy School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Liberty Township, named for John Dowdy, whose father, William Dowdy, settled there in 1881. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duck Creek
Description:A large stream in the northern part of the present Duck Creek Township, which was named as early as 1873 by the pioneers for the ducks which inhabited the creek. It was drained soon after 1900. (Campbell, Munger, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duck Creek Bridge
Description:A bridge built over Duck Creek (cf. above) in 1892. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duck Creek Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the northern part of Duck Creek Township, organized in 1860 and named for Duck Creek (q.v.) on which it was located. (Duncan 393, Douglass 478)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duck Creek School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Duck Creek Township, organized about 1890 and named from its location on Duck Creek. (q.v.) (Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duck Creek Township
Description:In the southwest part of the county. The original township was created in 1850 by the county court and named for the principal stream in the region. Changes were made in the boundaries in 1853 and in 1868 when the county was redistricted. Slight changes were again made in the county townships in 1898. (Douglass 304, Goodspeed 359, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duck Creek Valley
Description:A community in the northern part of Duck Creek Township in the valley of Duck Creek (q.v.), from which it is named. The first settlement was made here before 1860. (Munger, Dexter Statesman 1928)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dudley
Description:A small town in the northern part of Liberty Township. A post office was established in 1890 and the village incorporated in 1895. It grew out of a sawmill camp, and was named for an early settler, Mr. Dudley. (Davis, Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durnell
Description:A switch on the Frisco Railroad in the southeastern part of Pike Township, named for a landowner, Mr. Durnell, who located there in the interests of the Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company. (Himmelberger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eaglet
Description:See Eaglette
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eaglette
Description:A station on the Frisco Railroad in the northeastern part of New Lisbon Township. It was established in 1904 when the Houck Railroad was built and named by the workers on the railroad for the eagles which lived in the trees and reared their young (eaglets) in the cypress swamps. The name is also spelled Eaglet. (Houck's Mss., McKearly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:East Pryor
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Elk Township, named from its location southeast of Pryor School. (q.v.) (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:East Smith School
Description:See Middle Smith School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edmundson School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Duck Creek Township, organized in 1920 and named for R.E. Edmundson, who owned land there and was county judge from 1919-1922. (County Court Record, Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edwards School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Castor Township, named for Mike Edwards, a farmer in the community. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elk Creek
Description:A small branch of Lick Creek in the northern part of Liberty Township in 1873. It was named by the early settlers for the elk which frequented this region. (Campbell, Goodspeed, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elk Township
Description:In the southeast part of the county; formed in 1868 by the county court and named from Elk Creek. (cf. above) (Munger, Goodspeed, 358-359)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Essex
Description:A town in the northern part of Elk Township. The town was laid out in 1873 when the Missouri Pacific Railroad was built, by a Mr. Essex, an engineer of the railroad, and the town was named for him. A post office was established in 1876. (Hux)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ezzell
Description:A rural post office maintained from 1902-1904 in the eastern part of Liberty Township, named for the Ezzell family, as was the Ezzell School. (Clodfelter, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ezzell School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Liberty Township. (Cf. above)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fagan School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of New Lisbon Township, named for Lewis and W.F. Fagan, who settled there about 1898. (Clodfelter, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview Cemetery
Description:A rural school in the western part of New Lisbon Township, named from Fairview Church (q.v.). (McKearly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the western part of New Lisbon Township, organized in 1882 and given this descriptive name by the founders. (McKearly, Goodspeed 546)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:A rural school in the western part of New Lisbon Township, organized about 1915 and named from Fairview Church (cf. above). (McKearly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fidelity Center
Description:A rural community, containing Sweet Prospect Church and Tatum School, in the northeastern part of Elk Township, established about 1867 and given this ideal name by the early settlers. (Hall, Langford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fillmore Township
Description:One of the four townships organized in 1850 and disbanded in 1853. It was named for M. Fillmore (1800-1874), thirteenth president of the United States, who served from 1850-1853. (Munger, Goodspeed 348-359, Dict. of Am. Biog.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fish Lake
Description:A small lake in the northern part of Liberty Township near Lick Creek, which was probably named by an early settler for the unusual size of the fish found there. It was drained in 1900. Fish Lake School remains to mark the spot. (Campbell, Grant)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fish Lake School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Liberty Township, organized in 1890 and named from Fish Lake (q.v.) (Grant)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fisk
Description:Fisk post office is now in Butler County, although it was in Stoddard County in 1892-1899. A polling place remains in this county. It was named for Jim Fisk, a pioneer. (Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:French Spring
Description:A spring in the eastern part of Elk Township, so designated on Houck's map of 1908. (Houck 1908)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frisco
Description:A small settlement in the northern part of Elk Township. A post office was established in 1896 in this community locally known as Pinhook, because of a fancied resemblance of the ridgeto a pinhook used by the loggers. This place is not on the Frisco Railroad, but Judge Tucker says it was so designated because the people of the community hoped to induce the railroad officials to build a track through the community. (Tucker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frisco Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frisco School
Description:A rural school in the community known as Frisco (q.v.). The first school here was known as Pin Hook or Pinhook School, an old log school where the Methodist Church held services in the early days. (McAnally 504, Tucker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gailhouse Mill
Description:A sawmill near Dudley in the northern part of Liberty Township, named for Mr. Gailhouse, who operated the mill from 1890 until 1899. (Jennings, Dexter Statesman 1899)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Galloway School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Richland Township, named for Jim Galloway, a landowner in the community. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garner Crossing
Description:A community in the central part of Liberty Township, established about 1897 and named for John W. Garner, landowner, and the crossing on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garner School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Liberty Township, named for John W. Garner, who bought property there in 1897. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glade Creek
Description:A small branch of Little Lick Creek in the central part of Liberty Township, which appears on the map of 1873. It was named by the early settlers for the wet, mucky swamp, often called a glade in this region of low land through which it flowed. It has been drained since 1900. (Campbell, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Good Hope Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the community known as Mesler in the northeastern part of Pike Township, organized in 1930 and given this ideal name by the founders. (Stoddard County Minutes of Assn., Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Pond
Description:A large pond or lake which is a part of John's Creek in the northern part of Pike Township. It was named by the pioneers for the geese which frequented the pond. (Campbell, Tucker)
