Scotland County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:African Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:A Methodist church at Memphis organized by the negroes whence its name. (ATLAS SCOTLAND (1898); I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alexandria and Bloomfield Railroad
Description:A road projected in 1865 between Alexandria in Clark and Bloomfield, Iowa, following the Old Divide (See Alexandria and Bloomfield Wagon Road). There was much litigation over the bonds which continued until 1884; new bonds were issued on the consolidation of the road with the Alexandria and Nebraska City Railroad (q.v.) around 1881. (See Keokuk & Western Railroad) (ATLAS CLARK 1878; HIST. CLARK 1887, 292, 303; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 340, 341)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alexandria and Bloomfield Wagon Road
Description:A stage line operating in 1852 on an old trail starting at the mouth of the Des Moines at Alexandria and continuing northwest through Luray in Clark to Bloomfield, Iowa, thence on to Council Bluffs and Omaha and further westward. It was an important road in Northeast Missouri, as elsewhere, in the days preceding the railroad. It was known also as "The Divide," "The Old Divide," and the "Main Divide" for its location, and as such was established before 1842. Highway No. 3, across Iowa follows closely the "Old Divide." (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 33; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alexandria and Nebraska City Railroad
Description:After the issuance of bonds in 1868 the railroad projected to connect Alexandria, Clark County with Nebraska City and entered into a consolidation with the Alexandria and Bloomfield (q.v.) a second projected road, to form the Missouri, Iowa, and Nebraska City Railroad. (See Keokuk and Western). (ATLAS CLARK 1878; HIST. CLARK 1887, 292, 303; HIST. N.C. MISSOURI, 340, 341)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen's Branch
Description:A branch in the eastern part of the county, flowing generally east into the Wyaconda in southern Thomson Township. So named for families in the vicinity. (PLAT BOOK (1930; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Church
Description:A Christian church south of Memphis. An active church today. Cf. Antioch Church, Lewis. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; I.M. Horne; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Arabella
Description:See Arbels
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Arbela
Description:A post office since 1860; eight miles east of Memphis, in Thomson Township, a station on the Burlington and shipping point for stock raisers. In the original survey, made in 1858, it was known as North Perryville for its founders, the blacksmiths, Thomas and Al Perry, and the owner of the land, Perry Mitchell. "North" was added for its location. It went also by the name of Perryville. A new survey was made out about the time of the completion of the railroad, and the town of Arbela was laid out, south of and including the southern part of North Perryville. The original town on the site was known as "Burnt Church." All of this vicinity was known as the "Burnt District" (q.v.). The name "Burnt Church" suggests the burning of a pioneer church in the annual brush fires set by the Indians. Residents do not know it by the Indians. Residents do not know it by this name, but by the name "Burnt Shirt" to account for which there are various stories. One is that when the construction gang in 1872 was clearing the roadway and burning brush, the shirt of one of the men got on fire. Another account is that in a card game in the absence of other means of light one of the players burned his shirt so that they might finish the game. The town is said to be named for Arbela in Asia. Arbela was the site of a famous ancient battle, where Alexander defeated Darius in 381 B.C. It was then a city in Persia, now in Turkey-in-Asia under the name of Arbil. If Arbela, Scotland County, is named for the Asiatic city, it is another instance of classic influence. (See Palmyra, Hannibal, Marion County). It is said to be the only town of this name in the United States. On a map of Missouri of 1878, the name is given erroneously as Arabella. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 593; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 492, 497; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 613; P.G.; ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1876, 1898; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1861; Court Records; W.C. Ladd; C.E. Watkins; Mrs. Lou E. Knott; Samuel Ball; Lucy Latimer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atchison and Topeka Railroad.
Description:See Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad
Description:This railroad enters Clark County midway in Sweet Home Township on the Des Moines River, crosses the county diagonally to Scotland County where it passes through the southeast corner a distance of about nine miles, then enters Knox County which it traverses in the northwest section. Ground was broken at Topeka, Kansas, for this road, chartered as the Atchison and Topeka Railroad, in 1868, and trains were running by 1869. In 1875 the road reached Kansas City, and now followed westward substantially the line of the old Santa Fe Trail (q.v.) whence the name Santa Fe Road as applied to the railroad. In 1876 the line was completed to Pueblo; in 1879 to Las Vegas. The Santa Fe System was organized in 1886 under the name Chicago, Santa Fe, and California Railroad. It is known as one of the most gigantic and best equipped railroad systems in America. The road now runs from Chicago to the Pacific Coast. It was completed in 1887, and the first run on the completed road made January 1, 1888. The road goes most frequently under the name of the Santa Fe. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 303, 304; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 490; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 611; Williams 1904, 361; Duffus 1930, 260-66; HANNIBAL COURIER- POST, Aug. 15, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ayreshire Township
Description:An early township in existence in 1842 and recognized in the order for judges of the election in 1844. (See Maiden Kirk). The name occurs in the Court Record as Ayreshire and Ayrshire. There is no records of the township lines or of the reason for the name. (See Kilwinning). It is probably named for Ayrshire, an extensive county in Scotland. Ayrshire is described as undulating and hilly with many streams, a description which fits this extent of country doubtless covered by Ayreshire Township in Scotland County. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 439; Court Record; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ayrshire Township
Description:See Ayreshire Township.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Azen
Description:A post office since 1879; in northeastern Scotland County in Johnson Township, fourteen miles from Memphis. There is nothing there but a store. It was earlier known as Prairie View for its location on the prairie. Mr. Schirch said that the post office was named for the Postmaster General of the name of Hazen, and that since there was already established a post office of that name, the Department dropped the "h" and named the new appointment Azen. This would appear in part an error. In the list accessible of those serving in this position there is no one of this name. In the Hayes Administration (1876-1880), David McK. Key served in that office. It seems probable that the appointment was given the name for Wm. Babcock Hazen (1830-1887), a commander of distinction in the War of 1861, remaining in the military service until his death. He saw long years of service on the border, and wrote of life on the plains. During the Hayes Administration he was made chief signal officer in the War Department. (Polk 1879; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; 614; P.G.; NAT. CYC. OF AMERICA BIOG. V, 1-3, pp. 5, 6; DICT. OF AMERICAN BIOG. V. 8; Maps Missouri from 1902; Albert Schirch)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Azen School
Description:A schoolhouse in Johnson Township on the site of the post office of that name (q.v.), whence the name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baker Creek
Description:A stream in the southern part of the county. So named for families in the vicinity. John and Martin Baker were pioneers of the 1840s. (Campbell 1874, 592; Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ballard's Mill
Description:An early mill so named for its owner. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beache's Mill
Description:A pioneer mill of the 1840s. So named for its owner. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek
Description:A creek which rises in Scotland County to the southeast and crosses the southwest corner of Clark, entering the North Fabius just above the Lewis-Clark line. So named for the bears found by early hunters in the vicinity. (Campbell 1873; Campbell 1874, 592; ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; HIST. CLARK 1887, 400; Plat Book 1930; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bee Branch
Description:A branch which rises in the southwestern part of Mt. Pleasant Township and flows almost due north into Bridge Creek (q.v.). So named by the bee hunters of pioneer days. (See "Bee Roads") (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; SOIL SURVEY, Scotland 1906; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Benton Township
Description:A township of Lewis County set aside by the Lewis County Court for a separate county and organized for civil and military purposes. It originally included the present territory of Scotland County with a six-mile strip of Knox County. When in 1836 the Lewis County Court organized Mt. Pleasant Township (q.v.) out of Benton, the name Benton was retained for the eastern eleven miles from north to south. The township has undergone various changes. In 1844 that part of Benton that still lay in Knox was constituted a township and retained its name in that county. There is no township of this name today in Scotland County. Benton in Knox lies on the northern line of the county, with Colony to the east, Liberty to the south, and Greensburg to the west. Here it was one of the four original townships in 1845. So named for Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858). Democratic senator and representative to Congress from Missouri. He was elected to the 33rd Congress (1853-1855) as the Missouri Compromise delegate. (See "Bullion's Landing"). (HIST. KNOX 1887, 606, 740-742; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 417, 438, 439; COURT RECORD, SCOTLAND 1844; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 1898, 1916; (F) BIOG. DIREC. OF AMERICAN CONGRESS; (F: Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A Union Church organized near the center of Sand Hill Township in 1860 or soon thereafter by Cumberland Presbyterian and Methodist Church groups. A building was erected in 1876. The building is still there, used but irregularly by what is now the United Presbyterians and the Methodists. Cf. Bethel Church, above. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 548, 552; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bible Grove
Description:A post office from 1867-1904; established soon after the settlement of the county began. The County History says it was named as a post office at that time. It is located in the southwestern part of the county, eleven and a half miles from Memphis. There are two stores, a blacksmith shop, and a church on the site today. The first church services in the county were held here in the timber; hence the name. (Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; Polk 1876; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887; 490; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 614; Postal Guide; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; Arla B. Williams; Lucy Latimer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bible Grove Christian Church
Description:A Christian Church at Bible Grove, the second church in the county. It developed from meetings held as early as 1834 in the home of Jesse Stice (See Stice's Mill). The group organized a Christian Church in 1836 and a building was raised. The same was used also as a schoolhouse in 1842. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bible Grove Consolidated School District
Description:A consolidated school district composed of Enterprise, McClure, Houston, and Blue Grass Schools (q.v.). (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bible Grove School
Description:A school held in Bible Grove Church in 1842. (Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Branch
Description:A branch east of Memphis flowing southeast into the North Fabius. So named for its size. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; C.E. Watkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Billups' Branch
Description:A branch north of Prospect Grove, flowing southeast into the Wyaconda. So named for Jos. Billups, pioneer landowner. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Billups Mill
Description:See Hitt
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Billups' Mill
Description:A pioneer saw and grist mill established on the site of Hitt (q.v.) about the beginning of the Civil War or earlier. So named for its owner, J.H.E. Billups. (W.A. Mudd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Billupsville
Description:See Hitt
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Oak School
Description:A schoolhouse in Thomson Township. So named for the black oak trees in the vicinity. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Grass School
Description:A school in the Bible Grove Consolidated School District (q.v.). It stands in the blue grass at the foot of the hills on the Fabius, whence the name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bourn School
Description:A schoolhouse in Miller Township. So named for J.J. Bourn, an adjoining landowner. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bourn's Branch
