Ste. Genevieve County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Academy Hill
Description:The hill at Ste. Genevieve upon which Louisiana Academy, later known as Rozier Academy, was built. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 311; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Alder Hollow
Description:One mile east of Womack, in Saline Township. Named from the alder shrub growing there. (Arthur Womack)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Avon
Description:A small town, in the central part of Saline Township, with a post office from 1853-1928. Nothing could be learned of the origin of the name. It may have been chosen by some admirer of Shakespeare from his home at Stratford on Avon, the Warwickshire River. (Hayward (1853); Goodwin (1867); Postal Guide)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Avon Lead Mines
Description:At Avon, in southwestern Ste. Genevieve County, in NE 1/4 Sec. 12, T. 35N, 7E. (Winslow (1894) II, 676)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Avon Lookout Tower
Description:Three miles north of Womack, near Avon, for which it is named. The tower is used to detect fires in the surrounding forest. (W.J. Lenz)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Avon School
Description:At Avon in Saline Township. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Babb School
Description:A former school near Genevieve Baptist Church. It was named for a family in the vicinity. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bear Creek
Description:Rises in Union Township and flows into Terre Bleue Creek. Probably named from the animal, since many wild animals were in the vicinity in early days. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Mrs. C.F. Meyer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Beauvais Township
Description:Formed in 1832 from parts of Saline and Ste. Genevieve Townships. Named in honor of Jean Baptiste St. Gemme Beauvis, an official of the county. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 314; Lucille Basler)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bee Knob
Description:Six miles southeast of Miller's Switch (q.v.). A swarm of bees once found in a cave on the hillside is said to have suggested the name. (Joseph B. Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bell (e) Fountain Spring
Description:See Price's Spring.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bellview School
Description:A former school in Ste. Genevieve Township. The name is one of approbation for the prospect, which is remarkably beautiful. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bethel Methodist Church
Description:At Womack. Built about fifty-five years ago. For the name, cf. above. (Arthur Womack)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bidwell Hollow
Description:Three miles north of Womack, in Saline Township. Named for a family. Also called Sawmill Hollow from the sawmill owned by the Bidwells. (W.J. Lenz)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Big Bottom Creek
Description:Rises at New Offenburg and flows into Indian Creek one mile before the latter flows into Establishment Creek. A descriptive name; cf. Little Bottom Creek. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Felix A. Fallert)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Big Saline Creek
Description:See Saline Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Blackjack School
Description:See Cenntenial School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bloom Creek
Description:Rises one mile north of Avon and flows into Madden Creek two miles east of Coffman. Named for the Blume family. For the change in spelling cf. Bloomsdale. (C.A. Boyd)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bloomsdale
Description:A town in eastern Jackson Township, near Establishment Creek, with a post office since 1876. Known as early as 1839 under the name La Fourche a Duclos, for the creek of the same name (q.v.). Father Blume, wishing to have his parishoners on one side of the stream, bought land and had the settlement on what is now Establishment Creek moved to the present site of Bloomsdale. One account has it that Blumesdale, formed from Father Blume's name and the valley in which the town is located, was sent in as a name for the post office; because of its being poorly written, the name was returned with the spelling Bloomsdale. More probably the change is merely an example of the common process of Americanization of a foreign name. (Postal Guide; Rothensteiner (1928) II, 518; Mrs. Edward Schaaf; Rev. Henry Hassel)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Boarman School
Description:See Morning Shade School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bogy Sandstone Quarries
Description:U.S. Survey No. 3221, T. 37, R. 9E, about four miles south of Ste. Genevieve. Named for a landowner and operator. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 196; T.A. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bolivia