Source:

Place name:Gravel Hill Church [1 of 2]
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the southwest part of Pike Township, organized in 1859 and named for the natural surroundings, a hill covered with small rocks or gravel. (Goodspeed 557, Duncan 383, Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gravel Hill Church [2 of 2]
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the southwest part of Pike Township, which was organized before 1860 and named for its location on a gravel hill. (Goodspeed 544, Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gravel Hill School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Pike Township, organized about 1890 and named for the natural surroundings. (Cf. above) (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grayridge
Description:An old village in the eastern part of Castor Township. A post office was established in 1886, then discontinued until 1890 since when it has been kept. The name was spelled Gray's Ridge until 1893. It was named for an early settler, W.C. Gray. (Campbell 608, Postal Guide, Hux, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenwood School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Castor Township, named for an early settler. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grindle
Description:See Mingo
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grinnel
Description:See Mingo
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Guam
Description:A station on the Frisco Railroad in the western part of Richland Township. The name was Paront, probably named for a mill owner, from 1910- 1918. The name Guam was given about 1920, suggested by the island Guam, ceded to the U.S. by Spain in 1898. (Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Guide Star Church
Description:A General Baptist Church in the western part of Elk Township, which was organized in 1863 and named by J.A. Boone. Mr. Boone's grandson has heard his grandfather's reason for this selection, but he does not remember the significance of it; however, it is a fairly common church name. (Boone)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Guide Star School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Elk Township, established about 1867 and named from Guide Star Church (cf. above). (Boone)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gum Point School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Pike Township, named for the gum trees growing there on a point of land formed by Gum Slough (q.v.) (Hall, Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gum Slough
Description:A slough in the western part of Pike Township, named for the gum trees growing there. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hagy Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery, usually referred to as the Hagy Graveyard, in the central part of Liberty Township. It is one of the oldest cemeteries in the county, and was named for J.G. Hagy, an old settler. (Ulen, Dexter Statesman 1898)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hagy Graveyard
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hale School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Richland Township, named for Thomas A. Hale, a prominent farmer, who came to the county in 1881. (Clodfelter, Goodspeed's Biog.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hancock School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Liberty Township, named for a prominent farmer of the community. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawley School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Elk Township, named for Buck Hawley, a landowner, who gave the land for the school. (Hux)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Headquarters
Description:A small station in the eastern part of Liberty Township, established as the headquarters of the Moss Tie Company and named by T.J. Moss, president of the company. A post office was maintained there from 1896-1900. (Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Heagy
Description:A small settlement in the northeastern part of Pike Township, a post office was maintained there in 1920-1922 and was named for Louis Heagy whose father owned land and a sawmill there and had the flagstop made on the Frisco Railroad. (Munger, Hearn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Henderson's Lake
Description:A small lake in the southern part of Elk Township, named for Marshall H. Henderson, an early settler, whose father came to the county in 1851. (Cram, Hall, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hill Methodist Church
Description:See Mount Gilead Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hill School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Castor Township, named for T.J. Hill, a prominent farmer of the community. (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Himmel
Description:A small station on the Frisco Railroad in the eastern part of Pike Township. A post office was maintained from 1920-1934, and given a shortened form of the name of Mr. I. Himmelberger of the Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company which owns large tracts of land in this region. (Davis, Himmelberger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hobbs Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the eastern part of Duck Creek Township, organized about 1890 and named for J.M. Hobbs, a prominent farmer and one of the founders of the church. (Bailey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hobbs School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Duck Creek Township. (Cf. above)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hodges Ferry
Description:A ferry on the St. Francois River in the western part of Duck Creek Township, operated by John Hodge about 1908. The ferry is on longer in use, but a rural school of that name is located in the community. (Hearn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hodges Ferry School
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hoffstetter Slough
Description:A large slough in the western part of Elk Township on which a settlement was made in 1861 by a Mr. Hoffstetter, for whom it was named. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hofstetter Slough Bridge
Description:A bridge built over Hofstetter Slough (q.v.) in 1895. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holly Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the northern part of Elk Township, established before 1898 and named for one of the founders of the church. (Lankford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holly School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Richland Township, named for the Holly family, prominent members of the community. (Clodfelter, Lankford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hoosier
Description:A switch on the Frisco Railroad in the southeastern part of Pike Township, named for a landowner, Mr. Hoosier, who shipped logs from that place. (Himmelberger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Howell School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Liberty Township, named for Joseph Howell, a farmer, whose father Levi Howell came to the county in 1844. (Clodfelter, Goodspeed Biog.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hunter School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Richland Township, on land granted by Stephen B. Hunter, for whom it is named. (Munger, Jennings, Hux)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Huntersville
Description:A small settlement in the eastern part of Elk Township on the St. Louis southwest Railroad just east of Essex. It was established about 1904 and named for Stephen B. Hunter, a landowner, who is now director of penal institutions in Missouri. (Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Idalia
Description:A small village in the eastern part of Castor Township where a post office was established in 1890. It is said to have been named by Major H.H. Bedford, a landowner, for his daughter. An investigation of biographical material, however, shows that he had no daughter of this name unless she was born after 1888, so perhaps he coined the word from the names of his daughters, Ida, Ethel, and May. (Hopper, Evans, Goodspeed's Biog.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Idlewild
Description:A station on the Frisco Railroad in the northern part of Duck Creek Township, which was given this name when the railroad was being built by Mr. Houck in 1910. It was descriptive of the wilderness through which the right-of-way was cut. (Houck Mss., Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Illinois School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Liberty Township, abandoned since 1910; named by the people of the community for the state of Illinois, from which many of them came. (Himmelberger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Illinois, Missouri, and Texas Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Ford
Description:An old Indian ford or crossing on the St. Francois River in the eastern part of Duck Creek Township. A post office called Indian Ford Postoffice was established a few miles north of the ford on the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad in 1867 and maintained until 1873. The name does not appear after 1873 and it is probable that the river is no longer shallow enough to permit fording in this place. Hodges Ferry was maintained a short distance south of this place in 1908. (Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Ford Postoffice
