Shelby County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Alps
Description:A store so known in the northeastern part of the county, south of Sigsbee. This vicinity is the high lands or divide between Black Creek and North River; hence doubtless the name. Many places in the United States bear the name Alpine in reference to their elevation. (Maps Missouri, 1861-1886; Gannett; Nathan Winetroub)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Church
Description:See Leonard Christian Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Applegate Schoolhouse
Description:A schoolhouse in Bethel Township. So named for the pioneer owner of the land, and still so known. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Auhaha
Description:See Salt River Country.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:B. and M. Church House
Description:See Shelbina Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bachelor Hall
Description:See "Das Grosse Haus"
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bacon Chapel
Description:A Methodist stronghold, in the western part of Salt River Township, somewhat southwest of the center and two and a half miles northeast of Lentner. It was organized in 1837 in a large cabin built for George Bacon of Hannibal, but never occupied as a dwelling. It was deeded to the chapel by Mr. Bacon, whence the name. This cabin stood about 3/4 mile north of the present building. The first church built on land donated by George Bacon, around 1845, was of logs covered with clapboards. Before the floor was laid, "Old Father Eads" conducted servcies there, after the style of the Pilgrim Fathers. This building stood for twenty years. It was succeeded about 1870 by the present building. Bacon Chapel is an historic landmark, known as the oldest church in the county, and the "Mother of Methodism" in Shelby. The old chapel is still active. A remarkable feature in the history of the church is that the majority of the members attending church there today are descendants of the pioneer settlers who were members of its organization. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 628; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 818, 874; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 142, 185; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bacon School
Description:The first school in Salt River Township, 1838; conducted in the original building where the meetings of Bacon Chapel (q.v.) were held; hence the name. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baker School
Description:A schoolhouse in Black Creek Township. So named for an early settler. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek
Description:A creek which rises near the center of Adair County; flowing in a southeast direction through the northeastern corner of Macon County, it enters Shelby near the northwest corner and flows into the North Fork of Salt River soon after it enters the county. So named by hunters who killed a large black bear at the mouth of the creek. Sometimes known by them as Bear River. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 146; Williams 1904; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear River
Description:See Bear Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beatley School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jackson Township. The first building stood about forty rods east of the present one. It burned after some years, and the present building was erected at the crossroads. The first schoolhouse was named for an early settler that lived close by, and the second building retained the name. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; Earl Blackford)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bee Ford
Description:Whenever the "Bee Roads" (q.v.) crossed a stream, the name "Bee Ford" was given that point; and whenever the need arose for more definite distinction, it became known as Bee Ford of Salt River, Bee Ford of South Fabius, Beeford of Otter Creek, etc. The name was sometimes written as one word, Beeford, as in the one instance cited. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 43, 661; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 35; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bee Roads
Description:The name applied to the first trails; known first as "Bee Trails." They were two in number, running north and south, known individually as the Calloway Trail (q.v.) and the Boone Trail (q.v.). They were the earliest known roads of the surrounding counties as well. These trails were made by the settlers of the lower counties previous to 1836, who made annual pilgramages each autumn into this and adjacent counties in search of honey. The woods were full of bee-trees; hence the name "Bee Roads" or "Bee Trails." (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 643, 661; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 35; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bee Trails
Description:See "Bee Roads."
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bell's Branch
Description:A branch rising in the southwest corner of Tiger Fork Township and flowing east into Black Creek Township, then south, emptying into Black Creek in northwestern Jackson. So named for Samuel Bell, the first settler on the stream. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; Eaton, 66)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Berea
Description:A Christian Church northeast of Leonard, an offspring of the Leonard Church. It is still active. A Biblical name;-Paul preached at Berea in the synagogue unto the Jews (Acts 17:10) "that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the Scriptures daily, whether these things were so." (Acts 17:11) (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 109; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 193; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Berean Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:A Methodist Church established at Shelbyville in 1850. The church is still active. (See Burea) (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 821; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 187; Nathan Winetroub; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethany Church
Description:See West Bethany Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethany Methodist Episcopal Church South
Description:A Methodist Church in the eastern part of Black Creek Township; established in 1881. It is an active church. Cf. Bethany Church above. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 819; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 186; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel
Description:A post office from 1848; five miles north of Shelbyville, in the southeastern part of Bethel Township. Bethel was originally a German communistic settlement composed of about 500 German colonists coming to Missouri about 1845 from Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Iowa. At a period later, the colony numbered 1000 inhabitants. It is regarded as one of the three most notable communistic settlements on American soil as well as one of the first such experiments of that type. The colony was under the leadership of Dr. William Keil, a Prussian by birth who was forced to flee from his home country because he was accused of practicing the Black Art. He probably came to America around 1835, was converted at Pittsburg under the famous Dr. William Nast, founder of the German Methodist Church, and later became a convert of the Rev. Hartman's in the principles of communism. Not long after his arrival in America Dr. Keil began preaching to German families throughout Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio. He seemed sincere in his conversion, but early broke away from the church, and its tenets "where men served God for pay." (Bek) He was a religious fanatic, gave no token of having studied any book but the Bible, and that only as it helped him to enforce his own philosophy. There is no evidence of him ever having attended a technical school or university. The title of Doctor was one evidently bestowed by courtesy. He was "quick to turn every thought toward the subject of communal life, took illustrations mostly from the New Testament, and evidently laid much stress on the parental character of God" (Bek, 54, quoting Nordhoff). The Bethel community was unique in that there were no semblance of a constitutional agreement, no peculiar dress, no singular customs, such as have bound possibly all other communities. "The sole bond of union seemed the magnetic power and iron will of its founder" (Bek, 52). No doubt many joined because they forsaw and immediate betterment of economic conditions. There was no attempt even at a common religious affiliation;" several Protestant sects were represented; there was one Jew, but no Roman Catholics." (Bek, 52-Communistic Societies in the U.S., 319). A site was chosen on the bank of North River, as apart from "the contaminating influences of advanced civilization, three spies having been sent out by Dr. Keil, who evidently thought of himself like Moses and Joshua of old, as leading his people into a new promised land. Here there were taken up around 4000 acres of land including the present site of Bethel. A church was built (see Old Colony Church); shops, factories, and a steam mill were established. The wealthy poured their substance into the common treasury with the same alacrity as the humblest, and most harmonious and satisfactory relations were maintained. They lived by families and drew their portion from the colony storehouse on certain days in proportion to the size of the family. "From every man according to his capacity; to every man according to his needs"--this was the working hypothesis of the colony. There were no drones though the majority were new to this type of life. They built their homes, constructed their furniture, wove their clothing of linen from the flax fields and wool from the sheep. The chief support of the colony was of course agriculture, the common field a tract of 1100 acres. Produce of whatever kind was directed first to filling their own needs, the surplus, if any, being sold to outsiders. They became known for their wool cloth, their hats, and their buckskin gloves, the latter acquiring a national reputation. In the prosperous days of the enterprise, Bethel was a miniature Lowell. All of this occurred when the closest railroad was over one hundred miles away, and the shipment of manufactured goods had to be made overland to Hannibal and from there by boat. Dr. Keil drew upon the Bible for the name of his community, and when it seemed best to divide the community into groups he selected Biblical names for all but one. Close to Bethel were established Mamre (q.v.), Elim (q.v.), Hebron (q.v.), and at a further distance Nineveh in Adair County. Later, on the Pacific coast was established Aurora. In this case, departing from precedent, he chose for the name of the new community the name of his most loved daughter. In choosing Biblical names for his colonies, Dr. Keil must have had in mind the migration of Abraham, father of the faithful, into the promised land, like his own migration into a new country; first Bethel, the place where his tent had been at the beginning (Gen. 13:3); then, Hebron and Mamre ("Then Abram removed his tent, and came and dwelt in the plain of Mamre, which is in Hebron," Gen. 13:18). Elim was the second encampment of the Israelites after their exodus from Egypt ("And they came to Elim, where there were twelve wells of water, and three score and ten palm trees," Ex. 15:27). For Nineveh he may have thought of the still earlier Bible pioneer--Nimrod, who founded Nineveh, and who was a "mighty hunter before the Lord" (Gen. 10:0, 11). Dr. Keil's type of religion cannot well be defined. He adopted the teachings of the Apostolic Fathers, the Golden Rule, and "Gott mit uns" as the cornerstone of their faith. His philosophy, as summed up in the words of a former member of the community, ran "to live right with all men, to owe no man a cent, to do a fair amount of work each day, and to trust in God for all things." More and more he was regarded as an extraordinary man. He claimed to be inspired, and the older colonists rendered him homage as a superior creature, as perhaps "chosen of God to usher in a brighter day for human kind." His former love of the mystic reasserted itself, and he affirmed that he had visions while his wife declared her husband to be as great as Christ. (Bek, 59). In any case, so great was Dr. Keil's magnetic power that the congregation followed him blindly and devotedly, and clung to him lovingly as their spiritual as well as temporal leader. The colony of Nineveh was located on 1300 acres of land ten miles northwest of Kirksville in Adair County. Here were established a small sawmill, a steam mill, and another grist mill, with shops to supply the needs of the colony. The Nineveh shops, making boots and shoes, enjoyed a profitable patronage. In 1855, the last colony, Aurora, was established. Dr. Keil again sent out spies like Joshua of old. It was the days of the California gold rush, a fact that may have inspired the movement westward. Washington Territroy was chosen as the new site, but the location proving undesirable, the site of the new community was changed to Oregon. Dr. Keil's favorite son, who had been largely instrumental in planning the new project, died before the plan could be affected, and previous to his death asked that he be buried in the new community. Dr. Keil had always taught his people that a promise was sacred, and having given his word he left for Oregon, accompanied by forty caravans, around 250 members of the community, and carrying the body of his son in alcohol, a five month's journey across what was still the trackless West. From Aurora he never returned. Dr. Keil left the Missouri community groups in charge of a representative, though he himself remained the nominal head of the organization. No one could rule with the iron hand of Dr. Keil, however, and shortly after his death, which occurred in 1877, the community was dissolved (1879). It remained to its dissolution an unincorporated body, with no legal existence, "a voluntary gathering of likeminded person"--a curious admixture of individualism and communism. There had been on written compact, no provision for a possible dissolution. Unique in this respect, it was unique also in that on its dissolution after thirty-five years the property and assets were pro-rated according to the time each person had been a member of the community, and affairs were concluded amicable with no lawsuits. The town, incorporated November 6, 1883, differs little from towns of its size in the state, except that its buildings seem odd and unusually substantially built. Special inducements from the first had been extended artisians, finished craftsmen, and Bethel was known for years for some of the outstanding buildings which remained. Today there is an air of uniqueness about the place, the heirloom of old community days. The first house built on the site of Bethel still stands, that of Samuel Vandiver, a substantial house built of brick made on the site. Samuel Vandiver was the original owner of the site of Bethel, selling land originally to Peter Stice (See Stice Mill) and to the Bethel colonists. (Hayward 1853; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; CRAM ATLAS, SHELBY 1875; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; Eaton, 66; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; P.G.; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 633, 634; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 666, 861-869, 882; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 172-174, 176, 177; Bek, 52-59, 62, 68, 69, 71, 74, 99-101, 107, 111, 121, 125; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1855)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Baptist Association
Description:An association of Baptist churches formed in 1834 of churches dismissed from the Salt River Association of Baptist Churches in Ralls County for the purpose of organizing at Bethel Church in Marion a new association on their more immediate vicinity. On organization, it included Baptist churches of Northeast Missouri, including Clark, Scotland, Knox, Lewis, Shelby, Marion, Monroe, the northern part of Ralls and of Audrain, the eastern part of Schuyler, and the church at Des Moines, Iowa. In the "Mission Controversy" (See Looney's Creek Mt. Zion Church, Shelby) some of the churches withdrew and formed the "Two Rivers" Association, styled "Old School Baptist." The churches in Schuyler and Scotland Counties were dismissed in 1843 to form the North Union Association, and the following year the churches of Clark and Lewis Counties formed the Wyaconda Association (q.v.). In 1878 the Baptist churches in the northwest half of Shelby and all of Knox counties formed the Mt. Salem Association, and in 1905 the churches in Monroe County the Monroe Association. On the hundredth anniversary of Bethel Association observed in 1934, the association included the Baptist churches in the southeastern half of Shelby County, the northern half of Ralls above Salt River, and all of Marion, with Monroe City. The churches that formed the original association were fourteen in number distributed through the counties named. In 1934, limited in extent, the assocaition had a membership of twenty-six churches. The One Hundredth Annual Session was held with the Bethel Baptist Church in Marion County where the organization one hundred years before had occurred. For name, see Bethel Church. (MIN. BETHEL BAPTIST ASSOC., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Colony
Description:See Bethel.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Township
Description:The center township of the north county line, with Tiger Fork Township to the east, Taylor to the west and Black Creek on the south. It was laid out in 1846 by Sam Miller, one authority says; another says it was organized with its present boundaries in 1840. It took its name from the Bethel Colony (q.v.). (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 628, 871, 872, 882, 883; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 140; Maps Missouri, 1869; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; R. McN., 1935; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bishop School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. So named for an early settler. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Creek
Description:A creek which enters Shelby County east of the North Fork of Salt River from southwest Knox County where it rises. It flows diagonally through the center of Shelby County from the northwest corner to the southeast where it enters the North Fork of Salt River. So named by surveyors because of the blackness of the water when they first saw it. It was originally Jake's Creek, so called for the trapper named Jake who around 1820 built a cabin on the bank and lived there for some time trapping and fishing. Wetmore (1837) gives this name; Williams (1904), also, and a recent Cram Railroad Map of Missouri. Mitchell in his Map of Missouri Territory (1832) gives Jack's Creek, and Colton (1858) gives this name also. The name Black Creek is given by Rand McNally, 1935. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 621; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 652; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; Eaton, 66)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Creek Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1848 in the Eaton Schoolhouse two miles east and three miles south of Shelbyville, on Black Creek in Black Creek Township. In 1858 a church house was built. It is now extinct. So named for its location. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Creek Bridge
Description:The first bridge in the county; across Black Creek, west of Shelbyville. It consisted of two long logs thrown across the stream with strong slabs across these, the whole secured with wooden pins, and dirt thrown over the ends of the "stringers." It was also known as Hollyman's Bridge, so named because it furnished a passage from Shelbyville to Hollyman's Cabins on Salt River. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Creek Christian Church
Description:A pioneer Christian church, organized in 1839; somewhere on Black Creek, whence the name. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Creek Township
Description:Black Creek is the oldest township in the county, having been organized by the Marion County Court in 1834. At that time it comprised all of the territory now known as Shelby County (q.v.). From the original township others have been framed so that Black Creek Township today occupies the center of the county, with Taylor and Bethel townships on the north, North River Township on the east, Jackson, Salt River Township, and Lentner on the south, and Clay on the west. It was named on its organization for Black Creek, which traverses the county from northwest to southeast. (HIST. MARION 1884, 196, 198; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 641, 682, 883; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 4, 21, 140; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; Maps Missouri 1869; R. McN., 1935; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Hawk
Description:See Maud.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Board Branch
Description:A branch in the northeastern part of the county; rising in Bethel Township, it flows east into the Tiger Fork of North River in Tiger Fork Township. The abundance of board timber along its banks in an early day made the turning of timber into boards quite an industry, and named the stream. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 652; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boone (Boone's) Lick Country
Description:A name applied to the country lying between the Missouri and the Salt Rivers, the latter particularly famous for the licks worked by the family of Daniel Boone around the early 1800s; hence the name. The situation of Boone Lick Country led to exploration to the north along the whole extent of Salt River and its tributaries. It thus helped to write the story of all Northeast Missouri. Daniel Boone (1735-1820), famous woodsman and trapper, crossed the Mississippi River to become a Spanish subject around 1795. He was a true western American pioneer, a hunter, a scout, Indian fighter, and settler. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 625; MIRROR, 80; Shoemaker, 155; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boone Trail