Description:A post office from 1830-1837. Nothing could be learned about the exact location of this old post office, or the reason for its adoption of the name of the South American republic. It is perhaps significant that Bolivia achieved its independence in 1825, under the leadership of his favorite statesman Simon Bolivar (1783-1830), who was much admired in the United States, and for whom the country was named. (Green's Postal Guide (1831); Wetmore (1837)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bourbon School
Description:In Ste. Genevieve Township, in the district of New Bourbon, or Nouvelle Bourbon, from which it was named. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bowling
Description:Northwest of Avon. The origin of the name has not been ascertained. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Boyer School
Description:See Fairview School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bremen
Description:See New Bremen
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bremen School
Description:See Ozora School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brickey Hollow
Description:Near the site of Brickey's, for which it is named. (Albert Reed)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brickey Road
Description:Runs from French Village to Brickey's Landing on the Mississippi River, where farmers took grain. Named for its terminus. (F.C. Aubuchon)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brickey's
Description:A town in Jackson Township, on the Mississippi River, with a post office since 1910. John Brickey had a landing and a gristmill here. The fuller name Brickey's Landing was formerly used. (Postal Guide; Albert Reed)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brickey's Gristmill
Description:See Brickey's
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brickey's Landing
Description:See Brickey's
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brickeys School
Description:At Brickey's, for which it is named. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brown Hill
Description:Seven miles south of Miller's Switch (q.v.). Named for a farmer who lived there. (Joseph B. Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brushy Creek
Description:Rises near Centennial School in Saline Township and flows into Saline Creek two and a half miles west of Minnith. A descriptive name, for its wooded banks. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); C.A. Boyd)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brushy School
Description:In Beauvais Township. Named because of the wooded countryside. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Burks Creek
Description:Rises seven miles northeast of Farmington in Ste. Genevieve County and flows into Wolf Creek near Valley Forge in St. Francois County. Named for Charles Burks, landowner in the vicinity. (W.F. Yeager; L.T. Yeager; Jerry B. Burks)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Burks Road
Description:Runs from Farmington through Sprott, seven miles east of Farmington, to Plank Road, 1/4 mile east of Weingarten. For the name, cf. above. (Jerry B. Burks)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Burks School
Description:In Union Township. For the name, cf. above. (Jerry B. Burks)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Burns School
Description:See Pine Grove School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Butterfly Lake
Description:Eleven miles east of Farmington in Saline Township. The lake was constructed about 1928 and stocked with fish. From the air the body of water and surrounding hills give the appearance of a butterfly. So named by Mrs. Leo Dugal. (Leo Dugal)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Buzzard Glory School
Description:See Centennial School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Camp Branch
Description:Rises six miles northeast of Farmington and flows into Wolf Creek near Colony Baptist Church. There is an excellent spring about four feet in diameter at the place where it flows into Wolf Creek, which provides a good place to camp; this may be a reason for its name. (W.F. Yeager; Wm. O'Sullivan)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Camp Rowdy
Description:Three quarters of a mile north of St. Mary's, in Beauvais Township. Probably a rough camp. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Camp Wrather
Description:Near Ozora. It is used by the University of Chicago for summer field courses in geology. The camp was begun in 1915 by the late Dr. Atuart Weller, who discovered an unusual range of rock formations in the surrounding area. Named for William Wrather, a former student there, who provided the funds for building the permanent camp. (Ste. Genevieve HERALD, Aug. 17, 1935; MISSOURI (Am. Guide Series) 522)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cape Girardeau Northern Railroad
