Scott County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Ancell
Description:A small town in the northeastern part of Kelso Township. A post office was established in 1915 and named for Pashal Ancell, who was an early settler and landowner in that part of the county. (Postal Guide; Allen, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Applegate Grove
Description:A large grove of trees on the farm of S.W. Applegate, for whom it is named. It is used as a picnic ground. (Lennox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Assembly of God Church
Description:There are several churches of this faith in the county; the oldest is in Chafee, built in 1909 by Rev. Rob Shelton. The church is Fornfelt-Illmo community was built in 1921 by F.L. Doyle and Wm. Lawrence. The name is that of the denomination. (See Appendix) (Scott County Democrat 1936)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atlantic and Pacific Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Austin Switch
Description:A small log loading station between Porter and Dienlstadt in the south central part of Sandywoods Township on the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad, which was named for the family who owned the land and sawmill. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bain
Description:A community in the northern part of Sylvania Township; the name Bain gradually grew up between 1910-1917 because the Bain family was prominent in the community. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baker School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Richland Township, organized about 1890 and named for J.W. Baker who owned large tracts of land there. It is in the community known as Salcedo, and consequently sometimes called the Salcedo School. (Anderson, Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beach
Description:A post office maintained in 1928-1929. It appears on no maps, and nothing could be learned of its location or the origin of the name. (Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beechlands
Description:A large plantation, also called Watkins Plantation, in the northern part of Morely Township, established about 1870 by Nathaniel Watkins, a half-brother of Henry Clay, who was appointed by Govenor Jackson as brigadier general of the first military district in southeast Missouri in 1861. He was soon replaced by General Jefferson Thompson, and he seems to have done no more for the cause of the South. He moved to Scott County, established Beechlands, which he named for the beech trees growing near the house, and lived there until his death in 1876. (Smith, Douglass I 156-7, 328)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Benton
Description:The county seat of Scott County in the central part of Moreland Township. The first settlement was made in 1796 by Captain Charles Friend. The town was laid out in 1822 on land owned by Colonel Wm. Meyers and named for Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858), one of the first senators from Missouri, who served from 1820-1850. (Douglass I 108, 179, 290, M.H.R. 13:65, Allen, Moore, Ency. of Am. Biog.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Benton Ridge
Description:An old ridge running from Benton to Commerce and named for the town of Benton. (cf. above) (Missouri As it Is 32, Allen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Island
Description:See Power's Island
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Island School
Description:A rural school on Big Island, the name by which Power's Island (q.v.) is locally known. The school is named for its location on the island. (Anderson, Garnet Survey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Prairie Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the southern part of Richland Township, organized before 1876 and named from its location on Big Prairie (cf. above), (Tong 77, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bird's Hill
Description:A hill in the Perkins community in the northwest part of Sylvania Township, named, as was Bird's Island on which it is located, for Stephen Bird of the Abram Bird family, prominent in Mississippi County. (Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bird's Island
Description:An island during flood seasons when the waters of Whitewater and Little Rivers unite to form an island; in the western part of Sylvania Township and named for Stephen Bird, who settled there in 1805. (Houck's Map, Douglass I 179, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bleda
Description:A station on the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad in the northwestern part of Sylvania Township. The original settlement was made in 1873 and was known as Caney Creek, for the creek (q.v.) on which it is located. When a post office was established in 1895 Caney Creek was rejected because of the similarity to Cane Creek in Butler County. The name Bleda was suggested by Captain Ward L. Smith, who bought the land and operated a sawmill there. He named it for the town of Blida in Algeria in Northern Africa, which he had visited as a sailor. Doubtless the spelling was changed to correspond to the pronunciation. (Harrison, Purcell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blodgett
Description:A small town in the central part of Sandywoods Township settled in 1869. A post office was established in 1870 and the town incorporated in 1900. It was named for Wells H. Blodgett, officer of the Iron Mountain Railroad on which the town is located. (Douglass I 388, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boardman School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Richland Township, named for a prominent family of the community. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Botts School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of the county, organized in 1877 and named for B.F. and N.C. Botts, farmers and early settlers. (Harrison, Scott County Democrat)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridwell
Description:A flagstop on the Frisco Railroad in the eastern part of Sylvania Township maintained in 1915 and named for a landowner, James Bridwell. (Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brock's Sawmill
Description:A sawmill just north of Morley in the northern part of Morley Township. It was first established about 1865 by Mr. Brock, for whom it was named, and was the first sawmill in the county. (Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brook's Junction
Description:A small station at the junction of the Frisco and St. Louis Southwestern Railroad in the central part of Morley Township established between 1904-1908, when the Frisco was built, and named for Major Brooks, an engineer on the road. (Mrs. Harris, Baker, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Browns
Description:A flagstop, also known as Brown's Spur, on the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad, established about 1912 when Mr. Brown, in charge of the dredge boat which was digging drainage ditch No. 1 in New Madrid County, built a spur to the railroad in order to receive material for the work. (Scott County Map 1917, Moore, Mayfield, Mrs. Harris, Baker, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brown's Spur
Description:See Browns
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bryeans School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Sylvania Township, which was named for the family of E.O. Bryeans, who is now postmaster at Oran. (Bryeans)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bugg Ridge
Description:An elevation in the southern part of Morley Township, named for W.H. Bugg who settled there in 1890. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bugg School
Description:A rural negro school established in 1926 on Bugg Ridge (cf. above), from which it was named. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bushey Prairie
Description:A part of Big Prairie (q.v.) where Wm. D. Bush settled before 1800. The spelling perhaps indicates that the name is a "blend" of the personal name Bush and the common adjective "bushy." (Douglass I 179, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cairo and Fulton Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cairo, Arkansas and Texas Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Campbell School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Tywappity Township. The Methodist Church held services at Campbell's Schoolhouse in 1887. It was named for Captain W.W. Campbell, who became a stock farmer in the county in 1854. (Goodspeed's Biog., Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caney Creek [1 of 2]
Description:See Bleda
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caney Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A large creek which rises in the northern part of Kelso Township and flows into Little River in the southern part of Richland Township. The name appears first on the map of 1837 as Cane Creek. It is Caney Creek on the map of 1844, named because of the cane which grows along the banks of streams in this section. (Missouri Map of 1837, Hutawa 1844, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canham School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Commerce Township, which was named for Mr. Canham, a prominent farmer there. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape a la Bruche
