Shannon County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Akers
Description:A village in Jackson Township and a post office since 1886. Named for John Akers, who was postmaster. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); Miss Melissa Akers)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Allen Branch
Description:A small stream in Alley Township that flows northeast into Jack's Fork. (State Highway Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Alley
Description:In Alley Township. A post office since 1886. Named for John Alley, who came to the region before the Civil War, and built a mill on Jack's Fork. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Alley Mill
Description:In Alley Township. Named for the spring. (W.A. Dorrance, THREE OZARK STREAMS; CURRENT WAVE, Aug. 8, 1921)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Alley Springs
Description:A large spring in Alley Township. Named for John Alley, a pioneer. The old Alley farm has been made into a State Park recently. (A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Alley Springs State Park
Description:See Alley Springs.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Alley Township
Description:Formed from Eminence Township in 1907. Named for the post office. (County Records; Mrs. C. Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Amity Church
Description:A Christian Church at Ink, founded in August 1901. The name denotes friendship. (R.D. Lynch)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Angeline
Description:A post office from 1910 to 1929 in Delaware Township. Named by Mr. Mabie, a settler from Buchanan County, after a feminine relative. Another explanation credited E.B. Grandon, director of the Missouri Lumber and Mining Company, with naming the office after Mrs. Angeline Grandon. (R: Postal Guide; Will Smith; A.J. Hawkins; A. Deatherage)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Angeline School
Description:District School No. 88, near Alley. Named from the town. (MSTR; Will Smith)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Banker Cave
Description:A small settlement near Deslet and the Reynolds County line. (State Highway Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Banner Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Birch Tree Township. Named from the schoolhouse in which it meets. (Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Banner School
Description:District School No. 79, near Birch Tree. An ideal name given to signify the excellence of the school. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Barren Creek
Description:A small stream in the northeastern section of the county which flows into Current River. Named because much of the creek flows through rocky soil and between rock bluffs. (R. McN.; A.J. Deatherage)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bartlett
Description:A village in Bartlett Township; a post office since 1889. A railroad flag station named for W. R. Bartlett, a stockholder in the Frisco Railroad. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); R.L. Smotherman)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bartlett Township
Description:Formed from Winona Township in 1905. Named for the village (q.v.). (County Record; Mrs. C. Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bay Creek
Description:A small stream running into Current River near Goose Bay, from which it derives its name. (L.C. Shuck; County Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Beal
Description:A discontinued post office (1922-1930) in Grassy Township. Named in honor of William Beal, farmer and postmaster. (Postal Guide; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bee Bluff School
Description:District School No. 83, near Eminence. Named for its location near a bluff on which grew bee trees. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Big Creek
Description:Rises in Moore Township and flows southwest to Current River. Named for its size. (Plat Book; Conard, p. 573; Miss Melissa Akers)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Big Shawnee Creek
Description:Rises in Alley Township and flows northwest to Jack's Fork. Named for the Indian tribe. The adjective "big" was added to distinguish it from a smaller stream with the same name which is only a few miles away. (Plat Book (1931); Conard, p. 573)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Big Spring School
Description:District School No. 54, near Low Wassie. A spring is located near the school grounds. (MSTR; Miss Grace Miller)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Birch Tree
Description:In the center of Birch Tree Township; a post office since 1865. Named for a birch tree near the site of the original post office, which was two miles from the present town site. Name given by John Depriest. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); Eaton, vol. 13, p. 65; A.J. Hawkins; Campbell (1874), p. 600; MISSOURI GAZ. (1860)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Birch Tree Township
Description:One of the original townships, organized in 1842 and called Birch Valley until the settlement took the name of Birch Tree. Both names are derived from the birch trees which grow in the vicinity. (Campbell (1874), p. 32; County Records; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Birch Valley Township
Description:See Birch Tree Township.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Black Hill School
Description:District School No. 1 near Rat. Named after the type of soil in the vicinity. (MSTR; James Sweeney)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Black Pond School
Description:A rural school in Alley Township. Named because the school is located by a pond in a region of black soil. (MSTR; Miss Melissa Akers)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Black Valley Creek
Description:A large creek which has two prongs and which winds through much of the northwestern section of the county, and empties into Current River. The name denotes the type of soil found in the region. The upper branch of the creek is called North Fork Black Valley and the lower is called South Fork Black Valley. (Miss Melissa Akers; County Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Black Valley School
Description:A school district No. 18 near Hartshorn. Named from the type of soil found in the region. (MSTR; Miss Melissa Akers)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Blair Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A small stream that rises in Blair Creek Township and flows south to Current River. Named for a pioneer family. (Plat Book; Conard, p. 573; Miss Melissa Akers)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Blair Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A post office in Blair Creek Township in 1867. Named for the stream. (Goodwin (1867), p. 49; A.J. Deatherage)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Blair Creek Township
Description:Formed from Moore Township in 1897. Named for the stream which flows through the district. (County Records; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Blue Spring Park
Description:A tourist development with a very fine deep spring as the chief attraction. It is near the Howell County line. The name was chosen to describe the water. (A.J. Sercy; County Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bluff School
Description:District School No. 10, near Cedar Grove. Named from its location near a large bluff. (MSTR; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bowlan Township
Description:In the eastern section of the county, erected in 1842. Named for the Bowlin family, who settled the region. Both spellings are in use in the county, being used by branches of the family still residing there. (Campbell (1874), p. 32; County Records; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bowlin Township
Description:See Bowlan Township.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Boyds Creek School
Description:District School No. 17, near Ink. Named after George Boyd, a stock man from Illinois who settled in the region. (MSTR; W. Clark; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Brush Arbor
Description:A meeting place for the Church of God in Jasper Township. Named for the arbor which has been built for a shelter. A brush arbor is made by erecting posts and rafters for the roof. Branches of trees are then cut and laid over the rafters, thus providing shelter from sun and rain. (Katherine Powell)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Brushy
Description:A post office listed in 1932 and 1933, in Newton Township. Named from the schoolhouse. (Postal Guide; Smith Martin)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Brushy School
Description:District school No. 24, at Brushy. Named because of the undergrowth and brush which had grown on the cut over land. (MSTR; Smith Martin)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Buckeye City
Description:A long discontinued post office (1879) in Buckeye Township. It was named from the Horse Chestnut trees that are plentiful in the vicinity. The hamlet was of short duration, lasting only a year or two. (MISSOURI GAZ. (1879), p. 140; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Buckeye Township