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Mound
Description:A number of Indian mounds are found in the county, 3,211 according to Mr. Houck, but perhaps the most famous is the one on the farm of James W. Smith in Elk Township. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Spur
Description:A spur or short track built to the Frisco Railroad about 1907 for loading lumber from the Himmelberger Harrison Camp, and named by the railroad officials at the request of the company. It was so named because the Himmelberger family came from Indiana. (Himmelberger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Trail
Description:An old Indian trail, still pointed out as a landmark, leading from Bloomfield north. The Indians are said to have used this trail twice each year, in the spring and fall, traveling to St. Michael in St. Francois County to trade furs for supplies. (Houck I 231, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ives
Description:A settlement in the western part of Liberty Township, made about 1920 and given this shortened form of the name of John Ivester, a prominent farmer of the county, who owned land in this community. (Bailey, Hammond)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ivester Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the southern part of Elk Township, named for John Ivester, an early settler. (Bailey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ivester School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Liberty Township, organized in 1890 and named for John Ivester (1843-1928), an early settler. (Bailey, Dexter Statesman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jerusalem
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the northern part of Elk Township, organized before 1888 and named for the city of Jerusalem. (Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kinder
Description:A small settlement in the northern part of New Lisbon Township. A post office was maintained from 1915-1929 and named for James Kinder, who had a sawmill there, by the officials of the Frisco Railroad. (Davis, Munger, Hearn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:King's Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the northern part of Castor Township, organized in 1887-1888 and named for Rev. G.W. King, the minister in charge of the circuit from 1865-1890. (Goodspeed 546, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kitchen's Mill
Description:A mill on Castor River in the northern part of Castor Township, established before 1860 and operated by the family of Sol. G. Kitchen, a prominent family in the county. (Parker 148)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ladd Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery near Dadler's Chapel (q.v.) in the southwest part of Castor Township, named for F.M. Ladd, an early settler. (Hall, Ladd)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ladd School
Description:See Lost School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake Blanche
Description:A large lake in the northeastern part of New Lisbon Township, which appears on all the early maps, and is still an important stream in the county. It was named by the early French explorers from La Riviere Blanche (White River), and is a reference to the purity of the water. (Campbell, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake View School
Description:See Lakeview School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lakeview School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Liberty Township. The name is sometimes written Lake View, especially in the early records. It was named for its location which afforded a view of a lake or pond formed by the floodwaters of Little Duck Creek. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lakeville
Description:A small settlement in the northern part of Pike Township. A post office was maintained there from 1886-1889 and named from the many lakes in the region. (Campbell 609, Postal Guide; Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lambert School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Liberty Township. (Cf. above)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lancaster School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Liberty Township, named for Mr. Lancaster, an early settler in the community. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lanpher Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church near Bernie in the southern part of Elk Township, organized about 1920 and named for Nick Lanpher (1878-1928), one of the founders of the church. (Semo News 1937, O'Rear, Dexter Statesman 1928)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Last Chance Church
Description:A rural church of the General Baptist Denomination in the southern part of Elk Township, established about 1915 and given this name from an oft repeated phrase in the preacher's exhortations, "This is your last chance, perhaps, to repent; Today is the day of salvation." (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:LaValle
Description:A school and community in the southeastern part of Elk Township, established about 1904 and named for John LaValle who came here from New Madrid County and purchased land. (Goodspeed's Biog., Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leora
Description:A small village in the northeastern part of New Lisbon Township. It is the site of an old watermill used in the early days. A post office was established in 1886 and named by George S. White, father of the late W.F. White of Bloomfield, for his youngest daughter, Leora. The place was called Crackskull, a derisive name suggested by the drunken fights which occurred frequently; and also Toadsuck, a name suggested by the toads which frequented the swamps. (Tucker, Davis, Alexander, Barum)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the northeastern part of Castor Township, which was established about 1866 and given this common name by the founders, Liberty was a commonly used word during this Civil War period. (Clodfelter, Goodspeed 563, Douglass 473)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Hill Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the northwest part of Pike Township, organized before 1863 and disbanded during the Civil War. Liberty was a common name for churches and schools in this section and particularly at the time when it was an often used word in connection with the emancipation of the slaves. (Goodspeed 563, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Hill School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Pike Township, named for Liberty Hill Church (cf. above). (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Castor Township, which was named from Liberty Baptist Church (q.v.). (Goodspeed 563, Douglass 473, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Township
Description:In the southwest part of the county; organized originally in 1835; reduced in size in 1850 when four new townships were organized; in 1853 when the county was redistricted; and given the present boundaries in 1868. The name was a common one at the time. (Douglass 304, Goodspeed 358-359, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lick Creek
Description:A large creek in the central part of the county, which flows into the St. Francois River in the southern part of Liberty Township, named for a deer or salt lick at the head of the creek. It was drained about 1900. (Hall, Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lick Creek Bridge
Description:A bridge built by order of the county court in 1892 over Lick Creek (cf. above), from which it was named. (County Court Record, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lick Creek Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the western part of Liberty Township, established in 1890 and named from Lick Creek (q.v.). (Hux)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lick Creek School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Castor Township, located on the site of old Lick Creek (q.v.) from which it is named. (Hall, Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Link School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Castor Township, named for a landowner in the community. (Clodfelter, Lawrence)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Linnerman School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Elk Township, established in 1910 and named for Will Linnerman, a farmer of the community. (Hux)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Brick School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of New Lisbon Township, organized in 1915. This descriptive name has grown up because of the brick building. Most of the rural school buildings are of wood. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Lick Creek
Description:A small branch of Lick Creek in the southern part of Liberty Township. The name indicates the size of the creek in comparison with Lick Creek (q.v.), from which it was named. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Rock School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Pike Township, so named because there is a cluster of prominent rocks nearby and no others in the community. (McKearly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Vine Church [1 of 2]