Description:See Gray's Point.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape La Croix
Description:See Gray's Point.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape la Cruz
Description:A cape formed by Creek la Cruz, or La Cruche (q.v.), where Isaac Williams settled in 1802. (Houck II 190)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carlston
Description:A flagstop or switch on the Frisco Railroad in the southern part of Richland Township, which has long been abandoned and forgotten. Mr. Harrison says it was possibly named by combining Carl, a first name, with a suffix ton, which is commonly done even though there is no idea of a town growing up. (Harrison, County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cary
Description:A small community or settlement in the northeastern part of Sandywoods Township established and named by Mr. Benjamin Grant of St. Louis, Missouri, who owned land and a sawmill there, in honor of one of his feminine relatives. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cat Island
Description:A small island in the Mississippi River just north of Power's Island, which was laid off by the U.S. Government and named from the wild cats which were found there before the county was settled. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cat Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chaffee
Description:A town in the northern part of Kelso Township laid off in 1905. The land on which the town is situated was purchased by the Frisco Railroad and laid off into town lots as a division point and site of repair shops. It was named for General A.R. Chaffee (1842- 1914), of Spanish War fame. (Smith, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chain of Rocks
Description:See Gray's Point
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chambers
Description:A rural post office maintained in 1896 and named for the family of Miss Courtney Chambers, the first teacher of the Crosno School in Mississippi County in 1892. She later became Mrs. F.M. Crosno. (Boone, Charleston Dem.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chaney School
Description:A small rural school in the western part of Richland Township established about 1868, one of the first schools in the county, and named for Levi Chaney, a prominent member of the community. (Mrs. Harris, Harrison, Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chewning's Chapel
Description:A rural church in the eastern part of Moreland Township, built for both Methodist and General Baptist congregations in the 1890s. The Baptists withdrew and built the church at Cross Plains (q.v.). The old building was then torn down about 1900. It was named in honor of J.K.P. Chewning, one of the founders. (Scott County Democrat 1936, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Claypool School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Sandywoods Township, organized in 1910 and named for a prominent family of the community. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Commerce
Description:A small town and ferry landing on the Mississippi River in the east-central part of Commerce Township. A boat landing and trading post was established here in 1803 by T.W. Waters from South Carolina. It was laid out as a town in 1823 and incorporated in 1834. So named because it was a trading post of considerable business (commerce) from early days. (Douglass I 179, 290, M.H.R. 13:65, Allen, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Commerce Township
Description:In the eastern part of the county. Organized in 1822 and named for the principal town within its limits. (County C.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crawford
Description:A flagstop on the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad in the northwestern part of Sandywoods Township, which was established in 1875 as a wood yard for the railroad when the engine burned wood instead of coal. A Mr. Crawford furnished the wood and the switch was named for him. (County Map, Moore, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cross Plains
Description:A school and community in the eastern part of Moreland Township. The Cross Plains Methodist Church was organized there before 1887 with S.H. Renfroe as pastor. It was there decided to call the place Cross Plains because it was between Pleasant Plains and Sandy Prairie. (Goodspeed, 536, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cross Plains Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the eastern part of Moreland Township, organized in 1885 by a congregation withdrawing from Chewning's Chapel. The building was destroyed in 1910. (Scott County Democrat, Sept. 24, 1936)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crossroads
Description:A school and community in the southwestern part of Richland Township three miles from Sikeston. It was named from its location at the crossing of two county roads. (Mayfield)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crowder
Description:A small village in the northern part of Richland Township, which was settled in 1897 at the time of the building of the Houck Railroad (now Frisco). The first house was built by Samuel Marshall in 1890. The village was named for James H. Crowder, Supt. of the Railroad, who lived at Commerce. A post office was established in 1890. (Allen, Postal Guide, Scott County Democrat)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cypress
Description:A small settlement in the eastern part of Sandywoods Township on Big Cypress Creek, where a post office was maintained from 1844- 1867. It was named for the cypress trees which grew in the swamps. (Douglass I 303, Desilver's Map of 1855, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Daugherty's Landing
Description:See Manning
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Denton School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Sandywoods Township, one of the earliest schools in the county, organized in the 1860s and named for an early settler. A Methodist Church, organized in this schoolhouse in the 1860s by Rev. Morgan and Presiding Elder Fowler, was the forerunner of the present church at Blodgett. (Scott County Democrat, Sept. 1936)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Denton Schoolhouse
Description:See Denton School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Diebold School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Kelso Township, which was named for the family of Ignatius Diebold, an early settler who came from Germany. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Diehlstadt
Description:A small town in the southern part of Tywappity Township, settled in 1868 by John Kirkpatrick. The early settlers were German immigrants who named the place Diehlstadt (Diehl's town) for Colonel H.J. Deal. Colonel Deal changed the spelling of his name from Diehl to Deal because a sign painted so spelled it when making a sign for Mr. Deal's store in Paducah, Kentucky. The sign appealed to Mr. Deal so he kept it and henceforth so spelled his name. The town was incorporated in 1894. During the World War feeling against Germans and German terms, was so strong that an attempt was made to change the town's name to Pershing, but the change was not made. (Douglass I 379, Lucas, Moore, Deal, Miss Deal)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dolly's Ridge
Description:A prominent landmark in the early history of the county: possibly named for an early settler. (County Court Record 1822-1835, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dunover School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Tywappity Township, which was named for a prominent family of the community. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:East Creek
Description:See Hubble Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edna
Description:See Fornfelt
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eisleben Church
Description:The Lutheran Church in Kelso, organized by David Roth, Daniel Ruebel, and D. Bohnhardt in 185?, was probably named for Eisleben, an important town in Saxony, Germany, from which place a colony of German Lutherans had come to Perry County in 1838-1839 under the leadership of Martin Stephan (1777-1847), and had organized the Evangelical Lutheran Church in 1847 under the auspices of Dr. C.F.W. Walther (1811-1887). (Goodspeed 581, 930, Douglass 481, Concordia H.R. 7:69, Ebenezer 7-8, 27)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:El Camino Real
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ellis School
Description:A rural school in the county in 1919, which has been discontinued. It was named for Wm. Ellis, a landowner. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:English Island
Description:See Power's Island.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Epham's Mill
Description:A mill in the northern part of Morley Township, which was established by Mr. Epham to produce material used in the manufacture of paint and was named for him. It has been abandoned several years. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Forest Mills
Description:A rural post office maintained in 1867 in a sawmill camp in the forest; hence the name Forest Mills. It was one of the oldest mills of the county. (Postal Guide, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fornfelt