Description:The Bee Road (See Bee Roads) in the central part of the county. It was so named because it was the trail used by the bee-hunters from Boone County. It crossed Salt River above Walkersville, and Black Creek southwest of Shelbyville, and came up the bluff into the stretch of prairie on which Shelbyville stands. From here it pursued a northeast direction across the divide and joined the Calloway Trail (q.v.) south of the North River timber. From this point it followed a somewhat irregular course through the woods as far as the headwaters of the Fabius, and on to the Des Moines in Iowa. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 643, 661; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 35; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boyce's Mill
Description:A well- known institution for many years on Salt River one-half mile southeast of Shelbyville. It was started about 1836 by Asa and Silas Boyce for whom it was named. The mill was completed by a company composed of Anthony Blackford, Reddes, and Griffith, and later was known as the Reddes, and Griffith, and Blackford Mill, though it continued also to be known as Boyce's Mill. John Gay of Marion Countty was the millwright. The mill enjoyed a large patronage. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 659; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 34; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Judge V. L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bragg School
Description:A schoolhouse in Tiger Fork Township, on the Philadelphia-Newark road, in the northeastern part of the county; established about 1841. So named for Sylvanius Bragg, who deeded the land to the school district. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 762, 887; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 140; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; Mrs. Virginia Bethards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brewington School
Description:A schoolhouse in Clay Township. So named for an early settler. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brick School
Description:A schoolhouse northwest of Bethel by five miles, in Bethel Township; erected originally around 1865. The original building as well as the present was constructed of brick; hence the name. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; (F)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Broadway
Description:The name given the road running east from Shelbyville for four or five miles, around 1878. This was a wider road than the usual road of the period-hence the name. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Broughton Branch
Description:A branch which rises in the northwestern corner of Jackson Township, flowing south to join Douglas Branch before the two flow into Black Creek. So named for W.B. Broughton, the first settler on its banks. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; Eaton, 66)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Broughton Mill
Description:A pioneer mill of the tread type, built in Oakdale (q.v.) by Wm. B. Broughton, whence the name. It was destroyed by fire about 1865, and was never rebuilt. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Browning Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Chapel, four miles southwest of Shelbina in Salt River Township; organized in 1895 and the building dedicated the next year. Services were not held here for a number of years; the building has now been dismantled and the material used in the erection of a new church at Hunnewell. So named for the pastor on the organization of the church, Rev. A.C. Browning. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brush Creek
Description:A creek which rises southeast of Shelbina in the southeastern part of Salt River Township and flows southeast into Monroe County. So named because of the brushy nature of its banks. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; (F) Luden Wilkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckner's Mill
Description:A mill built on North River about two miles below Bethel around 1839. It was named for its owner, Samuel Buckner. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 660; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 34; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burksville
Description:A post office from 1893-1904. It is in the northeastern part of Black Creek Township, on North River, six miles north and east of Shelbyville. At one time it was well known for the hundreds of acres of timber nearby what was being made into railroad ties. Today there is left only the country store. So named for John T. Burk who opened the first store and was made the first postmaster. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916, 58; Postal Guide; Eaton, 66; Maps Missouri from 1890; (F) Ed Hines)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Byar Branch
Description:A branch which rises in the eastern part of Macon County and flows northeast into Bear Creek in northwestern Clay Township. So named fore the Byar family, early settlers. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Calloway Trail
Description:The Bee Road (See Bee Roads) in the eastern part of the county. It was so named because it was the route commonly followed by the early honey-hunters of Calloway County. It followed the divide between Black Creek and North River to a point nearly four miles northeast of Shelbyville where it deviated from the higher level and crossed a branch known as Camp Branch (q.v.). From here it went in a northwesterly direction to join the Boone Trail (q.v.) south of North River. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 643, 661; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 35; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp Branch
Description:A branch in the eastern part of Black Creek Township, emptying into North River; four or five miles northeast of Shelbyville. So named from the fact that the Calloway Trail (q.v.) crossed the stream here at a point which because of its plentiful supply of water furnished a good general camping ground and meeting place for all the early adventurers. The name was given it by early settlers and bee hunters. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 643, 661; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 35; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carlisle
Description:A post office in 1896 and 1897; fifteen miles northeast of Shelbyville. So named for Alexander Carlisle, who originally settled in 1842, on the land where the store and post office stood. The town may have been named for Henry C. Carlisle, U.S. Claim Agent from 1877, son of Alexander Carlisle, the original settler. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 893, 894; Postal Guide; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carnegy's Spring
Description:A spring on the banks of Black Creek, south of Shelbyville. So named for an early settler there. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 632; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chenoweth School
Description:See Red Star School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cherry Box
Description:A post office since 1861; ten miles northwest of Shelbyville, and seven and a half miles north of Hagers Grove, in the extreme northwest corner of the county. It was established as a German settlement of Mennonite faith, around 1855, the first west of the Mississippi River. It is still a Mennonite settlement. The post office, as late as 1884, is said to have been on wheels, perhaps owning to the fact that it was moved so many times from one house to another. It was first named Cherry Dell, but since there was another post office of that name (q.v.), it was changed to Cherry Box. There seems no specific reason for the name. Suggestions range from the fact that the first individual mail boxes were nailed to cherry trees. The son of the postmaster who was influential in getting the post office grant said the name had no specific application; that the men choosing a name liked the word "cherry," and as that word had already been used in other combinations they chose Cherry Box. (Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 882; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1861; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; (F) Will Turner; (F) J. Hilber; (F) Dr. Ed Gerard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cherry Box School
Description:See Oak Hill School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cherry Dell [1 of 2]
Description:A site on the old Newark, Hannibal, and Palmyra road, northeast of Shelbyville; earlier known as the Winchell Place for the family owning the land. It is said that there was a post office here during the Civil War, followed later by a store and tavern. It became known as the site on which a pot of gold was buried during the war, and was pockmarked by holes made by people digging for the treasure. Later the vicinity became the home of the Bender family, notorious around 1873 by reason of the discovery of the bodies of eight murdered persons on their premises. The vicinity at that time became known to many Shelby County people as Cherry Dell, as a pretty or fantastic name for an unsavory neighborhood. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; David Morgan; Nathan Winetroub)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cherry Dell [2 of 2]
Description:See Cherry Box.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chick School
Description:A schoolhouse in Black Creek Township. So named for a nearby resident of the neighborhood. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chinn Branch
Description:A branch south of the center of Black Creek Township, flowing into Black Creek. So named for W.S. Chinn, an early settler on the branch. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 652; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chinn School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. So named for an early settler, W.S. Chinn. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Christian's Ferry
Description:A ferry over Salt River at Bee Ford (q.v.), near the mouth of Watkins Branch. The ferry was a flat boat navigated by poles, operated by a Mr. Christian, whence the name. It was perhaps the first thing of its kind in Shelby County. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 643, 661; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 35; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Christine
Description:See Christine Crossing.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Claggett Mill
Description:A water mill on the south bank of the Fabius River in Tiger Fork Township, in 1838. It was operated by Thomas Claggett, whence its name. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clarence
Description:A post office since 1858; in eastern Lentner Township, twelve miles west of Shelbina on what is now the Council Bluffs and Quincy Railroad, and about one and a half miles from the western line, in the southern part of the county. It was laid out on the completion of the road through the county. It was first incorporated in 1866, and again as a city in 1877. It stands on the edge of a rolling prairie, and was said in 1911 to be the heaviest shipping point between Hannibal and Kansas City, the soybean center of northeast Missouri. It is said to have been named for the son of John Duff, the principal contractor for the building of the railroad, and an early settler. (Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 801, 849, 853; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 162; Eaton, 66; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1860; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clay Township
Description:A township on the midwest border of the county, Clay, is bordered on the north by Taylor, on the east by Black Creek, and on the south by Lentner. It was organized in 1845. The county was Whig in politics, and the new township was named for Henry Clay (1777-1852), American statesman and patriot, whom his partisans called "Gallant Harry of the West." (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 682, 871, 878, 879; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 139, 140, 144; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; Maps Missouri 1869; R. McN., 1935; INTERN CYC.; (F) Will Hamrick)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clear Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A creek which rises in Black Creek Township, and flows in a northern direction into North River in the southwestern part of Tiger Fork Township, east of Shelbyville. So named because it is fed by springs, and the water is clear and cold. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 652; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clear Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A creek rising in the southern part of Salt River Township, flowing south into Monroe County. So named for the clearness of its water. (Maps Missouri, 1861; (F) Dr. J.D. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Colony Mill
Description:A steam mill around 1846 built by the Bethel (q.v.) Colony, whence the name. It stood on the north bank of North River on the site of the old Stice Mill (q.v.). The Colony Mill was of brick, two and a half stories high, and was the largest and most extensively patronized of the steam mills. It ground all kinds of grain and made flour, carded wool, spun, wove cloth, and sawed lumber. It was burned in 1872, but was rebuilt on a larger scale though only the grist and sawmill were restored. On the dissolution of Bethel Colony in 1879, the mill went to a group of Oregon colonists to whom the colony was indebted. It was purchased in 1882 by a company in Bethel. It was then a buhr mill. In 1902 a Mr. Bauer, a member of the company, bought out the other interests and operated the mill until 1916 when the building was burned. This mill was known also as the Bethel Mill for its location. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Concord Church
Description:A Christian Church organized in 1883 in Tiger Fork Township seven miles northeast of Bethel, at Sigsbee. The name is an ideal one. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 824; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 194; (F) Walter Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Copenhaver School
Description:A schoolhouse in Black Creek Township. So named for John Copenhaver, an early settler in the vicinity of Hagers Grove. (The county history spells the name of this family Copenhauer). (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 899; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Corbin College
Description:A private school at Clarence in the 1860s, which took the name of the man who was instrumental in establishing the school. It was non-denominational and co-educational, drawing students from as far away as New York state. With the coming of Methodist College (q.v.) in 1887, Corbin College was abandoned. The building was partially demolished; one room however, is part of a barn on the Gillman farm. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; H.S. Carroll)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crooked Creek [1 of 3]
Description:A creek which rises in the southwestern part of the county in Jefferson Township; it flows southeast to join Otter Creek in northern Monroe County, about eight miles from the east line of the county. So named because of its crooked course. (Wetmore 1837, 119; Campbell 1874; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 877; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; Maps Missouri from 1861; (F) Dr. J.D. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crooked Creek [2 of 3]
Description:A settlement now abandoned about four and a half miles southwest of Shelbina. At one time there was a general store there. The place is listed in the Rand McNally Highway Map, 1935. So named for its location near Crooked Creek. (Jos. D. Bailey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crooked Creek [3 of 3]
Description:See Lentner
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crooked Creek Switch
Description:See Lentner
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Das Grosse Haus
Description:"The large house" was combined colony store and common storehouse which supplied the families of Bethel (q.v.) community with their allotted portions of provisions. It was also "Bachelor Hall" as well, a common boarding house where the unmarried male members of the community lived. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dennison's Corner
Description:See Emden
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dickerson Ford
Description:The original crossing of the North Fork of Salt River by the Old State Road of Northeast Missouri (q.v.); the present site of Salt River Bridge on the Shelbina-Shelbyville road, three and a half miles from Shelbina. This site was the first home of Obadiah Dickerson ( -1843) in Shelby County. A bronze plate erected to his memory near Salt River Bridge on Highway 15 reads as follows: "The first bona fide white settler in Shelby County. He came to Missouri about 1816 from Kentucky; landed at Louisiana in Pike County, and assisted in its organization. The first Circuit Court in Pike County was held at his home in 1819. He was the first postmaster in Palmyra (q.v.), and in 1831 moved to Salt River. He was a member of the Missouri Legislature in 1834 when Shelby County was organized, and was one of the donors of the site of the county seat." Major Dickerson was buried just north of the site of his home in a small grove, now back a little from the highway. His grave is marked by a heap of stones. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 53; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 621; Mrs. Kate Dickerson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dimmitt Branch
Description:A branch in southwestern Black Creek Township, flowing south to join German Creek before the two join the North Fork of Salt River in the northwest corner of Salt River Township. So named for Philip Dimmitt who was at one time owner of the land through which the stream flows. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; (F) Nathan Winebroub)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Douglas Branch
Description:A branch north of the center of Jackson Township, flowing generally west to join Broughton Branch, the two entering Black Creek in the northwest part of Jackson Township. Named Douglass Branch for R.W. Douglass, an early settler on the stream. By 1904 the name was spelled Douglas. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 4; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; (F) Rome Broughton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Drennan School
Description:A schoolhouse in Bethel Township. So named for an early settler. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duncan Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Chapel organized as an offshoot of Bacon Chapel at the Duncan schoolhouse (q.v.) in 1872; in the Shelbyville circuit. The present church house was built around 1888. It is still active. So named for Levin Duncan who donated the land for the church. (HIST SHELBY 1911, 186; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duncan School [1 of 2]
Description:A schoolhouse in Black Creek Township, operating today under this name. So named for the early owner of the land. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duncan School [2 of 2]
Description:See Oak Dale School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dunn Branch
Description:A small Branch in Black Creek Township, close to Shelbyville on the south, flowing into Black Creek. So named for the pioneer families of Dunns in the neighborhood. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT; July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dunn School
Description:See Red Star Schoolhouse.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dunn School District
Description:See Van Buren School District.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dutton's Mill
Description:A mill never completed on the North Fork of Salt River; three miles southeast of Hagers Grove, and about five and a half miles northeast of Clarence. It was begun about 1837 by a Mr. Dutton; the mill work was to be done by Julius Jackson. The dam was washed out before the building could be constructed, and the work was abandoned. The mill though never built is known as Dutton's Mill for the owner. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 660; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 34; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eaton School
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township, two miles east and three miles south of Shelbyville; built in 1855. So named for the owner of the land. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ebenezer Evangelical Church
Description:This church was organized about seven miles north of Clarence, and the church building dedicated in 1894. The building burned in 1910, and has not been rebuilt. The Evangelical Association originated through the labors of Jacob Albright, a Lutheran minister, (1759-1808), in Penn. It is a sect of American Christians originally of German descent. The sect was formerly known as the "So-Called Albright People," for the originator of the sect. In 1816 "Evangelical Assocaiton" was the name adopted. In Germany all protestants call themselves Evangelical in opposition to Catholic. (See Mt. Hope Evangelical Lutheran Church). The Association was known also among its members as "This Association," "Our Association," and "Gemeinschaft." All the pioneer preachers were German. The organization is Methodistic in doctrine and polity, sometimes incorrectly known as the German Methodist Church. It originated in an endeavor to reform the doctrines and habits prevalent among the German churches of east Penn. around 1800. For Ebenezer, cf. above. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 195, 196; INTERN. ENCY.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elgin
Description:A post office from 1888-1904; six miles north of Bethel, and 3/4 mile from the Shelby-Knox line. It is merely a country store that stood first 1/4 mile north of the present site, about 1884, and in the late 1890s was moved, and a new building erected. There are about four families in the neighborhood of the store which is still in operation. It was named for the George Elgin family, old residents of the locality. When the petition for the post office was sent in, the name Oakland was suggested for the abundance of oaks in that part of the country. Since there was already a post office of that name in the state, the present name was selected. (Maps Missouri from 1904; Postal Guide; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elgin School