Description:A rural church in the southern part of Morley Township, near Bugg School, which was built in 1895, and was used by Methodists, General Baptists, and Presbyterians. W.H. Bugg, a farmer of the Bugg Ridge community, donated the land. The building was destroyed in 1924. The name is used in several churches in this section and is a reference to the comparison made in the words of Jesus, "I am the vine; ye are the branches." (SCOTT COUNTY DEMOCRAT 1936, Foster)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Vine Church [2 of 2]
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the northern part of Pike Township, organized in 1867 and given this name by the founders. (cf. above). (Clodfelter, Douglass 478, Duncan 383)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Vine School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Pike Township, organized in 1890 and named from Little Vine Church. (cf. above). (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Star Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the northern part of Elk Township, organized about 1900 and given this ideal or emblematic name by the founders. (Lankford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Cypress Bridge
Description:A bridge built by order of the county court in 1892 over Long Cypress Slough (q.v.) for which it was named. (Munger, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Cypress Slough
Description:A large slough in the northeastern part of Pike Township. The name is descriptive of the slough which runs through Cypress Swamp (q.v.). (Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lost Hills
Description:A range of limestone hills about two miles long in the northeastern part of the county. These hills are regarded as natural curiosities because they rise some two or three hundred feet above the swamps and are the only outcropping of rock in this region, that is, they appear to be lost and are so named. (ENCY. HISTORY OF MISSOURI, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lost School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Castor Township. It was originally the Ladd School, named for an early settler, F.M. Ladd; in 1869 the building was moved to a field or old woods and the name Lost grew up because of its isolated site. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mabrey Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in Advance (q.v.), preserved according to the request of Joshua Mabrey, who owned the land on which the town of Advance was laid out. The cemetery is named in his honor. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mangrum School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Duck Creek Township, established in 1910 and named for Will Mangrum who gave the land for the school. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marco
Description:A rural community in the eastern part of Elk Township. A post office was maintained in 1910 when this was an important lumber camp. Various explanations are offered for the name. Judge Tucker says, "It was named by some man who was thinking of the two nearby settlements Frisco and Risco, and so added another name ending in 'co'." Dr. W.J. Hux says, "It represented a point south of which there was no development, and no law -- it might have been named as marking the spot beyond which there was no development. Both these explanations are doubtless afterthoughts and the settlement was perhaps named for an improvement company. (Hux, Tucker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Masters School
Description:Two rural schools, white and negro, have this name. Both are in the northeastern part of Pike Township and are named for Mr. Masters, a prominent farmer there. (Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maulsby
Description:A rural settlement in the southeastern part of Elk Township established about 1902 and named for the descendants of Hezekiah P. Maulsby, son of Lemuel Maulsby who was a pioneer of New Madrid County and a clerk of the circuit court of Stoddard County in 1853. (Goodspeed 404, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Medal
Description:A logging station on the Frisco Railroad in the eastern part of Elk Township, established in 1900 by the Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company as a shipping point and named from Medal Ridge (q.v.). (Lankford, Himmelberger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Medal Ridge
Description:A ridge in the eastern part of Elk Township, rising out of the swamp, on which Mr. Medal settled before 1881. (Lankford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Medley
Description:A small settlement in the southwest part of Elk Township, established about 1898 and named for the family of Tom Medley, a farmer of the community. (Munger, Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Melton School
Description:A rural school in the westeern part of Duck Creek Township, named for a prominent family of the community. (Hall, Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mesler
Description:A school and community in the northeastern part of Pike Township. A post office was established in 1915 and named for W.P. Messler, a landowner. The post office name is spelled Messler, but the common local spelling is Mesler. (Munger, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Messler
Description:Cf. above
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Smith School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Elk Township. It was established in 1890 and named Smith School for James W. Smith, a landowner. By 1910 four Smith Schools, three white and one colored, had been established and it became necessary to distinguish between them. The negro school retained the name Smith; this one was called Middle Smith because of its location between East Smith, by which the most eastern school was designated, and West Smith, the school to the west. (Clodfelter, Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller's Mill
Description:An early water power mill on Castor River in the central part of Castor Township, which was established as early as 1875 and named for the mill owner, a Mr. Miller. (Munger, Wilson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mingo
Description:A small settlement in the northwest part of New Lisbon Township. A post office was established in 1896 and named Grindle. The man for whom it was named--a land and mill owner--was a Mr. Grinnel, but the name was sent to the postal authorities as Grindle, doubtless because the name was often pronounced this way. The post office was discontinued in 1897, and in 1900 the settlement was known as Mingo, the name by which this entire region was known in the early days being Mingo Swamp (q.v.). (Davis, Houck's Mss. Barum)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mingo Swamp
Description:A large swamp in the western part of the county, named for an Indian chief, Mingo, whose tribe lived there until 1834. (Houck I 218, Davis, Houck's Mss., G. Houck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Railroad
Description:The original Missouri Pacific Railroad was chartered in 1876 as a part of the Pacific Railroad Company which had failed to build roads as directed in the charter of 1849. It was under the direction of C.K. Garrison until 1879 when it became the property of Jay Gould, who consolidated a number of railroads. This part of the system, however, had its beginning in the Cairo and Fulton Railroad which was organized in 1857 in Charleston, Mississippi County, through the efforts of Colonel H.J. Deal. The name indicated the two proposed terminals - Fulton, Arkansas and Cairo, Illinois. The first train on this road was run from Bird's Point to Charleston April 19, 1859. The chief engineer was J.S. Williams and the engine was called the "Sol G. Kitchen" in honor of a pioneer of Mississippi County. The road was finished to Sikeston, in Scott County, July 4, 1859, and the first locomotive on this run was the "Abe Hunter," named for another prominent pioneer of Mississippi County. During the Civil War the road was partially destroyed. It was reorganized in 1872 under the name Cairo, Arkansas, and Texas Railroad, so named because the company now proposed to extend the road through the state of Arkansas and on to Texarkana, Texas. The nickname "Cat" road, derived from the initials of the official road, came into use locally about this time. It was completed to Poplar Bluff, through Stoddard County in 1873. Shortly after the reorganization it was bought by the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad under the management of Thomas Allen. The St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad had been granted a charter in 1851 to build a road from some point on the Pacific Railroad to Pilot Knob; and in 1852 the Iron Mountain Branch of the Pacific Railroad was incorporated. The purpose of the railroad was the transportation of ore from Iron Mountain to St. Louis, from which point it could be shipped elsewhere, and this fact gave the road its name. The first survey was made in 1852 by J.H. Morley and the first section of rails laid in 1853. The road was opened to Iron Mountain in 1858. The Arkansas branch was completed from Pilot Knob to Moark in 1873, and the name changed to St. Louis Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad to indicate this extension of the road. In 1880 these roads were consolidated under the Missouri Pacific Railroad. (Deal Scrapbook, Charleston Democrat 1937, Kerr, Thornton 14-51, Douglass 499)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Gilead Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the central part of Castor Township, organized about 1890 and given this common church name (cf. above) by the founders. Locally it is known as the Hill Church, for it is near the Hill School (q.v.). (Clodfelter, Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Olive Church