Description:Formed from Eminence Township in 1901. Named for the horse chestnut trees, called buckeye, which grow in the region. (County Record; Mrs. C. Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bullock Hollow
Description:A small valley southeast of Ink. (State Highway Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bunker Hill Ranch
Description:A tourist resort in the southwestern section of the county, near Rhymer's Ranch. (State Highway Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Button Rock School
Description:District School No. 85, near Indian Creek. Named because at a point near the schoolhouse the creek runs against, or "butts on," a huge granite rock and turns off at a sharp angle. (MSTR; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Camp Zoe
Description:A tourist resort in Watkins Township. Named for the daughter of J.W. Sharp. (J.W. Sharp; R. McN.)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Carr Hollow
Description:A narrow valley which drains into the Current River near Deslet. Named for the family who farm the district. (L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cartwright Hollow
Description:A narrow valley northeast of Alley Springs. (State Highway Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Casto
Description:A post office in Casto Township from 1897 to 1901. An early settler and prominent farmer, Jim Keel, raised castor beans on a large scale. He named the township and the post office after his product. Why he shortened the name from "Castor" to "Casto" is not known. (Postal Guide; L.D. Shuck; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Casto Township
Description:Formed from Spring Valley Township in 1897. Named for the principal village in the township. (County Record; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cave Spring School
Description:District School No. 4, near Hardage. Named because it is located near a small spring which issues from a cave. (MSTR; W.W. Thompson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cedar Grove
Description:A very old trading post and a post office since 1890 in Bowlan Township. Named for its location in a grove of cedar trees. (Postal Guide; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cedar Hill School [1 of 2]
Description:A district school near Round Springs. Named for cedar trees on the schoolhouse hill. (MSTR; Anvil Lewis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cedar Hill School [2 of 2]
Description:District School No. 7, near Rector. Named for the type of timber and the location on a hill. (MSTR; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cedar Point School
Description:District School No. 14, near Mildridge. Named for the type of timber growing near. The district is now part of the Clark Purchase Unit of National Forests. (MSTR; Anvil Lewis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Chiltonsville
Description:A village in Eminence Township; now long disappeared but was across Jack's Fork from the site of the present Eminence. Named for Josh Chilton, early member of the House of Representatives (1860). (Parker (1865); Jim Chilton)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Church of God
Description:In Winona, Winona Township. Named for the religious denomination using the church for its meetings. This denomination is fast becoming the predominant church in the county. They have another large church at West Eminence also called the Church of God. Otherwise they hold their meetings in tents in the hill clearings, in brush arbors, and in various schoolhouses and vacant store buildings. (G.E. Lloyd; Katherine Powell)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Civil War Oak
Description:One of the few trees in the Ozarks having legal protection for life. The oak stands in a wheat field of what was originally the Joshua Chilton farm, a few miles north of Eminence in Eminence Township. It received its name because it saved the life of Alex Chilton, Joshua's brother, when he and his four companions were attacked by guerillas during the Civil War. The men were known to be southern sympathizers, but the guerillas gave them a sporting chance to run for their lives. The other four were shot, but Alex climbed into the huge tree in the clearing and hid there until the enemy left the country. The deed to the farm now carries the provision that the tree is not to be cut. (Otto Reyburn; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Congo
Description:A post office in Congo Township since 1896. Name suggested by Walter Webb, who had been studying the geography of Africa and was attracted by the name of the great river. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 65; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Congo School
Description:District School No. 68, near Mountain View. Takes its name from the nearby post office. (MSTR; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Congo Township
Description:Organized in 1910 from Birch Tree Township. Named for the post office. (County Record)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cordz-Fisher Lumber Company Railroad
Description:A short railroad built and owned by the lumber company which removed it when they withdrew their camp. It was in the southern section of the county near Winona. (County Map in CURRENT WAVE, August, 1901; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Corinth Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church organized October, 1877, in Bartlett Township but now disbanded. Cf. above. (Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Corinth School
Description:District School No. 91, near Birch Tree. Named by C.L. Deatherage for the church which once was in the neighborhood. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cornell School
Description:District School No. 5, near Sinkin. Named by C.L. Deatherage after the college as a center of learning. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cotoreva Schoolhouse
Description:District School No. 40, near Ellington. Named for Chief Cotoreva, who saved the early settlers from massacre. He is buried near the school. (MSTR; J. Chilton)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Council Hollow
Description:A narrow valley in Delaware Township. Named because the Indians held council meetings there. Years ago one of the Chilton family found Indian jewelry and semi-precious stones in the hollow. (A.J. Searcy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Courthouse Cave
Description:See Eminence.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Courthouse Hollow
Description:See Eminence.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Current River
Description:The largest river in the region rises in Dent County at Montauk and enters Shannon County in the northwest corner. It winds south and merely touches the border of Texas County but cuts through the greater part of Shannon and finally enters Reynolds County on the east and ultimately flows into Black River. An unusually beautiful river, which W.A. Dorrance in his book, THREE OZARK STREAMS, describes as "a river so clean, so full, so broad, so swift that it has forced four races to name it current." The French name was LA RIVIERE COURANTE (literally, running water) and the Spanish, RIO CORRENTE. Mr. Dorrance says the name was originally conferred by the "native red men;" but he does not give the Indian form, and I have found it nowhere recorded. (Plat Book (1930); Dorrance, p. 37; Wetmore, p. 245)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Current River
Description:The largest river in the region rises in Dent County at Montauk and enters Shannon County in the northwestern corner. It winds south and merely touches the border of Texas County but cuts through the greater part of Shannon and finally enters Reynolds County on the east and ultimately flows into Black River. An unusually beautiful river, which W.A. Dorrance in his book, THREE OZARK STREAMS, describes as "a river so clean, so full, so broad, so swift that it has forced four races to name it current." The French name was "La Riviere Courante" (literally, running water) and the Spanish, "Rio Corrente." Mr. Dorrance says the name was originally conferred by the "native red men;" but he does not give the Indian form, and I have found it nowhere recorded. (Plat Book (19230); Dorrance, p. 37; Wetmore, p. 245)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Current River
Description:A post office in the northeastern section of the county from 1867 to 1879. Named for the river. (Goodwin (1867), p. 600)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Current River Copper Mines
Description:See Sutton Copper Mines.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Current Township
Description:A central township named for Current River. (Mrs. Mary Davis; County Plat Book (1930)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:De Weese School
Description:District School No. 43, near Eminence. Named for the family of Henry De Weese, who live near the school. (MSTR; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Delaware