Description:Louis Houck was the greatest pioneer in railroad building in Southeast Missouri. He built a railroad from Chester, Illinois, to Perryville. In 1904 he formed a company known as the Cape Girardeau and Chester Railroad Company and built a railroad from Cape Girardeau by way of Jackson to Perryville, where connection was made with the road from West Chester. In 1906 the Saline Valley Railroad was incorporated, and work was begun at Saline Junction of the Cape Girardeau and Chester Railroad to Farmington in St. Francois County, which was completed in 1912. The entire system was then reorganized as the Cape Girardeau Northern Railroad. The road was abandoned in 1917. All the names were taken from the termini and direction of the lines. It was more familiarly known as Houck's Railroad, for its builder. (Miles, HIST. ST. F. (1935) 39- 40)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Castor River
Description:A large stream rising in Ste. Genevieve and St. Francois counties and flowing south into New Madrid County, where it empties into Little River. Miss Hamlett says of this stream: "It was called Crooked Creek, probably because of its winding or crooked appearance, by the early settlers. It is so called by Schoolcraft in 1818; and in 1823 is designated Castor or Crooked Creek by Beck. In 1837 Wetmore refers to it as Castor River, but it continued to be known as Crooked Creek until 1873. "Castor" is a French word meaning beaver, and the name was doubtless given by the early French settlers in St. Francois County, where the river rises." (Douglass (1912) I, xii; Miss Hamlett's thesis)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cave Hollow
Description:West of Avon Lookout Tower (q.v.). Named from a two-story cave at its head. (W.J. Lenz)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cedar Glade School
Description:A former school in Jackson Township. Named from its location in cedar growth. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Centennial School
Description:In Saline Township. Formerly Blackjack School because of the type of oak tree in the vicinity. It was also given the humorous name of Buzzard Glory. No one now seems to remember why the name "Centennial School" was adopted. Perhaps the change of name was in 1904, the 100th year after the American annexation of the Louisiana Purchase, at which time the exposition to commemorate it was being held in St. Louis. (H.J. Carron; Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cherry Springs Creek
Description:Rises one mile east of Zell in eastern Ste. Genevieve Township, to become a part of the source of North Gabouri Creek. A large cherry tree at the spring where it begins explains the origin of the name. (Louis J. Donze)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Chestnut Ridge
Description:A former post office from 1867 to 1876, in Union Township. So named because of chestnut trees on the ridge. Silas Harrington had a fruit nursery here before the Civil War, which ruined the business. (Goodwin (1867); Postal Guide; R.E. Hawn; H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Chestnut Ridge Baptist Church
Description:Six miles east of Farmington, at Chestnut Ridge. Organized in 1868. Named from the community. (R.E. Hawn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Chestnut Ridge School
Description:At Chestnut Ridge. Cf. above. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Chicago Copper Mine
Description:See Cornwall Copper Mine
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Chimney Rocks
Description:Five and a half miles south of Miller's Switch (q.v.). The rock formations resemble chimneys. (Joseph B. Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Clardy
Description:A post office from 1886-1889. Nothing could be ascertained about the origin of the name. (Postal Guide)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Clark National Forest
Description:Two of the four divisions of this national forest are found in these five counties. Parts of Crawford and Washington counties are in the Meramec Division; parts of St. Francois, Iron, and Ste. Genevieve, in the St. Francois Division. Named for Champ Clark (1850-1921), representative from Missouri, 1893-1895; 1897-1921, and speaker of the Sixty-second and Sixty-third Congresses. He was always an advocate of conservation work and a Federal conservative program. (St. Louis POST-DISPATCH, Apr. 10, 1934; Biog. Dict. Am. Congress)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Clearwater
Description:A post office since 1930, in Saline Township. So named by the first postmaster, J.C. Nations, for Clearwater, Florida, where his cousin lived. The town on the west coast of Florida, near Tampa, is now known as Clearwater Harbor. Clearwater is a stock name for American towns, being found in ten other states. (Postal Guide; J.C. Nations)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Clement
Description:A post office in 1910, on Establishment Creek. Named for people who had a fishing club there. (Postal Guide; Albert Reed)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cliff
Description:A post office from 1876-1890 and 1893, in Jackson Township. A landing on the Mississippi River where Brickey's Mill was located. A steep bluff rises immediately from the river; hence the name. (Postal Guide; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cliff Cave
Description:Six miles southwest of Ozora. The name is derived from its location. (Rev. Bernard Kramper)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Coffman