Description:A small town in the northeastern part of Kelso Township, which owes its existence to the building of the Mississippi Railroad bridge at Thebes, Illinois and to the railroad built to the bridge in 1904. The town was laid off by a Mr. Schutte who gave it the name Edna in honor of his wife. Postal authorities objected to the name because of the similarity to Edina in Knox County, so the name was changed to Fornfelt which was Mrs. Schutte's maiden name. (Douglass I 387, Allen, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frisco Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Froemsdorf
Description:A flagstop in the northeastern part of Kelso Township at the junction of the Cottonbelt and Frisco Railroads, established in 1913 and named for a German family living there. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gangle School
Description:A rural school organized in 1890 and named for the family of Joseph, John, and Charles Gangle, who came from France in 1857. (Anderson, Scott County Democrat 1936)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garza
Description:A switch on the Frisco Railroad in the southwestern part of Kelso Township. Mr. Harrison, the county surveyor, who knows the county thoroughly, says he knows of no such place, and that this is probably the location of an old landmark, generally known as Lone Rock, which was used by the Indians and traders as a meeting place. There is an Indian legend, which Hon. H.A. Buehlor, State Geologist, believes may be true, that there was once a lead mine near Lone Rock, the entrance to which the Indians hid when they moved from this place in 1825. (Harrison, M.H.R. 22: 99-100)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gluck Hill
Description:A small hill or ridge in the southeastern part of Kelso Township on a farm belonging to a man named Gluck. The hill received its name from the landowner. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Pond
Description:There are two locally known lakes or ponds of this name in the county; one was west of Sikeston in the southern part of Richland Township, and the other was west of McMullin in the northern part of Richland Township. Neither appears on the maps of the county and both have been drained since 1900. They were named for the wild geese which were once found in great abundance in the county. (Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gray's Point
Description:A small town in the northeastern part of Kelso Township on the Mississippi River, also known as Graysboro. This point was originally called Cape La Croix (Cape of the Cross) by the early French traders and explorers because of the fact that on this cape Father F. Joliet de Montigny erected a cross and so named the place in 1699. Later called Chain of Rocks because of the arrangement of rocks along the river. The name Cape a la Bruche or Broche, which means spit-like, also appears in the early records. When the first settlement was made by white men, the name Ross' Point was given for an early settler of that name, then the place was named Gray's Point for an old steamboat captain, Wm. Gray, who settled there. (Houck II 151, Hinchey 19, Thwaites 14:95, Allen, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Graysboro
Description:See Gray's Point
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greer School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Richland Township, which was named for John P. Greer, a farmer, who moved to this community in 1860. (Anderson, Goodspeed's Biography)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Guardian Angel Church
Description:The Catholic Church in Oran, organized in 1893 from the Church at New Hamburg (q.v.) in this community consistring of forty German Alsatian families; and given this common Catholic Church name. The Guardian Angel School was organized about the same time and was placed in the hands of the Sisters of the Most Precious Blood. (Scott County Democrat, Sept, 24, 1936)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Guardian Angel School
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hahn Hill
Description:A small hill or ridge in the southeastern part of Kelso Township on the farm belonging to Mrs. Ed. Hahn. The hill is named for the family who owned land there. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hamburg
Description:See New Hamburg
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hatcher
Description:See Whiteoak School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Head School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Kelso Township. Methodist Church services were held at the schoolhouse before 1888, and it was probably named for an early settler. (Goodspeed 536, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Head's Schoolhouse Church
Description:See Head School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Heney's Tobacco Patch
Description:This was a landmark in the county in 1822 and later; it appears in all the early county court records. Evidently it was a tobacco patch on a Mr. Heney's family homestead, and possibly the only tobacco patch of any size in the county. (County Court Records, Douglass I 303)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Grove Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of Morley Township, which was organized in 1881 and named for the surrounding grove of hickory trees. (Goodspeed 561, Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Grove School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Morley Township, which was named for the natural surroundings. (cf. above) (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hillman Spring
Description:A spring just west of Illmo in the northern part of Kelso Township, which was named for the Hillman family who own the land on which the spring is located. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hooe School
Description:A rural negro school in the southwestern part of Sylvania Township, which was named for a prominent negro family of the community. It was built about 1927. (Anderson, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hubble Creek
Description:A large creek in the northern part of Kelso Township, which enters from Cape Girardeau County. The first name was Riviere Zenon named in honor of Zenon Trudeau (1748- ), lieutenant-governor of Louisiana and command-general of St. Louis (1793-1798), who encouraged immigration. Under his influence people "forced rude boats up streams never visited before," and it is likely that such were the people who named Riviere Zenon. The name was changed to Hubble Creek for Ithaman Hubbel (or Hubble) who settled on the northern part of the stream in Cape Girardeau County in 1797. It is also called East Creek from its location on Whitewater River. (Allen, Houck II 58, 185, Douglass I 79, Barns 158)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hubble Creek Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church organized in 1861 and named from Hubble Creek (q.v.) on which it is located. (Tong 71)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hubble Creek Methodist Church
Description:A rural church organized in 1860 by Elder J.H. Clark and J.C. Maple on Hubble Creek in the northern part of Kelso Township and named from its location. (Goodspeed 550)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hunter School
Description:There are two schools of this name in the county; one is in the southeastern part of Richland Township and was named for the family of Benjamin F. Hunter, who was born in 1831 and whose father acted as delegate to the First Territorial Council of Missouri, having been appointed by President Madison. Mr. Benjamin F. Hunter was a farmer who owned large tracts of land in this part of the county. The other Hunter School is in the northern part of the county in Morley Township and was named for Honorable Isaac Hunter, who was born in 1821 and was one of the oldest natives of the county in 1888. He owned 4,500 acres of land near Morley and served in the county court and as probate judge of the county. (Mrs. Kate Harris, Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Illinois Road
Description:See King's Highway
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Illinois, Missouri, and Texas Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Illmo
Description:A small town in the northeastern part of Kelso Township. The first community, store, and school here was known as Washburn, named for the storekeeper who settled there before the railroad was built. The present town owes its existence to the building of the Mississippi River bridge from Thebes, Illinois and the railroad in 1904. The town was incorporated in 1905 under the name Illmo, an abitrary word coined from the first syllables of Illinois and the abbreviation of Missouri. Judge Allbright says the name was first used by the railroad officials who billed some materials to "that new station on the railroad near the Mississippi River Ill.-Mo." and left it to the train conductor to unload the material at the right point. (Douglass I 388, M.H.R. 13:65, Allen, Moore, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Immaculate Conception Church
Description:See St. Lawrence Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jackson Hill
Description:A small hill or ridge in the northern part of Moreland Township on Jackson's farm, which is named for the family on whose land it is located. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kagel