Description:A rural Christian Church in the central part of Elk Township, organized about 1900 and named from the Mount of Olives near Jerusalem. (Dexter Statesman 1914, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Pisgah Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the northwest part of Duck Creek Township, organized before 1887 and given this common church name by the founders. (Goodspeed 557)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Pleasant Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the eastern part of New Lisbon Township, organized in 1887- 1888, and given this ideal name by the founders. (Goodspeed 546, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Pleasant School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of New Lisbon Township, organized about 1890 and named for Mount Pleasant Church (q.v.). (Clodfelter, Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Union Church
Description:See Dexter Presbyterian Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Zion Church
Description:See Zion Church
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Bethel Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the central part of Liberty Township, established in 1905 and named from Old Liberty or Old Bethel Church (q.v.). (Hall, Dexter Statesman 1910)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Hope Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the western part of Duck Creek Township, organized before 1888. (cf. above) (Goodspeed 546)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Lakeville
Description:See Advance.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Liberty Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the eastern part of Castor Township, established in 1895 and named from Liberty Church (q.v.) Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Whiteoak School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Liberty Township, established in 1910 and named from Old Whiteoak School (q.v.). (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Antioch School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Castor Township, which received its name from its location north of Antioch School and Antioch Church (q.v.). (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Masters School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Richland Township, organized in 1910 and named from its location north of Masters School (q.v.) (Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove Church
Description:See Oak Grove School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Pike Township. A General Baptist Church known as Oak Grove Church was established in 1887 and named for the natural surroundings, a grove of oak trees. The school was later built at the same place. (Goodspeed 536, Munger, Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Castor Township, organized about 1900 and named for a grove of oak trees growing on a ridge. (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Bethel Church
Description:A rural Primitive Baptist Church in the central part of Liberty Township, in the community known as Garner Crossing. It was established before 1888 and given this common church name Bethel, by the founders. About 1905 it became known as Old Bethel, to distinguish it from a new church which had been given the same name, and which took the distinguishing name New Bethel. (Hall, Goodspeed 546, Dexter Statesman 1910)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Indian Creek
Description:A small creek in the southeastern part of Castor Township in 1873, which was so named by the early settlers. Indian tribes had lived there until long after the first white men came in 1825. (Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Whiteoak School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Liberty Township, established in 1890 and named Whiteoak School because of a grove of whiteoak trees growing there. In 1910 another Whiteoak School was established and the two were distinguished by referring to this as Old and the other as New Whiteoak School. About 1915 another school was located in this whiteoak region and was called South Whiteoak because of its location south of Old and New Whiteoak Schools. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Olio
Description:A settlement was made here in 1845 and a post office established here in 1853. It does not appear on any of the old maps and is unknown to the oldest settlers. (Cf. Zif.) (Colton, Postal Guide, Hayward)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Open Lake [1 of 2]
Description:A large lake in the northern part of Pike Township in the swamp known as Cypress Swamp or Big Field (q.v.). It was named by the early settlers before 1873 because of the "open" appearance of the lake and field as contrasted with the surrounding wooded regions. (Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Open Lake [2 of 2]
Description:A small lake in the northern part of Liberty Township, named because of the open appearance of the region (cf. above). (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Open Lake School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Liberty Township, named from Open Lake. (Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ott School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Elk Township, named for Bob Ott, a prominent farmer, who established Ott's Spur on the Frisco Railroad in 1910. (Clodfelter, Bailey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ott's Spur
Description:A spur or short line of railroad built from the sawmill of Bob Ott to the Frisco line in 1910. (cf. above)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pacific Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Page School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Duck Creek Township, named for Dr. John Page. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Painton
Description:A small settlement in the northeastern part of Pike Township. The first named settlement was Paradise. This ideal name was given by the land promoters who wanted to induce settlers to come to this section of the county. When a post office was established in 1921, it was named for Albert Painton, who owned a farm, mill, and store there. (Munger, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palestine Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the southern part of Elk Township, organized in 1857, disbanded during the Civil War; reorganized in 1866; disbanded about 1900, and again reorganized in 1912. It was named for Palestine, the Holy Land. (Duncan 383, Goodspeed 567, Minutes of Stoddard Assn., Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Panther Swamp
Description:A large swamp in the northern part of Elk and Liberty Townships, named for the panther, an animal well known to the early hunters. (Campbell, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Paradise
Description:See Painton
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Paront
Description:See Guam
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Philadelphia Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the northern part of Castor Township, organized in 1859 and named by the founders for the Philadelphia Church in Asia Minor, one of the seven churches to which the Book of Revelations is addressed. (Goodspeed 56-9, Duncan 383, Revelations 1:11, 2:7)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Philadelphia School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Castor Township, named from the church (cf. above). (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pike Township
Description:In the southeastern part of the county. In 1829 the Cape Girardeau Court organized two townships in what is now Stoddard County; one was Castor, including all of the territory west of Castor River and the other was Pike. Pike Township was named for Zebulon M. Pike (1779-1813), who had explored the Louisiana Purchase Territory and made many valuable discoveries. In 1835 when the County Court was organized, four townships were erected and Pike Township was thus reduced in size. In 1850 the county was redistricted with eight townships; in 1853 the territory of the county was reduced, part of it being added to Dunklin County on the south and part of it to Cape Girardeau County on the north; and in 1868 the county was finally redistricted and Pike Township given its present boundaries. (Douglass 304)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Piketon
Description:A small village no longer in existence which was established in the central part of Pike Township. The first settlement was made by people who came from North Carolina and was called Spring Hill, because of an excellent spring of water there. A post office was established in 1867 and named Piketon. The name was suggested by Pike Township (which had been organized in 1829) although this is a reversal of the usual order of names, that is, the township is usually named from the town. (Munger, Campbell 608, Sutherland 1860, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pinhook