Description:A branch in the northwest corner of the county, flowing southeast into the S. Wyaconda. It takes its name from two branches in Miller Township so named for J.J. Bourn, the adjoining landowner. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; SOIL SURVEY, Scotland 1906; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brick School
Description:A schoolhouse in Knox, serving a district lying in both counties. The building is of brick; hence the name. Formerly, the Ewing School, for a number of old families of that name in the vicinity. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridge Creek
Description:A stream in the southwest corner of the county, flowing into the South Fork of the Middle Fabius. So named for a family owning the adjoining land. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; SOIL SURVEY, Scotland 1906; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brock
Description:A post office from 1898-1904; a little community in the northern part of the county in Union Township, seven miles from Memphis. A store formerly which has burned since the post office was removed. It has not been rebuilt. So named for Hon. Wm. J. Brock (1860- 1916), a Member of the 37th and 38th General Assemblies (1893-1897). The locality was formerly known as Hydetown for a number of families of the name of Hyde. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 614; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; CASSVILLE REPUBLICAN, Mar. 9, 1916; Maps Missouri since 1904; W.W. Gillispie; John Schuler)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brock School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township on the site of an old settlement bearing the name (q.v.). (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brush Creek
Description:A creek to the south and west in southern Vest Township, where it joins the North Fork of the Middle Fabius. So named for the brush on its banks. Also known as Brushy Fork. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; PLAT BOOK 1930; W.W. Gillispie; Walter McPherson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brushy Fork
Description:See Brush Creek
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckner's Ford
Description:Nothing is known of the ford's location. Buckner a pioneer name in the vicinity. (Court Record 1844; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burcham School
Description:See Narrow Grove School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burnt Church
Description:See Arbela
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burnt District
Description:All this territory was annually the hunting ground of the Fox and Sac Indians until about 1842. Each fall the Indians burned the underbrush to drive the wild game into the open, and early settlers sometimes had to battle the flames in order to save their cabins. For this reason the term "Burnt District" was applied to the vicinity. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 497; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burnt Shirt
Description:See Arbela
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burnt Shirt Branch
Description:A branch which rises in Scotland County to the northeast near Arbela; entering Clark in Folker Township, it flows southeast into the Fox River. "Burnt Shirt" was the old name for Arbela (q.v.). (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; PLAT BOOK 1930; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp Ground Cemetery
Description:See Middle Fabius Cemetery.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp Ground Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Description:See Middle Fabius United Presbyterian Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canton Bloomfield Railroad
Description:A railroad projected from Canton in Lewis County to Bloomfield, Iowa, the first in Lewis County. It was begun in 1860 and about fifteen miles of road were built, from Canton to Bunker Hill, when operations were interrupted by the Civil War. The road became involved and was sold after an engine stood on the track near Tully for a year or two, the iron being sold to the government for a railroad down in Tennessee. The road was again chartered as the Mississippi and Western Railroad, but nothing followed. At this time the Mississippi and Missouri Air-Line was proposed (q.v.). This was succeeded by the West Quincy and Alexandria, and a road was built, which through various consolidations became the St. Louis, Keokuk, and Northwestern (q.v.). The line is now a part of the Burlington System, and extends westward from Keokuk, Iowa, through Clark and Scotland counties into Iowa by way of Schuyler County, Missouri. (Campbell 1874, 309; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 170-173; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 454; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI 388; Judge James T. Lloyd; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canton, Monticello, and Memphis State Road
Description:The mail route from Canton, Lewis County, to Memphis in Scotland County by way of Monticello; established about 1855. There was a great deal of traffic over this road. (See Santa Fe Trail) (W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Harrison Township close to the North Fabius. So named for the cedars in that vicinity. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Center Point School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township, located on an old road into Iowa. It was a point at which all roads at that time centered, whence the name. (I.M. Horne; Lewis C. Moore; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chaney School
Description:A schoolhouse in Sand Hill Township. So named for a family close to the schoolhouse. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chicago, Santa Fe and California Railroad
Description:See Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clapboard Street
Description:An early street in Memphis, known later as New Market Street. So named because the houses on this street when Memphis was first settled were made of clapboards. (W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clay Point School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township. Located in clay hills, whence the name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cline's Prairie
Description:An extent of prairie to the northwest in Scotland County. Nothing could be learned of the name. (Campbell 1873)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cody's Branch
Description:Reference to this branch was made in the court record, but nothing could be learned of it. (Court Record 1854)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Combs School
Description:A pioneer school in the 1850s in Johnson Township. So named for the pioneer landowner. (Court Records)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Concord Church
Description:A Union Church a few miles south of Memphis, organized at the close of the Civil War. A building was erected about 1876. Southern Methodists and Cumberland Presbyterians organized the church and were joined by a Christian Church group; hence the name. It was known also as the Concordia Union Church. The church no longer exists. Both names are ideal names. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 550; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Concordia Union Church
Description:See Concord Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cone School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township. So named for families in the neighborhood. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Conyer's Church
Description:A Methodist Church organized at Conyer's Schoolhouse (q.v.) about 1870; hence the name. A church was built later but has been torn down. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 550; Mrs. Lee R. Briggs)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Conyers School
Description:A schoolhouse four miles northeast of Memphis. So named for the family of Ed Conyer. (I.M. Horne; Mrs. Lee R. Briggs)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cook's Branch
Description:A branch flowing southeast and south into the South Wyaconda. Nothing could be learned of the name. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cooper Settlement
Description:Stephen Cooper emigrated from Howard County, Missouri, early in the fall of 1832 or 1833, and settled about one and a half miles northeast of Millport (q.v.). He was the first white settler in the county of Knox, coming to the vicinity when Knox was still a part of Scotland, and settling on land now included in the northeastern part of Knox and the southeastern part of Scotland. He himself never entered any land in Knox, but the Cooper Settlement to which he gave his name included land in both counties. Cooper Settlement became quite an important point to the settlers in the valleys of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. The settlement never developed into a town. (Campbell 1874, 591; HIST. KNOX 1887, 567, 568, 736; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 363; ATLAS KNOX 1876; R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cox Mill
Description:A pioneer mill of the 1840s. So named for the owner, Joshua B. Cox. (Court Records)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cox School
Description:A schoolhouse in Vest Township. So named for a family close to the schoolhouse. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Craig's Mill
Description:A flour mill in Memphis, dating from an early period and existing until 1855. So named for its owner, J.P. Craig. (Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crandall's Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Fabius on the Sand Hill road in 1859. So named for the owner of the tract of land at that point. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crawford
Description:A post office under the name of Crawford Station 1886-1904; cited as Crawford in 1904. Earlier known as Fabius, it appeared under this name as a post office in 1876 and 1879. It is located on the line between Miller and Vest townships about six miles west of Memphis on the Burlington Road and on the South Fork of the North Fabius from which it took the name Fabius. It was established in 1876 at which time Crawford Mill was located there (q.v.). Cram's Map of 1879 gives both Crawford and Fabius. The name Crawford Station appears for the last time in 1902. Its present name is for the Crawford family, J.H. Crawford was postmaster in 1883. (Polk). (Campbell 1874; Polk, 1876-1898; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 493; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 614; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1879; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crawford Mill
Description:A saw and corn mill on the South Fork of the North Fabius in 1876 on the site of Crawford. So named for the family operating the mill. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crawford Station
Description:See Crawford
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Croley School
Description:See Enterprise School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crow School
Description:A schoolhouse in Miller Township. So named for families in the neighborhood. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dairy
Description:A post office in 1853 and 1860; given by Hayward as 135 miles north of Jefferson City. (No further information could be found). (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Devil's Half-Acres
Description:A school southeast of Upton (q.v.) in 1876. The name "harked back" to the "Honey War" (See Jessamine Township). The men in this locality at that time took an oath they would not shave. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dorn Branch
Description:A branch southwest of Bible Grove, flowing northeast into the Fabius. So named for the landowner, W.B. Dorn. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dover Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the western part of the county; organized in 1857. The present building was erected in 1881. Not very active for an extensive period, the church has been closed. For name cf. Dover Baptist Church, Lewis County. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 545; I.M. Horne; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dover School
Description:A schoolhouse in Vest Township. So named for Dover Baptist Church (q.v.). (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dunbar Bridge
Description:A bridge over the "Faby" near Dunbar's Mill (q.v.), from which it takes its name. (Houck, I, 87; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dunbar's Mill
Description:A saw and grist mill ten miles southwest of Memphis, near Bible Grove. So named for its owner, Collins Dunbar. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 513; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:East Union Township
Description:See Union Township
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edinburg
Description:A post office at some time between 1837 and 1853; the third in the county; in southeast Mt. Pleasant Township, not far from the county line. The site was formerly a rendezvous for the Indians. The settlement dates back to 1836 when a store was opened at this point. At one time it was a voting center for an extended territory. The business of Edinburg ceased many years before 1887, the date of the county history. There is nothing left of the settlement but a church and a schoolhouse. So named by S.W.B. Carnegy, the Scotch surveyor, for the metropolis of his native country. The usual spelling is as given though sometimes it is written, more correctly, Edinburgh. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 428, 489; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 607; ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1876, 1898, 11914; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri 1857-1861; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edinburg School
Description:A schoolhouse to the northeast in Tobin Township. So named for the old settlement of that name. The first school in the county was held at Edinburg in homes. (I.M. Horne; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edinburgh