Description:A small community in the northern part of Kelso Township just east of Rockview, which was named for the Kagel family, Germans, who settled there and established a sawmill about 1900. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kelso
Description:A small town in the south-central part of Kelso Township. A settlement was made here as early as 1850 or 1851, for the Eisleben Evangelical Lutheran Church (q.v.) was organized about that time. A post office was established in 1876, and the St. Augustine Catholic Church in 1878. It was named for I.R. Kelso, one of the early settlers of the county. Mr. Allen says that Kelso was one of the first representatives from Scott County, but if this is true he was temporarily elected after the organization of the county in 1822 to serve until election in the fall of that year when a regular election was held, as his name does not appear in the Records of the State Legislature. (Goodspeed 526, Douglass I 388, Allen, Moore, Proceedings of State Legislature 1922-1924)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kelso Township
Description:In the northern part of the county. It was one of the original townships organized in 1822 and named for I.R. Kelso (cf. above). County Court Record, Allen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Cruche Creek
Description:A large creek which enters the county from Cape Girardeau County on the north. The name translated means Pitcher Creek, but Houck says the name is erroneously spelled and should be Creek La Cruz or Cruse. He gives no reason for this statement. Schoolcraft also spells the name Creek La Cruz or Cape L Cruz Creek in 1818-1819. Possibly it is a case of folk-etymology in the French settlers, who substituted cruche for Spanish cruz, meaning cross, their own word for cross being croix. (County Map, Houck II 190, Schoolcraft, Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lambert
Description:A small settlement in the central part of Moreland Township just southeast of Benton established about 1915 and named for W.C. Lambert, who was county judge at the time. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lemley
Description:A switch on the Gulf Branch of the Frisco Railroad, also called Lemley Switch, which was established about 1917 and named for James Lemley, a farmer on whose land the switch was built. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lemons
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Morley Township, named for Mr. Lemons of Blodgett, who owns land in the community. The site of the school was moved one mile east in 1926 when a new building was erected. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lennox School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Richland Township, which was named for W.L. Lennox who settled in that community some time before 1852, and who was active in getting the school started. (Anderson, Robley Lennox, Mrs. Ada Lennox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little River Church
Description:See Oran Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Rock
Description:See Garza
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lucas Bayou
Description:A small bayou in the central part of Sylvania Township, named for James Lucas who lived in that vicinity in 1901. (Lucas)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ludlow
Description:A rural school community organized in 1928-1929. The school was never built. The name is that of a family in the community. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lusk School
Description:A rural school abandoned in 1920 in the southeastern part of Commerce Township. The school took its name from Lusk's Chapel Methodist Church which was organized about 1880 and named for Rev. Wm. M. Lusk, who was a minister and a farmer in Scott County in 1847. (Goodspeed 536, Goodspeed's Biog., Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lusk's Chapel Methodist Church
Description:See Lusk School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Macedonia Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church organized in 1887 and disbanded in 1926 (cf. above). (Anderson, Goodspeed 536)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Macedonia School
Description:A rural school in tnhe western part of Commerce Township, organized in 1890 and named from Macedonia Church (cf. above). (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Manning
Description:A small ferry landing in the northeastern part of Kelso Township. It was originally Daugherty's Landing, named for an early settler who established a store and ferry there. About 1900 the ferry was run by a man named Manning and called Manning's Landing or Manning. It was used until the building of the bridge from Thebes, Illinois in 1904.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Manning's Landing
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marshall School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Sandywoods Township, organized in 1890 and named for John E. Marshall, a landowner. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Matthews Prairie
Description:A settlement where a post office was maintained from 1837-1867. If this village were in existence today, it would be in Mississippi County, but it is listed as a Scott County post office. It was named from Mathews Prairie (cf. above) (Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maxville
Description:See Morley
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McMullin
Description:A stop on the Frisco Railroad in the northern part of Richland Township. A post office was maintained there from 1904-1922. It was named for the Charlie McMullin estate. (Allen, Bowman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Melon
Description:A small flagstop on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the central part of Sandywoods Township, established about 1916 and so named because it was the shipping point for watermelons and cantaloupes which were grown there. This was the first section in the county in which melons were raised comercially. (Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miner
Description:A flagstop on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the southern part of Richland Township. The first station established here in 1861 was known as Vannoy's, for a man who owned the first mill in this community. In the year 1895 a post office, named Minner, was maintained here. It was named for Mr. Miner, a landowner, who built a tramway from his sawmill to the railroad. The members of the family pronounce the name with a short "i," and this accounts, possibly, for the spelling of the post office name. Locally the name is pronounced as the family pronounce it and also with a long "i." The family name was originally German, spelled Minner, and later anglicized. (Mayfield, Harrison, Harris, Baker, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miner Switch
Description:Another name for Miner (cf. above).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Minner
Description:See Miner
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Misfeldt School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Tywappity Township, settled by Germans about 1852 and named for J.P. Misfeldt, a prominent landowner and judge of the county court 1914-1918. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Railroad
Description:The original Missouri Pacific Railroad was chartered in 1876 as a part of the Pacific Railroad Company which had failed to build roads as directed in the charter of 1849. It was under the direction of C.K. Garrison until 1879 when it became the property of Jay Gould, who consolidated a number of railroads. This part of the system, however, had its beginning in the Cairo and Fulton Railroad which was organized in 1857 in Charleston, Mississippi County, through the efforts of Colonel H.J. Deal. The name indicated the two proposed terminals - Fulton, Arkansas and Cairo, Illinois. The first train on this road was run from Bird's Point to Charleston April 19, 1859. The chief engineer was J.S. Williams and the engine was called the "Sol G. Kitchen" in honor of a pioneer of Mississippi County. The road was finished to Sikeston, in Scott County, July 4, 1859, and the first locomotive on this run was the "Abe Hunter," named for another prominent pioneer of Mississippi County. During the Civil War the road was partially destroyed. It was reorganized in 1872 under the name Cairo, Arkansas, and Texas Railroad, so named because the company now proposed to extend the road through the state of Arkansas and on to Texarkana, Texas. The nickname "Cat" road, derived from the initials of the official road, came into use locally about this time. It was completed to Poplar Bluff, through Stoddard County in 1873. Shortly after the reorganization it was bought by the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad under the management of Thomas Allen. The St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad had been granted a charter in 1851 to build a road from some point on the Pacific Railroad to Pilot Knob; and in 1852 the Iron Mountain Branch of the Pacific Railroad was incorporated. The purpose of the railroad was the transportation of ore from Iron Mountain to St. Louis, from which point it could be shipped elsewhere, and this fact gave the road its name. The first survey was made in 1852 by J.H. Morley and the first section of rails laid in 1853. The road was opened to Iron Mountain in 1858. The Arkansas branch was completed from Pilot Knob to Moark in 1873, and the name changed to St. Louis Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad to indicate this extension of the road. In 1880 these roads were consolidated under the Missouri Pacific Railroad. (Deal Scrapbook, Charleston Democrat 1937, Kerr, Thornton 14-51, Douglass 499)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moorefield