Description:See Frisco
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pinhook School
Description:See Frisco School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of Liberty Township, organized before 1887 and given this ideal name by the founders. It was destroyed about 1915. (Dexter Statesman 1899, Goodspeed 557, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Valley Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the northwest part of Castor Township, organized in 1858 and given this descriptive name by the founders. (Goodspeed 556-559, Clodfelter, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Castor Township, which received its name from Pleasant Valley Church (q.v.). (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Poplin
Description:A small village in the southwest part of Liberty Township, established in 1867 and named for G.L. Poplin. A post office was maintained in 1886. (Wilson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pottery, The
Description:One of the outstanding features of the county; located on Highway 25 between Bloomfield and Dexter in the southern part of Castor Township. The Pottery has belonged to the Evans family for four generations, having been started before 1850, and is now operated by Arthur Evans. (E. Evans, M.H.R. 25, 336)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Powe
Description:A small settlement in the southwest part of Liberty Township where a post office was maintained from 1910-1929. It was named for a family who owned land in the community. (Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie Township
Description:A township created by the county court in 1850 and disorganized in 1853 when the entire county was redistricted. It was named from West Prairie (q.v.) in the southwest part of the county and in Dunklin County. (Douglass I 304, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Proffers
Description:A stop on the Frisco Railroad in the northern part of Castor Township, which was named for the family of Lawson Proffer, who came to Stoddard County in 1828 among the first settlers. (Ulen, Goodspeed's Biog.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Providence Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the western part of Richland Township, organized before 1860 and given this common church name (cf. above), by the founders. (Duncan 383, Minutes of Stoddard Assn., Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pryor School
Description:Two schools of this name, white and negro, in the southern part of Elk Township, are named for Mr. Pryor, a prominent landowner in the community. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Puxico
Description:A small village in the western part of New Lisbon Township, [Duck Creek Township] where a post office was established in 1887 and named by Louis Houck for the Shawnee Indian Pucksicah, whose tribe had camped in this region before the coming of the white men. (Davis, Houck's Mss., G. Houck) Note: (the following is a more descriptive history of Puxico) The first settlement at Puxico in Stoddard County was made September 29, 1883, and the town was incorporated June 2, 1884. The first mayor was E.L. Hawks. Among the early settlers were J.A. Hickman, E.L. Hawks, W.C. Clark, George Eaton, Henry Jeffords, Prior Daniels, John W. Reed, William Gray and H.B. Purcell. The buisiness interests for the town were, for the first period, in the hands of J.A. Hickman, John Reed, H.B. Purcell and T.J. Moss. There are now four general stores, handle factory, flour mill, electric light plant, canning factory, saw mill, and planing mill. Among the important buildings are the opera house, three churches, brick school building and a lodge hall. The town is situated on the Hoxie branch of the Frisco Railroad and has a population of 814. The Bank of Puxico was organized in 1898 and has a capital stock of $25,000. One newspaper, the PUXICO INDEX, is published in the town. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI, Robert S. Douglass (1912)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pyle
Description:A small settlement in the eastern part of Liberty; a post office was maintained from 1896-1904. Locally it was often called Pyle Town, and was named for J.K. Pyle, who built a store there. (Polk, Postal Guide, Munger, Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pyle Town
Description:See Pyle
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Red, White, and Blue School
Description:See Walnut Lane School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Redd
Description:A station on the Frisco Railroad in the eastern part of Duck Creek Township, maintained from 1913-1918 and named for Mr. Redd, the mill owner, who shipped lumber from this place. (Frisco Map, Doubleday, Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reece
Description:A small settlement in the western part of Duck Creek Township, where a post office was maintained from 1904-1915. It was named for Bill Reece who lived in the community. (Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Renner School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Castor Township, named for W.P. Renner, who settled there in 1893. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Richland Township
Description:In the south-central part of the county; organized in 1853 when the county was redistricted and given this name which is descriptive of the soil. (Goodspeed 368, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Point School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Pike Township, so named because it is located on a slope or point of land in the swamp, and the foundation of the school is one solid rock. (Clodfelter, Ulen, Hux, McKearly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rockwell School
Description:A rural school in the western part of New Lisbon Township, established about 1890 and named for the natural surroundings, the rocky soil and a rock-curbed well. (Jennings, McKearly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rosebrier Prairie
Description:A large prairie in the central part of Stoddard County, named by the early settlers before 1844 for the wild roses which grow in profusion on this ridge. (Cf. Bloomfield) (Hutawa, Munger, Douglass I 295)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Saddler's Chapel
Description:See Sadler's Chapel.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sadler's Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the western part of Castor Township, organized in 1914 and named for H.E. Sadler, one of the founders. The name is sometimes written Saddler's Chapel. Ladd Cemetery is located nearby. (Ladd, Dexter Statesman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scagg School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Richland Township, named for "Uncle" Bill Scaggs, an early settler. (Lankford, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shawnan
Description:A flagstop on the now abandoned branch of the Frisco Railroad in the southern part of Pike Township, named from the Shawnee Indians who inhabited this region before the coming of the white man. Shawnan School remains at this place. (Houck Mss., Frisco Map 1913)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shawnan School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Pike Township in the community of Shawnan (cf. above). (Houck Mss., Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shawnee Ford
Description:An old ford on Castor River in the central part of Castor Township. Shawnese Village, sometimes called Shawnee, existed here from 1823-1853, or perhaps earlier. Both the ford and the village were named for the Shawnee Indians who once lived here. (Goodspeed 237, Beck, Wetmore, Houck Mss.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shawnee Village
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shawnese Village
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sherry
Description:A rural post office in the southern part of Castor Township, maintained from 1897-1904 and named for A.P. Sherry, landowner in this region and once postmaster at Dudley. (Munger, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shoemaker School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Duck Creek Township, organized in 1890 and named for Mr. Shoemaker, a farmer of the community. (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shreve
Description:A station on the Frisco Railroad in the southwest part of Liberty Township. It was maintained from 1913-1918, and named for Mr. Shreve, the land and mill owner who shipped lumber from this place. (Frisco Map, Doubleday, Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Skelton School
Description:A rural school in the western part of New Lisbon Township, named for George Skelton, who settled there in 1897. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Smith Colored School
Description:See Middle Smith School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Smith School
Description:See Middle Smith School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Masters School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Richland Township, organized about 1915 and named from its location south of Masters S. (q.v.) (Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Pacific Railroad
Description:See below
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Whiteoak School