Description:See Edinburg
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edinburgh Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church on the site of the old settlement of Edinburg (q.v.) which was a Baptist community. The church holds services once a month, and with the schoolhouses keeps alive the name of a once important pioneer village. (Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Egypt
Description:A name sometimes given the Arbela School. From the fact that the name Arbela came from Asia, it would appear that county residents were seeking a name equally foreign for the school. There was in 1873 a section known as "Egypt" (q.v.) south of Arbela in the county below, not far from the north and south county lines, also a school in Clark to the south in the same section. All of that strip of country was wild, hilly, and overgrown; hence the name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm Branch
Description:A branch rising in Scotland County, flowing generally south in Clark into the North Wyaconda Creek. So named for the many elm trees in the vicinity. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; Chas. Seyb)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm Grove
Description:A grove of elm trees north to west in Jefferson Township. No community known of that name. (ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1898; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Johnson Township on the north line. It stands in a grove of elm trees. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Energy
Description:A post office from 1895-1904; a little store up in the clay hills in the western part of the county, close to the Schuyler line. It was never much of a village. Cram's Map of 1879 gives Energy as over the line in Schuyler. An ideal name, suggested by its location in the hills. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 614; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1904-1915; Mrs. Arla B. Williams; Lewis C. Moore; C.E. Watkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Enterprise School
Description:A school in the Bible Grove Consolidated School District (q.v.). An ideal name. Formerly known as the Croley School and later as the Purvis. Both names were for families close to the school. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Etna
Description:A post office from 1867-1902; in Thomson Township, in the southeastern part of the county; eleven miles from Memphis. It was settled by Germans--surveyed and established, the County History says, in 1855; the History of N.E. Missouri gives the date as 1865. It is in a fine locality on a high, dry, level prairie, on the Canton road. There was in the past a large inn there. It was also a Methodist center. Today all is gone but a church and the schoolhouse. So named for the Etna volcano in Sicily, the largest volcano in Europe. Just why the residents should have hit up on this name no one seems to know. There was a trifling eruption of this volcano in 1864-1865, and a very great eruption in 1852. The latter may have made them Etna conscious. (Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 593; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 490; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 614; ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1876, 1898; Eaton, 64; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri, 1861-1915; INTERN. CYC.; Mrs. Arla B. Williams; Walter McPherson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Etna School
Description:A schoolhouse in Thomson Township keeping alive the name of the little town of Etna (q.v.) on the site of which it stands. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ewing Place
Description:A country home known widely as the home of Ella Ewing, tallest woman in the world, 8 feet, 4 inches in height. The house is still of interest, built as it was to accommodate her height. Miss Ewing died in 1913. (Mrs. Arla B. Williams; C.E. Watkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ewing School
Description:See Brick School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius
Description:See Crawford
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius River
Description:Like North and South Rivers (q.v.), or "Two Rivers," the Fabius is a double or twin stream; the only difference being that "Two Rivers" never actually unite, though they empty into the Mississippi at practically the same point, whereas the North and South Fabius do unite just one mile above their mouth. The Fabius River proper is therefore but one mile in length. It empties into the Mississippi in east-cenrtal Fabius Township, Marion County, near West Quincy, about two miles above the mouth of "Two Rivers." The North Fabius rises in Iowa and flows southeast through Scotland County, which it bisects diagonally; then it cuts off the northeast corner of Knox County and the southwest corner of Clark County, and flows still in a general southeast direction, diagonally through Lewis County into Marion County, of which it cuts off the northeast corner. In Union Township of Lewis County it receives a tributary known as the Middle Fabius, which rises in Schuyler County and flows southeast through Scotland and Knox to the junction. The South Fabius also rises in Schuyler County and takes a southeastern course through Scotland, Knox, Lewis, Shelby, and Marion Counties. In Liberty Township, Knox County, it receives two tributaries known as the North and South Forks of the South Fabius (on the 1876 map named the North and South Branches). North Fork rises in Greensburg Township, Knox County; South Fork rises in Adair County and enters Knox County in Lyon Township, flowing southeast to the junction with the South Fabius. The North and South Fabius, like the other streams of northeast Missouri, are rivers only by courtesy, much too small for navigation. They are called creeks by Beck. The various name by which they had their tributaries distinguished are obviously mere colorless names of position, with the exception of the name Fabius itself. This name, has had a bewildering variety of spellings, and its origin presents a problem of peculiar difficulty. The oldest form of the name, found on the Lewis and Clark Map of 1809, is "R. Fabiane." This form, slightly shortened, appears as "Fabian" in Cumming's WATER PILOT of 1837 (p. 129), and as late as 1871 in James's RIVER GUIDE (p. 9), although farther on (p. 18) James speaks of it as "Fabin's River." On the Lincoln Map of 1822 it is varied to "Ferbien." Forms without the final -n begin to appear in 1821. The spelling "Fabba" is given on the Maps for 1821, 1824, 1826, and 1832. Beck in his GAZETTEER (1823) calls it "Fabba Creek" and speaks of the South Fabius as the "Little Fabba." Holcombe in the HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND (1887), p. 23, says the old forms were "Faba" and "Little Faba," and that the two streams together were known as the "Fabas" or "Fabbas;" so Coues in a note to his ed. of Pike's EXPEDITION (I.9). The modern spelling "Fabius" first appears on a map of 1834, and is used in Wetmore's GAZETTEER (1837). Wetmore calls the two streams together the "Fabii." A popular nickname today for them is the "Faby." After that "Fabius," and the distinctive "North and South Fabius" become general. The name "Middle Fabius" first appears on a map of 1844. On a map of 1881 appears "Trabius," an obvious misprint. The Soulard story offered by Holcombe in 1884 (HISTORY OF MARION P. 771) to account for the name, according to which it was given about 1800 by Don Antonio Soulard in honor of the Roman general Fabius Maximus, has been given at length and criticized under Hannibal (q.v.). In spite of the fact that Holcombe himself presented it doubtfully and later discarded it, it has been accepted by Mahan and Eaton. For the reasons given, and especially in view of the early spellings which have just been listed this story must be ruled out as clearly impossible. In 1887 Holcombe offered a substitute derivation from the Spanish word "faba," a pea or bean. "The Spaniards probably gave it that designation because of the great number of wild peas originally upon its banks. In time the south fork was called Little Faba; then both streams were spoken of as the Fabbas, and of course the corruption was easy to Fabius...With more light on the subject than he had in 1884, the writer is now of the opinion that the name came as stated above, and that the real English name of the stream is Bean Creek." (HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND, p. 23). Holcombe's second explanation must likewise be rejected, both in the light of the earliest forms listed above and for other reasons. The Spaniards named very few places in Missouri, and none in N.E. Missouri; and such a name as "Bear Creek," though not impossible has few parallels in Missouri nomenclature. And yet Holcombe had perhaps a glimmering of the truth in his ingenious suggestion that the modern Fabius might have arisen from the plural form of the name, as used for the two streams. If the earliest form of the name, as there is every reason to believe, a plausible chain of development would be as follows; Fabiane---Fabian---Fabia---Fabias (pl.)---Fabius. It would be very easy for the final nasal to disappear in American speech, as the later forms Faba, Fabba, and Faby demonstrate that it actually did disappear and with the -s added for the plural, it would be equally natural for some classically minded American, about the time of the founding of Hannibal, Scipio, and Palmyra to get a suggestion from it of the name of the Roman general. Indeed, it is altogether possible that the false etymology which made Fabius out of the old French river name was the actual germ of the "Carthaginian complex" and of the whole series of classical names that swept Northeast Missouri like an epidemic. (See for other classical names the discussion under Hannibal). If the true original of Fabius was indeed Fabiane of Fabian, it follows of course that we must accept a humbler name-father than the famous Roman "Cunctator" and contender against Hannibal. Probably he was merely another of those forgotten French traders and trappers who had left their imprint so widely on Missouri nomenclature. Certainly it is in accord with what we might naturally expect to find the three principal water-courses of Marion County, now known as Fabius, North River (q.v.)---originally the Jeffreon--and Bay de Charles, all of which must have been in the days of the French occupation veritable hunters' paradises, bearing the familiar French personal names of Charles, Jeffreon, and Fabian. (Maps Missouri, 1809-1881; ATLAS MARION, 1913, SHELBY, 1878, KNOX, 1898, LEWIS, 1916, CLARK, 1878, SCOTLAND, 1898; Holcombe's HIST. MARION, 1884, and HIST. LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, SCOTLAND, 1887; Mahan, HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 1913; Eaton; GAZETTEERS and GUIDES by Beck, 1823, Wetmore, 1837, Cummings, 1837, and James, 1871; Pike's EXPEDITION, ed. Coues, 1895)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:A schoolhouse in Johnson Township. So named for its location on a prairie with rolling hills. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Farnworth's Mill
Description:A mill north of center toward Hill (q.v.). So named for its owner. There are Farnworths there today. (Map Missouri, 1844; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Forman Creek
Description:A stream which rises somewhat north of center, flowing generally southeast into the North Fabius. So named for the pioneer miller. (See Forman's Mill) (Campbell 1874, 592; SOIL SURVEY, Scotland 1906)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Forman's Mill
Description:The first saw mill in the vicinity of Memphis, with a circular saw run by horse-power. The County History gives the spelling as Foreman. So named for the pioneer miller. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 497; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fort Donaldson
Description:A community store established at an early period in Tobin Township by Thomas Donaldson, whence the name Donaldson. It seems evident that FORT was added to the family name for "Fort Donaldson," the fort on the Tennessee River which surrendered to Grant in 1862. (L.C. Moore; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fort Donaldson School
Description:A schoolhouse in Tobin Township. A school is said to have been taught here as early as 1838 by Judge John C. Collins. So named for the community store known as Fort Donaldson (q.v.). (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 537; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fortney's Ford
Description:A ford on the North Fabius in the 1840s. So named for a pioneer landowner. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Friendship Church
Description:See Little Zion Baptist Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Friendship School
Description:A schoolhouse in Vest Township to the west of Crawford. An ideal name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frogge School
Description:A schoolhouse in Tobin Township. A number of families of this name in the neighborhood thought the schoolhouse was probably named for J.M. Frogge. Formerly known as Rabbit Roost for the number of rabbits in the vicinity. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garden Prairie
Description:See Lawn Ridge
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garden Prairie School
Description:A school near or at Lawn Ridge (q.v.). The school is now discontinued. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gorin
Description:A post office from 1887; in the southeast part of the county, in Harriton Township, on the Santa Fe., sixteen miles from Memphis. The original town was established in 1857 on a hill to the north of its present location. When the railroad in 1866 was completed to the point of the present site of Gorin, the town was moved. It is now an important commercial center in the county. Eaton says that it was named for the Rev. M.G. Gorin though "another says for Major H.J.M. Gorin, an early settler." (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 490; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 611; Eaton, 64; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1902; W.W. Gillispie; Walter McPherson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grand River Christian Union College