Description:See Tanner
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mooreland
Description:See Tanner
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moreland Township
Description:One of the two townships which made up Scott County when it was organized from New Madrid County in 1822. Moreland Township had been organized in 1813, being one of the original townships of New Madrid County. It was reduced in size in 1822. The name is that of an early settler. (Goodspeed 354, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morley
Description:A small town in the northern part of Morley Township, which was laid out in 1868 and incorporated a year later. The first settlement in this region was known as Maxville, named for an early settler by using his first name and adding the suffix "ville." When Morley was laid out about a mile north of the old settlement, Maxville was incorporated with it. Morley was named for J.H. Morley, engineer of the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad to which the town owes its existence. (Goodspeed 464, Campbell 597, Parker 324, Moore, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morley Township
Description:In the central part of the county; organized August 21, 1872 at the request of P.N. Bainbridge et al., from Moreland, Richland, Sandywoods, and Sylvania Townships. It was named from Morley (cf. above), the principal town within its limits. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mound School
Description:A rural school named for an Indian mound near which it is located. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Zion Camp Ground
Description:The place of the camp meetings of the Mount Zion Church. The Quarterly Conference was held here August 23, 1834.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Zion Church
Description:An early rural Methodist Church in the southern part of Morley Township, organized before 1834 and given this common church name by the founders. (Clark 20)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Zion School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Morley Township, abandoned about 1927. It was named for Mount Zion Church (q.v.) which was organized before 1834. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mud Bridge
Description:A bridge mentioned in the early county court records as being in the northern part of Commerce Township. Mr. Moore says it was named from the mud in this low, marshy region. (Moore, County Court Records)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Hamburg
Description:A small village in the northern part of Moreland Township settled by German immigrants. The leaders were Lawrence Bucher and Francis Heurig, who came from adjoining villages in Alsace-Loraine in 1848. Mr. Brucher donated the land for the St. Lawrence Catholic Church (q.v.) in 1859, and the northern part of the village was called St. Lawrence. Francis Heurig laid out the town south of the church in 1866 and called it Hamburg for Hamburg, Germany. Mr. Tanner pointed out that there was a town named Hamburg in St. Charles County so the name was changed to New Hamburg. Many old maps give the name as Hamburgh, doubtless influenced by the common English suffix, as in Edinburgh, and the post office was New Hamburgh from 1876 until 1893, when the present spelling, which corresponds to the German, was adopted. The name New Hamburg gradually became accepted for the whole village and was so adopted for the post office, although St. Lawrence is still used locally and in surveyor's maps. (M.H.R. 13:65; Goodspeed 527, Campbell 598, Moore, Rev. Eggeman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Hope Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church organized in 1876 and given this ideal church name by the founders. (Tong 77)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Providence Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church organized bvefore 1876 and given this common church name by the founders. (Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New York
Description:A small settlement or boat landing in the northern part of Commerce Township just north of the town of Commerce on the Mississippi River. It was settled by Germans who came from New York City about 1844 and was named for the Eastern City. The town caved into the river gradually after 1873. (Campbell, Moore, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Northcoat Bridge
Description:See Northcut Bridge.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Northcoat Cypress
Description:See Northcut Cypress
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Northcut Bridge
Description:A bridge on Big Cypress Creek in the western part of Tywappity Township on land which John Northcoat settled in 1820. Originally the bridge was Northcoat Bridge, but like the swamp, Northcoat Cypress (q.v.), it became Northcut Bridge. (Douglass I 303, Sutherland 1860, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Northcut Cypress
Description:A swamp which is called Northcut Cypress in reference to the north and south line, or cut, of the swamp. It was, originally Northcoat Cypress, named for John Northcoat, who settled tnere in 1820 but the two names were later blended. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oran
Description:A town in the southeast part of Sylvania Township. The first settlement made in 1868 was called St. Cloud, doubtless from the French town near Paris, which was named for St. Clodoald. St. Cloud post office was maintained in 1876. When a new post office was established in 1882, the name Sylvania, from the township of that name (q.v.), was presented, but was preempted by a town in Dade County. The name Oran was given by Captain Ward L. Smith, a retired sailor, who had bought land near Sylvania in 1869 and settled there. He named it for Oran in Algeria, North Africa, which he had visited. (Douglass I 387, M.H.R. 13:65, Lucas, Moore, Father Helmbacher, Harrison, Purcell, Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oran Baptist Church
Description:The Baptist Church of Oran was first organized in 1872 as the Little River Church, because of its location near that river; it took the name Sylvania, an early name for Oran (cf. above) in 1880 and was so called until the name of the town was changed to Oran in 1882. (Scott County Democrat 1935-1936)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Owensby School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Moreland Township, named for a family of the community. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pacific Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Parker
Description:A settlement in 1879 just south of Oran, which was named for the Parker family who owned land there and had a sawmill. (Cram 1879, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peavine Railroad
Description:A mocking name given to the Houck Railroad (now Cottonbelt) because the train ran so slowly the firemen sometimes gathered peavines from beside the track and used them for fuel. (Allen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perkins
Description:A small town in the northwest part of Sylvania Township. A post office was established in 1902 and named for Amos Perkins, a landowner and lumberman in the community. (Allen, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the southern part of Kelso Township, now abandoned. It was organized in 1828 and reorganized in 1852. The name is descriptive of the surrounding country. In 1906 the church was moved to Commerce. (Tong 71, Goodspeed 557)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:An old rural school of the county in the southern part of Kelso Township, abandoned several years ago. It was named from Pleasant Hill Church (q.v.). (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Plains
Description:An old village in the northern part of Richland Township situated on the dividing ridge that separates Lake St. Mary and St. John. No traces of the village remain. It was given this descriptive name by the early settlers. A post office was maintained there from 1853-1867. If the place were in existence today, it would be in Mississippi County, but the postal directory listed it as an office in Scott County. (Parker 382, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Plains Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the northern part of Richland Township organized before 1830 and named Sandy Prairie Church, for Sandy Ridge on which it was located. The name was changed "upon reflection" at a Quarterly Conference October 4, 1834 to Pleasant Plains Church, an idealized descriptive name. (Clark 20, quotation from Quarterly Conference Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Valley Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the south-central part of Sandywoods Township, organized in 1885 by Richardson and Anderson. It was named from its location near an old settlement called Pleasant Plains (q.v.). The church was abandoned in 1900. (Anderson, Goodspeed 561, Mrs. Harris)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Sandywoods Township. It was named from Pleasant Valley Church (q.v.) which was organized there before 1885. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Porter