Description:A schoolhouse at Elgin in Bethel Township. It bears the name of the post office though there is no more than a country store that marks the site. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elim
Description:An offshoot of Bethel Community, now extinct, established around 1845 or 1846, east of Bethel (q.v.), about one and a quarter miles down the picturesque North River. Here was built the Mansion House (q.v.) which is still standing along with some few of the brick houses built for the use of the colony. The name is sometimes spelled incorrectly Elam, once Elm. For the origin of the name, see Bethel. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 862; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904, 6)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elim Hall
Description:See Mansion House.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ellis Select School
Description:A pioneer, private school in the old Methodist Church building in Shelbina; established and taught by Hezekiah Ellis, whence the name. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Emden
Description:A post office from 1889; in the southeastern part of North River Toswnship, close to the east border of the county on a line with Shelbyville. First known as Dennison's Corner for J.H. Dennison who established the first store there in 1888 and served as the first postmaster. At the time also the name Windell Street from "a bit of doggerel verse" was given as a joke to the locality though never accepted as a name. "Dennison's Store, Windell Street, Ruth's Hotel with nothing to eat." The name Emden (for Emden in Germany) was included in a list of names sent in by Mr. Dennison with the petition for the post office, and was selected by the postal department. (Eaton, 66; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1904; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; Mrs. D.M. Sharp; (F) Ben Ruth; (F) Dave Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Enterprise
Description:A post office from 1886-1904; in the "Panhandle District" (q.v.) six miles south of Clarence, close to Otter Creek. A country store was built there in 1882. The name is said to have been on a list sent in on application for a post office, suggested by the postmaster of Woodville, Macon County as a good name for a new undertaking. (Maps Missouri from 1904; Postal Guide; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; (F) W.J. Daniel; (F) Chas Riding)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Epworth
Description:A post office from 1892; four and a half miles north and east of Leonard, near North River in the western part of Bethel Township. In 1892 a store was started here, and the settlement which grew up around it took the name of the Epworth Methodist Church nearby (q.v.). There is a quaint little store there today with a post office, a few houses scattered about, and a rather well- populated countryside. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 629; Maps Missouri from 1904; Postal Guide (F) J. Hilber; (F) Mrs. A. Claggett)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Epworth Methodist Church
Description:A Methodist Church one mile north of Epworth; established in 1889. So named for the birthplace of John Wesley, founder of Methodism, Lincolnshire, England. (F) J. Hilbur; (F) Mrs. A. Claggett)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Evans Chapel
Description:A Methodist Chapel, three miles west of Leonard, in Taylor Township organized in 1865. A new building was erected in 1881. The chapel is now abandoned, but the building still stands. No reason for the name has been uncovered. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 187; Judge V.L. Drain; Chas. H. Timmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius River
Description:Like North and South Rivers (q.v.), or "Two Rivers," the Fabius is a double or twin stream; the only difference being that "Two Rivers" never actually unite, though they empty into the Mississippi at practically the same point, whereas the North and South Fabius do unite just one mile above their mouth. The Fabius River proper is therefore but one mile in length. It empties into the Mississippi in east-cenrtal Fabius Township, Marion County, near West Quincy, about two miles above the mouth of "Two Rivers." The North Fabius rises in Iowa and flows southeast through Scotland County, which it bisects diagonally; then it cuts off the northeast corner of Knox County and the southwest corner of Clark County, and flows still in a general southeast direction, diagonally through Lewis County into Marion County, of which it cuts off the northeast corner. In Union Township of Lewis County it receives a tributary known as the Middle Fabius, which rises in Schuyler County and flows southeast through Scotland and Knox to the junction. The South Fabius also rises in Schuyler County and takes a southeastern course through Scotland, Knox, Lewis, Shelby, and Marion Counties. In Liberty Township, Knox County, it receives two tributaries known as the North and South Forks of the South Fabius (on the 1876 map named the North and South Branches). North Fork rises in Greensburg Township, Knox County; South Fork rises in Adair County and enters Knox County in Lyon Township, flowing southeast to the junction with the South Fabius. The North and South Fabius, like the other streams of northeast Missouri, are rivers only by courtesy, much too small for navigation. They are called creeks by Beck. The various name by which they had their tributaries distinguished are obviously mere colorless names of position, with the exception of the name Fabius itself. This name, has had a bewildering variety of spellings, and its origin presents a problem of peculiar difficulty. The oldest form of the name, found on the Lewis and Clark Map of 1809, is "R. Fabiane." This form, slightly shortened, appears as "Fabian" in Cumming's WATER PILOT of 1837 (p. 129), and as late as 1871 in James's RIVER GUIDE (p. 9), although farther on (p. 18) James speaks of it as "Fabin's River." On the Lincoln Map of 1822 it is varied to "Ferbien." Forms without the final -n begin to appear in 1821. The spelling "Fabba" is given on the Maps for 1821, 1824, 1826, and 1832. Beck in his GAZETTEER (1823) calls it "Fabba Creek" and speaks of the South Fabius as the "Little Fabba." Holcombe in the HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND (1887), p. 23, says the old forms were "Faba" and "Little Faba," and that the two streams together were known as the "Fabas" or "Fabbas;" so Coues in a note to his ed. of Pike's EXPEDITION (I.9). The modern spelling "Fabius" first appears on a map of 1834, and is used in Wetmore's GAZETTEER (1837). Wetmore calls the two streams together the "Fabii." A popular nickname today for them is the "Faby." After that "Fabius," and the distinctive "North and South Fabius" become general. The name "Middle Fabius" first appears on a map of 1844. On a map of 1881 appears "Trabius," an obvious misprint. The Soulard story offered by Holcombe in 1884 (HISTORY OF MARION P. 771) to account for the name, according to which it was given about 1800 by Don Antonio Soulard in honor of the Roman general Fabius Maximus, has been given at length and criticized under Hannibal (q.v.). In spite of the fact that Holcombe himself presented it doubtfully and later discarded it, it has been accepted by Mahan and Eaton. For the reasons given, and especially in view of the early spellings which have just been listed this story must be ruled out as clearly impossible. In 1887 Holcombe offered a substitute derivation from the Spanish word "faba," a pea or bean. "The Spaniards probably gave it that designation because of the great number of wild peas originally upon its banks. In time the south fork was called Little Faba; then both streams were spoken of as the Fabbas, and of course the corruption was easy to Fabius...With more light on the subject than he had in 1884, the writer is now of the opinion that the name came as stated above, and that the real English name of the stream is Bean Creek." (HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND, p. 23). Holcombe's second explanation must likewise be rejected, both in the light of the earliest forms listed above and for other reasons. The Spaniards named very few places in Missouri, and none in N.E. Missouri; and such a name as "Bear Creek," though not impossible has few parallels in Missouri nomenclature. And yet Holcombe had perhaps a glimmering of the truth in his ingenious suggestion that the modern Fabius might have arisen from the plural form of the name, as used for the two streams. If the earliest form of the name, as there is every reason to believe, a plausible chain of development would be as follows; Fabiane---Fabian---Fabia---Fabias (pl.)---Fabius. It would be very easy for the final nasal to disappear in American speech, as the later forms Faba, Fabba, and Faby demonstrate that it actually did disappear and with the -s added for the plural, it would be equally natural for some classically minded American, about the time of the founding of Hannibal, Scipio, and Palmyra to get a suggestion from it of the name of the Roman general. Indeed, it is altogether possible that the false etymology which made Fabius out of the old French river name was the actual germ of the "Carthaginian complex" and of the whole series of classical names that swept Northeast Missouri like an epidemic. (See for other classical names the discussion under Hannibal). If the true original of Fabius was indeed Fabiane of Fabian, it follows of course that we must accept a humbler name-father than the famous Roman "Cunctator" and contender against Hannibal. Probably he was merely another of those forgotten French traders and trappers who had left their imprint so widely on Missouri nomenclature. Certainly it is in accord with what we might naturally expect to find the three principal water-courses of Marion County, now known as Fabius, North River (q.v.)---originally the Jeffreon--and Bay de Charles, all of which must have been in the days of the French occupation veritable hunters' paradises, bearing the familiar French personal names of Charles, Jeffreon, and Fabian. (Maps Missouri, 1809-1881; ATLAS MARION, 1913, SHELBY, 1878, KNOX, 1898, LEWIS, 1916, CLARK, 1878, SCOTLAND, 1898; Holcombe's HIST. MARION, 1884, and HIST. LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, SCOTLAND, 1887; Mahan, HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 1913; Eaton; GAZETTEERS and GUIDES by Beck, 1823, Wetmore, 1837, Cummings, 1837, and James, 1871; Pike's EXPEDITION, ed. Coues, 1895)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius Township
Description:A township erected on petition of Enoch Johnson and others, April 1, 1839, extending from a point on the South Fabius to the west boundary line of the county, to be known by the name of Fabius Township. The order was repealed July 6, 1841, all that part of Fabius Township lying northeast of the divide between Black Creek and North River being at this time attached to Tiger Fork Township, and the remainder to Black Creek Township. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 50; SHELBY COUNTY COURT RECORDS, Number Two, pp. 83, 274; Chas. H. Timmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:A schoolhouse in Taylor Township. So named for its location. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Forest Grove Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church, northwest of Shelbyville, near Kirby. So named for a hickory grove by the building. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 187; A.F. Carmichael)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Forman's Bridge
Description:The first bridge over the North Fork of Salt River in Taylor Township, 1849; near Forman's Mill (q.v.), from which it took its name. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Forman's Mill
Description:A horse-mill run by a sweep; in Taylor Township, one and three-quarters miles south of Cherry Box. It was earlier known as Hargis Mill for its owner. It was purchased in 1846 by Benjamin Forman. It was the most widely known and extensively patronized of any of the horse-mills, owning probably to its size and capacity. It was resorted to from miles around, each customer furnishing the team for the grinding of his corn, wheat, buckwheat, or rye. During busy seasons the mill was in operation the night through. Mr. Forman ran it for a number of years, until it finally gave place to the steam mill. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 880; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 146; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT; July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fort Moore
Description:A strong house northwest of Shelbina; the home of the Moores (See Moore Settlement), who in the Shelby "Indian War" in 1839 gave shelter to the families in their vicinity. This so-called Indian War was a false alarm of a threatened raid raised over a straggling hunting party. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 11; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Franklinville
Description:A general merchandise store in northwestern Jackson Township, near Black Creek and about two miles west of the site of Oakdale; started in about 1906. It is surrounded by several nearby houses on small farms. The first store was burned. In 1908 a new one was built which is still operating. So named for a Dr. Franklin who lived near, on the place now owned and occupied by Guy Jordan. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT July 31, 1935; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Freeman School
Description:A schoolhouse in Black Creek Township. So named for the pioneer owner of the land on which the schoolhouse was built. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Friendship Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized at Kendall in 1873. In 1876 it consolidated with fellow churches in the organization of Prairie View (q.v.). An ideal name. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frye School
Description:A schoolhouse in Black Creek Township. So named for Frank Frye who deeded the land to the school district. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; Mrs. Virginia Bethards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garnet Branch
Description:A branch which rises in Bourbon Township, Knox County; flowing generally east to join North River in northwestern Bethel Township, Shelby County. So named for the several families of Garnet's who owned the land at one time through which the branch flows. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; (F) Will Turner)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garrison School
Description:The schoolhouse at Elgin, five miles northeast of Bethel, in Bethel Township. So named for Thomas Garrison who gave to the district the land on which the schoolhouse was built. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; (F) Walter Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:German Creek
Description:A creek which rises in the southwest part of the county, to the north and east of Sink Branch in Black Creek Township. It flows generally south joining the Dimmit Branch before the two flow into the North Fork of Salt River in the northwestern part of Salt River Township. So named for a German settlement northwest of Shelbyville. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; A.F. Carmichael)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gilbert
Description:See Kendall
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Givan School
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township. So named for the original owner of the land. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gooch School
Description:A schoolhouse in Black Creek Township. The first schoolhouse of the name was established in 1874. A new building was erected in 1920. So named for an early settler, James Gooch, who deeded the land to the district. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; Mrs. Chas. D. Baker)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grab-All
Description:A name applied to a vicinity on Black Creek, southeast of Shelbyville. Written also Graball. The story goes that the young men of this community would go courting over to "Ribbon Ridge" (q.v.), and snatch ribbons from the young ladies; hence the name. Another explanation of the name is that it was suggested by the grab-bags which were features of all early socials. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; David Morgan (F) Sam Coleman; (F) Mrs John Snider; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Graham School
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township. So named for the original owner of the land. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gray School
Description:A schoolhouse in Taylor Township. So named for the owner of the land. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenfield [1 of 2]
Description:See Leonard
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenfield [2 of 2]
Description:See West Springfield
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenville
Description:See West Springfield
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenwood
Description:See West Springfield
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Clay Township, in the vicinity of Hagers Grove, from which it took its name. It is also known as the Hagers Grove School. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grubb College
Description:A schoolhouse in Taylor Township. It is still known by its pioneer name. It was built of logs, and the name was given it because of conditions pertaining to the period. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gurdane School
Description:A pioneer school in Lentner Township, still operating under its pioneer name, which was doubtless, as the pronunciation indicates, a variant spelling of the familiar name Jordan or Jurden. So named for a family of old settlers who lived in the neighborhood. The first building was moved one-half mile east of the old location to what is known as the Duke farm, but the name remained the same. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; Sam Todd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hagers Grove
Description:A post office from 1853-1916; ten miles west-northwest of Shelbyville, on the North Fork of Salt River. A Catholic settlement in 1856; the site is marked now only by a country store established about 1857-1859. It was early the site of a blacksmith shop which stood on a grove named for its owner, John Hager. An important steam sawmill was operated here in 1857. (See Walker's Mill). The name was written earlier Hager's Grove. (Hayward 1853; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 879; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 144, 145; CRAM'S ATLAS, Shelby 1875; Eaton, 67; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1861)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hagers Grove Catholic Church
Description:See St. Michael's Catholic Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hagers Grove Church
Description:A Christian Church at Hagers Grove, established in the early 1870s, when it was known as Pleasant Grove Church, for its location. The first building was erected in 1875. It is still active. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 109; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hagers Grove Mill
Description:A two-story steam mill originally intended for a flour mill, but never so equipped. It was operated at Hagers Grove in 1857 by Joseph and William Walker. It was well equipped for grinding corn and other grain, and was a good sawmill. Later a distillery was added. This mill was useful to the people of western Shelby County but remained in operation only a short time. It was owned by a group of men, and took its name from the village. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hagers Grove School
Description:See Grove School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hale School
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township. So named for an early settler. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Haman School
Description:A schoolhouse in Bethel Township. So named for an early settler. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal and North Missouri Railway
Description:An electric interurban line to be operated between Palmyra and La Plata in Macon County; projected around 1912, but never built. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 134; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad
Description:The road was completed through Shelby County in 1857. It runs through the southern part of the county, entering at the southeast corner, and has been of vast importance in opening up a fine section of land. It established a line of six towns as stations across the country. The first proposed route was through Shelbyville, the original plan being that of connecting the county seats by way of the Hannibal and St. Joseph State Road (q.v.). This plan was defeated by local controversies between towns, and by the fact that the farmers in the vicinity of Shelbyville were afraid the trains would scare their stock. (Goodwin 1867; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 680, 801; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 128; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 631; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hardshell Baptist Church
Description:See Looney's Creek Old School Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hardy's School
Description:A pioneer school four miles southeast of the site of Oak Dale. It no longer exists. So named for the owner of the land on which the school building stood. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 4)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hargis Mill
Description:See Forman's Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harmony Grove Baptist Church
Description:A church organized in 1885 northeast of Shelbyville; a church house built the same year. It is now dormant. The church is located in a grove; otherwise the name is an ideal name. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawkins Branch
Description:A branch which rises in eastern Shelby and flows into the North Fork of North River in Marion County. So named for a family in the vicinity. (PLAT BOOK 1930; Mrs. D.M. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawkins Branch