Description:A college established at Edinburg (q.v.) was near the Middle Fabius. It was a Baptist community so that the college was not an organization of the Christian Church. (Williams 1904, 56; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Granger
Description:A post office since 1876; in the northeastern part of Thomson Township, on the Burlington, about one and a half miles west of the eastern line, and twelve miles east of Memphis. Surveyed and laid out in 1874; incorporated in 1912. It lies on a high prairie, the center of a fertile farming area. The Granger society (See Fabius Grange) was attracting much attention at the time, and there was a number of Grangers at this point; hence the name. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 491; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 613; Eaton, 64; Postal Guide; ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1876, 1898; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1879; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Granger Consolidated School District
Description:A consolidated school district which included a part of Etna School District and a part of Black Oak, with all of one district in Clark County known as Pea Ridge (q.v.). (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greasy
Description:See Middle Fabius
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greasy Seminary
Description:A seminary conducted at Middle Fabius (Village Greasy) (q.v.) by a Miss Veech as early as 1860. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green Township
Description:See Union Township
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green's Mill
Description:A pioneer mill of 1844. So named for its owner, Thomas Green. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hall School
Description:A schoolhouse in Miller Township. So named for a family in the neighborhood. (I.M. Horne; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harbridge Mounds
Description:Three Indian mounds three-quarters of a mile north of Arbela, in the bottom land of the Middle Fabius. Nearby there was formerly a large pond now dry and under cultivation. The supposition is that earth was taken from this tract for the purpose of building the mounds. So named for H.W. Harbridge, the pioneer land owner. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 409; C.E. Watkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harmony Grove Church
Description:A Baptist church which formerly stood three miles east of Sand Hill in Scotland County where it was known as Sand Hill Church. It was organized before 1842 and is known as the first church in that county. It was later moved into a grove across the line in Knox County and given the name Harmony Grove. An ideal name. (MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harrison Township
Description:A township in the southeast corner of the county, with Thomson to the north, and Jefferson and Sand Hill to the west. It was framed in May of 1844. So named for William Henry Harrison (1773-1841), ninth President of the United States, in 1841. He died after one month in office. (Court Record; PLAT BOOK 1930; R. McN., 1935; Intern Cyc.; W.C. Ladd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hazel Dell School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township close to Memphis. A name suggested by its location in the hills, and by the hazel growth in the vicinity. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hazel Hill School
Description:A schoolhouse in Thomson Township. So named for its location on a hill with hazel brush in the vicinity. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1914; I.M. Horne; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hazelville
Description:A post office in Knox County from 1898-1904; in the northwest corner on the Scotland-Knox line, in Greensburg Township. It was no more than a country store and post office which stood first in Scotland County where it was a post office from 1886-1897. It was then moved across the line into Knox. So named for the hazel brush that grew abundantly on the treeless plain all around the place. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; ATLAS KNOX, 1898, 1916; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1904-1915; R.W. Haselwood; (F) James Delaney)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Headen's Mill
Description:A mill at Etna in the 1850s and early 1860s. So named for its owner, Jos. V. Headen. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hendricks School
Description:A schoolhouse in the hills south of Memphis, in Sand Hill Township. It is also known as Mound College. Hendricks is a family name. (I.M. Horne; C.E. Watkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Grove Cemetery
Description:A cemetery north of Granger. So named for Hickory Grove Church (q.v.). (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Grove Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church South, one mile west of Arbela; organized about 1850. A building was erected about 1858. So named for a grove of hickory trees in the vicinity. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 549; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hicks School
Description:A schoolhouse in southeast Harrison Township. So named for a family close to the schoolhouse. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hilburn Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Middle Fabius near Pierce's mill (q.v.). So named for Aaron Hilburn, owner of the land at this point. (R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hilt
Description:See Hitt
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hitt
Description:A post office from 1867-1910; in northeast Miller Township, ten miles northwest of Memphis. It was formerly a trading point known as Billupsville for the pioneer, J.H.E. Billups, who came to the county in 1840. Billups' Mill was established at this point and gave to the settlement which grew up the same name out of which developed Billupsville. On the establishment of a post office the name was changed to Hitt for Robert R. Hitt of Illinois (1834-1906), later Congressman from that state, 1903-1905. Mr. Hitt was in the village when the name was selected. Around 1876-1879 the name occurs several times as Hilt, doubtless by error. Billupsville occurs on the maps of 1861-1871. (Parker 1865; P.G.; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 440, 1149; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 614; ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1876, 1878; Maps Missouri from 1874; HIST. ENCY, OF ILLINOIS, V. I; W.W. Gillespie; Lewis C. Moore; I.M. Horne; W.A. Mudd)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hoop Pole College
Description:See McClure School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hoop Pole School
Description:See McClure School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Houston School
Description:A school in the Bible Grove Consolidated School District (q.v.). So named for a family in the neighborhood. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hydetown
Description:See Brock
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Independent School District
Description:A school district north of Memphis in 1898. An ideal name. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:A creek which rises in southwestern Jefferson and flows southeast into the North Fabius in eastern Sand Hill Township. For name see Scotland County. (Campbell 1874, 592; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; SOIL SURVEY, Scotland 1906)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Creek Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church so named for its location on Indian Creek (q.v.). It is an active church. (Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Industry
Description:A post office in 1867. Probably an ideal name. (Goodwin 1867)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jayne School
Description:A schoolhouse in Tobin Township. It bears the name of an old family. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jefferson Township
Description:A township in the center of the county, with Vest, Union, and Thomson to the north, Thomson and Harrison to the east, Mount Pleasant, Tobin, and Sand Hill to the south, and Vest to the west. It was framed in 1844. So named for Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), third President of the United States, (1800-1809). (Court Record; PLAT BOOK 1930; R. McN., 1935; W.C. Ladd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson Township
Description:A township in the northeast corner of the county, with Thomson to the south and Union to the west. It was framed by 1842 as one of the first group of six townships in the county. (See Scotland County). It is likely that the township was named for early settlers. (See Miller Township). No information could be found on this point. (Court Record; PLAT BOOK 1930; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jordan
Description:A post office in 1874; fifteen miles northeast of Memphis. So named for people in the vicinity. (Campbell 1873; Campbell 1874; 593; W.W. Gillispie; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jordan School
Description:A schoolhouse in Johnson Township. So named for people in the neighborhood. (I.M. Horne; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keokuk and Western Railroad
Description:A railroad from the Mississippi River extending north and west through Iowa to Nebraska and points further west, to be known as the Missouri, Iowa, and Nebraska Road, a consolidation of the Alexandria and Nebraska City Road and the Alexandria and Bloomfield (q.v.). It was originally to extend from Alexandria in Clark (1873). Later it was extended to Keokuk, whereupon it became known as the Keokuk and Western. As the Missouri, Iowa, and Nebraska it was completed as far as Memphis in 1871. The road was subjected to long litigation. The court ordered the bonds to be returned and destroyed on the ground that the issue was not sanctioned by the vote of the people. In 1876 the Federal Courts ruled that the bonds were valid. The issue was carried twice to the Supreme Court of the State. The railroad was finally constructed in 1881. It is now a part of the Burlington System. (Campbell 1873, 55; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; ATLAS KNOX 1878; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 455; 458; HIST. CLARK 1887, 292-297, 303; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 340, 341; Williams 1904, 361; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Killwinning
Description:See Kilwinning
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kilowinning
Description:See Kilwinning
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kilwinning
Description:A post office from 1886-1904; in southern Miller Township, twelve and a half miles northwest of Memphis, on a beautiful prairie convenient to timber. It was platted as Uniontown in 1857. Campbell (1873) gives Union Town. Unionton appears on the maps (1871-1898), though the post office was given the name Kilwinning by 1886. Unionton was an ideal name. The present name is that of a town of some imprortance in Ayrshire, Scotland. The name thus carries on the association of Scotland County, Missouri, with old Scotland of the Kingdom of Great Britain. The name is given erroneously with two l's (1915) and as Kilowinning (R. McN., 1936). (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 492; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 614; Postal Guide; ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1876, 1898; Maps Missouri from 1871; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knob View School
Description:A schoolhouse near the southern line in Mount Pleasant Township. Located in "the Knobs" (Hills), whence the name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Laura
Description:A post office in 1860 and 1867; on the border of Schuyler and Scotland counties. The source of the name could not be discovered. Cf. above. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Maps Missouri, 1861)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lawn Ridge
Description:A post office from 1876-1904; seven miles north and east of Memphis. There was a store there which is no longer used. Formerly known as Garden Prairie. Both names are for location. The name occurs as one word 1904-1915. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 538; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 614; Postal Guide; ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1876, 1898; SOIL SURVEY, Scotland 1906; Maps Missouri 1879- 1915; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lawn Ridge Church
Description:A Christian Church near Lawn Ridge (q.v.), whence the name. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leach Mill
Description:A grist and flour mill of brick in the vicinity of Memphis, in 1887. It also carded wool. So named for its owner, Charles Leach. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 497; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leeper School
Description:A schoolhouse northwest of Memphis in Miller Township. So named for a landowner. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Township
Description:A township framed in the May term of court, 1875. The order was revoked in the same term after a matter of less than two weeks. An ideal name. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Fox
Description:A stream which rises in Iowa and flows southeast through the northeast corner of Scotland County into Clark, where it joins the Fox River a little north of center. It takes its name from the larger stream. (Campbell 1874, 592; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Fox River
Description:A stream which rises in Iowa, crosses the northeast corner of Scotland County, flowing southeast, and joins the Fox River (the Big Fox) a little north of Kahoka in Clark. Maps of 1865 and 1871 give the stream as Little Fox or South River. Both names are given for its location and size in relation to the larger stream. (Parker 1865; Map Missouri 1871; ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915, R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Tobin Creek