Description:A railroad stop on the Iron Mountain Railroad in the southeastern part of Sandywoods Township, established between 1908 and 1917 and named for the Porter family, who owned land there. It is also called Porter Switch. (Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Power's Island
Description:An island three miles long in the Mississippi River south of the town of Commerce. It was called English Island by the explorers with Cumings in 1836, but the name appears on the maps as Power's Island since 1844. It was named for an early settler and landowner to whom the island belonged. Locally it is known as Big Island from its size, and Big Island School is located there. (Thwaites 26:83, Moore, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Price's Landing
Description:A ferry landing and post office which was established in 1867 by a Mr. Price, for whom the place was named. (Moore, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Quarry
Description:A signal stop on the Frisco Railroad just north of Rockview in the northwestern part of Kelso Township, where a rock quarry is located. It is designated as a station because the products of the quarry are shipped from this point. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ramsey Creek
Description:A large creek flowing through the northern part of the county in Kelso Township. It was named for John Ramsey, who came from Cape Girardeau in 1811. (Douglass I 179)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ranney Creek
Description:A small creek in the northern part of Kelso Township, which was named for an old settler, W.C. Ranney. The creek has been drained since 1900. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ranney's School
Description:An old rural school, now abandoned, in the northern part of Kelso Township, which was established in 1868 on Ranney Creek (cf. above) from which it was named. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Redman
Description:A school and community in the eastern part of Scott County in Moreland Township just east of Benton, established about 1913 and named for Robert Redman, a prominent farmer of the community. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Richland Township
Description:In the southwest part of the county; one of the original townships organized in 1822. It was so named because the condition of the land in this section is in contrast to that of the larger part of the county; that is, it is rich land here. (Cf. Sandywoods Township) (Goodspeed 354, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Richwoods
Description:A region in the southwest part of the county. The terms Richland (q.v.) and Richwoods are used interchangeably. (Lennox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Richwoods Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church which originally was organized at the Lennox School House (q.v.), largely through the efforts of W.L. Lennox, about 1856. Later a new church building was erected about two miles south of the school on land belonging to Francis Dunnican, and given this name by which the entire region was known (cf. above). (Lennox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riviere Zenon
Description:See Hubble Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rockview
Description:A railroad stop on the Frisco in the northern part of Kelso Township. A post office was maintained here from 1904 until 1915 and named for its location, which affords an excellent view of the high rocky bluffs. (Allen, Moore, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rootwad
Description:A rural community in the southern part of Richland Township three miles west of Sikeston. This is a local expression meaning the trees were blown up by a storm and the roots exposed with dirt massed (wadded) around them. (Mayfield, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ross' Point
Description:See Gray's Point.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Mound
Description:An Indian mound in the southern part of Tywappity Township, which is so named because of its circular appearance. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Mound School
Description:A rural school in the Diehlstadt district in the southern part of Tywappity Township, which was named for the Indian mound (cf. above) nearby. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salcedo
Description:A small settlement in the southwestern part of Richland Township, established in 1895 when J.W. Baker purchased the land there. The rural school is known as Baker School (q.v.), but when the railroad was established it was named by Louis Houck, Salcedo, in honor of Don J. Manuel De Salcedo, King's Lieutenant, Governor of Texas, and Brigadier of the Royal Armies at New Madrid in 1803. Houck attempted to preserve historical names as much as possible, and that policy governed his choice here. An amusing, but unfounded story, connects this name with the old fashioned singing schools, which were common in rural communites, in the singing of the notes "so(l)-la-ci-do." (Baker, Mayfield, Spanish Regime 1789, Giboney Houck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salcedo School
Description:See Baker School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salls Creek
Description:A small creek in the northern part of Kelso Township, which was named for a family who settled there. It has been drained. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Lake Island
Description:An island in the lake which was formed by the excavation made by the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad workers in order to obtain sand for building the road bed over swampy land. (Douglass I 303-304, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Siding
Description:A signal stop on the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad in 1874, which was named, as was Sandywoods (q.v.) from the fine sandy soil here and from the railroad siding. A siding is a short track connecting with the main line. (Campbell, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Switch
Description:A switch established by the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad in order to load sand excavated from thirty or forty acres of sandy land in order to build up a road bed over the swampy land. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sandy Prairie
Description:A small prairie in the northern part of Richland Township, which does not appear on a map, but is known locally and the name of which is preserved in Sandy Prairie School. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sandy Prairie Church
Description:See Pleasant Plains Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sandy Prairie School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Richland Township. It is one of the oldest schools in the county and was named for the natural surroundings, the sandy plain or prairie on which it is located. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sandy Woods Township
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sandywoods Township
Description:In the southern part of the county; one of the original townships organized with the county in 1822. So named because of the natural condition of the soil which is sandy, and in contrast to Richland Township (q.v.), where the soil is rich. In earlier records and sometimes now the name is written as two words - Sandy Woods. (County Court Record, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sargent
Description:A flagstop on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the southeastern part of Richland Township, established in 1867 as a sawmill and log loading station. This settlement was known as Scoville according to Campbell's atlas of 1873, and E.P. Deal says it was named for a man of the community, A Mr. Scholes, who added "ville" to the first syllable of his name and so called the settlement Scoville, but Mrs. Ada Lennox insists it was Scofield not Scoville, and was named for a Mr. Scofield. The name was changed to Sargent about 1877 for the Sargent family who bought land and a sawmill in this community. (Baker, Harrison, Mrs. Lennox, E.P. Deal, Miscellaneous Speeches and Documents of 1864-1867)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Savannah Zion Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church organized in 1887 in the southern part of Richland Township and named for the slough near which it was located, and Zion, a common church name. (Goodspeed 561)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scherer School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Kelso Township, which was one of the first schools of the county. It was named for Rev. Martin Scherer of New Hamburg community, who came from Bavaria, Germany in 1863. He was instrumental in establishing the church at New Hamburg and had charge of two rural schools in his district. These were the Cheney School and Scherer School. (Anderson, Goodspeed's Biog.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scofield
Description:See Sargent
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scott County