Description:A post office since 1924 in Delaware Township. Named for the creek. The stream was named first, then the Township, and last the post office, but they all seem to have been named from the Indians as much as having been transferred from one another. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); Colton (1870); Shoemaker, HIST. MISSOURI, p. 18; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Delaware Creek
Description:A stream which rises in Delaware Township and flows north to Jack's Fork. Also called Indian Creek. Named for the Indian tribe. (Plat Book; Conard, p. 573; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Delaware School
Description:In Eminence Township. Named for the stream. (MSTR; A.J. Searcy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Delaware Township
Description:In the west-central section of the county; organized in 1870. Named for the Delaware Indians. There are many evidences of their existence in the county. The tribe originally occupied the basin of the Delaware River and southeast New York. They called themselves Lenape ("real men"); but were known as Delawares by the English from the river, which took its name from Lord Delaware, governor of Virginia, who sailed up Delaware Bay in 1610. They were invited to settle in Missouri by the Spanish government in 1789. (Campbell (1874), p. 32; County Records; Mrs. Cora Williams; Shoemaker, HIST. MISSOURI, p. 19)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Delmar School
Description:District School No. 3, near Hardage. No one knew the actual origin of the name, but Delmar is a common school name. It may have been borrowed from one of the seven other Delmars in the United States, or from the well- known Delmar Avenue in St. Louis. (MSTR)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dent's Mill
Description:A flour mill on the Little Shawnee in 1901. Named for its builder and owner, Hiram Dent. (Jewel Thompson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Deslet
Description:A post office in Bowlan Township since 1899. Because of the remoteness of the place, the name Desolate was selected, but through some error the name was spelled Deslet. (Postal Guide; Eaton, vol. 13, p. 66; Williams; STATE OF MISSOURI; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Devil's Well Hollow
Description:Located near Rector in the northwestern section of the county; the hollow takes its name from a natural well about 100 ft. deep where a subterranean stream may be seen. Local people believe the water is the same as that from Cave Spring. (Anvil Lewis; Keith McCanse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dooley Hollow
Description:A narrow valley in Jackson Township. Named for an old family who were pioneers in this section. (Miss Melissa Akers; Highway Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dutch Hollow
Description:A narrow valley in Spring Valley Township. The name was applied to the area because it was settled by people of German extraction, who were commonly called "Dutch" by Americans. (A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dutch Hollow School
Description:A rural school in Spring Valley Township. Named from the hollow. (MSTR; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Eminence [1 of 2]
Description:The original county seat, located, as early maps show, on Current River. The courthouse was placed on a fine hill or bluff overlooking the river; hence the name. It was burned during the Civil War and the county government was non-existent for several years, although court was held in Courthouse Cave (q.v.) during that time. Later the county seat was transferred to the present Eminence (q.v.) . The vanished town is now often referred to as "Old Eminence." (R: Colton (1861); Mrs. Cora Williams; J. Freeman)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Eminence [2 of 2]
Description:The present county seat, located in the center of Eminence Township. It was established in 1870 and has been a post office since 1874, although the town was not incorporated until 1930. There has been much discussion as to the origin of the name. The obvious solution would be that it was named for its position, but it is located not on an eminence, but in a valley. Jesting neighbors have accounted for the discrepancy by a story to the effect that the first wagon bearing material for the courthouse broke down at the foot of the hill on which they had intended to build it, and that the inhabitants were too lazy to repair it and hence resigned themselves to living in the hollow. Naturally this explanation is indignantly rejected, by natives of the town, as inspired by mere envy and uncharitableness, According to Mr. A.J. Hawkins, the town site was donated by Thomas Joshua Chilton, who had a large plantation. Mr. Chilton gave fifty acres of land to be dedicated to the public use for streets and alleys, as is mandatory under the Missouri law. This tract extended up the bold hill on the north of the town, from which point there is a remarkable view. Hence the name. Mr. John Freeman, assistant postmaster at Eminence, says he is the grandson of W.M. Freeman who drove the famous first wagonload to build the courthouse in 1867. He says the wagon did break down, it being winter and the roads very muddy, but this incidence had nothing to do with the name Eminence. The original intention had been to erect the courthouse near Round Spring, which is about one mile down Current River, at the place now sometimes called "old" Eminence, but usually Courthouse Hollow and Courthouse Cave. During the 1860s court had been held in this cave at the mouth of the hollow, and had Freeman's wagon not broken down in 1867, the courthouse building would have been erected there. Mrs. Cora Williams, who is the daughter of the original wagon driver, is positive that the name Eminence was transferred from old Eminence. She says that the old place was so called before the present town was started. It was the original county seat before the Civil War. The courthouse there was on a fine bluff overlooking Current River. This was burned during the Civil War and the county government was non-existent for several years. Court was held in the cave during this time. When the courthouse was rebuilt, it was located at the site of the present Eminence as stated by John Freeman. The courthouse burned again and was rebuilt. In 1937 it burned once more. In 1938 a bitter fight ensued to move the county seat to Winona, a larger town, but in the extreme southern end of the county. Led by Judge Arthur Deatherage, the Eminence faction was successful, and the third courthouse is being built at Eminence this summer (1939). Reference to an early map (1861) shows a town of Eminence located on the Current River, north of the present location, which is south of Jack's Fork. This seems convincing proof of the Freeman story that Eminence is a transferred name from "Old" Eminence, which was named because of its location. (R: Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); Colton (1861); Mrs. Cora Williams; Judge A. Deatherage; A.J. Hawkins; J. Freeman; Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Eminence Township
Description:One of the original townships, established in 1842 in the center of the county. Named for the principal village, the old county seat. Cf. above. (Campbell (1874), p. 32; County Records; Mrs. C. Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Eudy
Description:A post office from 1910-1914 in Eminence Township. Named for Christopher Eudy, who came from North Carolina before the Civil War. His grandson, Dr. W.T. Eudy, is now a physician at Eminence. Dr. Eudy says the name, originally German, should be pronounced "Udi," not as most people do "Judi," thus making a closer approximation to the Germans "Jidi." (R: Postal Guide; A.J. Hawkins; Dr. W.T. Eudy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fair Grove School
Description:District School No. 90, near Birch Tree. A name given to compliment the district. (MSTR; Miss Grace Miller)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:District School No. 13, near Timber. Named to commemorate the view. (MSTR; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ferndale School
Description:District School No. 77, near Deslet. Named from the wild fern which once grew near. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fishertown
Description:A section of Winona which was once a lumbering camp belonging to the firm of Cordz and Fisher. The lumbering camp was moved from place to place in the vicinity, and therefore several places around Winona are referred to as Fishertown. (CURRENT WAVE, Aug. 8, 1901; Jewell Thompson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Flat Rock School
Description:District School No. 86, near Summerville. Named for a rock formation close to the school building. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Fredericks)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Flatwood School
Description:In Moore Township. Named for a grove on prairie land in which the school is located. (MSTR; W. Clark)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Flint Ridge School
Description:In South Benton Township. A name descriptive of the locality. (MSTR; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Flip
Description:A post office listed from 1915 to 1921. Named by a Mrs. Hudson for her pet dog. (Postal Guide; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Forest Glen School