Description:A small stream that enters Tobin Creek to the southeast, whence the name. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Wyaconda River
Description:The stream rises from branches in southeastern Scotland County, entering Clark in Washington Township, and flowing southeast through Union to unite with the Wyaconda in Jackson Township to the south and west. It takes its name from the larger stream of that name. (See Wyaconda River). (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; R. McN. 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Zion Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church northwest of Memphis by eight miles, in the hills near Crawford; organized in 1860. An active church today. Doubtless this use of the name Zion was suggested by the Zion Baptist Church (q.v.) in the eastern part of the county. The church is known also as Friendship Church, an ideal name. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 545; I.M. Horne; Lewis C. Moore; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Loe School
Description:A schoolhouse in Vest Township. So named for a landowner. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Star House
Description:A house known by this name belonging to J.P. Knott in 1853. It was the site of a camp in Civil War days. So known for the four- pointed star in the cone of the house. (Mrs. Arla B. Williams; Mrs. Lou E. Knott)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lottie
Description:See Rutledge
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Luker's Creek
Description:A stream south of Memphis, flowing into Forman's Branch. So named for a pioneer family. (Campbell 1873; C.E. Watkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lynn Tract
Description:A large tract near the South Wyaconda, south of Granger (q.v.). So named for John Lynn, the original owner. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 419; Walter Scott)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:M. I. and N. Railroad
Description:See Keokuk and Western Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mackley's Distillery
Description:A distillery started in 1876 on the site of Forman's Mill (q.v.). It continued a year or more, then collapsed. So named for its owner. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 513; W.W. Gillispie; Walter McPherson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maiden Kirk Township
Description:An early township in these counties, in existence in 1842 and still recognized in the Court Record of Scotland County in 1844 when judges were selected for the approaching election. The election was to be held in this township at Pratt's Mill (q.v.) which was three miles northwest of Newark in Knox. Fresh's Mill, one mile west of Newark was also in this township. Thus this township must have included the eastern part of Knox County, the latter remaining a part of Scotland County until 1845. There exists no record of the township lines nor reason for the name. The name occurs in the records as two words, but is given in the County History as one word. There is a Kirkmaiden in the southwestern corner of the county of Scotland, which may have suggested the name. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 439; Court Record; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maidenkirk Township
Description:See Maiden Kirk Township
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Masonic Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in Memphis controlled by the Masonic Lodge, whence the name. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 495)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Matticks and Freys Saw Mill
Description:A saw mill on the Memphis and Edina Road in the 1850s and early 1860s. So named for its owners. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McAdow Cemetery
Description:A cemetery a few miles south of Memphis. It took its name from McAdow Cumberland Presbyterian Church (q.v.). (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McAdow Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Description:See Unity Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McClure School
Description:A school in the Bible Grove Consolidated School District (q.v.). So named for a family close to the schoolhouse. Formerly known as Hoop Pole School and Hoop Pole College. It was "down in the brush" where people made their living shaving hoops for making barrels, whence the name. (I.M. Horne; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McGrady Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Description:See McGready Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McGready Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian Church in the southwestern part of the county near Energy; organized in 1859. A log building was erected in 1860; a frame building in 1868. The church was in existence in 1908, but no longer exists. So named for Rev. James McGready who in a revival of religion in in 1797 in the western part of Kentucky was instrumental in organizing this religious denomination. The County History gives the name as McGrady. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 552; MIN. GEN. ASSEM. OF CUMBERLAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 1908; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Memphis
Description:A post office in 1837, the second in the county, at the home of Forman, (See Forman's Mill), 1837-1840. The village grew up one and a half miles from the earlier site. It was dropped as a post office in 1904, but was reinstated in 1922. Memphis is located on the North Fabius in Jefferson Township on the Burlington Road. The first log cabin on the present site was that of Burton Tompkins in 1835. It stood southwest of the present railroad station. The seat of government was established at Memphis three years later. The village was surveyed and laid out in 1843 and the first courthouse was erected in 1844. The village was incorporated in 1853, but the incorporation was discontinued at some time during the Civil War. It was reincorporated in 1864 and incorporated as a city in 1885. The first courthouse was followed by a second in 1856 and a third in 1907. Obadiah Dickerson, whose name has been associated with so much of the pioneer history of N.E. Missouri, helped in the selection of the site and the name for the county seat. The commission chose Memphis, for the city of that great name in Egypt. The old Memphis was the capital of Egypt through most of its early history. Its greatness began with Menes, 5702 B.C., as the date is sometimes given, whence the name. Menes was the first king of the first Egyptian dynasty. Thus would it appear Obadiah Dickerson sought to give historical significance to the "virgin West." (See Palmyra) (Hayward 1853; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 593; ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1876, 1898; Eaton, 64; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 428, 441, 442, 513, 515; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 608; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1857; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Memphis Academy
Description:An academy that existed in Memphis in 1867, whence the name. (W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Memphis-La Grange Road
Description:A road known earlier as the Memphis-La Grange Trail, which connected these two pioneer settlements, Memphis in Scotland County, and La Grange in Lewis County, in 1835. (MISSOURI HIST. REV., Jan., 1936, 221)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Memphis-La Grange Trail
Description:See Memphis LaGrange Road.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mety and Gorin Mill
Description:First wool carding mill at Memphis, in 1846. So named for its owners. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 497; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Fabius
Description:A post office from 1853-1890; in Jefferson Township, eight and a half miles from Memphis on the Middle Fabius River, whence the name. There is a little store there today. Hayward (1853) spells the name Fabies; Sutherland and McEvoy, Goodwin, and Campbell give two names, --Greasy and Middle Fabius, while Sutherland lists the name Middle Fabius (Village Greasy). County residents knew the place as Slab Town because the main employment was the cutting of hoop poles out of hickory trees for barrel making. It was also alluded to as "No Man's Land" for the amount of brush about the place which gave it a wild uninhabitable appearance. No light has been shed upon the name Greasy unless it was a more highly opprobrious name to express the residents' attitudes toward the place. There were some negroes there and earlier we know there were Indians. The name was accepted in good faith seemingly for there was established Greasy Seminary as early as 1860. In 1841 the store here was named "Pull Tight" by some negro families who lived at the foot of the long hill which led up to the store, and which made a "hard pull" necessary in muddy weather to reach the store at the top of the hill. This name still clings to the district. (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1873; Campbell 1874, 593; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 420, 537; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 366; Maps Missouri, 1871-1879; I.M. Horne; W.C. Ladd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Fabius Camp Ground
Description:A camp ground used alternately by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church people and other denominations until about 1853 when it was abandoned for that purpose. It is located nine miles west and a little south of Memphis on the Middle Fabius, whence the name. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 554; Brice Walker)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Fabius Cemetery
Description:A cemetery incorporated by this name, located on the Middle Fabius in the vicinity of the Middle Fabius Camp Ground (q.v.). It is also known as the Camp Ground Cemetery. Both names are for its location. (Brice Walker)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Fabius Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Description:See Middle Fabius United Presbyterian Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Fabius School
Description:A schoolhouse in Vest Township serving the community known by this name. Known also as the "Pull Tight" for the old store in the community. (See Middle Fabius). The school was established in 1841. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 420, 537; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 366; 615; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Fabius United Presbyterian Church
Description:A church organized as the Middle Fabius Cumberland Presbyterian Church at the Middle Fabius Camp Ground (q.v.), whence the name. It was also known as the Camp Ground Cumberland Presbyterian Church for its location. It was organized in 1840, and a log church was built there in 1848. A second building, a frame, was erected in 1853, and the present building in 1875. The church still holds services. The Cumberland Presbyterian churches rejoined the Presbyterian Church in the United States in 1906; hence the name United Presbyterian. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 551; I.M. Horne; Lewis C. Moore; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Fork of the North Fabius
Description:A short stream in northern Jefferson Township, flowing into the North Fabius, from which it takes its name. (PLAT BOOK)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. So named for a family in the neighborhood. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller Township
Description:A township in the northwest corner of the county, with Union and Vest to the east, and Vest to the south. It was framed by 1842 as one of the group of first six townships in the county. (See Scotland County). So named for old settlers who were large land holders. (Court Record; PLAT BOOK; R. McN., 1935; W.C. Ladd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mississippi and Western Railroad
Description:See Canton Bloomfield Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri and Mississippi Railroad
Description:A railroad chartered by a local company in 1865 to run from Macon in the county of that name through Edina in Knox County to the northeast corner of the state. The route proposed was much the same as that proposed for the Alexandria and Bloomington (q.v.). Bonds were issued for the road in 1871, Clark County was surveyed and grading was begun at St. Francisville. Conditions for the building of the road were not fulfilled, the bonds were destroyed and litigation ensued, continuing for some time. The road which was to connect the two rivers, whence the name, was never built. The counties have but recently paid off the last of the indebtedness incurred. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 292-297, 303; HIST. KNOX 1887, 713 ff.; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 367, 368; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morgan's Branch
Description:A stream in Union Township, emptying into North Wyaconda. So named for Jos. K. Morgan from Knox who settled in this township. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 420)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morning View School
Description:A schoolhouse in Thompson Township. So named for its location on the prairie. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mound College
Description:See Hendricks School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Pleasant Township