Description:A branch east of Leonard (q.v.). So named for Wm. Hawkins who owned the land through which the stream flows. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; Eaton, 67; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawkins' Store
Description:A post office in 1860-1867; supposed to have been near Leonard (q.v.) Shelby County court records show that an election was held in and for Clay Township at the store of John T. Hawkins--Dates: June 11, 1856; October 8, 1856. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Judge V.L. Drain; Chas H. Timmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hebron
Description:A branch (now extinct) of the famous Bethel (q.v.) colony. It was established around 1845 or 1846 about one mile north of Bethel. Now but two lone farmhouses remain in the vicinity, and the old colony cemetery, the common burial place, maked by humble limestone tombs made by the colonists. For the origin of the name see Bethel. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 862; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Heckart's Mill
Description:A pioneer horse-mill operated for some time around 1838 in the neighborhood of Lentner. Built and owned by Adam and Michael Heckart, whence the name. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 34, 143; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Heckart's Mill [1 of 2]
Description:Permission was granted the Heckarts in 1838 to build a mill on the North Fork of Salt River, five miles southwest of Shelbyville, and about three and a half miles north of the present site of Lentner, but it is not remembered that this mill was ever built. The Heckarts became the owners of the Walkersville Mill (q.v.) in the vicinity, and this fact doubtless led to their dropping the earlier project. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 34, 143; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Heckart's Mill [2 of 2]
Description:See Walker's Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Henry Louthan Baptist Church
Description:See Looney's Creek Old School Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Grove Camping Ground
Description:A grove of hickory trees northeast some eight or nine miles from Shelbina; used for camp meeting grounds around 1836. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Grove School District
Description:A school district partly in Shelby County and partly in Macon. (See Hickory Grove Schoolhouse). (James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Grove Schoolhouse
Description:A schoolhouse in Clay Township. (See Hickory Grove School District). So named for a fine grove of hickory trees. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hightower School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jackson Township. So named for the owner of the land. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hilton Branch
Description:A branch in the northwestern part of the county in Taylor Township, rising south of the center and flowing to the south and east into Black Creek. So named for A.J. Hilton, who, at one time, owned land through which the stream flows. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; (F) Dr. Ed. Gerard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holiness School
Description:See Nazarene College
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holliday's Mill
Description:A saw and grist mill on Black Creek, about two and a half miles southeast of Shelbyville; built in 1835 by Julius A. Jackson and known as Jackson's Mill. It was the first mill near Oak Dale. After a few years it became the property of Wm. Holliday, and was thence known as Holliday's Mill. This mill was of inestimable value for some eight or ten years, after which it was destroyed by fire. Some claim this mill was not built until 1837 or 1838. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 659; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 34; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hollyman's Branch
Description:A branch northeast of Shelbyville. So named for Thomas Hollyman, an early settler on the branch. (The name is given as Holman in the Shelby County history and Eaton). (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; Eaton, 67; David Morgan; Nathan Winetroub; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hollyman's Bridge
Description:See Black Creek Bridge.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holman's Branch
Description:See Hollyman's Branch
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hope's Mill
Description:A horse- mill in Tiger Fork Township, around 1840; owned by Joshua Hope, whence its name. One of the most noted and most successful of the horse-mills. (HIST SHELBY 1884, 887; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hopper School
Description:A schoolhouse in Clay Township. So named for the owner of the land. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hunnewell
Description:A post office from 1857; ten miles east of Shelbina, in the southeast corner of the county, one of the oldest and most substantial towns in the county. It was platted in 1857 by Josiah Hunt, land commissioner of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad and the first town on the railroad coming into Shelby County. It was incorporated in 1869, and again in 1882. So named in honor of H. Hollis Hunnewell, a Boston capitalist and land agent for the road. (Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; Eaton, 67; Postal Guide; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 801, 854, 860; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 170; CRAM'S ATLAS, Shelby 1875; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1860)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hunnewell Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1859 in the Sherry Schoolhouse three miles north of Hunnewell, from which it took its name. It was disbanded in 1875-1876, some of the members becoming charter members of Prairie View Baptist Church (q.v.). In 1893 it was reorganized at Hunnewell. It is a weak church. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Independent Holiness Church
Description:A Holiness Church at Clarence built sometime after 1906. Services were held at first in the building in which was conducted the Independent Holiness School. (See Nazarene College). This religious sect is a congregation of Holiness people raised up from some revival effort, and continued as non-denominational, or independent of any other such congregation; hence the name. Between 1880 and 1926 there were many of these bodies of Holiness people that came into existence most numerously in the Central West where their chief feeders, the Methodistic bodies, are most numerous. (HIST. SHELBY, 1911, 179-189; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; Sweet 1930, 500; Rev. Geo. H. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Independent Holiness School
Description:See Nazarene College.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Iron Bridge School
Description:A schoolhouse west of Bethel in Tiger Fork Township. Still operating under this name. So named for an iron bridge over North River put up during the Civil War near the site of the school, the first iron bridge in Shelby County. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; (F) D.J. Bevill)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ivanhoe
Description:A post office established by 1876 and discontinued by 1886; a store and post office about five miles northwest of Bethel. The name even in reference to the neighborhood has not been used since about 1905. So named by J.G. Burkhart, the postmaster, for the Walter Scott novel of this name which he had just finished reading when the petition for a post office was sent in. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1877-1886; (F) Fred Burkhart; (F) Nathan Winetroub)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jack's Creek
Description:See Black Creek
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jackson Township
Description:A township in the southeast corner of Shelby, with North River and Black Creek Townships on the north, and Salt River Township on the west. It was organized on petition in 1837 out of Black Creek Township. In 1882 the southwest part of the original township was given to Salt River Township, the northeast to North River. It was named for Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), seventh president of the U.S., 1829-1837. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 682, 872, 873; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 139, 141; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; Map Missouri 1869; R. McN., 1935; INTERN CYC.; (F) Rome Broughton; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jackson's Mill
Description:See Holliday's Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jake's Creek
Description:See Black Creek
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jefferson Township
Description:A township in the "Panhandle District" with Lentner Township to the north. It was determined in 1868. In 1897 the boundaries were changed to their present lines. The township was named for Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), third president of the United States (1801-1809). (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 728, 872, 877; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 140, 143; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; Map Missouri 1869; R. McN. 1935; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jones Branch
Description:A branch in the southeastern part of the county, rising in the eastern part of Jackson Township and flowing generally southeast into Marion County. So named for families of Jones in the locality. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878, Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jones Branch
Description:A branch in the northeastern corner of the county in Tiger Fork Township, flowing northeast into the South Fabius. So named for families of Jones in that locality. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keller Station
Description:See Kellersville
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keller Switch
Description:See Kellers
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kellers
Description:In Black Creek Township to the northwest, midway between Shelbyville and Leonard, on the Shelbyville Northwesters Railroad. So named for the Keller Station between Shelbyville and Shelbina. Known also as Keller Switch. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; R. McN., 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kellers Switch
Description:See Kellersville
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kellersville
Description:A switch on the Shelby County Railroad (q.v.) about halfway between Shelbina and Shelbyville. The place started about 1906 or 1907 when the railroad was being laid, but never attained any size or importance. Now with the decline of the railroad it exists in name only. So named for the Keller family who lived at the site. Also called Kellers Switch and Keller Station. (So designated by Rand McNally, 1935). (R. McN., 1935; (F) Nathan Winetroub; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kendall
Description:A post office from 1890-1902; six miles west and north of Hunnewell, on Black Creek. A little store, around 1859, known as "Sniderburg" for its owner, John H. Snyder, and located about 1/4 mile north of the site of Kendall, is in reality the beginning of the settlement which later became known by this name. Today there are only five families there. On application for a post office, the vicinity chose the name Gilbert, for what reason is not known. This name was duplicated in the state, and the postal authorities assigned the name Kendall. The name is a stock name borne by seven or eight other American towns and perhaps came originally from Kendall, England. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1904)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kincheloe Bridge
Description:A bridge north of Lakenan in the southeastern part of the county. So named for Elias Kincheloe of Marion County who had settled in the vicinity. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 728; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kirby
Description:A post office from 1887-1904; in Black Creek Township, west and north of Shelbyville, on Black Creek. The establishment of Kellers (q.v.) on the railroad killed Kirby. Today there are only a store and a few buildings on the site. So named for a family in the vicinity. (Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1902; Nathan Winetroub; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lair's Mill [ 2 of 2]
Description:See Wilson and Evans Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lair's Mill [1 of 2]
Description:A mill on the South Fabius where the Newark road crosses the stream in the northeast part of the county; operated about 1837 by Mr. Lair, the owner, whence its name. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 34)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lakeland
Description:A post office from 1860-1867; in the northwestern corner of the county close to the west line. The Campbell Atlas shows a number of streams in the immediate vicinity, and there are lakes in the northeast section of the adjoining county. Otherwise there is no explanation for the name. Residents do not know the place. (Sutherland and McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; CRAM'S ATLAS, Shelby 1875; Campbell 1873; Maps Missouri, 1861-1886)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lakenan
Description:A post office from 1876; on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad, midway between Shelbina and Hunnewell. It was laid out by the veteran contractor, John Duff, in 1858, on the completion of the railroad to that point. The town was raided by Anderson and his guerrillas in 1864. Lakenan was incorporated in 1909, but was disincorporated ten years later. So named in honor of Hon. Robert Lakenan, a practicing attorney in Hannibal, influential in the building of the road and author of the charter. Mr. Lakenan was a large landholder in the vicinity as well, and was a member of the State Legislature from Shelby County, 1876-1883. (Campbell 1874; CRAM'S ATLAS, Shelby 1875; HIST. MARION 1884, 610; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 801, 872; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 141; Eaton, 65; Postal Guide; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1861)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lentner
Description:A post office from 1870; six miles west of Shelbina, in Lentner Township, on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. Prior to 1897 when Lentner Township was framed, the station was in Clay, and the railroad at this point divided the two townships, Clay and Salt River. There was no provision made by the railroad for a station between Shelbina and Clarence, a distance of twelve miles. But soon after completion of the road there was a need for a shipping point midway between the two, and a switch was built that went from the main line through Towne Farm, a large stock farm, about two miles west of the present site of Lentner and just west of Crooked Creek. It was known as Crooked Creek Switch for its location, and the settlement which grew up was known as Crooked Creek. As the siding and loading chute here were off all roads and could not be reached easily, they were moved to a cross roads, the point where Lentner now stands. A depot was erected, and a few buildings for section men or workmen on the lines, and a post office was established in the depot. In 1880 the first store was opened, and the post office was moved to this location. On the establishment of the post office (1870), the station was named Lentner for Lentner Lathrop, a large landholder in the vicinity. This name, however, does not occur regularly on the maps of Missouri until 1904, the station continuing to be known as Crooked Creek, and so indicated 1869-1886. Lentner has gone also by the name Lentner's Station. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 801; HIST SHELBY 1911, 145; Postal Guide; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1869; Henry S. Carroll; Jos. D. Bailey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lentner Township
Description:A township on the west county line, with Clay and Black Creek Townships on the north, Salt River Township on the east and Jefferson to the south. It was organized in 1897 out of sections from Salt River Township, Jefferson, and Clay, and took its name from the village of Lentner. (q.v.). (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 141; R. McN., 1935; (F) Dr. J.D. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lentner's Station
Description:See Lentner
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leonard
Description:A post office soon after 1873; on Black Creek, six and three quarters miles north to west of Hagers Grove. An early name desired by the residents was "Greenfield" for the pioneer of that name who gave the site for the mill at that point and the post office, but Mr. Greenfield would not let them name the village for him. It was named around 1873 Millersburg for "Dolph" Miller, the building of whose mill marked the beginning of the town. (See Miller's Mill). It is so indicated in the Shelby Atlas of 1878. Since there was one Millersburg already in the state, the post office department, on the application for a post office, required the selection of another name. The residents selected "Leonora," the name of one of Mr. Miller's daughters, but owning to a possible clerical error, the Department called the new post office Leonard. "Millersburg" continues to be used locally as much as Leonard. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 882; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 147; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; Postal Guide; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1879; (F) Dr. Ed Girard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leonard Academy
Description:An academy established at Leonard in 1890 on the scholarship or subscription plan. It continued until 1896, but could not be sustained in the rural community lacking for sufficient funds. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 179, 180; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leonard Christian Church
Description:The earlier church, known as Antioch Church, stood three and a half miles northwest of Leonard. The first church house was a large hewn-log house erected in 1867. The present building was erected in 1884 at Leonard, and became known as the Leonard Christian Church. Antioch, A Biblical name:--It was at Antioch that the disciples were first called Christians (Acts 11:26). It was here that Paul preached. (Acts 13:1, 14; 14:26; 15:30) (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 824; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 191; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leonora
Description:See Leonard
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leslie Evangelical Church
Description:An Evangelical Church (See Ebenezer Evangelical Church) that organized in Clay Township at Brewington Schoolhouse (q.v.), around 1900. The building was erected in 1903. It is thought it may have been so named for Leslie Schwada. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 195, 196; H.S. CARROLL; CHAS. H. TIMMONS)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewisville
Description:A settlement southwest of the center of the county, on the North Fork of Salt River near the site of Walkerville. Nothing was found relative to the name. One resident said it was probably only a country store. (Maps of Missouri, 1849, 1859; David Morgan; H.S. Carroll)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. The name belongs to the ideal Class. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lily Dale School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. It stands in a pretty little valley; otherwise the name is purely fanciful. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Elm
Description:An elm tree that stood as the one landmark across the southwest part of the county in pioneer days. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone House
Description:"Lone House" farm is two miles southwest of Emden; the house was built about 1836 by a John Selsor. It was given this name because for many years it was the only house on the wagon trail from Palmyra in Marion County to Shelbyville in Shelby. Here the trains of oxen stopped for the night both coming and going, taking two days for the trip. Stagecoaches changed horses also at this point. The house is still occupied. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; Mrs. D.M. Sharp; (F) Dave Sharp; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Bridge
Description:See Salt River Bridge.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Looney's Creek
Description:A creek or branch rising in the southeast corner of Bethel Township, and flowing southeast into North River. It took its name from Peter Looney, a large landowner in Black Creek Township. Incorrectly given as Loony by SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 886)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Looney's Creek Baptist Church
Description:See Looney's Creek Mt. Zion Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Looney's Creek Mt. Zion Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Tiger Fork Township, four miles north and four east of Shelbyville; organized in 1835 by Wm. Fuqua, an itinerary preacher, one of the first in northeast Missouri (See South River Baptist Church, Marion County). The church was organized at the home of Caroline Looney on Looney Creek, and was known by the name of Looney's Creek Baptist Church. A log meeting house was built in 1837. Henry Louthan became pastor at that time. He opposed the "Mission System," as he called it, and the Church became divided. Shortly after, Henry Louthan, with his followers, organized a new church known as Looney's Creek Old School Baptist Church (q.v.). Those out of sympathy with Louthan retained the house erected in 1837, and organized it into the Mt. Zion Baptist Church. Mt. Zion in 1859 built a new church house on the site of the old. It is still active. The church is now known as Looney's Creek Mt. Zion Church and as Mount Zion. A Biblical name:--Mount Zion was taken by David and called his city (II Sam. 5:7). Thereafter the name was used typically for the City of God. (Heb. 12:22) "But ye are come unto Mount Zion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem." (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 816, 817, 882, 886; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 182, 183; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 628; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Looney's Creek Old School Baptist Church