Description:District School No. 22, near Venice. Named for its location. (MSTR; Smith Martin)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Frisco
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fristoe National Forest Purchase Unit
Description:Named because much of the land was purchased from E.L. Fristoe. Ultimately to become part of the Clark National Forest. The forests of Missouri are divided into two branches, the Clark and the Gardner. (R. McN.; J.C. Combs)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gang
Description:A post office in Bowlan Township since 1893. Named by "Uncle" Jim Ferguson, who was the leading citizen of his community and always referred to it as the "Gang." (Postal Guide; Williams, STATE MISSOURI (1904); A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gila
Description:A discontinued post office (1886-1915) in Newton Township. Named after the river in Arizona. (Postal Guide; Plat Book; W.W. Thompson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gladden Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in Dent County and flows southwest to empty into Current River in Shannon County. Named for a prominent family whose name occurs seven times in place names in Shannon, Dent, and Texas Counties. (A. Click; State County Highway Maps)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gladden Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in Dent County and flows southwest to empty into Current River in Shannon County. Named for a prominent family whose name occurs seven times in place names in Shannon, Dent, and Texas Counties. (A. Click; State County Highway Maps)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gomez
Description:A post office in 1897. It evidently was of short duration or else is an error for on one could be found who remembered it. (Postal Guide)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Goose Bay
Description:The name applied by a group of sportsmen to the junction of Current River and Sutton Creek. It was a hunting and fishing club and the site was selected because of the excellent conditions for sports there. (L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Grange Valley
Description:A post office in 1879, in Casto Valley Township. A long discontinued post office which took its name from a farmer's organization which flourished in the district. (Postal Guide; L.D. Shuck; MISSOURI GAZ. (1879), p. 264)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Grassy Hollow
Description:A narrow valley in Grassy Township. Named for the grass which grows there. (Smith Martin)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Grassy Hollow School
Description:District School No. 23, near Venice. Named for its location on a level prairie-like valley. (MSTR; Smith Martin)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Grassy Township
Description:Formed from Jasper and Newton Township in 1912. The name is descriptive of the grass- grown table land in the region. (County Record; Mrs. Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Haeffner
Description:A discontinued post office (1910-1918) in Moore Township. Named after a German family of Haeffners who farmed in the region. (Postal Guide; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Halstring School
Description:See Heelstring School.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hardage
Description:A post office since 1918 in Moore Township. Before and office could be established, the farmers in the community had to volunteer to carry the mail free for a time. W.W. Thompson, who was in charge of the matter, had great difficulty in securing aid. When the office was established he decided to call it Hard, but his family objected to the abruptness of the name so he added "age." (Postal Guide; W.W. Thompson; Anvil Lewis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hay Hollow
Description:A narrow valley near Eminence from which grass is cut for hay. Hence the name. (A.J. Hawkins; County Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Heelstring School
Description:District No. 60, in Congo Township. A derogatory name given because the district was poorly supported and organized. The region and its citizens are often referred to as the "Heelstring Nation." Halstring School, evidently a misspelling for Heelstring, is listed in MSTR. (Mrs. Mary Davis; Katherine Powell; MSTR)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Himont
Description:A small settlement east of Rat near the Reynolds County line. (State Highway Map 1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Horner School
Description:District School No. 52, near Winona. Named after the John Horners, who have a store near the school. (MSTR; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Horse Hollow
Description:A region in Alley Township. Named because John Alley kept his horses there and during the Civil War raids were made to steal the animals. (A.J. Hawkins; State Highway Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hospital Cave
Description:A cave on Current River. Named because the cave was used as a hospital during the Civil War. (W.A. Dorrance; THREE OZARK STREAMS, p. 27)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Howell Hollow
Description:One of a series of hollows in the northwestern section of the county which drains into Current River. Practically all of the hollows deep in the Ozarks have a small stream winding through them. The name is that of the family who farms the district. The Howell family is one of the earliest in the region, the original members coming to the locality in 1838. (L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hunter Hill School
Description:District School No. 92, near Birch Tree. Named from its location on a hill of the farm of William Hunter. (MSTR; Miss Grace Miller)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hurricane Creek
Description:A small creek which rises in Newton Township and flows into Current River. The name is given because of the manner in which the creek rises suddenly and dangerously after heavy rains. (A.J. Hawkins; County Highway Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Independence School
Description:District school near Winona in Winona Township. An ideal name, chosen by the school board. (MSTR; Miss Grace Miller)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ink
Description:A village in central Jasper Township and a post office since 1886. Mrs. Deatherage, present postmistress, says that the post office was named by Mr. George Shedd, who died in March, 1938, at the age of 92. He chose the name after a discussion among the residents, when a bottle of ink was accidently spilled. One of those present said,"Why not call it Ink?" The story was confirmed by Mrs. Cox, school teacher, grand-daughter of Mr. Shedd, who said Mr. Shedd had been told by the government postal authorities that short names were desired, three letters if possible. He sent in a number of three-letter names, among which Ink was preferred by the Washington authorities. He had just received a consignment of goods in which a bottle of ink had been broken, spoiling the other articles. The government asked for short names to fit the post office ring or stamp. Judge Arthur Deatherage confirmed the story that Mr. Shedd was asked to submit a number of three-letter names, and sent in Ink among them. He doubted the spilled ink story; he thought his grandfather-in-law had merely put down all the three-letter words he could think of. Mr. James Cox, son-in-law of Mr. Shedd said he had often heard his father-in-law tell how he had sent in the names. There was no special reason for Ink except that he put down all the three-letter words he could remember from his school day reader. (R: Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); J.T. Deatherage; Arthur Deatherage; Mrs. Cox; Mr. James Cox; Mrs. Shockley)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Inwood School
Description:District school No. 47, near Mountain View. Named because of its location in the woods. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jack's Fork
Description:A post office from 1918, in Spring Valley Township. Named for the stream. (Postal Guide; C. Covert; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jack's Fork of Current River
Description:A large stream which rises in Texas County and enters Shannon from the west, flowing north and east until it empties into Current River in the east central section of the county. The river flows through land which is very wild and forbidding. Mr. Covert of Houston says that a favorite early joke was to offer a criminal his choice of five years in the state prison or one year on Jack's Fork. The river today is becoming a favorite resort for fishermen. Named for an old Indian, John Jacks, who lived near the head of the stream. (R: Plat Book (1933); C. Covert; L.D. Shuck; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jack's Fork of Current River