Description:See Old Whiteoak School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spence School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Pike Township, organized in 1890 and named for Krat C. Spence, a landowner of the community, who served as prosecuting attorney of the county from 1901-1904. (Ulen, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spiller Ranch
Description:A large farm or ranch in the eastern part of Elk Township, which belonged to S.W. Spiller in 1898. (Dexter Statesman 1898)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spring Creek
Description:A small branch of Lick Creek in the southern part of Castor Township, so named because it flows from a spring. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spring Hill
Description:See Piketon
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spring Hill Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church organized before 1860 in the community known as Spring Hill, which came to be known as Piketon. (Goodspeed 557)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francois River
Description:A large river which rises in the northern part of St. Francois County, flows through Wayne and Madison Counties, forms the western boundaries of Stoddard and Dunklin, and finally empties into the Mississippi River in Arkansas near Helena. It was known to the Indians as Cholohollay, a Choctaw name meaning "smoke," taken from Oca-Cholohollay meaning "smoky water." Eaton says it was named by early explorers for the patron saint of their order. This would be St. Francis of Assisi. However, none of the prominent early explorers were of the Franciscan order, at least none who descended to the mouth of the St. Francois River. Hennepin was the only Franciscan among the prominent explorers and he named the St. Francois River in Michigan, now known as Rum River, so it is not likely he also named this river, nor did he descend south as far as the St. Francois. DeSoto mentions a river answering the description of the St. Francois River, but he does not mention its name. Marquette reached a point near where the river empties into the Mississippi in 1673, and possibly he named it as he had spent some time at the mission of St. Francis Xavier before starting on this trip. St. Francis Xavier (1506-1552) was a Jesuit missionary, like Marquette, and a friend of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit Society. The St. Francois River was first used in business proceedings in the grant of New Madrid to Colonel Morgan in 1787. The name is sometimes spelled St. Francis on recent maps. (M.H.R. 13:60, Shea 112, Buel 240-241, HIST. MAGAZINE VOL. 5, MAGAZINE OF AMER. HIST. VOL. 2, Houck I 16-17, quoting from Silliman's Journal of Science III:25)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francois Township
Description:In the southwest part of the county; one of the four original townships organized in 1835, but disorganized in 1853 when the entire country was redistricted. It was named for St. Francois River (cf. above), which forms the western boundary of the county. (Douglass I 304)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francoisville
Description:See Asherville
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Description:This railroad was first organized as the Southwest branch of the Pacific Railroad in 1849, along a surveyed route from St. Louis west to the Pacific Ocean. In 1851 it became the South Pacific Railroad and was completed to Rolla in 1861. In 1866 it was created the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad by an act of Congress, and authorized to build to the Pacific Coast. It was finished to Vinita in Indian territory in 1871. In these counties the road is the result of the consolidation of a number of short lines which were connected to form the present system. It had its beginning in the Cape Girardeau and State Line Railroad Company, which proposed to build a line from Cape Girardeau to the Arkansas line in 1869. No work was done on this road, and in 1871 Governor Fletcher of Missouri reorganized the company as the Illinois, Missouri and Texas Railroad Company with the idea of connecting those three states by rail. This charter was purchased in 1880 by Louis Houck and organized as the Cape Girardeau Railroad Company because the businessmen of that city were to furnish the capital. In 1881 the branch was built to Lakeville in Stoddard County, and the name changed to Cape Girardeau and Southwestern Railroad Company, indicating the direction of the road from Cape Girardeau. In 1891 the name was again changed to the St. Louis, Cape Girardeau, and Fort Smith Raiload, named to indicate the intention of extending the road north to St. Louis and south to Fort Smith, Arkansas. The railroad also includes the line of the Missouri and Arkansas Railroad organized in 1891 by Mr. Houck to build a road from Morley to Cape Girardeau, and the St. Louis, Kennett and Southern Railroad, which was built in 1890 from Campbell to Kennett, and the Kennett to Caruthersville Railroad, which was built in 1894. In 1902 all these roads were consolidated under the name St. Louis and Gulf Railroad with the intention of extending the road from St. Louis to the Gulf of Mexico, and shortly afterward the property was transferred to the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad. The latter company extended the line from St. Louis to Memphis, Tennessee, thence to Pensacola, and west from Memphis to Oklahoma, but it has not yet reached its intended destination - San Francisco. In Pemiscot County the company purchased a right-of-way extending from Caruthersville to the Arkansas line and thence to Blytheville, Arkansas from Cunningham Brothers of Caruthersville, who had been interested in building a railroad and had begun private operations. This road is commonly called Frisco, a shortened from of San Francisco. (Willis, Douglass 502-504, Wollman 16, Ham, Wilson, Barns 615, 673)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Luke
Description:An old lake settlement which appears on the maps of 1867-1873, which was probably named by an early settler for the Apostle Luke. (Munger, Nicely, Goodwin, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stoddard
Description:A community in the western part of Liberty Township. A post office was maintained in 1892 when this was a center of the lumber industry. It was named from the county (q.v.). (Ulen, Hux, Jennings, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stoddard Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of Castor Township, one mile north of Bloomfield. It was organized in 1846, the first church in the county from which it was named. Later the church was moved to Bloomfield. (Duncan 383)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stoddard County
Description:The general assembly passed an act in 1829 defining the boundaries of a new county to be erected out of parts of Wayne and New Madrid Counties. It was to be named in honor of Captain Amos Stoddard (1762-1813), agent of the United States government who received the transfer of the Louisian Territory from France. (March 10, 1804) At this time the county was attached to Cape Girardeau County, and the court of that county divided the territory into two townships. That part of the territory west of Castor River was called Pike Township, and the part northwest of Castor River was called Castor Township. It remained under the jurisdiction of Cape Girardeau County until 1835, when the legislature passed an act to organize the county government. The territory of the new county lay between the St. Francois and Little Rivers, and to the south of Mingo and Big Swamps. (Douglass I 304, M.H.R. 13:68, DICT. of AM. BIOG.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stokes
Description:A station on the now abandoned Frisco Railroad in the northern part of Liberty Township, named for the family of L.B. and C. Stokes, early settlers and mill operators. (Stokes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stover
Description:A station on the Frisco Railroad in the southern part of Liberty Township, maintained from 1913 until 1918 and named for Joseph W. Stover, a land and mill owner. (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stover Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the community of Stover (cf. above), from which it was named. (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stover Chapel Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery near Stover Chapel (cf. above).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Creek
Description:A small branch of Duck Creek in the western part of Duck Creek Township in 1891; named for the sugar maple trees growing there. The creek was drained in 1900. (Colton, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Tree Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the northwest part of Elk Township, named for a maple sugar tree growing there. (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Tree School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Elk Township, established in 1910 and named for a maple sugar tree growing there. (Ulen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Summer Hill
Description:A settlement was made here in 1845 and a post office established in 1853. It does not appear on any of the old maps and is not known to any of the oldest settlers of the county who are living now (cf. Zif). (Munger, Hayward, Colton, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Swan Lake