Description:A township organized by the Lewis County Court, July 11, 1836. It included with Benton Township (q.v.) a part of Knox and all of Scotland County, Mt. Pleasant including the west side, ten miles in width, of the old township, and the entire length north and south. It has been reorganized at various times; on its reorganization in 1844 all the territory in Knox County that formerly constituted part of Mt. Pleasant Township was attached to Center Township in that county. It was otherwise changed in the same year when other townships were formed. The present Mt. Pleasant Township occupies the southwest corner of the county of Scotland, with Vest and Jefferson to the north and Tobin to the east. The name is one of location. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 417, 438, 439, 44; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 607; Court Record; PLAT BOOK; R. McN., 1935; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Zion Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1878 at Arbela, where a frame building was erected. Later it was moved to Gorin. A Biblical name:-Zion, "the same is the city of David." (II Sam. 5:7) (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 546; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mudd Mission
Description:See Mudd Settlement
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mudd Settlement
Description:A Catholic settlement in the northwest corner of the county, three miles northwest of Hitt. As early as 1852 the congregation of Mudd Settlement was established as a mission, known as Mudd Mission. It is the only Catholic Church in the county, served by a priest from a neighboring county. So named for a family of pioneers. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 604; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI 99; Mrs. Velma Williams; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Myers Branch
Description:A branch which flows into the North Fabius from the north. It heads on land owned by the Myers family, whence the name. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Myers School
Description:A schoolhouse in Tobin Township on the south line of the county. It bears a family name. Formerly known as Runts Corner for a family of small people who lived nearby. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Narrow Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in the southeastern corner of Harrison Township in a small grove, whence the name. Formerly known as the Burcham School for a family of that name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nauvoo
Description:A name given for an unknown reason to the northeast part of Memphis, beginning at the northwest corner of "the square." This was the residential district, often referred to as "the silk-stocking" part of town. The name occurs occasionally in the oldest newspaper files going back to 1865. The name is undoubtedly connected somehow with Nauvoo, Illinois, which is located directly east of Memphis just across the Mississippi River in Hancock County. The Illinois town is best known as the seat of the Mormon community after they were expelled from Missouri. Founded by them in 1840, it became famous for the splendor and wealth of the Temple and other buildings they erected. This association may have been responsible for its transferred use of the richest section of the Missouri village that grew up after 1836. When the Mormons were driven out of Illinois in 1846, their buildings were burned, and Nauvoo, Illinois, acquired an unsavory reputation (See Fox River Country, Clark) as headquarters of an organization of thieves and murderers. During the Civil War excitement, Judge Thomas Richardson of Memphis, a Confederate sympathizer "but no rebel," and a highly reputed member of the bar, sitting by the window while confined with other prominent prisoners in the upper story room of the courthouse under military guard, was killed by a musket ball fired from a window on the west side of the square. Later it was the sinister boast of one Frank Byars, a notorious character of Fox River Country, that he had fired the shot. It would appear to be stretching a point to seek explanation for the application of the term "Nauvoo" in this incident though it is possible. The sobriquet may have been given in sport to this particular part of Memphis because it was the "silk stocking" part of town. But the origin of the name more probably goes back to the old Mormon days. (Murphy 1882, 60-62; W.W. Gillispie; John Schuyler; C.E. Watkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ned's Branch
Description:A small branch in the southern part of the county, given the first name of an early settler and still known by this name. (Walter McPherson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Salem Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:A church in southwestern Union Township. For name cf. Salem Church. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nigger Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Fabius near Middle Fabius School (q.v.). So named for a negro that lives near the site. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nigger Deep
Description:A name given to the "old swimmin' hole," a deep hole in the "old Faby bed," a few bends above the railroad bridge. No one knows why it was so named unless it was for the dark appearance of the water owing to the depth of the hole. (W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:No Man's Land
Description:See Middle Fabius
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Barker School
Description:A schoolhouse in the northeast corner of Miller Township. So named for families in the neighborhood. (See South Barker School) (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Fork of the Middle Fabius
Description:A stream which rises in northwestern Schuyler County and flows southeast into Scotland County where it unites in Tobin Township with the South Fork to form the Middle Fabius, whence its name. (R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Fork of the North Fabius
Description:A stream which rises in Iowa, flows through the northeast corner of Schuyler County into Scotland County where it joins the South Fork a little northwest of center to form the North Fabius River, for which it is named. (R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Liberty School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. A name indicating the northern one of two schools bearing the ideal name of Liberty. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Mount Pleasant School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. Located on the prairie, north of South Mount Pleasant School, whence the name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Perryville
Description:See Arbela
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Wyaconda
Description:A branch of the Wyaconda which rises in Iowa, and crosses Scotland County northeast of center. In western Clark it unites with the South Wyaconda to form the Wyaconda River, from which it takes its name. (Campbell 1874, 592; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Wyaconda Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church almost on the Scotland-Clark line, in the vicinity of the South Wyaconda River, whence the name Wyaconda. It was established in 1841. To the name Wyaconda was prefixed North, a term of location which served later to distinguish this, the earlier church, from the South Wyaconda Baptist Church (q.v.) to the south in Clark County. (MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Chapel
Description:A chapel, Southern Methodist, ten miles southwest of Memphis; organized in 1867 and a church building erected the same year. So named for the oak trees in the vicinity. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 550; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Forest School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. So named for its location in extensive white oak territory. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Ridge Addition
Description:An addition to Memphis. A ridge of land so named for its growth of oaks. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 494, 495; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Ridge School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. Located on a ridge among white oak trees, whence the name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Octavia
Description:An addition to Gorin (q.v.). The only explanation offered for the name was that it came about from contention among landowners, "four" sections of land cornering there. This however has no significance in its bearing upon a name that suggests "eight." More probably it is a personal name, for some lady now forgotten. (W.W. Gillispie; Walter McOPherson; W.C. Ladd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pearce's Mill
Description:See Pierce's Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perryville
Description:See Arbela
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pershing Highway
Description:A highway laid out in pioneer automobile days to extend from Canada south to the coast, passing through Memphis, Edina, Bethel, etc. It was never developed. So named for John Jos. Pershing (1860-1948), Commander-in-Chief of the American forces in France in 1917, in the World War. The road was promoted as the Triple Star route, a matter of clever advertising. (INTERN. CYC.; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pierce's Mill
Description:A mill on the South Fork of the Middle Fabius, ten miles southwest of Memphis; existent in 1862. There was an engagement here during the Civil War. (See Vassar Hill). So named for the owner. Knox County History gives "Pearce." (HIST. MARION 1884; 454; HIST. KNOX 1887, 118; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Grove Cemetery
Description:An old cemetery which lies close to the site of Pleasant Grove Church (q.v.), from which it took its name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Grove Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized about four miles from Gorin. The County History gives the date of its organization as 1850; the date is otherwise given as 1877. The church no longer exists. So named for its location. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 545; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 91; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Description:See Pleasnt Hill United Presbyterian Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church in southern Union Township. The name is one of location. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. It is located on a hill slope and named for Pleasant Hill Church in the neighborhood. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill United Presbyterian Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church eight miles northwest of Memphis; organized as Pleasant Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church in 1864. The present church building was erected in 1868. The church is still active. The name Pleasant Hill was given it for its location. The Cumberland Presbyterian churches rejoined the Presbyterian Church U.S. for the most part in 1906; hence United Presbyterian Church. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 553; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Retreat
Description:A post office from 1849-1901; a general store (1887) in Mt. Pleasant Township on the Middle Fabius, about eight miles south of Memphis. Judge John C. Collins served as postmaster from 1849-1883, and gave the post office its name for its location. Nothing remains there today. (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 593; ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1876, 1898; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri 1861-1915; Mrs. Arla B. Williams; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Ridge
Description:A post office in 1849 in the same location as Pleasant Retreat (q.v.). it is evidently an error for that community. (QUINCY HERALD- WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plum College
Description:A schoolhouse in Thomson Township, north of Arbela. So named for its location on the edge of a thicket of wild plum trees. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plum College Church
Description:A Christian Church organized at Plum College (q.v.), and so named. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Poe School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township. So named for a landowner. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pony Creek
Description:A creek northwest of Memphis in Union Township, flowing generally south into the North Fork of the North Fabius. Over the prairies here Indians rode their lean and sturdy ponies in the game drives in the autumn. The name seems to have come down from that period. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; PLAT BOOK)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Praire View Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:A Methodist Church in the northeastern part of the county, ten miles from Memphis; organized in 1840. A frame church building was erected about 1856, and was still in use in 1887. The church is still active. So named for its location. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 547; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie View
Description:See Azen
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie View Christian Church
Description:A Christian Church in the same locality as Prairie View Methodist Church (q.v.), for which it was named. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 548; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie View School
Description:A schoolhouse on the prairie south of Crawford (q.v.) in Vest Township. So named for its location. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Price Chapel
Description:A Methodist Chapel six miles west of Memphis; organized soon after the Civil War, and named for John Price. Previous to 1882, the class met in a schoolhouse. The widow of John Price bequeathed all her property to the church for the purpose of erecting a building, and the chapel was erected in 1882. The building has since been sold and torn down. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 548; Mrs. Arla B. Williams; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Price School
Description:A schoolhouse in Harrison Township close to the south county line. So named for families in the neighborhood. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Price's Mill