Description:A large stream which rises in Texas County and enters Shannon County from the west, flowing north and east until it empties into Current River in the east-central section of the county. The river flows through land which is very wild and forbidding. Mr. Covert of Houston says that a favorite early joke was to offer a criminal his choice of five years in the state prison or one year on Jack's Fork. The river today is becoming a favorite resort for fishermen. Named for an old Indian, John Jacks, who lived near the head of the stream. (R: Plat Book (1933); C. Covert; L.D. Shuck; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jackson Township
Description:In the northwestern section of the county, organized from Newton Township in 1870. Named for Claibourne F. Jackson, governor of Missouri from 1857-1859 and a Confederate sympathizer. (Campbell (1874), p. 32; County Record; Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jam-Up Hollow
Description:A narrow valley on Jack's Fork which can only be reached by horseback. It is considered one of the attractions of Rhymer's Ranch resort. The name is derived from the peculiar geological formation found there. (Anvil Lewis; Keith McCanse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jasper Township
Description:In the center of the county, organized in 1870 from Eminence Township. Named for William Jasper (1750-1779), a military hero who distinguished himself by saving the colors at Fort Sullivan, June 28, 1776, when fighting under Colonel Moultrie. He was offered a commission but refused, saying he preferred to remain with the common soldiers who were, like himself, uneducated. (Campbell's (1874), p. 32; County Records; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Koller
Description:A discontinued post office (1915-1918), at a logging station in Jackson Township. Named for a German family, who operated the store. (Postal Guide; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lewis Hollow
Description:A narrow valley in Jackson Township. Named for the Lewis family, who live in the region. (Anvil Lewis; State Highway Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lewis Hollow School
Description:A rural school in Jackson Township. Named for the region in which it is built. (MSTR; Anvil Lewis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:District school No. 58, near Birch Tree. An ideal name. (MSTR; Judge F.C. Bradford)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lightfoot
Description:A post office from 1893 to 1895. Named for a family in whose home the office was established. (Postal Guide; W. Clark)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Little Shawnee Creek
Description:A stream in Eminence Township, which flows northwest to Jack's Fork. Named for the Indians who lived along the banks. (MISSOURI GAZ. (1874), p. 599; L.D. Shuck; Plat Book; Conard, p. 573)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Little Shawnee School
Description:District school No. 37, near Jack's Fork. Named after the Indian tribe which resided in the area. (MSTR; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Low Wassie
Description:A village and post office in Pike Creek Township since 1891. First named Pomeroy after James Pomeroy, pioneer; it was changed to Low Wossie in 1892, and Low Wassie in 1925. Named because of a sink hole close to the village. A wassie is a dialect term for a rain wash or a swamp. (Postal Guide; Davis, HIST. MISSOURI; W. Clark; L.B. Shuck; Campbell (1873)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lower Rocky School
Description:District school No. 41 near Winona. Named for its location on a hillside. "Lower" distinguishes it from another school called Rocky farther up the creek. (MSTR; Sam Rayfield)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Macedonia Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Birch Tree Township. Cf. Macedonia Church in Dallas County. (Miss Grace Miller)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mahon Creek
Description:A small stream in the central section of the county, which flows into Jack's Fork. Named for a family who lived at the head of the creek. (L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mahon's Creek
Description:An early post office (1867) which has long been abandoned. Named for the creek. (Goodwin (1867), p. 49; J.T. Deatherage)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Map
Description:A post office from 1893 to 1936. An office in Buckeye Township which was named by Mr. Martin Smith, first postmaster, because the word was short and had no duplicates. (R: Postal Guide; Plat Book; John Freeman; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Maple Grove School
Description:District school No. 39, near Ellington, Deslet route. Named for trees in the vicinity. (MSTR; C.L. Deatherage)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Marble Hill School
Description:District school No. 69, near Teresita. Name given because of a rocky slope. It is not marble nor remotely resembling it. (MSTR; R.L. Smotherman)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:McHenry Hollow
Description:A narrow valley near Ink which was named for settlers in the region. (R: A. Deatherage)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Midridge
Description:A discontinued post office (1932-1934) in Jasper Township. Named for its location in the center of the ridge. (Postal Guide; A.J. Hawkins; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Montier
Description:A village in Montier Township, a post office since 1890. Named for A.N. Montier, who was master mechanic of the Frisco Railroad at Springfield. Often spelled Monteer. The hamlet, according to Mr. Smotherman, was first known as Nip, after Bill Nip, who was the first section foreman on the Current River Division. Mr. Hwkins, however, said that like Flip (q.v.) it was named for a dog, by Mr. C.P. McClellan, the first postmaster, in 1885 or 1886. Nip seems more like a dog's name than a man's. (R: Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 66; R.L. Smotherman; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Montier Township
Description:In the south-central section of the county, established in 1901. Named for the principal village in the district. (County Records; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Moore Township
Description:In the north-central section of the county, organized in 1842. Named for Robert E. Moore, a pioneer. (Campbell (1874), p. 32; County Record; Mrs. Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Munsell Chapel
Description:In Eminence Township. A former Methodist chapel which is now used as a school. For years it served as both. Named for Levi Munsell, a preacher. (A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Munsell Chapel School
Description:In Eminence Township. Named for the church. (MSTR; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:New Enon Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Bowlan Township. A Bible name (cf. above). (County Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Newton Township
Description:In the north-central section of the county; organized in 1842. Named for Joab Newton, who held land patents to much of the district. (Campbell (1874), p. 32; County Records; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nicholl's Mill
Description:A mill owned and operated by an old soldier of the War of 1812. In Eminence Township. It has long been deserted and is now entirely destroyed. (MISSOURI GAZ. (1874), p. 600; J. Chilton)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nip
Description:See Montier.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:North Fork Black Valley Creek
Description:See Black Valley Creek.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Not
Description:A discontinued post office (1887-1918), in Spring Creek Township. Named by Simeon Pierce, first postmaster. He meant to name it Knot, because of a large knot on a black oak tree that stood in front of the early post office, but not being much of a scholar spelled the word Not. (R: Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:District school No. 89, near Birch Tree. Named from trees in the vicinity. (MSTR; A.J. Searcy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oak Hill School
Description:District school No. 19, near Hartshorn. Named for oak trees growing near. (MSTR; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oakside
Description:A post office since 1891 in Current Township. Named from the timber growing in the vicinity. (Postal Guide; Mrs. Mary Fredericks)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oakside School
Description:District school No. 46, near Summerville. Takes its name from the village. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Fredericks)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Old Eminence
Description:See Eminence
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Open Hollow
Description:A wide and rather populated valley near Delaware in the south-central part of the county. It is so called because of its width. (L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Orchard Point
Description:A post office in 1876 in Jackson Township. Named for Mat Orchard, a farmer and postmaster, later a state senator. (Postal Guide; James Chilton)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Owls Bend