Description:An Old School Baptist Church east of Bethel, near the Tiger Fork line, six miles north and five miles east of Shelbyville; organized by Henry Louthan and his followers (See Looney's Creek Mt. Zion Church). A meeting house was built in 1846. It was early known as the Henry Louthan Baptist Church, for the man "who preached without charge and labored with untiring energy," and who served the church as pastor for thirty-four years. It is known by various names: Primitive Baptist Church, Hardshell Baptist, Old School Baptist. The church is still active. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 816, 817, 882, 886; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 182, 183; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 628; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lowman Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal South Chapel; west and south of Walkersville. Organized in 1889 in the Baptist Church at Walkersville; an offshoot of Bacon Chapel (q.v.). The church house was erected in 1890. It is still active. So named in honor of W.O. Lowman old and lifelong Methodist, who had years before organized the first Sunday School in the community. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 187; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Macon District High School Academy
Description:See Methodist College
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mammoth Bridge
Description:See Salt River Bridge.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mamre
Description:An offshoot, now extinct, of the famous Bethel (q.v.) colony. It was established on the south side of North River opposite Bethel. For the origin of the name (sometimes spelled incorrectly Mamri) see Bethel. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 862; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mansion House
Description:A substantial three-story house built at Elim (q.v.) of brick made on the site and stone from the bluffs; erected by the Bethel (q.v.) colonists for a residence for Dr. Keil, and part of the possessions of the colony. Here he lived as became a feudal lord except that he assumed no superiority but what was necessary in directing the affairs of the colony. It was built as the seat of government and recreation center of the colony. From its purpose as well as its size, it acquired its name. Here in a commodious banquet hall, the whole of the second story, were held all festivities, to which the colonists from the neighboring colonies marched, accompanied by the band. It is said that Dr. Keil remained at Mansion House but a short time until he moved, against the protests of his followers, into a more simple home. Mansion House was also known as Elim Hall because of its location. Mansion House, still standing, commands a wide view of the valley from the high bluff on which it was built. It is now remodeled somewhat, and the first story is used by the owner of the farm as a dwelling. The third story which was entirely enclosed with windows and was devoted to drying herbs for medicinal purposes is now removed. The house was built with great thick walls as if to withstand a siege, and will undoubtedly withstand the siege of time for many years to come. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 634; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 666; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Margaret Lair)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Martin School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Townnship. So named for a family in the neighborhood. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maud
Description:A post office from 1886-1904; in the southwestern part of the county, south and east of Enterprise, on Otter Creek, in the "Panhandle District" (q.v.). "Black Hawk" was the name given first to this locality, so named for the "bitters" sold there. Later it was known as Stivers Corners for John Stivers, the first settler, who came about 1869. The next time was Petersburg for the first storekeeper, Peter F. Ridings. Mr. Ridings, as first postmaster, named the post office Maud for his four year old daughter. Maud had a population of 22 in 1935. (Maps Missouri from 1886; Postal Guide; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mays Branch
Description:A branch in the western part of Tiger Fork Township to the north, flowing in a southerly direction into the Tiger Fork of North River. So named for Kennedy Mays, a pioneer owner of the land adjoining the branch. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; A.F. Carmichael)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCarty Mill
Description:See Wilson and Evans Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCully School
Description:A schoolhouse in Taylor Township. So named for a neighborhood family. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McMurray Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Chapel, four miles northeast of Shelbyville; organized at Givan Schoolhouse (q.v.) around 1891. The church building was dedicated in 1893. It was burned several years since and was never rebuilt. So named for Rev. W.W. McMurray who organized the church and served as pastor. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McWilliams School
Description:A schoolhouse in Taylor Township. So named for a family in the neighborhood. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mennonite Church
Description:A church one and a half miles south of Cherry Box (q.v.); built about 1868 or 1869. The only Mennonite Church in the county. The Mennonites derive their name from Simon Menno (1492-1559), who drew together into the new religion the later school of Anabaptists (Gr.--to baptize again), a name given those Christians who rejected infant baptism and administered the rite only to adults. The Mennonites profess belief in the personal reign of Christ on earth during the millennium; in the unlawfulness of oaths, of war, of lawsuits, and of allowing civil magistrates to be members of the church. So far from being guilty of the excesses that have made the name Anabaptist odious, they are numbered among the best citizens which the church ever knew, and the best citizens which the state ever had. The first Mennonites came to the United States in 1683, influenced doubtless by the sentiments which the society of Friends held in common with them. Wm. Penn invited them to settle in the new province of Penn. Within half a century 500 families made Penn. their home. From here their descendants emigrated to other states and Canada. At the present time they are found in nearly every part of the land. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 190; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Merrill's Branch
Description:A branch which rises in northeastern Jackson Township in Shelby County. It flows generally east and north through the southeast corner of Tiger Fork Township into Marion County, where it enters the North Fork of North River. So named for a pioneer. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; ATLAS MARION 1901; ATLAS MARION 1913; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Messner Branch
Description:A branch which rises in the western part of Bethel Township, and flows through the northern part of Black Creek Township to the east into North River. So named for F.K. Messner who at one time owned land along the stream. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; (F) Gus Bauer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Messner Schoolhouse
Description:A pioneer school south of Bethel in 1866. So named for the family on whose land the schoolhouse stood. (HIST SHELBY 1911, 195, 196)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Methodist Academy
Description:See Methodist College
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Methodist College
Description:A school established at Clarence in 1888 as the Macon District High School Academy by the Methodists of that district; hence the name. It was continued for about fifteen years when it was sold to the Independent Holiness sect. (See Nazarene College). During these years the school became known as Methodist Academy and Methodist College (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 627; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 179; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Fork of Salt River
Description:A stream which crossed the extreme southwest corner of the Panhandle District. It rises in the northeast corner of Macon County, traversing in a generally southern direction the east side of Macon County merely touching the southwest corner of Shelby as its course changes to a southeast direction in Monroe County where it joins South River. (Colton (1858) indicates this as South Fork of Salt River. (Williams 1904; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller's Mill [1 of 2]
Description:A saw and grist mill on Black Creek, six and three quarters miles north to west of Hagers Grove, built around 1871 or 1872. It was operated by Adolf Miller, a well-known pioneer miller, familiarly known as "Dolph," who gave the mill its name. To it was added later a carding machine. The mill stood at the crossing of two roads in one of the most fertile farming sections in Northeast Missouri. It was a success from the first. Removed about 1883, it was replace by a small mill belonging to I.N. Watson; but, operated by "Dolph" Miller, it continued to be known by his name. It changed owners several times, and was finally removed owing to changed economical conditions. This mill marked the beginning of Leonard (q.v.). (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller's Mill [2 of 2]
Description:A mill on the bank of Clear Creek, north of Oaksdale, and five miles east and north of Shelbyville; around 1855. It was operated by Solomon Miller, whence the name. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 629, 885; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 8; (F) Nathan Winetroub; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Millersburg
Description:See Leonard
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moffett School
Description:A pioneer private school in the Gurdane district in Lentner Township. So named for the teacher who conducted the school. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moore Settlement
Description:A neighborhood of three or four families northwest of Shelbina around the 1830s. So named for the Moore family and "Fort Moore" (q.v.). (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 11; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moreman School
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township, six miles southwest of Shelbina. Built in 1870, and called Prairie View School for its location. Gradually the name was changed to Moreman, for Gus Moreman, owner of the land on which the schoolhouse was built. The latter name has been established about fifteen years. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; (F) Thornton Keith; (F) Mrs. Virginia Bethards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morris Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church South, one-half mile east of Hagers Grove; organized around 1866, and known early as Southern Methodist Episcopal Church. The building remodeled from a schoolhouse stood on land deeded to the church by "Uncle Lacey" Morris, an early settler in the Bacon Chapel neighborhood, who was instrumental in organizing the church. Later it was known as Morris Chapel in his honor. In 1883 a fine country church was erected on the site. The church was abandoned some years since and the building sold. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 186; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moulton
Description:A post office established between 1876 and 1878, abandoned before 1886; in the northwest part of the county in Taylor Township sixteen miles northwest of Shelbyville. A little store was built there by a Mr. McWilliams. It is long since gone. Nothing could be learned of the reason for the name. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1879-1886; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Era
Description:A Christian Church established at Walkersville. It was moved about 1890 to a location north of Salt River, near the Shelby County Railroad about one and a half miles east of the old site. It is now abandoned and the building is torn down. It was so named for another Christian Church that had a great reputation in its day. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 194; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; David Morgan; Judge V.L. Drain; H.S. Carroll; Chas. H. Timmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Olive School
Description:A schoolhouse in Clay Township. It stands in a hilly countryside, and is also close to Mount Olive Church (q.v.); hence the name. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Pleasant
Description:A Methodist church close to the hills of Salt River; established in 1887. So named for the locality. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 187; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Pleasant School
Description:A schoolhouse in Clay Township. It stands close to the hill of Salt River, and is also close to Mount Pleasant Church; hence the name. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Zion Church
Description:See Looney's Creek Mt. Zion Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Hope Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:A church organized by German immigrants, seven miles west of Shelbyville, 1868, on a corner of the farm later owned by the Doss family, first of the faith in Shelby County. They met first under a great shade tree until cabins were built, then in their homes. In 1870, the year of the first pastor, they held their meetings in the Red Star Schoolhouse (q.v.). The church building was erected in 1882. The church is still active. The name Mt. Hope belongs to the ideal class of names. Evangelical, an adjective derived from a Greek word meaning "good news" or "the gospel," was adopted by dissenters from the established faith. In Germany all Protestants call themselves Evangelical in opposition to Catholics on the grounds that all reformers taught the pure gospel of Christ, cleansing it of all human corruptions. Lutheran was the name appropriated by reformers of the 16th century among Protestants as applied to those who took part with Martin Luther against the Swiss reformers--Lutherans vs. Reformed Church. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Olive Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Chapel, east of Kendall; organized at Kendall in the old Temperance Hall. The church house was built in 1889. A Biblical name;--Christ "abode in the mount that is called the mount of Olives." (Luke 21:37) (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church located seven miles north and west of Shelbyville; organized in the Applegate Schoolhouse (q.v.) in 1886. The church is still active. It is known also as Pisgah Church. A Biblical name;--The Lord showed Moses the promised land from the top of Pisgah. (Deut. 3:27) (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; David Morgan; (F) Fred Burkhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Zion Baptist Church
Description:See Looney's Creek Mt. Zion Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mud Creek
Description:A little stream in the extreme southwest corner of Jefferson Township. So named because of the very muddy bottom. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 877; (F) Chas Ridings; (F) Will Daniel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nazarene Church
Description:A church organized at Clarence about 1928. Previous to this time there were two churches of this denomination close to Clarence. They use as their place of worship the Presbyterian Church erected in Clarence in 1860. The Nazarenes are one of the bodies of religious people who came into existence following the earlier Holiness Movement, all of which were reactionary to the regularly organized churches. These new churches felt that since the older churches had been recipients of gifts from capitalists they had become the agents and tools of capital. The name comes from the word, Nazareth, used by the Jews as one of the designations of Christ. As used by them it was a name of contempt, since Nazareth was but a second-rate city of the despised province of Galilee. (John 18:5, 7: Acts 24:5) (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; Sweet 1930; 501, 504; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nazarene College
Description:A college conducted at Clarence in the building known formerly as Methodist College (q.v.). This college was purchased in 1906 by the Independent Holiness people representing several states, and a Holiness School opened there, known by this name and also as Independent Holiness School. In 1913 it was known as the only Holiness School not long since abandoned. Later it passed into the hands of the Nazarenes, one of the bodies of the Holiness Movement. The building burned in March of 1931, and has not been rebuilt. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 628; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 181; Sweet 1930, 501; Rev. Geo. H. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nelsonville
Description:A post office from 1878-1891; fifteen miles northeast of Shelbyville, in the extreme northeast corner of the county. (See Nelsonville, Marion County) (Campbell 1874; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; Postal Guide)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nesbit School
Description:A pioneer school still existent, southeast of Bethel, in Black Creek Township. So named for John Nesbit, who gave the land to the district. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; Mrs. Virginia Bethards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Providence Church
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian Church, two miles south of Cherry Box in the southeast corner of Taylor Township. It was organized at Robison Schoolhouse (q.v.) in 1859. It is now abandoned. The Cumberland Presbyterians were a relatively late body in organizing; hence perhaps the name "New" Providence. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 823; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 185; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New York
Description:A city projected and laid out in 1835, somewhat northwest of the center of the county; a part of the "Eastern Run" (q.v.), conceived by William Muldrow and his associates. The speculator entered about one-third of the land in the county, thousands of acres, the money for which was furnished by Eastern speculators. It was a city beautifully platted, conceived on such a scale that it might rival the great Eastern city for which it was named. It remained a city without houses, but was indicated on the maps of Missouri from 1842 to 1886. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 653, 654; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 31; CRAM'S ATLAS, Shelby 1875; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri 1842-1886)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Fork Salt River
Description:A stream which, rising in southern Schuyler County, flows southeast through eastern Adair County, across the southwest corner of Knox County, and enters Shelby on the northwest. It traverses the county somewhat southwest of center to the southeastern corner. Thence it enters Monroe County and finally Ralls County where it joins the main stream of Salt River, whence it takes its name. The names Salt River and North Fork of Salt River seem both to be used for the stream. (Mitchell Map 1832; Hutawa 1844; Colton 1858-1861; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North River