Description:A town in Saline Township, with a post office since 1876. Named for John Coffman, landowner. (Postal Guide; Frank Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Coffman School
Description:At Coffman in Saline Township. Named for the town (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Coldwater Creek
Description:Rises one mile east of Womack and flows into North Fork of Saline Creek seven miles west of Minnith. It is fed by springs; hence the name. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Arthur Womack; J.H. Boyd; Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Coldwater Outing and Game Preserve
Description:Seven miles southeast of Coffman on Coldwater Creek. A private outing place owned principally by St. Louisans, it was organized about 1925. Named from the stream. (E.J. Lawrence)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Concord Methodist Church
Description:In Jackson Township. Services were formerly held in the school building. An ideal name. (Solomon Solberger)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Concord School
Description:In Jackson Township. An ideal name. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Copper Mine Creek
Description:Rises one mile south of New Offenburg and flows into River AuxVases six miles east of New Offenburg. Named for a copper mine along the creek. (Mrs. R.J. Morek; Chas. Morek)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Corn Hollow
Description:At the site of Kinsey in Jackson Township. It was bottom land, where grain, especially corn, was grown. (F.C. Aubuchon)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cornwall Copper Mine
Description:About eight miles southwest of Ste. Genevieve. Simon Grass discovered copper here in 1863. Work was begun by a Chicago firm (hence called Chicago Copper Mine), in 1876. O.D. Harris bought property and operated under the name Cornwall. Cornwall, England, is famous for minerals. (Bain & Ulrich (1905) 36; Weller & Clair (1928) 331)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Counts Hollow
Description:Three miles north of Womack, in Saline Township. Named for a family. (Arthur Womack; W.J. Lenz)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:County Limestone Quarry
Description:One mile south of Ste. Genevieve; in 1904 it had been worked intermittently since 1900. It was on land owned by Peter Schneider of St. Louis. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 195)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Crooked Creek
Description:See Castor River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Crow Lead Mines
Description:The source of the name could not be ascertained. (Bain & Ulrich (1905) 36)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Davison Hollow
Description:West of Avon Lookout Tower (q.v.). Named for a family. (W.J. Lenz)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Detchemendy Hill
Description:Six miles south of Miller's Switch (q.v.). Named for a farmer there. The name Detchemendy is that of one of the oldest French families in the county. Pascal Detchemendy, says Houck, was a resident of Ste. Genevieve in 1797; he was on the Riviere AuxVases in 1790, and in this year had about twenty arpens under cultivation there, houses and outhouses built, was also on Gabouri and Establishement creeks, and at St. Louis. He had a tract of land also near Mine a Breton (now in Washington County), and at the cession of Louisiana in 1804 was a Deputy of Ste. Genevieve. The hill may have been named for one of his descendants. (Houck (1908) I, 355; II, 364, 391; Joseph B. Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Detchemendy House
Description:See "Our Lady of Mount Carmel"
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:District of Ste. Genevieve
Description:See Ste. Genevieve County
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dodge Creek
Description:Rises about three miles south of Ste. Genevieve and flows into a slough of the Mississippi River six miles south of Ste. Genevieve. Francesco Valle, Junior, sold a mill on this creek to Israel Dodge, one of the earliest settlers in the locality. (Houck (1908) I, 365; Lucille Basler)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dodge's Run
Description:Rises one mile south of Minnith and flows into Big Saline two and a half miles east of Minnith. Probably named for an early settler. (Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Doss School
Description:See Salem School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Douglass School
Description:For negroes at Ste. Genevieve: cf. above. (Miss Dayse Baker)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Drury Zinc Mines
Description:About four miles southeast of Robbins Lead Mines. Named for the landowner. (Winslow (1894) II, 700; T.A. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dry Fork
Description:Rises near French Village in St. Francois County, runs through the northwestern corner of Jackson Township in Ste. Genevieve County, and flows into Plattin Creek in Jefferson County. It is usually dry. (T.A. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dry Hollow