Description:Created by act of legislature December 28, 1821; organized from New Madrid County in 1822 and named in honor of Hon. John Scott (1782-1861), the first congressman from Missouri. The boundaries of the county were fixed as follows: "And now the county of New Madrid shall be and the same is hereby divided and erected into two separate counties, by a line running as follows: Beginning in the main channel of the river Mississippi opposite a small creek or bayou, called James Creek or Bayou; thence in a direct line to the mouth of said creek; thence in a northwestern course to a point in the swamp due north of the line between townships 25 and 26 east of the fifth principal meridian parallel with the northern boundary line of the tract of land situated in the upper end of Big Prairie originally granted and confirmed to Moses Hurley, and where Mrs. Elizabeth Phillips now lives; thence running due west to the western boundary line of said county of New Madrid; and that the said tract of the county lying to the south of said line shall be continued to be called and known by the name of New Madrid County and the tract of country lying north and east of said line shall be called Scott County." The present townships are: Sylvania, Kelso, Sandywoods, Commerce, Tywappity, Morley, Moreland, and Richland. (Douglass I 303, County Court Record, Ency. of Am. Biog., Goodspeed 353)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scott County Hills
Description:A range of low hills or ridges through the center of the county, from which it is named. (Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scoville
Description:See Sargent
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sikeston
Description:The first settlement in this neighborhood was made in 1790 by Ed Robertson and Moses Hurley. The first town was called Winchester in honor of Colonel H.W. Winchester who lived in that vicinity. The town was laid out in 1814 half a mile south of the present site of Sikeston and was for a time the county seat of New Madrid County. The successor to Winchester was Sikeston, laid out in 1860 by John Sikes at the place where the Cairo and Fulton Railroad crossed King's Highway. It was named for John Sikes. (Douglass I 179, 291, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sikeston Ridge
Description:A long, slightly elevated ridge east of the town of Sikeston (cf. above), from which it is named. (Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slapout School
Description:See Stringer School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Pacific Railroad
Description:See below
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spring Hill
Description:An old settlement in the northeast part of Kelso Township, which existed from 1844 until 1849. It is either the present Hillman Spring (q.v.) near Illmo, or else the spring and the hill which gave the settlement its name have caved into the river. The latter theory is probably the correct explanation as the two settlements just south of Spring Hill (New York and West Philadelphia) caved into the river, and since the location of Spring Hill on maps is too far south of Illmo. (Parker 342-345, Hutawa, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Ambrose Church
Description:The Catholic Church in Chaffee in the northern part of Kelso Township. The first mass was said January 1, 1908 in honor of St. Ambrose, the patron of the church. St. Ambrose (340-397), Bishop of Milan, was one of the most illustrious Fathers and Doctors of the Church and occupied the chair of Prince of Apostles in St. Peter's at Rome. The parochial school was established in 1918 in charge of the Sisters of Mercy. (Scott County Democrat 1936, Cath. Ency.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Ambrose School
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Augustine Cemetery
Description:The cemetery in the churchyard of St. Augustine (q.v.) the oldest cemetery in the county. (Scott County Democrat)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Augustine Church
Description:A Catholic Church in Kelso, organized in 1878 by Rev. S. Kleiser of Cape Girardeau. It was set off from the New Hamburg congregation, or the St. Lawrence Church, and St. Mary's Church of Cape Girardeau. The church was dedicated in 1890 to St. Augustine ( -804), the founder of the order of St. Augustine. (Goodspeed 937, Douglass 388, 450, Cath. Ency.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Augustine School
Description:The parochial school of St. Augustine Church (cf. above), organized in 1877 under the direction of Father Kleiser with Miss Elizabeth Lindermann as teacher. (Scott County Democrat 1936)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Cloud
Description:See Oran
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Dionysius Church
Description:The Catholic Church at Benton; organized in 1840 as the St. Mary's Church in honor of the Virgin, by Catholics who came from the St. Francis de Sales Church in Mississippi County. The building was burned in 1864 by guerillas of the Civil War and there was no church until Dennis Diebold left by will, money and instructions for the building of a church at Benton. The church and school were assigned to contractors in 1894 and the former was dedicated in 1904 under the invocation of St. Dionysius ( -268), who was Pope from 259 until his death. (Scott County Democrat 1936, Cath. Ency.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francis Xavier Church
Description:The Catholic Church in Sikeston was built in 1885 and dedicated to St. Francis Xavier (1506-1552), a Jesuit missionary. (Scott County Democrat 1936, Cath. Ency.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph Church
Description:The Catholic Church of Illmo and Fornfelt communities begun in 1909 by the work of ladies' sewing circles. The church was founded in 1911 by Rev. John Muehlsiepen of Kelso, and a building was erected in 1912. It was dedicated to St. Joseph. (Scott County Democrat 1936)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Lawrence
Description:See New Hamburg
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Lawrence Church
Description:A Catholic Church in New Hamburg (q.v.). The first church, a log building which still stands, was under the protection of the Immaculate Conception, but in 1859 Rev. Leo Osredker built the present edifice and suggested the name of St. Ann, the patron saint of married women, in recognition of the services of the women of the community. Some members objected to this name, so finally Father Leo suggested that the church be put under the patronage of St. Lawrence, the patron saint of Lawrence Bucher, who had donated the land for the church. This name was accepted and the church so named. The northern part of the village of New Hamburg is often called St. Lawrence from the church. (Eggeman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Description:This railroad was first organized as the Southwest branch of the Pacific Railroad in 1849, along a surveyed route from St. Louis west to the Pacific Ocean. In 1851 it became the South Pacific Railroad and was completed to Rolla in 1861. In 1866 it was created the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad by an act of Congress, and authorized to build to the Pacific Coast. It was finished to Vinita in Indian territory in 1871. In these counties the road is the result of the consolidation of a number of short lines which were connected to form the present system. It had its beginning in the Cape Girardeau and State Line Railroad Company, which proposed to build a line from Cape Girardeau to the Arkansas line in 1869. No work was done on this road, and in 1871 Governor Fletcher of Missouri reorganized the company as the Illinois, Missouri and Texas Railroad Company with the idea of connecting those three states by rail. This charter was purchased in 1880 by Louis Houck and organized as the Cape Girardeau Railroad Company because the businessmen of that city were to furnish the capital. In 1881 the branch was built to Lakeville in Stoddard County, and the name changed to Cape Girardeau and Southwestern Railroad Company, indicating the direction of the road from Cape Girardeau. In 1891 the name was again changed to the St. Louis, Cape Girardeau, and Fort Smith Raiload, named to indicate the intention of extending the road north to St. Louis and south to Fort Smith, Arkansas. The railroad also includes the line of the Missouri and Arkansas Railroad organized in 1891 by Mr. Houck to build a road from Morley to Cape Girardeau, and the St. Louis, Kennett and Southern Railroad, which was built in 1890 from Campbell to Kennett, and the Kennett to Caruthersville Railroad, which was built in 1894. In 1902 all these roads were consolidated under the name St. Louis and Gulf Railroad with the intention of extending the road from St. Louis to the Gulf of Mexico, and shortly afterward the property was transferred to the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad. The latter company extended the line from St. Louis to Memphis, Tennessee, thence to Pensacola, and west from Memphis to Oklahoma, but it has not yet reached its intended destination - San Francisco. In Pemiscot County the company purchased a right-of-way extending from Caruthersville to the Arkansas line and thence to Blytheville, Arkansas from Cunningham Brothers of Caruthersville, who had been interested in building a railroad and had begun private operations. This road is commonly called Frisco, a shortened from of San Francisco. (Willis, Douglass 502-504, Wollman 16, Ham, Wilson, Barns 615, 673)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Mary's Church