Description:A river formed by the union of North and South Forks of North River between Warren Township and Union Township, near their eastern boundaries. It flows east and slightly north to enter the Mississippi River between Fabius and Liberty Township, less than one- half mile above the mouth of South River (q.v.), and about ten miles north of Hannibal. The North Fork of North River rises Knox County, in northeastern Salt River Township, flowing southeast to enter Shelby County in Behtel Township and on through Black Creek and Tiger Fork Townships into Marion County till it unites with the South Fork. The South Fork of North River is much shorter, rising in southwestern Warren Township of Marion County, from the confluence of three short branches known as East Branch, Middle Branch, and West Branch, and flowing northeast to unite with the North Fork. North River with its two forks is named North Two Rivers, in distinction from South Two Rivers, used for the present South River, on the maps for 1832, 1866, 1867, 1869, and 1870, but the present simpler names appear as early as 1861 and after 1870 becomes fixed. At an earlier period, first on the map for 1822, North and South Rivers appear merely as Two Rivers, the country lying in between them being known as the Two River Country. The original name of the stream was probably the Jefferon River, although the identification is not absolutely certain. The Jefferon was a well-known river of northeast Missouri before the war of 1812. It was used as the boundary between the United States and the Sac and Fox Indians in the treaty made at St. Louis on November 3, 1804, the line being traced in the following words: "Beginning at a point in the Missouri River opposite to the mouth of the Gasconade River; thence on a direct course so as to strike the River Jeffreon, at a distance of thirty miles from its mouth, and down said Jeffreon to the Mississippi River" (See American State Papers, Indian Affairs, Vol. I, No. 107, p. 693). The treaty was reestablished after the War, on September 13, 1815, in the same terms. With the spelling Jeffrion, it appears in the legal records of the Bouvet-Gratiot litigation (Am. State Papers, Vol. V, pp. 791-2), and again in an Act passed by the General Assembly of the Territory of Missouri in 1814, in which the "river Jeffrion" is used as the boundary of the newly constituted county of St. Charles. As Jeffrion it appears in Morse's UNIVERSAL GAZETTEER in 1821. Beck refers to it in his Gazetteer (1823) as Geoffrions, and in the HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND (1887) it appears for the last time under the spelling Geoffrions, and in the HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX and Scotland, (1887) it appears for the last time under the spelling Geoffrion. Meanwhile a very disturbing element in the chequered orthographical history of the name was introduced by Pike. In the published journals of his Expedition of 1805, he mentions what is obviously the same river several times, but with three different and much distorted spellings. It what is known as the "Early Text" or preliminary publication of 1807 it appears (p. 4) as the Jauflione, and the same spelling is used on the map included with the "regular edition" of 1810. But in the text of the 1810 edition it appears as the "river Jaustioni, which is our boundary between the Sac nation, and the United states on the west side of the Mississippi" (App. to Part I, Document No. 18) (See Coues ed. of 1895, I.290). On the next page Pike adds a remark which helps to locate the stream: "About seven miles below the Jaustioni a Frenchman is settled on the west shore. He is married to a woman of the Sac nation, and lives by a little cultivation and the Indian trade." This Frenchman is mentioned in the Journal for August16, 1805, in a way that enables us to fix his home as about one mile below the present site of Hannibal (q.v.). On a still later page in "Document No. 18" (Coues ed., I.339), the boundary river takes on the spelling Jauflioni. All students of Pike's famous Journal have remarked upon the utter confusion of his spellings of Indian, French, and Spanish names. The publisher of the original edition prefaced it with a note of apology, declaring that "he very much doubts whether any book ever went to press under so many disadvantages as this one;" and his latest editor Coues sums it up in the words (I.xxxvii): "Pike's pen proved mightier than his sword in putting bookmaking to confusion and editors to despair...He seems never to have spelled the same name twice in the same way." Some excuses may be found in the many vicissitudes which the precious manuscript underwent during its 4000 miles of travel. In the first letter written by Pike after he has escaped from his Spanish captivity to United States territory, he says: "My papers being in such a mutilated and deranged state, it will require some time to arrange them..at Washington I can obtain some necessary assistance, as it would take one person a great length of time to make copies." It would seem from this that what finally reached the printer was a copy of a copy, perhaps made by some ignorant or careless transcriber; Pike never corrected the proofs, and the original manuscripts have disappeared. It is therefore quite fair to assume that what the brave explorer originally wrote down as the name of the little Missouri stream was a good deal nearer to the original Jeffreon than appears in the published work. Such a spelling as "Jeofrions" for example, in Pike's exeorable handwriting, might very easily have been interpreted as "Jauflioni" or "Jaustioni." This mare's nest of military orthography produced by Pike would be unimportant if it were not for its after-effects. To it was probably due the disuse of a good old French river name, and even an uncertainty of its identification,. No such result would have been produced, in all likelihood,, if it had not been for the break in tradition cause by the War of 1812. During the struggle, white Americans were practically driven out of northeast Missouri altogether. When they returned, the living tie between the original names and the places they denoted had been interrupted, and the old names had largely been forgotten. But Pike was the hero of the day, and his EXPEDITION was enormously popular throughout the Middle West. His bizarre versions of the old river name actually began to be adopted. Beck in his Gazetteer (1823), though he knows the old form Geoffrione, gives also the form Jaufflione, and even adds to the confusion by suggesting that the river ought to be called Javelot, for etymological reasons. Beck's work is full of wild etymologies, and his curious argument here deserves to be quoted: "Javelot is a French word, signifying war-club, and doubtless the Indian word was of the same signification." Fortunately his suggestion did not find favor. Pike's other invention, Jaustioni, was preferred in Brown's GAZETTEER in 1817, and was passed on to Cramer's widely NAVIGATOR (p. 221) in 1824. In the form Justioni it was even continued in to later steamboat manuals, the WATER PILOT (1837) of Cummings (p. 129) and the RIVER GUIDE (1871) of James (p. 9). But Pike's names are clumsy and uncouth, and it is not surprising that the incoherent state of things was finally remedied by discarding all the forms of the old names and replacing them by the colorless Two Rivers, North Two Rivers, or North River. Even the identity of the old Geffreon with the modern North River has been doubted, but the argument for it given by Coues (Footnote 14 in his ed. of Pike, I. 10) seems conclusive. Coues admits that from Pike's references alone it would be impossible to decide whether his "Jaustioni" or "Jauflione" was North River or South River just below it, or the Fabius just above it. But the terms of the treaty of 1804 seem to rule out South River, which is hardly thirty miles long, whereas the treaty describes the Geffreon as over thirty miles. Identification with the Fabius, though supported by Holcombe in his HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX AND SCOTLAND, is excluded by the fact that Beck, Cummings, and Cramer give them as separate streams. For the same reason the identification made by Violette of the boundary stream as "the river Jeffron or Salt River" is clearly impossible. Finally Coues affirms that a map in the Bureau of Indian Affairs at Washington in connection with the treaty makes the identity of Geffreon and North River absolutely certain. The recent names Two Rivers, North Two Rivers, and North River, as well as North Fork and South Fork, East, Middle, and West Branch, are obviously names of position and direction. The origin of the old name Geoffreon is unknown, but it seems likely that it was one of the large group of Missouri River names derived from forgotten French hunters or voyageurs (cf. under Fabius River above). It is just possible that the Frenchman who gave his name to the stream was the well known Godfrey Le Seur, who Holcombe asserts (p. 226) was trading near the present site of La Grange in 1795, and whom he thinks (p. 25) perhaps the same as the Frenchman mentioned by Pike in 1805 as living near the present site of Hannibal (q.v.). His last name has certainly survived in the name Le Seur (q.v.) in Lewis County. Conceivably his first name in the French form Geoffreon or Jeffreon may have become attached to the principal stream of the county in which he operated. For a similar use of the first name cf. Riviere Xenon, named for Governor Xenon Trudeau, Mine a Joe, etc. Professor John Francis McDermott has suggested in his edition of Brackenridge that the James River, frequently written Riviere a Jacques, was named for Jacques d'Eglise. But the identification must remain a mere conjecture until more and better documentary evidence about Godfrey Le Seur becomes available. (HIST. MARION, 1884; HIST. LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, and SCOTLAND, 1887; Atlas Marion, 1913, Shelby, 1878, Knox, 1876 and 1898; Maps Missouri 1822 ff.; Gazetteers and River Guides, Beck, 1823, Cummings, 1837,and James, 1871; Pike's Expedition, ed. Coues, 1898; Acts Passed by the General Assembly of the Territory of Missouri, 1817; Am. State Papers)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North River Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church two miles east and north of Leonard, in Taylor Township; established in 1844. Now dormant. So named for its location in old North River Township. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 816; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 183; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 628; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North River Township
Description:This township lies on the mid-eastern border of the county, separated from Tiger Fork Township on the north by North River, for which it was originally named. It is bounded on the south by Jackson, and on the west by Black Creek Township. It was organized in 1834 out of Black Creek Township by the Marion County Court, and included all that territory between Black Creek and North River. In 1835 Shelby County was created by the Legislature, and by 1850 Taylor, Bethel, Tiger Fork Townships, and parts of Clay and Black Creek Townships had submerged North River Township. In 1897 the present North River Township was formed out of the southeastern part of Tiger Fork Township and the northeast part of Jackson. (See Shelby County) (HIST. MARION 1884, 196, 198; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 641, 642, 682; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 21, 139, 140; R. McN., 1935; (F) Rome Broughton; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Two Rivers
Description:See North River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Union Association
Description:See Bethel Baptist Association.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Dale Methodist Church South
Description:A Methodist Church two miles west of the site of Oakdale organized soon after Bacon Chapel (q.v.), around 1837. A church house was built in 1870, and the present building in 1908. Some say this church is older than Bacon Chapel. It is still active. It was so named because of its location. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 821; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 186; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Nathan Winetroub)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Dale School
Description:A schoolhouse in the Oak Dale (q.v.) vicinity, first known as the Duncan School for Mrs. James Duncan, the original owner of the land. Later it became known by its present name for its location. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove School District
Description:A school district in the northwest corner of Marion County on the Marion-Lewis line and the Marion Shelby line. Formerly known as the Carpenter District. The district is "cut at an angle" to take in portions of the three counties. (I am led to believe that the name Carpenter around 1901 was applied to the district for its peculiar shape. I can find otherwise no reason for the name). For the present name, see Oak Grove school. (ATLAS MARION, 1901)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Hill School
Description:The first schoolhouse in the community of Cherry Box, one-half mile north and one quarter of a mile west, at a homestead known by the name of Oak Hill; built in 1860. It was a subscription school and very successful. The homestead was so named for its location on a hill on which there were many oak trees growing. Old settlers say the Cherry Box School is still officially Oak Hill School. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Ridge Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church five miles west and two miles south of Shelbina, on Crooked Creek in Jefferson Township. It was organized in 1867 in the Oak Ridge Schoolhouse (q.v.). The church house was built in 1882. The church is still active. The name, also spelled Oakridge, was one of location. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 817; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 183; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 628; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; (F) Rev. Adolph Vollmer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Ridge Schoolhouse
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township, south and west of Shelbina. So named for its location. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakdale
Description:A post office in 1833, and recorded again in 1837 and in 1860; cited regularly 1886-1904. The first permanent settlement in the county; east and south of Shelbyville by about seven miles, on Black Creek. The first pioneers came into Shelby from Monroe County in 1830, and settled near the mouth of Black Creek. By 1833, twenty-six families had arrived in the southeastern part of the county. The post office was opened by special request of W.B. Broughton in his country store. The first county court in Shelby County was held in 1835 in Mr. Broughton's yard, as were also the first and second terms of the circuit court. At one time Oakdale promised to develop into a considerable town, but today it is no more than a name, kept alive by the church, the school, and a grange hall. Only five families were on the site in 1935. The original Broughton farm is now the home of Rome Broughton, a direct descendant of the pioneer settler. Oakdale was so named by Mr. Broughton, 1832, for the huge black oak trees on a knoll overlooking his home. The spelling Oak Dale was not used until around 1870, after which the name was written as one word. (Wetmore 1847; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; CRAM'S ATLAS, Shelby 1875; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 629, 630; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 7; P.G.; Eaton, 66; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1842; (F) Rome Broughton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakdale Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1871 on the site of the village of Oakdale (q.v.), whence the name. The church dissolved in 1876 to help in organizing Prairie View Baptist Church (q.v.). (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakland
Description:See Elgin
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakland Church
Description:A Methodist Church, five miles north of Bethel in Bethel Township. Disbanded in 1930. So named for the abundance of oaks in the neighborhood. ( (F) Walter Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:O'Bryen Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Chapel in the Shelbyville circuit. Organized around 1883 with the Rev. O'Bryen as pastor, for whom the chapel was named. The church was disbanded and the property sold some years since. The name is sometimes spelled O'Brien. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 186; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ohaha
Description:See Salt River Country
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Blockhouse
Description:A blockhouse erected against bushwackers at Salt River Bridge (q.v.), in which a garrison of soldiers was kept almost continually during the Civil War. Here the "St. Louis woodseller," General Grant, began his illustrious military career. The old well is still there. General Grant's favorite spring at the foot of the hill is still running. It is known also as the "Old Fort." (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 4, 80; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Colony Church
Description:The church erected at Bethel (q.v.) in 1848. One of the first buildings to be built by the colony, and perhaps the crowning work of these industrious people from an architectural point of view. It was built of brick and stone after the type of churches in the fatherland. There was a large balcony finished with black walnut and supported by great white columns. Here the band played at church services. There were big paneled arch windows, a floor of large square bricks or tile, and a pulpit of solid black walnut. The whole was five stairways high and topping all was a big cupola in which were hung three bells that rang in harmony and could be heard for miles around. Here Dr. Keil instilled his philosophy into the minds and hearts of the people. Everybody was welcome to this general meeting place, where all were treated alike and where, since there was no compulsion about attendance, all met for Sunday services. Until a schoolhouse could be built, school was also held in the church house, where the English language was taught. The quaint old church was built to accommodate 1000 people, and for years was the pride of the colonists and of the entire country as well. It was sold and taken down after the colony disbanded. Two of the bells were taken out to Oregon, and a member of the Bethel colony bought the other. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Fort
Description:See "Old Blockhouse"
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old School Baptist Association
Description:See Bethel Baptist Association.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old School Baptist Church
Description:See Looney's Creek Old School Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old State Road of Northeast Missouri
Description:A state road surveyed and laid out in 1833 by order of the legislature, connecting the county seats of the counties in a line from the mouth of the Des Moines River (q.v.) to Paris, Monroe County, by way of Waterloo (q.v.) in Clark, Monticello (q.v.) in Lewis County, Shelbyville (q.v.) in Shelby County. It crossed the Hannibal nd St. Joseph State Road (q.v.) in Shelbyville. The date of the establishment of the road is given in the Shelby County History as 1836 and 1837. (HIST SHELBY 1911, 35; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Otter Creek
Description:A creek which rises west of Clarence in southeast Macon, flowing southeast through Jefferson Township in the southwest corner of Shelby, and south and east through northern Monroe into the North Fork of Salt River, about two miles below the mouth of Crooked Creek. Shown as Otter Fork of Salt River on Colton's map of 1858. In an early day it contained otters and beavers, the former in greater numbers; hence the name. (Wetmore 1837, 119; Campbell 1874; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 652, 877; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Otter Creek Union Church
Description:See Union Grove Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Otter Fork of Salt River
Description:See Otter Creek
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra-Shelbyville Wagon Trail
Description:A pioneer road connecting these two points. (Mrs. D.M. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Panhandle District
Description:An extension to the south on the southwest corner of the county; included in Jefferson Township. So named for its relation to the rest of the county. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1844)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pansy
Description:A post office from 1883-1893; nine miles northeast of Shelbyville. It was operated by the Weedon family who grew great quantities of pansies. On making application for the post office, they sent in the name "Pansy," and it was accepted by the Post Office Department. (Postal Guide; (F) Cora Weedon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Parker Branch
Description:A branch out by Oakdale (q.v.), flowing into Black Creek. So named for George Parker, a pioneer. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; Eaton, 66, David Morgan; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Parsons School
Description:A schoolhouse in North River Township. So named for J.D. Parsons who deeded the land to the school district. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; Mrs. Virginia Bethards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Patton Mill
Description:A pioneer mill, an early saw and grist mill, at Hagers Grove; operated by Gosney and Patton, and named for the latter. Pay for grinding was taken by toll--one bushel for every five ground. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perry Branch
Description:A branch in the northwestern part of the county in Taylor Township, flowing southeast into Hilton Branch. So named for several families of Perrys who at one time owned land through which the stream flows. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; (F) Dr. Ed Gerard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Petersburg
Description:See Maud
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peyton Branch
Description:A branch which rises in the southern part of Clay Township, and flows east and northeast into the North Fork of Salt River, near Hagers Grove. So named for John Peyton. The Peytons were a pioneer family. The name is spelled also Payton and Paton. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 10, 30; Eaton, 67; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pisgah Church
Description:See Mt. Pisgah Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Grove Church
Description:See Hagers Grove Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Prairie Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church about five miles north of Bethel. It was organized in 1866 in the Brick Schoolhouse (q.v.) and the church house erected in 1869. It was rebuilt in 1903-1904. It is the only active Presbyterian Church in the county. The name is one of location since the church is built on the stretch of prairie in northern Shelby. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 822; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 185; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; (F) Fred Burkhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant View Methodist Church South
Description:A Methodist Church east of Shelbyville; organized in 1881. It has been disbanded for a number of years. So named for its location on the prairie. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 820; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; David Morgan; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pollard's Branch
Description:A branch in the western part of Black Creek Township, flowing east into Black Creek. So named for Elijah Pollard, 1838, who was the first to locate on the stream. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 652; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby, 1904; Eaton, 66)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie School
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township. So named for its location. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie View
Description:A Baptist Church established in 1876; in Jackson Township, five miles north and one west of Hunnewell. It was a consolidation of Oakdale, the first Hunnewell, and Friendship Churches (q.v.). It is still active. The name comes from the prairie land on which the church is located. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 817; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 183; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 628; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; (F) Rev. Adolph Vollmer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie View School [1 of 2]