Description:Two miles northeast of Womack, in Saline Township. Since there are no springs, it is usually dry. (Arthur Womack)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dugour Road
Description:Runs between Immacualte Conception Catholic Church and Mr. Gilbert's property in St. Mary's (q.v.). The road was dug out to make a short cut to meet the road to St. Mary's Seminary at Perryville. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Eads
Description:A post office in 1915, in Saline Township. Four miles east of Coffman on Saline Creek. Named for an old settler. (Joseph H. Klein)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Egyptian Marble Company's Quarry
Description:Marble deposits in U.S. Surveys 2074, 2083, 3164, T. 37, R. 83, between the upper tributaries of River AuxVases and Saline Creek. Egyptian Marble Company began developments in 1892. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 194)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:El Camino Real
Description:See King's Highway
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:English and Classical Academy
Description:See Rozier Academy
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Establishment Creek
Description:Rises in the vicinity of Sprott in Union Township, runs north between Jackson and Ste. Genevieve townships, and flows into the Mississippi River nine miles north of Ste. Genevieve. On the creek at Politte's Spring was once a settlement (French establishment), that was a place of encampment for those going to St. Louis or Potosi. The creek took its name from the French word for settlement, which in English became Establishment. According to McDermott, who quotes from Poisson's JESUIT RELATIONS AND ALLIED DOCUMENTS, Arkansas, 1727, "On appelle establissement un canton ou il y a plusieurs habitants peu eloignees les uns des autres, qui font une espece de village." (Mrs. Edward Schaaf; A.P. Drury; J.A. Kettinger; McDermott)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Establishment Hollow
Description:Three miles south of Brickey's, where the Establishment Creek flows into the Mississippi River. Named from the creek. (Albert Reed)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Evening Shade School
Description:In Ste. Genevieve Township. Shaded in evening by woods west of it. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Fair View Baptist Church
Description:Nine miles north of Farmington, in Union Township. A complimentary name for the prospect. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:In Ste. Genevieve Township. The name is one of approbation for the location of the school. Formerly called Boyer School, for a family in the community who gave land for the school. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf; H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Flint Bottom Creek
Description:Rises near New Offenburg and flows into River AuxVases. Doubtless descriptive of the bed of the stream. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Fort Joachim
Description:In Ste. Genevieve (town) along South Gabouri Creek. As early as 1759, church records tell that Andre de Guire and others were captains of militia of post of Saint Joachim. Not until 1796 is there knowledge of regular fortification. Saint Joachim, father of the Virgin Mary, was patron of the church at Ste. Genevieve. (Houck (1908) I, 339; Douglass (1912) I, 52; Yealy, SAINTE GENEVIEVE (1935) 70-71)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Fourche a Du Clos
Description:Rises two and a half miles south of Lawrenceton and flows into Establishment Creek one mile east of Bloomsdale. "Fourche" is the French word for fork or creek, used with the preposition a to refer to the owner of the land. Named for an early settler. (A.P. Drury; Mrs. Edward Schaaf; McDermott)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Fourche Polite Creek
Description:See Sugar Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Frenchman Creek
Description:See Sugar Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Frisco Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gabarrie Creek
Description:See North Gabouri Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Genevieve Baptist Church
Description:Two miles west of Miller's Switch. Named from the county. (Joseph B. Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gilliam's Cave
Description:Several hundred yards distant from the left bank of River AuxVases, in a direct line about three miles northwest of a salt spring near the mouth of Saline Creek. Named for the people who owned the land. (Bushnell (1914) 661; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gisi Hill
Description:At the west end of Ste. Genevieve. Valerian Gisi owned the property. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Goose Creek
Description:Rises at French Village and flows into Fourche a Du Clos two miles northeast of Lawrenceton. Many geese were found along its banks. (Mrs. Martin Carron; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gordon School