Description:A horse mill near Sand Hill, built by Joseph Price; hence the name. It is said to have been the first mill in the county for grinding grain. It was of short duration. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 427)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prospect
Description:See Prospect Grove
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prospect Grove
Description:A post office from 1853-1904; ten miles east-northeast of Memphis. The post office in 1876 was a farmhouse. (Polk, 1876). The Atlas of 1876 and of 1898 give the name Prospect, as does the Soil Survey Map of 1906. There is nothing there today but the school. So named for its location on the prairie in a grove. (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 593; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1861-1915; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prospect Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Johnson Township. Marking the site of an old settlement bearing the name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Providence Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the northeast part of the county; organized in 1865. A building was erected in 1878. The church is still active. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 546; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pull Tight
Description:See Middle Fabius
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pull Tight School
Description:See Middle Fabius School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Purvis School
Description:See Enterprise School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rabbit Harbor
Description:See South Liberty School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rabbit Roost
Description:See Frogge School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rainbow
Description:A post office from 1881-1889, and again in 1891; a trading post near the southeast corner of the county, three miles south of Gorin on the North Fabius. It was established in 1880 and used to be quite a town. Today Rainbow Bridge (q.v.) is all that keeps the name alive. The name Rainbow it is thought, may have been suggested by Raine, the name of a family living there. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 490; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; I.M. Horne; Mrs. Arla B. Williams; Mrs. Lou E. Knott)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rainbow Bridge
Description:A bridge over the North Fabius on the site of the former village known as Rainbow (q.v.), from which the bridge took its name. (Mrs. Lou E. Knott)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Range Line Schoolhouse
Description:A pioneer schoolhouse existing around 1840. It was near Bible Grove. So named for its location. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 538; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Redd Mill
Description:An early mill at Etna (q.v.). So named for its owner. (O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Richland Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church south of Hitt; organized in 1849. It is still active. So named for the quality of the soil. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 544; Mrs. Arla B. Williams; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ritter
Description:A post office in 1874; five miles northeast of Memphis. There was a store there which no longer exists. So named for a pioneer family. (Campbell 1874, 593; W.C. Ladd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Robinson School
Description:A schoolhouse in the northwest part of Vest Township. So named for a family in the neighborhood. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Grove
Description:A grove southeast of Memphis down by Gorin, so named by reason of its form. (Brice Walker)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Grove Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian Church at Round Grove (q.v.), whence its name. Organized in 1859. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 553; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse north of Gorin, in Harrison Township. Formerly located in a grove, now gone; hence the name. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898, 1914; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rumpus Ford
Description:A ford over the North Fabius on an early road of the 1840s. So named for John F. Rumdue, justice of the peace, who was instrumental in laying out the road. Evidently a humorous nickname. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Runts Corner
Description:See Myers School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ruskin
Description:A post office from 1899-1901; south and east of Memphis, midway between the North Fabius and Middle Fabius streams, close to Rutledge. So named on the grounds that "Ruskin" was as near to the name "Rutledge" as the residents could find. (Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1904-1915; R.D. Westcott)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rutledge
Description:A post office from 1889; in the southern part of the county in Sand Hill Township, fourteen miles southeast of Memphis. It is a station on the Santa Fe line, so established about the time the line was completed to this point. When Millport (q.v.) in Knox was missed by the railroad it was moved over to this new site. Rutledge is surrounded by good farming land. The land was purchased from a Wm. Lingenfelter, the latter retaining one-half interest. He wanted to name the station Lottie for one of his daughters, but was overruled by the land company. The company was getting its money from an English company, and it was a requirement that two towns on the Santa Fe at this point be named for two officials of that company; hence the name Rutledge. (See Baring, Knox County) (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 612; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1898; R.D. Westcott)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem Church
Description:A Christian Church seven miles southeast of Memphis. It is an active church today. Cf. above. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 548; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. So named for Salem Church (q.v.). (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Hill
Description:A post office from 1835-1902; the oldest settlement in the county and the first post office. The first county court of this locality met at Millport (q.v.) in what is now Knox County; the second met at Sand Hill, which was chosen as the first county seat. Here the first election was held in 1833, the purpose of which was to elect a congressman and Lewis County officers. Sand Hill was settled in 1833 and its first store was established in 1835. Levi and George Rhoads settled near in 1833, and Sand Hill was the headquarters of the so-called Cooper Settlement (q.v.) when Scotland and Knox were one territory. It is said to have been founded by James L. Jones of Tennessee. Sand Hill lay fourteen miles south-southeast of Memphis on the Middle Fabius, just over the border of Scotland County. It was laid out in 1857 by Chas. Durkee, and gave promise of growing into an important industrial center, drawing for a time quite a little trade from what is now Knox County. On the taking off of the six miles for Knox (See Scotland County) the site of Memphis was selected as the county seat of Scotland County as it was a more nearly central location. When the court was moved to Memphis, Sand Hill ceased to grow, remaining but a small village. Today there is no store on the site and there are but few people. It was given its name from the fact that at this point there is a section more or less of land composed almost wholly of sand which extends to a great depth, and in which there are a number of springs or places where there is an abundance of water just below the surface. (Mitchell 1850; Hayward ; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 593; Eaton, 64; P.G.; HIST SCOTLAND 1887, 408, 437, 438, 488, 489; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 607; ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1876, 1898; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri, 1857-1915; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Hill Branch
Description:A branch south of Indian Creek (q.v.), flowing southeast by Sand Hill, whence its name. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Hill Church
Description:See Harmony Grove Church, Knox.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Hill Township
Description:A township on the south line, with Jefferson to the north, Harrison to the east, and Tobin to the west. It was created out of Mt. Pleasant Township in June of 1852. It took its name from the first settlement, the village of Sand Hill (q.v.). (Court Record; PLAT BOOK; R. McN., 1935; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 445)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Saunders' Mill
Description:A saw and grist mill at Uniontown (See Kilwinning) in 1860. It was operated by Saunders and Bros., whence the name. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 492)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scotland County
Description:Scotland County is located on the Iowa-Missouri line, with Clark County to the east, Knox to the south, and Schuuyler and Adair to the west. The county was originally included in Lewis, and was until about 1842 a part of the hunting grounds allotted by the government to the Indians. This particular locality was known as headquarters of the Indian chief of the Sauk and Foxes, Keokuk, (1780-1848), who gave his name to Keokuk, Iowa. The county consists of an extense of land about two-thirds prairie and one-third timber and bottom land. Originally it was that part of Lewis County known as Benton Township (q.v.), set apart for a separate county and duly organized for civil and military purposes, and included besides what is now Scotland County the northern part of Knox, a strip six miles in width. In 1836 the Lewis County Court organized Mt. Pleasant Township (q.v.) out of Benton. In 1837, territory which now composes about one-third of Scotland County was attached to Clark County for civil and military purposes. The two townships, Benton and Mt. Pleasant participated in the dispute over the boundary line between Iowa and Missouri, and were not organized into a county until 1841 after the adjustment of the dispute. The statement that Scotland County was settled as early as 1832 is questioned, for the Black Hawk War was occurring in this vicinity at that time. Sand Hill (q.v.) was the site of the first settlement, to which the date of 1833 is given. David Cooper in the spring of that year became identified with the story of both Scotland and Knox (See Cooper Settlement). It is claimed that Robert T. Smith, first treasurer of the county, came in 1833. The pioneers who came in that early period were from Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. "Squatters" settled on the rolling prairie in the vicinity of Sand Hill, Bible Grove, and Pleasant Retreat (q.v.). On the close of the War of 1861, a large emigration ensued from Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Iowa. The county was so named by the old Scottish surveyor, S.W.B. Carnegy of Canton, for the homeland of the Scottish people. The two already existing townships were continued with changed lines, and to these were added Johnson, Miller, Maidenkirk, and Ayreshire (q.v.) the last two recalling in name association with the mother country. These Scotch names were followed by names of early settlements so associated. (See Edinburg and Kilwinning) Records of the location, extent, even date of organization of these early townships have not been preserved. Changes followed with additions, the townships reaching in 1891 the present number of ten with lines existing today. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 405, 406, 410, 417, 439, 469, 489, 497; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 606; Davis & Durrie 1876, 429; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; SOIL SURVEY, Scotland, 1906; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slab Town
Description:See Middle Fabius
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Barker School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. So named for families in the neighborhood. (See North Barker School) (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Bethel Methodist Protestant Church
Description:A Methodist Protestant Church in southern Union Township. For Bethel see above. "South" was added for its location. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Fork of North Fabius
Description:A name given around 1836 to the Middle Fabius, owing to the location of that river. (See Fabius River) (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 48)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Fork of the Middle Fabius
Description:A stream which, rising in western Schuyler County, flows through southwest Scotland County, uniting in Tobin Township with the North Fork to form the Middle Fabius, whence its name. (Campbell 1874, 592; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Gorin
Description:Directly south of Gorin proper, whence its name. (R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Liberty School
Description:A schoolhouse in the hills of Sand Hill Township. Cf. North Liberty School. Formerly known as "Rabbit Harbor" for the number of rabbits there. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Mount Pleasant School
Description:A schoolhouse on high rolling prairie near the county line to the south, whence the name. (See North Mount Pleasant School) (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Upton School
Description:See Upton School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spees School
Description:A schoolhouse in Miller Township, close to the western county line. So named for families in the neighborhood. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spirit Hill
Description:The home of John Harvey Mott; south of Memphis, in the late 1870s and early 1880s. Mr. Mott was "probably the greatest medium of his age;" hence the name. For years people came to Memphis from all parts of the United States to consult him. The hill is now the site of the County Home. (Mrs. Arla B. Williams; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spirit Ridge