Description:A schoolhouse in Jackson Township. So named for its location and proximity to Praire View Church. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie View School [2 of 2]
Description:See Moreman School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Primitive Baptist Church
Description:See Looney's Creek Old School Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rawlings Bridge
Description:A bridge over the North Fork of Salt River, 1849, north of Hagers Grove. (The county history, 1911, gives the name as Rollins). So named for the landowner, Captain Sam Rawlings, Representative from Shelby County, 1854. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 1017; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 147; Nathan Winetroub; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rawson Chapel
Description:A union church building in the western part of the county, used by various religious societies in the community; a successor to the Rawson Schoolhouse (q.v.), which had been used previously for the same purpose, and from which the chapel took its name. The building was destroyed by fire in 1894. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 196)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rawson Schoolhouse
Description:A schoolhouse in the western part of the county, now abandoned. So named for a prominent family that lived near. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 196; David Morgan; H.S. Carroll)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ray's Bridge
Description:The first bridge over the North Fork of Salt River in the vicinity of Cherry Box, dating back to 1849. It was the site of a camp of Federal troops in 1861. It took it's name from Ray's Ford (q.v.) which was at this point previous to 1849. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 72, 147)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ray's Ford
Description:A ford over the North Fork of Salt River, west of Cherry Box, previous to 1849. So named for the family owning the land. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 72, 147; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Red Star Schoolhouse
Description:The first schoolhouse in the county; about 3/4 mile northeast of the site of Kellerville, in Black Creek Township, on Black Creek. As a pioneer school it was known as the Dunn School, so named for the neighborhood known as the Dunn neighborhood or for John Dunn who organized the district. (See VanBuren School District). Later it became known as the Chenoweth School for the family who became owners of the adjoining land. Its present name, the Red Star, is purely emblematic. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 11; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reddes, Griffith, and Blackford Mill
Description:See Boyce's Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ribbon Ridge
Description:See Union Chapel
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ribbon Ridge School
Description:See Union Chapel School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ridge School
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township. So named for a neighborhood family. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riggs Branch
Description:A branch which rises in Clay Township and flows north and east through the northwest section of Salt River. So named for Jim Riggs, the miller. (SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; David Morgan; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riviere au Sel
Description:See Salt River Country.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Robison School
Description:A schoolhouse in Black Creek Township. So named for the owner of the land who gave the site to the district. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rockwood Branch
Description:A branch in northeastern Black Creek Township, flowing northeast into North River. The Rockwoods were early residents in the vicinity. (PLAT BOOK)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rockwood Farm
Description:Famous as the site of Elim (q.v.). So named for its owner who sold the land to the colonists in 1844. (HIST. SHELBY, 861, 862)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rockwood School
Description:A schoolhouse in Black Creek Township. So named for the pioneer owner. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rollins Bridge
Description:See Rawlings Bridge
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salt River Bridge
Description:The bridge across the North Fork of the Salt River on the Shelbina-Shelbyville road at the old Dickerson Ford (q.v.). The first bridge at this point, an old wooden bridge, was known as Long Bridge and as Mammoth Bridge, both names being given it because of its size. The old bridge has given place to a modern structure. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 4, 80; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salt River Country
Description:A name applied to all Northeast Missouri. It took its name from Salt River, "pole star attraction," owning to the salt springs discovered as early as 1687. (See Boone Lick Country). (Houck, I, 238) DeLassus, the French governor (1799-1804), strained every nerve to make the French Territory independent of the importation of salt,--salt sold for $6 a bushel. Salt water is found over the whole extent of this region, yielding from one-eighth to one-twelfth of its weight in pure salt. In many places this water breaks out in the form of fountains or springs. Sometimes veins are to be secured by boring. (Peck, 1831, p. 88) Salt River was originally the Ohaha or Auhaha, an Indian name of unknown origin. It was laid down on the maps before 1700. The French gave the river the name, "Riviere au Sel," translated by early settlers Salt River because of the salt springs which lay near it in Ralls. Under this name Salt River is first given on the map of Missouri Territory, 1818. (MIRROR, 79, 83; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; Miss Leech's Thesis)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salt River Railroad Bridge
Description:The railroad bridge across the North Fork of the Salt River between Hunnewell and Lakenan (q.v.). (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 4, 80; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salt River Township
Description:This township occupies the south central portion of the county on both sides of Salt River, extending to the county line, with Black Creek Township on the north, Jackson on the east, and Lentner on the west. In 1839 the limits of the township extended to the western county line. It took its name from the North Fork of Salt River, which traverses the northern part of the township. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 682, 861, 874, 875; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 139, 141-143; ATLAS SHELBY 1878; Map Missouri 1869; R. McN., 1935; (F) Dr. J.D. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schwada School
Description:A schoolhouse in Clay Township. So named for a neighboring family. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shale School
Description:A schoolhouse in Clay Township. So named for the owner of the land. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sharp's Class
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Class (Chapel) said by some authorities to precede a little the organization of Bacon Chapel (q.v.). The class met in settlers' homes just south of Oakdale in 1837; organized by Rev. Richard Sharp, a circuit rider, of Sharpsburg, Marion County, from whom it took its name. The first Methodist organizations were "societies" or "classes," consisting of small groups that met in the homes of their members. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shaw Mill
Description:A mill on Black Creek in the southeastern part of the county, two miles north and east of Lakenan; in operation in 1834. It took its name from its owner, Hill Shaw. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 34; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelbina
Description:A post office from 1858; midway in the extreme southern part of the county, on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. It lies in a strip of prairie covered in an early day with a growth of grass often six to nine feet in height. It was laid out in 1857 by Josiah Hunt, land commissioner of the railroad; the first building put up was a small shanty north of the tracks. The station was built in 1859. After the Civil War, Shelbina grew rapidly. It was incorporated as a town in 1867 and as a city in 1878. It is the largest city in the county, and is said to be the most important station on the old Hannibal and St. Joseph line outside of the terminals. The name, Shelbina, was formed by the settlers from the word, Shelby, of which Shelbina is the diminutive. (Goodwin, 1867; Campbell, 1874; CRAM'S ATLAS, Shelby 1875; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 138, 801, 843, 848; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 165; Switzler, 432; Eaton, 66; Postal Guide; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1860)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelbina Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church at Shelbina; originally a union house built in 1860 by both Baptists and Methodists, and known as the "B. and M. Church House." The Methodists erected their own building in 1867, the Baptists retained the old. In 1881 a new building was erected and again in 1918. The church is still active. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelbina Collegiate Institute
Description:A school at Shelbina, established May 16, 1877. The faculty was a strong one, but the patronage was not sufficient, and the town began talking of a thorough high school. At a meeting of the citizens in May, 1892, without a dissenting voice, the college merged into a public school, giving way "when public high schools had become efficient," and a high school course was added to the already existing grade curriculum. The building is now used for a hospital. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 848; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 168-9, 178; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 627; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelby County
Description:A county erected on petition to the Legislature January 2, 1935, at which time Black Creek and North River Townships were organized as a new county to be known as Shelby. Records show that the territory now known as Shelby was not included by legislative enactment in Marion in 1826 on the organization of that county, but at a later date was attached to Marion for military, civil, and judicial purposes only. The settlers felt that for judicial purposes they were too far from the seat of justice at Palmyra; hence the position for county organization. Until its organization as a distant and separate county therefore in 1835, Shelby was a part of Ralls (HIST. SHELBY, 1911). From 1831 to 1834, however, it was for the purpose of administration of justice only, attached to Marion County as a part of Warren Township. In May, 1834, this territory was formed into Black Creek Township (q.v.). Later the same year it was reorganized into two townships, the new township being known as North River Township (q.v.). In the following January the two townships were designated by legislative act Shelby County. The county was at that time only eighteen miles in extent north and south, but in 1843 the Legislature cut off sixty square miles from Monroe County and added this territory to Shelby, an action said to have been taken to insure keeping the county seat of Monroe County at Paris. Shelby County is a rectangular 511 square miles with a "Panhandle District" (q.v.) on the southwest, with Knox, Lewis and Marion Counties on the east, Monroe on the south, and Macon on the west. It is traversed by many little streams, all of which were named for men who first settled or located there. Its principal stream is the North Fork of Salt River which traverses the county through the center diagonally from northwest to southeast. The first bona fide white settler was Major Obadiah Dickerson, pioneer settler of Palmyra (q.v.), who came to Shelby in 1831. (See Dickerson Ford). Undoubtedly the first white men to visit the county were Kentucky hunters who crossed from Boone Lick Country on the Missouri River seeking the head waters of Salt River. Probably even earlier that Boone Lick days, in the early 1800s it was visited by hunters and trappers. From the two original townships, Black Creek and North River, created in 1834 for voting purposes, there were in 1840 returns from six townships designated as Black Creek, North River, Salt River, Fabius, Tiger Fork, and Jackson. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 50). We do not see again the name Fabius. In 1852, but five recorded votes: Black Creek, Bethel, Tiger Fork, Taylor, and Jackson (IBID, 50; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 682). In 1856 Clay was one of eight, as were Salt River, North River, (IBID, 682), Taylor, Jackson, Bethel, Black Creek, and Tiger Fork. Jefferson had entered by 1870 and Lentner as late as the late 1890s. These ten comprise the present townships of the county. There are conflicting reports of the townships owning to incomplete records. (See HIST. SHELBY 1884, 682, 728, 878; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 629; Switzler, 432). Since tne early residents of Shelby were from Kentucky, the Legislature named the county in honor of Governor Isaac Shelby (1750-1826), who served three terms as governor of Kentucky, in 1792 and again in 1812 and 1816. Before going to Kentucky Governor Shelby served in the Revolutionary War, in Virginia, and later served in the legislature of Carolina. HIST. SHELBY 1884, 631, 641, 652; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 1-3, 15, 21-23, 29; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 621, 629; Eaton, 66; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelby County Railroad
Description:A county-owned railroad from Shelbina to Shelbyville built by subscription and completed in 1907, at which time the first passenger train made its initial trip. Since the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad (q.v.), missed Shelbyville by eight miles, this road was laid by the county. The road was put down without laying a bed, and the line is now in a condition that makes it almost useless. The mail car makes a daily run, and at times a shipment is made over the road when necessary. It remains in the hands of the county. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelby High School
Description:A church school at Shelbyville; a chartered literary institution under the auspices of the Missouri Annual Conference of M.E. Church South. The conference was organized in 1865; the school succeeded the Shelbyville Seminary (q.v.), and was taught in the Shelbyville High School. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelbyville
Description:A post office from 1836; county seat of Shelby County, just north of the geographic center, in Black Creek Township on the creek of the same name. The site was chosen for the county seat and hence selected as near the center as possible. The town was laid out by the county seat commissioners in 1836. The first court held here met in that year though the courthouse was not completed until 1838. Shelbyville was incorporated first in 1859, again in 1867, and as a city in 1877. From 1840 to the Civil War, growth was slow. During the years 1861-1865, Shelbyville became a military post, and the courthouse was used as headquarters for soldiers. (See Shelbyville Stockade). During the winter of 1861-62, two companies of Union soldiers were quartered here. A part of the courthouse during these years was used as a prison. In the years following the war, Shelbyville, off the main line of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad by eight miles, never grew into a prosperous town. (See Shelby County Railroad) The name, Shelbyville, was formed by the settlers from the name of the county--"the town" of Shelby. (Wetmore 1837; Hayward 1853; Sutherland and McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; CRAM'S ATLAS, Shelby 1875; Switzler, 432; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 630; HIST. SHELBY 1844, 623, 841; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 163; Postal Guide; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1842)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelbyville Boulder
Description:"The largest land ice erratic in North Missouri;" quite evidently a cycle or two older than the Hampton Boulder. (See Hampton Boulder Site). (MIRROR, 5, 6)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelbyville High School
Description:See Shelby High School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelbyville Northwestern
Description:A extension of the Shelby County Railroad from Shelbyville to the northwest through Keller Switch, Leonard, and Cherry Box, to Novelty in Knox County; hence the name. The road is in operation today, used only, however, to carry the mail. It is in the hands of the reciever. It is owned by the county. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelbyville Seminary
Description:A school established in 1858 in Shelbyville. It was of high standing, and flourished until the early 1870s, when it passed into the hands of the Shelby High School (q.v.). (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 840; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 180; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 627)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelbyville Stockade
Description:A stockade of fifteen-foot heavy oak posts sharpened at the upper ends, built around the courthouse in Shelbyville (q.v.) during the Civil War. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sherry Schoolhouse
Description:A pioneer schoolhouse three miles north of Hunnewell. Disbanded in 1857. So named for a prominent family that lived near. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; SHELBY COUNTY HJERALD, July 31, 1935; H.S. Carroll)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shiloh Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Bethel Township, eight miles north and two east of Shelbyville, at Elgin; established in 1869. The church house was built in 1870. The church is still active. Cf. above. The Battle of Shiloh, fought in Tennessee in 1862, was so named for a church situated where the battle was fought. There is a possibility of double significance in the selection of the name here. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 861, 817; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 182; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 628; INTERN. CYC., (F) Rev. Adolph Vollmer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shiloh School
Description:A pioneer schoolhouse in the neighborhood of Shiloh Church (q.v.) for which it was named. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shofstall School
Description:A schoolhouse in Taylor Township. The old building erected in 1875 stood one-half mile north of the present site. The school seems to have borne Mr. Shofstall's name at that time. In 1855, Wm. Shofstall deeded land to the district, and a new building was erected. In 1898 a new building was again erected on the same site. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; Frank Wand; H.S. Carroll)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Short Schoolhouse
Description:A schoolhouse in Bethel Township. So named for the family who gave the land to the district. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sigsbee
Description:A post office from 1898-1904; twelve miles northeast of Shelbyville. There was a little store here which has not been operated for several years. The name however is still used for the locality though not given by Rand, McNally, 1935. It was so named by D.J. Bevill, the postmaster, for Capt. Chas. Dwight Sigsbee (1845-1923), Captain of the S.S. Maine, sunk in the harbor at Havana, Cuba, February 15, 1898. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Maps Missouri, 1901- (F) 1934; Postal Guide; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; ENCYC. BRIT.; (F) D.J. Bevill)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sink Branch
Description:A branch which, rising in eastern Clay Township, flows in a southeast direction through the southwest corner of Black Creek Township into the North Fork of Salt River. So named because in certain seasons it flows on the surface; at others it disappears, and then rises again and flows in another distance on the surface. This is due to the rocky nature of its course. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; H.S. Carroll)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sniderburg
Description:See Kendall
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snowder Bridge
Description:A bridge crossing the old channel of Salt River, near Hagers Grove. So named for the owner of the land at this point, an early settler. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Fork of Salt River
Description:See Middle Fork of Salt River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Southern Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:See Morris Chapel
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph's Catholic Church
Description:See St. Michael's Catholic Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Mary's Catholic Church
Description:A Catholic Church at Shelbina; erected in 1879. St. Mary's was begun with the building of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. The Irish Catholics who came into the county with the building of the road went to church first at "Old Clinton," nine miles southeast, in Monroe County. That church, was abandoned when "Old Clinton" was abandoned, shortly after 1878, whereupon the Catholic Church was erected at Shelbina. In 1923 the old building of 1879 was razed, and the cornerstone of a new St. Mary's was laid. Since the Parish was established shortly after the dogma of the Immaculate Conception was defined as an article of faith by the Vatican Council (1854), the church, it is believed, was dedicated to Mary, the Holy Virgin, Mother of God, under the title of her Immaculate Conception. This title was bestowed upon her because the Church believes that she was conceived without sin. As the queen of all saints, she is held in the highest esteem by all Catholics, who venerate her as their mother. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 187; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; INTERN. CYC.; SAINTS WE LOVE; Father Michael M. Grace)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Michael's Catholic Church