Description:See St. Dionysius Church
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Paul's Lutheran Church
Description:The Lutheran Church of Chaffee, organized in 1918 by Rev. A.M. Lohmann and named for St. Paul, the Apostle. (Scott County Democrat, 1936)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stringer
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Richland Township, named for the Stringer family, prominent farmers of the community. It is mockingly called Slapout, a common term usually originating in the expression "We're slap out of _____," meaning "We have none." (Lennox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sylvania
Description:See Oran
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sylvania Township
Description:In the eastern part of the county; erected from Moreland Township February 7, 1871 at the request of W. Bassett et al., and named, as were Richland and Sandywoods Townships (q.v.), from the natural conditions. Sylvania is from the Latin word "silva" meaning woods or forest. (County Court Record, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tanner
Description:A sawmill camp and settlement in the western part of Richland Township. Joe Moore and his father, who owned large tracts of land in this region, took steps to establish a post office here in 1891 and suggested the name Moorefield or Mooreland, but post office authorities objected because of Morehouse, which is six miles south of this place in New Madrid County. The post office was then named Tanner for Samuel Tanner who also owned land in this community. It was sometimes called Tanner Switch because of its location on the old St. Louis Southwestern Railroad. (Mayfield, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Harris, Moore, Tanner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tanner School
Description:A rural school in the community of Tanner (q.v.) which was named in 1907 when the school was established. (Tanner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tanner Switch
Description:See Tanner
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thrower's Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the southern part of Tywappity Township, organized in 1880 and named for B.K. Thrower, who was a minister in Charleston in 1878 and helped found this church. (Goodspeed 536, McAnaly 378)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trees
Description:This name appears on the map of 1917 as a flagstop on the Frisco Railroad in the extreme northwestern part of Morley Township, but no resident of the county has heard of such a place. Mr. W.G. Anderson, who lives in this community, says he knows of no such place. (Harrison, W.G. Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trinity Methodist Church
Description:The Methodist Church of Oran, organized in 1896 by Rev. R.G. Parks. The present building was erected in 1891 and given this common church name by the founders. (Moore, Scott County Democrat)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tywappity Bottoms
Description:A large area of low land extending from the Mississippi River at the point opposite the mouth of the Ohio River to the Scott County Hills on the north to the St. James Bayou on the south and to Little River on the west. The name Tywappity is one of the oldest in this region. With various spellings it appears in all the earliest accounts of the settlement of the territory south of Cape Girardeau. Thwaites gives an account of Americans settling in "Tywapatia" Bottom in 1789. Brown describes Tayatia in 1818, Schoolcraft mentions a visit to Tiwapeta July 5, 1818, and the head of Tiawapetia Bottom July 7, 1818. Beck shows Tywapatia on his map of 1823, and Wetmore shows Tiwapta in 1831. Switzler uses the present spelling in 1879. No attempt is made to explain the meaning of this name, which is of Indian origin. Hodge does not give the term. Perhaps it is a combination of the Shawnee Indian term "ty" meaning chief, and "wapite" meaning moose or elk. (Thwaites 17:121, Brown, Beck, Wetmore, Schoolcraft 823, Hodge, Switzler, Houck II 161, III 151)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tywappity Church
Description:The oldest Baptist Church west of the Mississippi River, organized in 1805 (one year before Bethel Church near Jackson in Cape Girardeau County which is often given the distinction of being the oldest church in this section) in Tywappity Bottoms in what is now Scott County. It was organized by Elder David Green, a native of Virginia, and named for the swamp in which it is located. No building was erected and the congregation soon united with other churches after their organization and this is the reason Bethel Church enjoys distinction as the oldest church. (M.H.R. 12:60, Douglass I 198, Houck III 196, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tywappity Township
Description:In the southeast part of the county; one of the original townships which made up Scott County when it was organized in 1822; in fact it had been one of the original townships of New Madrid County in 1813 (cf. above). It was reduced in size by the organization of other townships in 1822 and divided in 1836 when the county was redistricted and St. James Township organized, and further reduced in size when Mississippi County was organized in 1845. It was named by Tywappity Bottoms (q.v.). (Goodspeed 354)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Uhann Hill
Description:A small hill or ridge in the northern part of Moreland Township on the farm of a man named Uhann. The hill received its name from the landowner. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Unity Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the central part of Moreland Township, organized about 1880 and given this common church name by the founders. (Scott County Democrat, Goodspeed 561)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vanduser
Description:A small town in the southern part of Morley Township, established in 1895 at the time of the building of the Houck Railroad from Commerce to Morehouse in New Madrid County. It was named for John Vanduser, who owned a farm where the station was established. (Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vannoy's
Description:See Miner
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wade's Mill
Description:An early sawmill in the southwest part of Moreland Township, maintained in 1878 by a Mr. Wade, who sawed lumber for the Morley Methodist Church. (Scott County Democrat, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ward School
Description:A rural negro school in the western part of Morley Township, which was named for Wm. W. Ward, who came to Missouri in 1874 and became a landowner, a prominent citizen of the community, and later surveyor of Scott County. It was first established for whites and changed to a negro school in 1932. (Anderson, Goodspeed's Biography)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Washburn
Description:See Illmo
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Watkins Plantation
Description:See Beechlands
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Philadelphia
Description:A small settlement consisting of a store and a boat landing in the southern part of Tywappity Township, which appears on the maps of 1841 and 1873. It was named by early settlers, some of whom came from Philadelphia, for the eastern city. This place caved into the river soon after 1873. (Campbell, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whiteoak School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Tywappity Township. It is one of the oldest schools in the county and was named for the grove of whiteoak trees in which it is located. It was also known as the Hatcher School for a prominent man in the community. The redistricting program in 1932 caused the school to be abandoned. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilburn Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River in the eastern part of the county where a settlement was made as early as 1855 by Henry E. Milburn. The name has been changed to Wilburn, probably through a map maker's error. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Woods Island
Description:A small island just south of Power's Island in the Mississippi River, which was named for the Woods family, who own the island. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wray's Landing
Description:A ferry landing in the extreme northern part of Kelso Township maintained from 1844-1850. It was named for Hansford T. Wray, who came to Scott County in 1859 and established a ferry on the Mississippi River. (Harrison, Goodspeed's Biog.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wylie School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Sylvania Township; named for Sylvanus B. Wylie, an early settler who came to Scott County in 1863. (Anderson, Goodspeed's Biog.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zewapeta
Description:An old village, probably of Indian origin, in the eastern part of Commerce Township near the site of Commerce, which is mentioned by early explorers, particularly Major Hamtramck in 1788. (Houck I 162)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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