Description:A small lake, also called Swan Pond, in the northern part of Pike Township, which was named early in the history of the county. It was ordered drained by the county court February 9, 1898. The name was given for John Swan, a landowner in this neighborhood. Swan Lake Rural School remains to mark the site of the old lake. (County Court Record, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Swan Lake Bridge
Description:A bridge over Swan Lake (cf. above), built in 1893.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Swan Lake School
Description:See Swan Lake.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sweet Prospect Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the neighborhood of Tatum School (q.v.) in the northeastern part of Elk Township, organized in 1867 and given this common church name by the founders. (Hall, Lankford, Dexter Messenger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Swinton
Description:A small town in the northwest part of Pike Township, where a post office has been maintained since 1900. It was named for the Swinton family. (Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tatum School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Liberty Township, named for B. and S.V. Tatum, landowners. (Boone)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the eastern part of Elk Township, named for Taylor Church (q.v.) near which it is located. (Hux, Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the eastern part of Elk Township, which was named for Wm. R. Taylor, one of the founders of the church. (Hux, Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Stage Road
Description:An important stage road which entered the county from the west and connected Bloomfield with Cape Girardeau. It was used in 1837 and maintained until the building of railroads in Southeast Missouri in 1859. (Wetmore, Hayward, County Court Record, Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tilman
Description:A small village in the northern part of Pike Township where a post office was maintained from 1886-1904 and named for Squire John Tilman who owned land and a sawmill there. Nothing remains now and the name is no longer in use. (Munger, McKearly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Toadsuck
Description:See Leora
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Toga
Description:An old settlement in the northeastern part of Pike Township, long abandoned, named for Toga Bill Rhodes, who lived there. (Munger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tom Pond
Description:A small lake in the southeast part of Castor Township, named for Tom McDonald, on whose farm it is located. It is visible in flood seasons only. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Topper
Description:A switch on the Frisco Railroad in the north-central part of Richland Township, also called Toppertown. It was established about 1910 and named for a sawmill operator, Mr. Topper.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Toppertown
Description:See Topper.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trammel School
Description:Two rural schools, white and colored, in the southeast part of Elk Township, named for Jay Trammel, a prominent farmer of the community. (Clodfelter, Lankford, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tropf School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Pike Township, named for Martin Tropf, who came from Bavaria, Germany in 1833 and bought a farm in Stoddard County in 1860. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trotter School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Elk Township, named for Harvey Trotter, a landowner, who gave the land for the school. (Hux)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek
Description:A small creek in the western part of Liberty Township, named by hunters because of the wild turkeys which they found there. (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek Bridge
Description:A bridge built over Turkey Creek (cf. above) in 1892. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vader Robinson Pond
Description:A small pond in the northwest part of Castor Township, on the Vader Robinson farm from which it is named. It is also called Robinson Pond, and is used by the Pleasant Valley Church for baptismal services. (DEXTER MESSENGER 1928)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Venson School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Elk Township, named for John Venson, a landowner and prominent man in the community. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walker School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Elk Township, named for James Walker, a landowner in the community. (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walnut Lane Farm
Description:An estate belonging to John Montgomery in the northern part of Richland Township, named from the long line of walnut trees which Mr. Montgomery set out along his driveway. (Hall, Caverno, Bailey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walnut Lane School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Richland Township, established about 1900 and named Red, White, and Blue School, a patriotic reference to the colors of the flag. It was named in 1910 Walnut Lane School for John Montgomery's estate (cf. above). (Caverno)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Antioch School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Castor Township, which received its name from its location west of Antioch School and Church (q.v.). (Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Prairie
Description:A post office was maintained here in 1853. It was named for West Prairie (cf. above), and became a part of Dunklin County in 1853. (Munger, Cox, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Pryor
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Elk Township, named from its position west of Pryor School (q.v.). (Dunn, Clodfelter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Smith School
Description:See Middle Smith School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Tanner School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Elk Township, named from its position west of Tanner School (q.v.) in Scott County. (Tanner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Union Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the western part of Duck Creek Township, established in 1925 and named for its location in the western part of the county and the common church name Union. (Jennings, DEXTER MESSENGER 1928)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Oak Grove Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the southern part of Liberty Township, organized in 1858 and named for a grove a whiteoak trees. (Duncan 383, Goodspeed 557, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilkerson School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Duck Creek Township, organized in 1915 and named for the Wilkerson family, who were early settlers. (Bailey, Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wolf Creek
Description:A small creek in the northern part of New Lisbon Township, which appears on the maps of 1844-1873. It was named by the early settlers and hunters for the wolves which frequented this region. (Hall, Hutawa, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wolf Creek Bridge
Description:A bridge built in 1893 over Wolf Creek (cf. above).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zadock
Description:A small settlement in the northwest part of Pike Township. A post office was maintained from 1892-1915. Judge Tucker says it was named by Joe G. Lewis, later sheriff of the county, "who had a streak of humor." Possibly Mr. Lewis had read Schoolcraft's account of his travels in which he recorded a visit with Mr. Zadock Lee on Crooked Creek (in Bollinger County), on July 8, 1818, and used this name. (Davis, Tucker, Schoolcraft 853, Polk)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zeta
Description:A small station on the Frisco Railroad in the north-central part of Richland Township, named by Mr. G. Crumb, who built a railroad from Bloomfield to Zeta. A post office was established in 1910 and named by Mr. Crumb, Zeta, the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet. Mr. Crumb was interested in all things classical, and usually chose such names for the places he established or named. Zeta is remembered as the place to which Mrs. Dolly Gibbs and twenty of her followers went to wait for the Judgment Day, which they expected March 1, 1914. (Houck Mss., Davis, Tucker, Dexter Statesman 1914)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zif
Description:A post office maintained in 1853; it is unknown to the oldest settlers, who think this post office was possibly in the territory cut off from the county and added to Bollinger County in the latter part of 1853. (Munter, Nicely, Goodwin)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the northeastern part of Castor Township, organized in 1864, reorganized in 1865 and named Zion for the hill in Jerusalem. (Goodspeed 546, Bailey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Castor Township, named from Zion Church (q.v.). (Bailey, Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zoll School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Duck Creek Township, named for a landowner. (Jennings)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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