Description:A post office since 1924 in Current Township. Named because of the number of owls around the bend of Current River. A fertile spot in a lonely valley. (Postal Guide; Anvil Lewis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark Hall Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Birch Tree. Named because it meets in a building called Ozark Hall. The use of Ozark as a place name is very common in southern Missouri. (CURRENT WAVE, August, 1922)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark Lumber Company Railroad
Description:A short railroad built by the Ozark Lumber Company to connect with the Frisco. It is no longer used. (County Map in CURRENT WAVE, August, 1901; Jewell Thompson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark Mountains
Description:A mountain range of great antiquity and beauty which embraces all five of the counties in this thesis. The name is of French and Indian origin and the result of a misunderstanding by the English. It means literally "at the (country, river, or place of the) Arkansas." The Indians of Siouan stock who migrated westward called themselves Quapaw (down stream people) but they were called, both before ands after their migration, the Arkansas by the Illinois. Early 18th century maps by G. De l'Isle show that both the Ohio and the Wabash rivers were called the Arkansea. Father Gravier in the JESUIT RELATIONS in 1700 writes: "It is called by the Illinois and the Oumiamis the river of the Arkansea because the Arkansea formerly dwelt on it." It was the custom of the French colonists to abbreviate the long, difficult Indian geographical names; hence les Arkansea became les Arcs. In the French archives at Jefferson Memorial in St. Louis, Mr. W.A. Dorrance states, the phrase "aux arcs" appears many times, meaning in the river, at the post, or in the country of the Arkansas. The abbreviated phrase "aux arcs" was mistaken by the English for one word and they spelled it Ozark. The word is found on a map by Bradbury in 1809. In 1816 it was spelled Osark by Kerr. Schoolcraft in 1819 spelled it Ozark. (Dorrance, W.A., THREE OZARK STREAMS, appendix 1; JESUIT RELATIONS, vol. 65, p. 107)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark Mountains
Description:A mountain range of great antiquity and beauty which embraces all five of the counties in this thesis. The name is of French and Indian origin and a result of a misunderstanding by the English. It means literally "at the (country, river, or place of the) Arkansas." The Indians of Siouan stock who migrated westward called themselves Quapaw (down stream people) but they were called, before and after their migration, the Arkansas by the Illinois. Early 18th century maps by G. De l'Isle show that both the Ohio and Wabash rivers were called the Arkansea. Father Gravier in the JESUIT RELATIONS in 1700 writes: "It is called by the Illinois and the Oumiamis the river of the Arkansea because the Arkansea formerly dwelt on it." It was the custom of the French colonists to abbreviate the long, difficult Indian geographical names; hence les Arkansea became les Arcs. In the French archives at Jefferson Memorial in St. Louis, Mr. W.A. Dorrance states, the phrase "aux arcs" appears many times, meaning on the river, at the post, or in the country of the Arkansas. The abbreviated phrase "aux arcs" was mistaken by the English for one word and they spelled it Ozark. The word is found on a map by Bradbury in 1809. In 1816 it was spelled Osark by Kerr. Schoolcraft in 1819 spelled it Ozark. (Dorrance, W.A., THREE OZARK STREAMS, appendix 1; JESUIT RELATIONS, vol. 65, p. 107)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Paint Rock
Description:A sawmill settlement in the south-central section of the county near the Reynold-Carter County lines. (State Highway Map 1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pertz
Description:A post office from 1901 to 1904. A logging spur named after the postmaster, Van Pertz. (Postal Guide; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pigeon Hollow
Description:A narrow valley near Ink, next below McHenry Hollow (q.v.) and running into Spring Valley; so named because it was a famous resort for wild pigeons in early days. (R: A. Deatherage)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pike Creek
Description:A stream which rises in Pike Creek Township and flows southeast to Current River. Named for pike (fish) which are still abundant in the stream. (Mrs. Cora Williams; Katherine Powell)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pike Creek Township
Description:In the south-central section of the county, formed from Birch Tree in 1870. Named for the stream. (Campbell (1874), p. 32; County Records; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pin Oak Hollow
Description:A valley in the central section of the county which is named for the type of trees predominant in the hollow. (A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Grove
Description:A post office listed in 1910, in Spring Valley Township. Named for a pine forest nearby. (Postal Guide; R.L. Smotherman)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Grove School
Description:A district school near Summersville. Named for its location in the pine district. The southern end of the county is covered with pine growth. (MSTR; R.L. Smotherman)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Hill
Description:A post office from 1867-1879 in the southern part of the county. Named for the trees in the locality. (Goodwin (1867), p. 49; Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Hollow [1 of 2]
Description:A valley in Alley Township. Named for the trees which are abundant in the neighborhood. (L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Hollow [2 of 2]
Description:A narrow valley near Birch Tree. Named for the trees which grew there. (Norton Hardesty)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Hollow School
Description:District School No. 49, near Birch Tree. Named for its location in a hollow covered with scrub pine. (MSTR; Norton Hardesty)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Piney Wood
Description:A post office from 1876-1879 in what is now Bartlett Township. Named for the trees in the district. (Postal Guide; Katherine Powell; MISSOURI GAZ. (1879), p. 507)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Grove School
Description:District School No. 61, near Teresita. A descriptive name; the school is built in a grove. (MSTR; R.L. Smotherman)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:District School No. 74 near Birch Tree. A descriptive name. (MSTR; Miss Grace Miller)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Ridge School
Description:District School No. 8, near Cedar Grove. Built on a ridge and commands a nice view. (MSTR; A.J. Searcy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Polk Ridge School
Description:District school in Jasper Township. Named for a family. (MSTR; W. Clark)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pomeroy
Description:See Low Wassie.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pond Hollow
Description:A narrow valley northeast of Winona. Named for a pond in the hollow bottom. (F.C. Bradford)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pond Hollow School
Description:In Winona Township. Named for its location in Pond Hollow. (F.C. Bradford)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Poplar School
Description:District School No. 73, near Gang. Named after the trees which grow below the schoolhouse. (MSTR; A. Lewis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Possum Trot Hollow
Description:A valley in Winona Township. Possum Trot is a common name applied to remote regions. (A.J. Hawkins; State Highway Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Powder Mill Creek
Description:Rises in the east-central section of the county, near the Reynolds County line and flows southwest into Current River. (State Highway Map 1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Praire Hollow School
Description:A rural school in Spring Valley Township. Named for its location. (MSTR; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Prairie Hollow
Description:A district along the Gasconade River near Hazelgreen which was settled as early as 1830. (Nyberg, p. 18)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pulltight
Description:A post office from 1891 to 1902. There is a large spring at this place and the entire valley is referred to as Pulltight Valley. A steep hill leads down to the spring and in the early days a large grist mill was located there. Bringing the grain wagons heavily loaded down the hill required the men to pull tight on their reins. (Postal Guide; L.D. Shuck; F.C. Bradford)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pulltight Mill
Description:An early mill in Spring Valley Township. See Pulltight.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pulltight Spring
Description:See Pulltight.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pulltight Valley
Description:See Pulltight.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Randolph School
Description:District School No. 81, near Summerville. Named for the M.A. Randolph family. (MSTR; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rat