Description:The road lying along the ridge leading to the home of John Harvey Mott (see "Spirit Hill"); hence the name. (Mrs. Arla B. Williams; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Staple's Mill
Description:A pioneer mill south to west of center; entered on the Court Records in the 1840s, and indicated on maps 1844-1861. So named for its owner. Hutawa gives Stapol's, which is incorrect according to the records. (Hutawa Map Missouri, 1844; Map Missouri, 1861; Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stapol's Mill
Description:See Staple's Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stark's and Ellis Bridge
Description:A pioneer bridge on Bear Creek in the 1840s. It may have been so named for an old mill though no record of a mill by this name was found. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stice School
Description:A school in the Stice neighborhood (see Stice's Mill), that met in pioneer days in a cabin erected for a dwelling house, about 1/4 mile north of Bible Grove. So named for its location. (HIST. SCOTLAND (1887), 537)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stice's Mill
Description:A water mill on the Fabius River established by Jesse Stice, whence the name. The mill was of short duration. Jesse Stice is credited with building the first house in the county (1834). It stood about one-half mile south of Bible Grove (q.v.). It is claimed by some that the Stice brothers were the first settlers in the county. (HIST. SCOTLAND (1887), 428, 522; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Summer's Bridge
Description:A bridge on the North Wyaconda near Summer's Mill (q.v.) for which it was named. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Summer's Mill
Description:A mill in the northern part of the county on the North Wyaconda. So named for the owner. (Map Missouri (1844); Walter McPherson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Santa Fe Railroad
Description:See Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thomson Township
Description:A township on the east line in the middle tier, with Union and Johnson to the north, Union and Jefferson to the west, and Harrison to the south. It was framed out of Harrison Township in August of 1888. So named for an old and prominent family of early settlers who were large landholders. Judge John Thomson, who died in 1877, and Judge Robert Thomson were prominent judges each for a long period, the latter in the 1880s. (Court Records; PLAT BOOK; R. McN., 1935; W.C. Ladd; Walter Scott)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tobin Creek
Description:A creek which rises in the western part of the county in Vest Township, and flows southeast through southwestern Jefferson and Tobin Townships a little east of center into the Little Fabius in the latter township. So named for George Tobin who came to Missouri from Tennessee, settling in this vicinity from six to ten days later than Jesse Stice (see Stice's Mill). But five miles lay between the two but they did not meet for six months. (Campbell (1874), 592; R. McN. (1935); Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tobin Schoolhouse
Description:A pioneer schoolhouse on Tobin Creek, whence the name. It was the first building to be used exclusively as a schoolhouse. It no longer exists. (HIST. SCOTLAND (1887), 537; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tobin Township
Description:A township on the south county line, with Jefferson to the north, Sand Hill to the east, and Mount Pleasant to the west. It was established in June of 1890. So named for Tobin Creek (q.v.). (Court Record; PLAT BOOK; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:A Methodist Church ten miles northwest of Memphis. It is still standing but is not active. For name cf. Trinity Church, Marion. (HIST. SCOTLAND (1887), 547; I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Triple Star Route
Description:See Pershing Highway
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tyra Marches Horse Mill
Description:A horse mill in Mt. Pleasnat Township in the 1850s. So named for its owner. Probably a miswriting for March's. (Court Record)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Church
Description:A church seven miles southeast of Memphis, erected in 1883. It was built and is used jointly by several denominations, whence the name. (HIST. SCOTLAND (1887), 550; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; ATLAS SCOTLAND (1898); Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Thomson Township, located on the southern slope of a hill that has been in timber, whence the name Grove. Union is an ideal name. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union School
Description:A schoolhouse in a district including part of Jefferson and Harrison townships. So named for Union Church in the neighborhood, (q.v.). (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Town
Description:See Kilwinning
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Township
Description:A township on the northern line of the county, with Johnson and Thomson to the east, Jefferson, Vest, and Thomson to the south, and Miller and Vest to the west. It was organized in 1859 out of Johnson Township and known as Green Township for Judge and Thomas Green, the latter the county sheriff at the time. The lines were changed in 1862 and again in 1866, and in the latter year the name was changed to Union, an ideal name. Though no such division is indicated on the maps, Union Township is divided into East and West Union, as determined in the Court Record of 1888, and is so known by the residents. (Court Record; PLAT BOOK; HIST. SCOTLAND (1887), 445; R. McN., 1935; W.C. Ladd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Unionton
Description:See Kilwinning
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Unionton College
Description:A school established in the late 1870s or early 1880s in Unionton (see Kilwinning), whence the name. (W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Unity
Description:A post office from 1876-1904; a farming settlement seven miles southeast of Memphis. The store is gone today. It appears to have taken its name from Unity Cumberland Presbyterian Church (q.v.). (Polk (1876); Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1871-1915; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Unity Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian Church six miles southwest of Memphis. It was organized in 1859-1860, and held its meetings in a schoolhouse until the present building was erected in 1873. The church still exists as a United Presbyterian Church, though not very active. Unity was an ideal name. It went also under the name McAdow Cumberland Presbyterian Church; so named for Samuel McAdow who aided the two ministers, Finis Ewing and Samuel King, in their irregularities which led to the organization of the Cumberland Presbyterians. (HIST. SCOTLAND (1887), 552; I.M. Horne; Lewis C. Moore; C.E. Watkins; J.L. Tennant; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upton
Description:A post village from 1860-1867, and again in 1891 and 1892; in Johnson Township; thirteen miles from Memphis on the State line. South Upton, the original town (1855), was on the Iowa side, and is still a post office there. There was nothing left on the Missouri side by 1887 but the schoolhouse which keeps alive the name. (Sutherland & McEvoy (1860); Goodwin (1867); Postal Guide; ATLAS SCOTLAND, 1876, 1898; HIST. SCOTLAND (1887) 493)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upton School
Description:A schoolhouse in Johnson Township. So named for an old post office of that name (q.v.). Known also today as the South Upton School for the Iowa village just over the line. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Van Osdoll's Mill
Description:A grist mill northwest of the center of the county on one of the "Fabies;" owned by a German family of this name. (Map Missouri (1844); W.W. Gillispie; Walter McPherson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vassar Hill
Description:A hill near the Middle Fabius on the road leading from Memphis to Kirksville, about one and a half miles northeast of Bible Grove. Here was fought the only engagement in the county during the Civil War, July 18, 1862; known as the Battle of Vassar Hill. The hill was so named for the owner. (HIST. SCOTLAND (1887), 519; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 617; Mrs. Arla B. Williams; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vest Township
Description:A township in the middle tier on the western line, with Miller to the north, Union and Jefferson to the east, and Jefferson and Mt. Pleasant to the south. It was framed from Jefferson in February of 1891, and its lines changed somewhat in 1906. So named for Senator George Graham Vest (1830-1904), Confederate Senator, 1862-1865, member of the U.S. Senate, 1879-1903. (Court Record; PLAT BOOK; R. McN., 1935; W.C. Ladd; U.S. BIOG. DICT.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Village Greasy
Description:See Middle Fabius
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walker's Mill
Description:First grist mill in the vicinity of Memphis; established in 1851 by J.P. and T. Walker, whence the name. (HIST. SCOTLAND (1887), 497)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Vest Township. So named for its location in a grove of walnut trees. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Quincy and Alexandria Railroad
Description:See Canton Bloomfield Railroad
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Union Township
Description:See Union Township
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Chapel
Description:A Baptist Chapel in southwest Thomson at Round Grove (q.v.). It holds services irregularly. So named for a family in the vicinity. (ATLAS SCOTLAND (1914); Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township, southwest of Memphis. So named for a pioneer family. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williams Creek
Description:See Williamson's Creek
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williamson's Creek
Description:A creek close to Memphis on the southwest, flowing northeast into the North Fabius. It furnishes Memphis with its water supply. The Atlas of 1876 indicates it erroneously as Williams Creek. So named for a land owner. (ATLAS SCOTLAND (1876); SOIL SURVEY, Scotland (1906); Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilson School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township on the north line. So named for a landowner. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Works Creek
Description:A creek to the east rising near Memphis and flowing into the South Wyaconda. So named for people in the vicinity. (Campbell (1873); Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda
Description:A post office from 1853-1874; in Union Township, nine miles north-northeast of Memphis. So named for the Wyaconda streams in the vicinity. (Hayward (1853); Goodwin (1867); Campbell (1873); Campbell (1874); 593; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1861- 1874)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda River
Description:This river is formed by the union of two long streams known as the North and South Wyaconda, both of which rise in Iowa and flow southeast through Scotland County, uniting in northern Clark to form the main stream. This follows a southeastern course through southwest Clark, joined on the way by the Little Wyaconda, enters Lewis by way of Lyon Township, traverses the latter county through the northeast and east, joining the Mississippi a short distance above La Grange. It is one of the largest rivers between the Des Moines and the Salt rivers. Pike speaks of its mouth as being 100 yards wide, and bearing due west from the Mississippi. Beck (1823) speaks of it as the Waconda Creek. It is known by an Indian name which goes back to an old Indian tradition of two Sioux Indians who died on its banks in the night with no marks of violence upon them. Their death was thus ascribed to the supernatural; hence the place of their death became known as the Waconda--residence of the Master of Life or the Great Spirit, whom they knew as Wakonda. The latter is a term applied by tribes of the Siouan family when the power believed to animate all natural forms is spoken to or spoken of in supplication or in rituals. (Spelled Wakanda by Riggs in the Dakota Dictionary, where it is given as a verb signifying to reckon as holy or sacred--to worship). The noun Wakan signifies a spirit, something consecrated. To the Omaha nothing is without life; the rock lives, as do the cloud and the tree as well as the animal. He projects his own consciousness upon things. The power which brings to pass and holds all things in their living form he designates as Wakonda. All power is of the Wakonda, which is invisible and therefore of the spirit, to which is ascribed all that is mysterious or beyond ordinary experience. The name is pronounced usually as written--properly_____the common pronunciation in the vicinity of the river is_____Pike (1805) spelled it as at present, as did also Peck (1851). The Lincole Map (1822) indicates it as Wahkondah. Beck (1823) spelled it Waconda, and it was so indicated on the Map of Missouri, 1824. Other early writers spelled the name Wakenda (Map Illinois and Missouri, 1834). In 1832 Wyaconda again appears, in 1844 Wiaconda, in 1850 Wiconda, in 1858 Wyaconda again. The name continues to vary in form until about 1878 when it becomes somewhat consistently Wyaconda. The stream is also known as the Big Wyaconda, and the North Wyaconda Creek, because of its relation to the other stream of the same name. (See Little Wyaconda). (HIST. LEWIS (1887), 152; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; ATLAS CLARK (1878); Pike (1805), 291; Beck (1823); Peck (1851); Eaton, 275; Hodge; Maps Missouri from 1822)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the eastern part of the county; organized in 1850. The present church building was erected in 1875. For name cf. Zion Evangelical Church. (HIST. SCOTLAND (1887), 545)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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