Description:In Saline Township. Named for the family who deeded the land for the school. (John H. Patterson; Joseph B. Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Government Limestone Quarry
Description:Two miles north of Ste. Genevieve in No. 146, T. 38, R. 9E. U.S. Survey; operated by the U.S. Government. Opened in 1892. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 195)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Grand Park
Description:See New Bourbon Common Field
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Grant's Hill
Description:A post office twenty miles west-southwest of Ste. Genevieve. The origin of the name has not been ascertained. (Campbell's GAZETTEER (1874) 506)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Greasy Creek
Description:Rises in the Greasy Hills and flows into the North Fork of Saline Creek. Water has an oily appearance. There is a local story of stolen hogs thrown into the stream, and the detection of the theft from the appearance of the water. "Greasy," however, is a dialect word for muddy; cf. Mark Twain's use, "Can't you keep away from that greasy water?" and comment in the MARK TWAIN LEXICON. The French equivalent was "vaseux" or "aux vases;" cf. River AuxVases below. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Frank E. Coffman; Ralph Coffman; McDermott)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Greasy Hills
Description:Southwest of Minnith. Named from the creek (Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Grifford Knob
Description:Five miles southeast of Miller's Switch. Named for a trapper and hunter who had a home on top of this high hill, from which the lights of Chester, Illinois can be seen. (Joseph B. Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Haney Hill
Description:One quarter mile west of Clearwater (q.v.). Named for Sam Haney, who lived at its foot. (J.C. Nations)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Henry Hollow
Description:Leads into Butterfly Lake (q.v.). Named for a man who lived there. (Mr. & Mrs. H.N. Vaugh)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hephzibah Baptist Church
Description:Established in New Tennessee in 1820 by Elder Wingate. A favorite Bible name because of its application in Isaiah 62:4 to the restored Jerusalem; its significance is said to be "My delight is in her." (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 552; Conard (1901) V, 437)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Herman School
Description:In Union Township. Named for a family in the community. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hertich Academy
Description:See "Asylum"
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Herzog Copper Mine
Description:Opened in 1879, about eight miles southwest of Ste. Genevieve. Named for Frank Herzog, landowner. (Bain & Ulrich (1905) 36-37; George Herzog)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hickory Creek
Description:Rises about three miles west of Weingarten and flows into Establishment Creek three miles from New Offenburg. Named from the trees. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Simon Schwent)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hill Field
Description:See New Bourbon Common Field
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hogenmiller School
Description:In Ste. Genevieve Township. On land donated by the family. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Holy Cross Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:In Ste. Genevieve. It was incorporated by the circuit court on May 11, 1867. The church was erected in 1875. The significance of the name is obvious. (Douglass (1912) I, 481)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hook Pond
Description:See Huck Pond
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Horine Hill
Description:Two and a half miles from Ozora on the Telegraph Road where it crosses River Aux Vases. Named for a family who owned land there. (J.H. Boyd)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Houck's Railroad
Description:See Cape Girardeau Northern Railroad.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Houser Ridge
Description:Three miles north of Womack at the site of Avon Lookout Tower. Named for a landowner. (W.J. Lenz)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Huck Pond
Description:Three and a half miles west of Ste. Genevieve. Named for the family on whose property it is found. It is incorrectly spelled Hook Pond on some maps. (Lucille Basler)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Illinois Road
Description:See King's Highway
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Illinois Southern Railroad
Description:See Missouri-Illinois Railroad
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Immaculate Conception Catholic Church
Description:At St. Marys. For the name cf. above. (Catholic Directory (1937) 160)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Independence School
Description:In Beauvais Township. An ideal name. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:Rises north of Zell and flows into Establishment Creek three miles south of Bloomsdale. There was an Indian encampment nearby. Arrowheads can still be found there. (Hixson's Plat Book; Simon Schwent; Felix A. Fallert)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Inkley Marble Quarry