Description:A post office north of Timber on Big Creek since 1899. Named by James Sweeny, the first postmaster, in disgust because he could not have the name he wanted. He had asked for the name Buckshorn because he had a fine pair of horns over the post office door; but the Department rejected that name as too long and already used elsewhere in the state. (R: Postal Guide; A.J. Hawkins; Sam Rayfield)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Razor Hollow
Description:A narrow valley in Jackson Township near Akers. The barrenness of the soil and the steepness of the rocky hills give local wags an opportunity to exercise their wit in naming the locality. (L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rector
Description:A post office in Moore Township since 1893. Named for a pioneer family, many of whom still live in the district. (Postal Guide; Williams, STATE MISSOURI (1904); Eaton, MISSOURI H. R., vol. 13, p. 66; Jim Moffett; Melissa Akers)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Reed Church
Description:A Methodist Church organized by Rev. J.C. Boyd in August, 1901. Named for the schoolhouse in which it met. The church has been disbanded for several years. (CURRENT WAVE, Aug. 8, 1901; Jewell Thompson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Reed School
Description:In Winona Township. Named for the John Reed family. Reed's father, Clint Reed, was the first county representative after the Civil War. (MSTR; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rhymer's Ranch
Description:In Montier Township. A large farm modeled after the dude ranches of the west. Named for E.H. Rhymer and his daughter, who operate the resort. (R. McN. (1937); L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rich Valley Church
Description:A disbanded Missionary Baptist Church in Casto Township. Organized August 13, 1857 by Dabney Lynch. Named because of the fertility of the soil. (Duncan, HIST. BAPT. IN MISSOURI, p. 638; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rio Corrente
Description:See Current River.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Riverside
Description:A small settlement in Jackson Township on the Current River; a post office in 1879. Named for its location by the Current River. (MISSOURI GAZ. (1879), p. 534)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Riviere Courante
Description:In Boone Township. A small spring which is named from the manner in which the water issues from the ledge. (Tourist Map; Mrs. Isabel McCoy)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rocky Creek
Description:The stream rises in Buckeye Township and flows northeast to Current River in Bowlan Township. Name descriptive of the stream bed. (Plat Book; Conard, p. 573; Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Round Spring
Description:In northeastern Jasper Township; a post office since 1876. Named because of a large round spring about 80 ft. in diameter. A local legend says that a mad Indian chieftain stamped the ground until the hollowed basin from which the spring flows was formed. (Postal Guide; J.T. Deatherage)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Round Springs State Park
Description:In Jasper Township. Named for the spring. (R. McN.)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Russell
Description:A discontinued post office (1874-1893) in Bowlan Township. Named for H.H. Russell, a pioneer farmer and postmaster. Listed until 1886 as Russell's Hill. (Postal Guide; L.D. Shuck; Campbell (1874), p. 600)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Russell's Hill
Description:See Russell
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Salem Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Eminence Township. A Bible name (Heb. 7:2), an old name for Jerusalem. (Plat Book)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Science Ridge School
Description:District School No. 55, near Birch Tree. A comparatively new school built on a ridge and named to honor the type of education to be given there. (MSTR; A. Lewis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Seaman Creek
Description:A stream that rises in the south-central section of the county, south of Winona and flows almost due east to Pike Creek. (State Highway Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Shannon County
Description:In the south-central section of Missouri, in the second tier of counties north of Arkansas and southwest of the Mississippi River. It is bounded on the north by Dent County, on the east by Reynolds and Carter, on the south by Oregon, and on the west by Texas and Howell. Shannon was separated from Crawford County in 1841, but it is the most sparsely settled county in the state. The county was named in honor of George F. Shannon of Marion County, who was a member of the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1804 and later became a United States attorney. Shannon was born in Pennsylvania in 1785 and was the son of a Revolutionary soldier. He was one of nine children, several of whom became noted, one, Wilson, being governor of Ohio and territorial governor of Kansas. At the age of 19, Shannon joined the Lewis and Clark expedition. He was the only member of the party who was the social equal of the leaders, and the journal shows that he was self-reliant. He narrowly escaped death when he became separated from the party while looking for two horses. From August 26 to September 11, he was lost in the wilderness and found the expedition again only by accident after he had determined to return down the Missouri alone. In 1807 he went with Nathaniel Pryor on an Indian expedition and received a leg wound which resulted in his having the leg removed, and he received the sobriquet "Peg-leg Shannon." In May, 1810, W. Clark sent him to Philadelphia to help Nicholas Biddle prepare the expedition's journal for publication. He was the only member of the party who helped at first hand, and he is supposed to have aided materially in interpreting the notes and in giving personal recollections. He returned to Missouri in 1828, and made his home at St. Charles, but died suddenly at Palmyra in 1836. His grave is unmarked. The exact spot is not known. (Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 64; Allen, EXPEDITION OF LOUIS & CLARK, vol. 1, p. 90; "Peg-leg Shannon," MISSOURI H.R., vol. 29, pp. 115- 120)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Shannondale
Description:Shannondale was laid out by Charles Shannon in 1874. It is also listed as Shannon. (Eaton, p. 274; Campbell, p. 135; Postal Guide, (1904), p. 671)
Source:Adams, Orvyl Guy. "Place Names In The North Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Shannondale
Description:A community center in Newton Township, established in 1931, sponsored by the Christian churches of St. Louis. The center contains a large rock church, a school building for adult classes in sewing, canning, weaving, etc., and tennis courts. A filling station and general store complete the group. Named for the county and the center's location in a valley. (Robert Vaughn; Katherine Powell)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Shawnee
Description:In the western part of Eminence Township. A post office from 1891 to 1918. Named after the Indian tribe which was invited into Missouri in the early day to protect settlers from war-like Osages. Shawnee is an Indian word for the tribe and means "Southerners." They were first known in the Cumberland basin in Tennessee, but they were wanderers and roamed over much of the middle southwest. (Postal Guide; Williams, STATE MISSOURI; Shoemaker, HIST. MISSOURI, p. 19; L.D. Shuck; Hodge, p. 535)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Simpson School
Description:District School No. 27, near Gang. Named for the J.G. Simpson family on whose farm it is located. (MSTR; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sinkin
Description:A discontinued post office (1874-1934) in Newton Township. Named because Sinking Creek goes under a hill at this point making a sort of natural bridge, which is from one-eighth of a mile to one and a half miles in width. The spelling corresponds to the local pronunication of Sinking. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); Campbell (1873); Eaton, vol. 13, p. 66; Campbell (1874), p. 600)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sinking Creek
Description:A stream which rises in southeastern Dent County and flows southwest into Shannon County to empty into Current River near Round Springs. Named for a low natural bridge under which the stream sinks into a hill. (State Highway Map (1938); L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sinking Creek
Description:A stream which rises in southeastern Dent County and flows southwest into Shannon County to empty into Current River near Round Springs. Named for a low natural bridge under which the stream sinks into a hill. (State Highway Map (1938); L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Smyrna Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Winona, Winona Township. A Bible name (Rev. 2:8-11): one of the seven churches of Asia. (Katherine Powell)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Spring Valley