Description:A Catholic Church two miles north and east of Hagers Grove. The first church here was erected in 1866, and was known as St. Joseph's Catholic Church. This was destroyed by fire the following year. A new building was erected in 1871 and dedicated to St. Michael. In 1906 a third church building was erected on the site of the old one. The church is also known as Hagers Grove Catholic Church because of its location. St. Joseph is regarded as the "patron and model of interior and contemplative souls." (DAILY MISSAL, 1925) It is not strange that the church should honor Joseph, who in becoming the husband of Mary became the Guardian of the Virgin Mother and the Child. March 19th is his festival day. Beyond what we learn of him from Holy Scripture the facts of Joseph's life are unknown to us. From the circumstances of his not being mentioned in the history of the Passion, it is believed that already he had "Gone to his rest." Devotion to him as a Saint, fervent in the East from early ages, has later grown in the West in such marvelous wise that he is now formally constituted the Patron Saint of the Universal Church. The churches and altars dedicated to him in all parts of the world are literally numberless. (Luke 1:27; Mat. 2:13) St. Michael has always been specially invoked by the Catholic Church both in the East and in the West. Michael is the Archangel in Scripture, in connection with whose canonization there are various legends. Michaelmas (Sept. 29) is the festival day of St. Michael, who in legendary art is represented as young and beautiful, winged in armor, bearing the shield and lance, with his foot on the evil one, ready to pierce and bind him. (Dan. 10:13; Dan. 12) "I shall send My Angel to march before you, to guard you on the way and to bring you into the land which I have prepared for you." (Exod. 23:20-23) Leader of the Heavenly Host in their battle and triumph over the forces of hell (Apoc. 12:7). (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 188; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; Brewster, 141; INTERN. CYC.; BOOK OF SAINTS)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church
Description:A Catholic Church erected at Clarence in 1886, and dedicated to St. Patrick, the first services being held on St. Patrick's Day of that year. St. Patrick (372 (?)-464 (?) ) is the patron saint of the Irish people though he was not of Irish birth. We are familiar with his story, with the fact that it is thought that he was born in Britain in a Roman Provincial village, that he was captured and sold into Irish slavery where he learned the Irish language, and that later following his escape from slavery he voluntarily returned to Ireland as a missionary and there performed an endless number of miracles, not the least of which was driving the snakes out of the country. God raised up "The confessor and bishop St. Patrick to announce His glory to the pagans" of Ireland. (DAILY MISSAL, 1935) (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 825 SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; Brewster, 138-140)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Rose's Catholic Church
Description:A Catholic Church erected at Lakenan shortly after 1878 when "Old Clinton" (Monroe County) was abandoned. It was rebuilt in 1887. The church was named for St. Rose whose festival day is August 30. St. Rose of Lima (Peru) is the only canonical saint yet chosen from the western shores of the Atlantic; St. Rose (1587-1617) was a beautiful child, christened Isabel, but from "the wondrous color of her complexion which resembled the delicate tints of a rose," her mother called her "My Rose." From infancy her life was one beautiful story of love and patience. At an early age she took the habit and vows of the Third Order of St. Dominic. She was canonized by Clement X in 1671. Another story of the origin of her name is that one day the face of the child appeared marvelously transfigured with all the beauty of the rose. (DAILY MISSAL, 1925) (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 187; Brewster, 388)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stalcup School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township; established for about eighty years. So named for several neighboring pioneer families. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; Sam Timbrook)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stice Mill
Description:A "corn cracker" and sawmill on North River, established on the site of Bethel (q.v.) by Peter Stice in 1835, and known by his name. As a water mill it was not a success and was torn down in 1845. On the site was erected the large steam mill known as the Colony Mill (q.v.). (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 633, 861, 877; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 34; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stivers Corner
Description:See Maud
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stribling and Shale Mill
Description:See Wilson & Evans Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Swift's Grove
Description:A grove one mile north of Shelbina used for picnics and Fourth of July celebrations. So named for the pioneer owner, Dr. Swift. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 644; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. So named for the owner of the land. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor Township
Description:This township lies in the northwest corner of Shelby County, with Bethel Township on the east, Black Creek Township and Clay on the south. It was organized between 1848 and 1850 with its present boundaries. It was named for Zachary Taylor (1748-1850), 12th president of the United States (1849-1850). (HIST. SHELBY (1884), 682, 871, 878, 880; HIST. SHELBY (1911), 140, 145; ATLAS SHELBY (1878); Map Missouri (1869); R. McN., 1935; INTERN. CYC.; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Tannery
Description:A tannery on Clear Creek, 1844, east of Shelbyville, below the point where Miller's Mill (q.v.) was later located. Owned and operated by Judge Daniel Taylor, whence the name. (HIST. SHELBY (1911), 41; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ten Mile Creek
Description:A long stream west of Shelbyville, rising in eastern Macon Township. It is reported that this name was given the creek because of an early settlement near its head that was ten miles from Macon. There is a town in Macon, known by the name of Ten Mile, which lies near the head of the stream. The fact that the stream is a long stream and rises in Ten Mile Township in Macon County may have given rise to the name. (Campbell (1874); ATLAS SHELBY (1878); Judge V.L. Drain; H.S. Carroll)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Lost Town
Description:See Walkersville
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thomas Branch
Description:A branch in Bethel Township, flowing northeast into the Tiger Fork of North River. So named for the owner of the adjoining land. (PLAT BOOK; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thomas Creek
Description:A creek which rises east of Shelbina in southeastern Salt River Township and flows in a generally east direction into the North Fork of Salt River in Jackson Township. So named for Rev. Henson Thomas, who entered a large tract of land in this vicinity. (ATLAS SHELBY (1878); SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thomas Hotel
Description:A tavern at Shelbina, upon or very near the spot where the present Waverly Hotel stands. It was built by the first permanent citizen of Shelbina, Martin Thomas, who came to the vicinity in the winter of 1857, on hearing of the coming of the railroad. A large tract of land itinerant Baptist preacher, at an early date. This land included the site of Shelbina. So far as can be learned the Rev. Thomas never lived here. The hotel burned in 1866. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tiger Fork
Description:A post office listed in 1860 and 1867; in the northeastern part of the county, eight miles north and east of Bethel, on the Tiger Fork of North River, from which it took its name. (Sutherland and McEvoy (1860); Goodwin (1867); (F) Maps Missouri, 1860-1871; (F) Gus Bauer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tiger Fork of North River
Description:A stream rising in northern Shelby, and flowing in a generally southeast direction through the northeast part of the county, traversing Bethel and Tiger Fork townships to join North River just before it enters Marion County. So named because two large panthers were killed on its banks in the winter of 1835, and the settlers, it is said, thought they were tigers. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 621; HIST. SHELBY (1884), 633, 652; HIST. SHELBY (1911), 11, 30; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby (1904); Eaton, 66; Maps Missouri from 1844)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tiger Fork Township
Description:A township in the northeast corner of the county, with North River and Black Creek townships on the south, from which it is separated by North River, and Bethel Township to the west. It was one of the first townships settled and one of the first organized. The date of organization is thought to have been about 1840. (See Shelby County) In 1897 it was given its present boundaries. It was named for the Tiger Fork of North River (q.v.) which traverses the northern part of the township. (HIST. SHELBY (1884), 682, 870, 885; HIST. SHELBY (1911), 139; ATLAS SHELBY (1878); Map Missouri (1869); R. McN., 1935; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tingle Branch
Description:A branch in northeastern Black Creek Township, flowing northeast into North River. So named for a landowner. (PLAT BOOK; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Two River Association
Description:See Bethel Baptist Association.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Chapel [1 of 2]
Description:A community in the southeastern part of the county in Jackson Township, three miles north of Hunnewell. The community was earlier known as "Ribbon Ridge," so nicknamed, it is said, by the young men of the neighboring "Grab All" (q.v.) community because of the great number of ribbons worn by the young ladies. The name more likely was applied to the narrow ridge of land lying between Black Creek and the North Fork of the Salt River within the southeastern corner, the earliest settled part of the county. Later the name was changed to Union Chapel, for the church and school of that name. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; David Morgan; (F) Sam Coleman)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Chapel [2 of 2]
Description:A union chapel in Jackson Township, north of Hunnewell; established in the 1890s. It is still active. So named because it is a union of church people of various denominations. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; H.S. Carroll; E.B. Hendrix)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Chapel School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jackson Township. So named for Union Chapel (q.v.) in the neighborhood. Formerly Ribbon Ridge (q.v.), this name also for its location. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Christian Church
Description:See Union Grove Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Grove Baptist Church
Description:See Union Grove Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Grove Church
Description:A union of Christian, Baptist, and Methodist denominations worshipping in the one church, south and west of Clarence, on Otter Creek; established around 1873. It has been known as Union Grove Baptist Church, as Union Christian Church, and around 1878 as Otter Creek Union Church; indicated as the latter in the Shelby Atlas, 1878. Its various names were given it for its nature and for its location in a grove along Otter Creek. (ATLAS SHELBY (1878); HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 109; HIST. SHELBY (1911), 187, 192; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; David Morgan; Rev. Geo. H. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Independent Holiness Church
Description:A Holiness Church south of Clarence, near Otter Creek, established in the 1880s. (See Independent Holiness Church). So named for its proximity to Union Grove Church, (q.v.). (HIST. SHELBY (1911), 189; Rev. Geo. H. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union School
Description:A schoolhouse in Taylor Township. The name is an ideal one. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upland Plain of Missouri
Description:The name given particularly to the beautiful tableland on the banks of the large stream, the North Fork of Salt River; the name is given generally to the northern part of the state of Missouri, owing to its stretch of prairie traversed by many streams. This part of Missouri was early known as a choice agricultural region. (Bek, 65; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Valley Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Tiger Fork Township. It is located in a grove in a deep valley; hence the name. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Van Vacter Branch
Description:A little branch near the center of the county, flowing into Black Creek. So named for a pioneer owner of the land along the stream. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:VanBuren School District
Description:The first school district in the county; organized in 1838 by John Dunn on the banks of Dunn Branch (q.v.). The first public school which follows was known as the Dunn School (q.v.), and the district became known as the Dunn District. The territory is now the Red Star and parts of the Chick, Robison, and Freeman districts. So named by Mr. Dunn for Martin VanBuren (1782-1682), eighth president of the United States, 1837-1841, in office on the organization of the district. (HIST. SHELBY (1911), 9; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walker's Mill
Description:A water mill with a large dam, the first on the North Fork of the Salt River; three miles north of Shelbina, around 1840, in what is now Salt River Township. A mill was contemplated at this point in 1839 by a Mr. Williams of Marion County who owned the land on which the mill was afterward built. On his death before the mill was established, the land was sold to Daniel O. Walker and Geo. W. Barker, who built the mill and named it for Mr. Walker. Later it was operated by Adam and Michael Heckart who were famous mill- wrights, whereupon it became known as Heckhart's Mill. Under its old name the mill had served as a cornerstone for Walkersville, and was often referred to as the Walkersville Mill. Probably with the Bethel Mill this mill was the largest in the county for a number of years. It was a buhr mill; it ground grain, carded wool, and sawed lumber. Built in 1840, it was still in operation in 1879, but was discontinued shortly after that date. (Goodwin (1867); HIST. SHELBY (1884), 874; HIST. SHELBY (1911), 34, 35, 143, 166; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 632; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walkersville
Description:A post office from 1853-1867; on the North Fork of Salt River, three and a half miles northwest of Shelbina. Missed by the Hannibal and St. Joseph road by three and a half miles, it began to decline in the course of thirty years, and in as many more it had ceased to exist as a village. The town grew up about Walker's Mill (q.v.), for which it was named. The name is still applied to the locality, though there are only traces of the foundations of the early town left. For this reason it is sometimes spoken of as the "Lost Town." (Sutherland and McEvoy (1860); Goodwin (1867); CRAM'S ATLAS, Shelby (1875); HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 632; HIST. SHELBY (1884), 660, 874; HIST. SHELBY (1911), 166; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri 1861- 1886)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walkersville Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1871 in the village of Walkersville (q.v.), whence the name. Abandoned in 1878. SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walkersville Mill
Description:See Walker's Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walkersville School
Description:A pioneer school, still existent, on the site of Walkersville (q.v.), the "Lost Town," the name of which is kept alive today by the school of this name. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Warren Ford
Description:A ford on Salt River near the mouth of Watkin's Branch (q.v.), in the Bacon Chapel neighborhood (q.v.). It was an old bee-hunters ford (See Bee Ford), named for Jimmy Warren, and dates back to a period previous to 1836. (HIST. SHELBY (1884), 661; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Watkin's Branch
Description:A branch northeast of Shelbyville, flowing into North River. So named for the pioneer landowner. (HIST. SHELBY (1884), 661; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Weedon School
Description:A schoolhouse in Black Creek Township. So named for the owner of the land. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wells Branch
Description:A branch rising in northern Jackson Township, and flowing in a generally northern direction into North River in southern Tiger Fork Township. So named for an early settler on the stream. (ATLAS SHELBY (1878); SOIL SURVEY, Shelby (1904); (F) Rome Broughton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wesley Chapel
Description:A chapel Methodist Episcopal South; four miles northeast of Clarence. Organized in 1894 and a church house built. It is an offshoot of Bacon Chapel. It is still active. So named for John Wesley (1703-1791), the English Divine who was the founder of Methodism. (HIST. SHELBY (1911), 187; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; ENCY. BRIT.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Bethany Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1893 as Bethany Church; five miles north and one west of Clarence, in western Shelby. The church became known later as West Bethany because it was west of the Baptist Church known as Bethany Church (q.v.) in Marion County close to the Shelby County line. West Bethany was disbanded in 1925. For name see Bethany M.E. Church South. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Greenfield
Description:See West Springfield
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West School
Description:A schoolhouse in Lentner Township. So named for the owner of the land. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Springfield
Description:A post office in 1853, discontinued between 1876 and 1886; in the northeastern part of the county, near Sigsbee (q.v.). In early days a town near the site of Sigsbee was called Greenfield (Hutawa, 1844; Colton, 1857-1858; CRAM'S ATLAS, Shelby, 1875). The statement made in the Herald that later this town was known as West Springfield is not borne out entirely so far as the dates go, West Springfield being given by Hayward, 1853, and Goodwin, 1867. The latter is indicated on the Maps of Missouri, 1861 (Lloyd) -1886. Further conflict arises in the names as given on the various maps. Colton, 1861, gives a West Greenfield, which would appear to indicate the name in the process of transition. Colton also indicated a Greenville, both as in the northeastern part of the county close to the Marion line, the former to the south and west of Greenville. The latter name is given also on the map as a post office in 1860. There seems no reason extant for these names other than the fact that the site is the Upland Plain of Missouri (q.v.). (Postal Guide; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD; July 31, 1935; Nathan Winetroub)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whitelock School
Description:A school seven miles northeast of Bethel, close to the Bethel-Tiger Fork line. So named for Geo. Whitelock who gave to the district the land on which the schoolhouse stands. (SHELBINA DEMOCRAT, July 31, 1935; James Gwynn; (F) Walter Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilson and Evans Mill
Description:A grist and sawmill on Otter Creek in the southeastern part of Clarence, built in 1872 by a Mr. Wilson and Mr. Evans who gave the mill its name. It was operated during the years of its existence by various owners. About 1876 it was owned by Patrick McCarty. It was burned in 1883, and at that time the owner was Mr. Lair. It was rebuilt as a flour mill, said to have been rebuilt for Mr. Lair by Dolph Miller, and continued under his name. It was later operated by Stribling and Shale and then by J.M. Wine, who moved the mill to another site. It was burned about 1929. In later years it ground stock feed. Old residents know it as the Wilson and Evans Mill. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilson's Mill
Description:A mill erected on the Tiger Fork of North River, in the northwestern part of Tiger Fork Township about 1880 by Ed Wilson. Mr. Wilson was an educated Englishmen who spent all of his spare time writing. ( (F) Nathan Winetroub; (F) Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Winchell Place
Description:See Cherry Dell
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Windell Street
Description:See Emden
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wine's Mill
Description:See Wilson and Evans Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Cemetery
Description:A cemetery one mile or one and a quarter miles west of Bethel, belonging to the Zion Evangelical Church (q.v.), from which it takes its name. (Margaret Lair)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Evangelical Church
Description:An Evangelical Church (See Ebenezer Evangelical Church) about two miles west of Bethel. It was organized in 1868, in the Short Schoolhouse (q.v.), the first class of this church in the county. The church group worshipped here until 1870 when the church house was built. Cf. above. (HIST. SHELBY (1911), 195, 196)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Methodist Church
Description:A Southern Methodist Episcopal Church, three miles south of Clarence; organized in 1872. The church is disbanded. Cf. above. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Go back to the top of the page | View other place names