Description:At Marlo (q.v.). The name is probably personal in origin. (Louis J. Donze)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Isle au Bois Creek
Description:A small stream that forms the southeastern boundary between Ste. Genevieve and Jefferson counties and flows east into the Mississippi River. The name is French meaning "Isle of the Woods" (incorrectly spelled for "Ile au Bois"), derived from a wooded island or islands in the Mississippi River, which Marquette probably named in 1673. It is also explained, however, by McDermott (under "ile") as a term which the Canadian "voyageurs" used for patches or clumps of trees bordering a river--a grove of trees along a river bank. Also spelled Isle au Boise, Isle du Bois, and Isleaubois. The popular pronunciation Zile au Boy points to the plural form as probably the original one, for it could have risen naturally by "liasion" from "Aux Iles au Bois;" cf. Auxvasse, Ozarks, etc. (Wetmore (1837); Goodwin (1867); Campbell's GAZETTEER (1874) 281; MHR, II, 192; McDermott; Miss Welty's thesis; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Isle au Boise Creek
Description:See Isle au Bois Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Isle du Bois Creek
Description:See Isle au Bois Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Isleaubois Creek
Description:See Isle au Bois Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jackson Hill
Description:One mile north of Bloomsdale in Jackson Township, from which it may have derived its name. There is a local story that the hill is named for a lead hauler, who had difficulty in getting his yoke of oxen tlo ascend the hill on the way tol Brickey's Landing. (A.P. Drury; T.A. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jackson Hill Limestone Quarry
Description:On Jackson Hill, from which it is named. (A.P. Drury)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jackson School
Description:At Kinsey in Jackson Township, from which it no doubt took its name. Formerly there were two schools in the district, Red School and Pleasant Grove School. Later the two schools were combined, and the name became Jackson. The Red School was in a Roth community. The pronunciation of Roth being similar to the German rot, red, resulted in the school's being called Red. Pleasant Grove was a descriptive name. (Robt. P. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jackson Township
Description:Formed in 1827 from the northern portion of Ste. Genevieve Township. Doubtless named for Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), who became President of the United States in that year. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 314)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Janis Gristmill
Description:See Sherlock Gristmill
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jennings School
Description:In Union Township. Named for a family. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Johns Creek
Description:Rises near Centennial School and flows into Saline Creek one mile east of Clearwater. Named for a family in the community. (W.J. Lenz)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jonca
Description:A post office from 1886-1904, in Union Township. Named from the nearby stream. (Postal Guide; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jonca Creek
Description:North Fork Jonca and South Fork Jonca rise in Union Township and flow together to form Jonca Creek, which flows into River Aux Vases at the town of River Aux Vases. It was probably named for an early settler. According to Houck, the name of Joseph Jonka (1787) is found among the names of early residents given in the Ste. Genevieve church records. (Houck (1908) I, 357; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jonca School
Description:In Union Township. Probably named for the post office. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Kaufman's Iron Bank
Description:T. 37, R. 8, E., Sec. 11. Named for the owners or lessees, the Kaufman estate. (Schmidt (1872) 196)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Kehl
Description:District in Ste. Genevieve Township. So named by its German founders from the town they had left in Baden. Kehl is on the Rhine opposite Strassburg, and about ten miles northwest of Offenburg. (Yealy, SAINTE GENEVIEVE (1935) 114)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Kehl School
Description:In Ste. Genevieve Township. Named from the district in which it is located. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Kerlagon School
Description:Two miles from Coffman. A subscription school taught by Cy Kerlagon. (Frank E. Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:King's Highway