Description:A large valley in the western section of the county. Named because of its numerous springs. (Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Spring Valley Township
Description:One of the original townships, organized in 1842 in the west-central section of the county. Named for the valley. (Campbell (1874), p. 32; County Records; Mrs. C. Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Spurgeon Hollow
Description:A narrow valley on Jack's Fork a little north of Eminence. (State Highway Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Description:The only railroad in Laclede County; the Eastern Division running from St. Louis to Springfield crosses the county from the northeast corner to the southwest. The Southern Division running from Memphis to Springfield crosses the southwestern tip of Texas County from Sargent to Cabool. A branch line, known as the Current River Division, crosses Shannon County from east to west near its southern border. Named for its proposed terminals. The railroad never reached San Francisco, however. The nickname and commonest name for the road is "Frisco," a shortened form of San Francisco. The road was originally (in 1869) called the Atlantic and Pacific because it was intended to span the continent. It has never been extended farther than St. Louis on the east, and Paris, Texas, on the west. (R. McN.; Tourist Map; R.L. Johnson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Description:The only railroad in Laclede County; the Eastern Division running from St. Louis to Springfield crosses the county from the northeast corner to the southwest. The Southern Division running from Memphis to Springfield crosses the southwestern tip of Texas County from Sargent to Cabool. A branch line, known as the Current River Division, crosses Shannon County from east to west near its southern border. Named for its proposed terminals. The railroad never reached San Francisco, however. The nickname and commonest name for the road is the "Frisco," a shortened form of San Francisco. The road was originally (in 1869) called the Atlantic and Pacific because it was intended to span the continent. It has never been extended farther than St. Louis on the east, and Paris, Texas, on the west. (R. McN.; Tourist Map; R.L. Johnson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stoup Creek
Description:A small creek which flows from Eminence Township to the Current River. The more usual name for the creek is Sutton, but a small stretch of it is named for the Stoup family by whose farm it flows. (A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stoup Creek School
Description:District School No. 29, near Eminence. Named after the Stoup family on whose land the school was built. The creek is the same as Sutton Creek, but has a different name higher up the stream. (MSTR; J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sugar Tree Grove School
Description:District School No. 2, near Rat. Named for the maple trees which grow in the district. (MSTR; Sam Rayfield)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sunnyside School
Description:District School No. 65, near Low Wassie. Named for its location on a south slope. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Davis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sutton Copper Mine
Description:An abandoned copper mine located on Sutton Creek in south-central Eminence Township. Named for the family who developed it. These mines were known earlier as Current River Copper Mines. These copper mines are said to have been worked by the Spanish in the 16th century. See "Report from the Chief Engineers on Meramec River, Missouri, Covering Navigation, Flood Control, Power Development, and Irrigation, for the 71st Congress of the House of Representatives" (1930), Doc. 686. (MISSOURI GAZ. (1874), p. 600; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sutton Creek
Description:A small creek which rises in Eminence Township and flows into Current River. Named for a pioneer family. Also known as Stoup Creek (q.v.). (Plat Book; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sutton Creek School
Description:A rural school in Eminence Township. Named for the stream. (MSTR; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sycamore Creek
Description:A small stream that winds through Winona Township and into Seaman's Creek (q.v.). Its name is derived from the trees along the bank. (County Highway Map; L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Teresita
Description:A post office since 1904. Named by the postal department after the suggestion, Pleasant Grove, made by Mr. R.L. Smotherman, had been rejected. The Smothermans had the store and post office at Teresita from its establishment until about two years ago when they sold the store and moved the post office about two hundred yards down the highway. Mr. Smotherman said a postal employee told him the name meant "spot on the earth," --obviously a bad guess. The word is a common Spanish name for a woman. Cf. Angeline, Louisa, Vada, etc. (R: Postal Guide; R.L. Smotherman; A.J. Hawkins; A. Deatherage)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Thorny Creek
Description:A small stream which winds near Deslet in Bowlan Township. The region is very wild and the banks of the creek, which has several good fishing spots, are covered with thorn bushes. (Keith McCanse; State Highway County Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Timber
Description:A post office in Jasper Township since 1896. Named from its location in a timbered region which will eventually be included in Clark National Forest. (Postal Guide; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Turkey Oak School
Description:A rural school in Birch Tree Township. So named from the chinquapin oaks which were called "Turkey Oaks" because the fowls used to roost in them. (MSTR; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Union Hill School
Description:School District No. 16, near Round Spring. So named because a church used by several denominations occupied the same hill. (MSTR; J. Chilton)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Venice
Description:In Moore Township. A post office from 1915 to 1925. Named by Clyde Martin, son of the postmaster Smith Martin, after something he had been reading. Hawkins did not remember whether it was MERCHANT OF VENICE or not. (Postal Guide; A.J. Hawkins; Sam Rayfield)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Virginia Warrior Path
Description:Houck's map shows it extending westward from Poplar Bluff from the Natchitoches Path through Butler, across Carter and Current River south of Van Buren, across Shannon and Howell counties. Nothing has been found about the origin of the name, but very likely it is from the state of this name. (Houck I.226)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Virginia Warrior's Path
Description:See Warrior's Path.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Welch School
Description:District School No. 95 near Summerville, located on the farm of James Welch. (MSTR; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Wells Ford
Description:A crossing of Current River in Moore Township near Rector. Named for the Wells family. (A. Lewis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Wells Ford School
Description:In Moore Township. Named for its location near Wells Ford. (MSTR; A. Lewis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:West Eminence
Description:A village north and west of Eminence in Eminence Township. Now almost entirely disappeared. A post office since 1910. Named for its location across the river from Eminence. West Eminence was offered for sale November 7, 1928. The town once had a population of 2,000 but the timber industry failed and the people left. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; W. Clark; MISSOURI H.R., vol. 23, p. 316)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:White Hall School
Description:District School No. 93 near Eminence. Named because it was painted white and had replaced a brown school building which burned. (MSTR; A.J. Hawkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Wild Wood School
Description:A District School No. 31, near Summerville. Named for its location in a remote region. (MSTR; Mrs. Mary Fredericks)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Willow Spring School
Description:District School No. 20, near Summerville. Named from its location near a willow-guarded spring. (MSTR; Mrs. Cora Williams)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Winona
Description:In central Winona Township, a post office since 1889. Named by lumbermen from Minnesota for their home city, Winona. The word is a Sioux female name signifying a first born child. The name is used by Longfellow in HIAWATHA. It was first made popular by Keating's pathetic account of the girl Winona in his narrative of Long's Expedition. It is the story of a Sioux maiden who commits suicide because her relatives sought to make her marry against her will. It has become a stock name in the United States, being found in twenty other states besides Missouri. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); Eaton, MISSOURI H.R., vol. 13, p. 66; A. Lewis)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

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