Description:Not long after the establishment of the post of New Madrid in 1789, a public road was marked out, following an old Indian trail, from New Madrid to St. Louis. The road passed through what is now known as Big Prairie and the Rich Woods, to Scott County; then across the hills to Cape Girardeau, to Ste. Genevieve, on to St. Louis. It was known to the French as Rue Royale; to the Spanish as El Camino Real; and to Americans as the King's Highway. It was also known to early American settlers as the Illinois Road, because it led to Illinois country, north of Apple Creek, and to St. Louis as far as the Missouri River. The original name, El Camino Real, was conferred by Colonel George Morgan in honor of Charles IV, the reigning king of Spain (1788-1808). In 1850 the road acquired the name of the Telegraph Road, when the first telegraph line was established along it. (Houck (1908) II, 150-154; Douglass (1912) I, 108-110; MHR, XXIX, 95-99; Mrs. Edward Schaaf; J.H. Boyd)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Kinsey
Description:A village in the central part of Jackson Township, which has had a post office since 1890. It was named for Congressman William Metcalfe Kinsey (1846-1931), of St. Louis. Kinsey was born in Ohio, and came to Missouri in 1875. He was elected to Congress as a Republican from the Tenth District of Missouri in 1889, and served two years (1889-1891), in the 51st Congress. In 1904 he was elected Judge of the Circuit Court in St. Louis, and reelected in 1910. Kinsey was one of the leaders of his party in the State, and had many followers and admirers in southeast Missouri. (Postal Guide; Snow (1908) II, 436; Biog. Dict. Am. Congress; Goforth Ditch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Kinsey Creek
Description:Rises at Willow Pond, in Jackson Township, flows through Kinsey and empties into Fourche a Du Clos east of Cedar Glade School. Named for the post office. Formerly called Micheau Creek for an old settler. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Goforth Ditch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Kunkle School
Description:See Shady Grove School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:La Fourche
Description:See North Gabouri Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:La Fourche a Duclos
Description:See Bloomsdale
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lake Hill School
Description:A former school in Beauvois Township. A topographical name. In the district between St. Mary's and Ozora there are many ponds or sink holes caused by underground water through limestone formation. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Las Salinas
Description:Salt works near the mouth of Saline Creek. In 1769 a village of four or five houses existed at the salt works. The importance of the works is shown by the fact that in 1778 an expedition came from Kentucky to purchase salt. Israel Dodge and son Henry shipped salt to Illinois settlements and to Big Barrens in Kentucky in 1802. Called The Salines in Hayward (1853), a translation of the original Spanish name. The name is often written incorrectly, as La Salinas. (Hayward (1853); Houck (1908) II, 255-256, 298)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lawrenceton
Description:A small town in the southern part of Jackson Township, whose post office was established in 1886 and discontinued after 1941. Named for Henry Lawrence, who had done much in the development of the settlement; he had a flour mill; a store, from which mail was delivered; and a farm there. The settlement was formerly known as Punjaub, which was a post office from 1867-1876. The reason for the adoption of this name of a district of India could not be discovered. It was probably taken over from the Punjaub Mining Company of Ste. Genevieve County, which was incorporated on May 13, 1865 (LAND RECORDS OF STE. GENEVIEVE COUNTY, Book Q, pp. 546-547). Some have tried to explain it as for "pond job," because of the dam built there for a water power mill, which gave employment to many men,--a very far-fetched and unlikely conjecture. For the name of the mining company, cf. The Egyptian Marble Company's Quarry, above. (Goodwin (1867); Postal Guide; F.C. Aubuchon; Effie Lawrence; E.J. Lawrence; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lawrenceton School
Description:At Lawrenceton in Jackson Township. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Le Grand Champ
Description:See The Big Field
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lebanon Baptist Church
Description:Six miles north of Bloomsdale. Organized in 1833. A Biblical name: Cedar trees from Lebanon were used to build the temple at Jerusalem (1 Kings 5). (Solomon Solberger; Mrs. Wm. Holst)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Leonard Creek
Description:Rises in Union Township, two miles southeast of the main Terre Bleue Creek and flows into Terre Bleue one mile east of the site of Turley Mill. Named for the landowner. (Mr. & Mrs. R.J. Reeder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Les Sucreries
Description:An establishment for the making of sugar, on the River Aux Vases. In 1797 a grant of land here was made by the Spanish Government to the younger son of old Pierre De Lassus, Commandant of Nouvelle Bourbon, for the setting up of a sugar mill. In 1798 he had a grant on the south fork of the Saline, where also he manufactured sugar. See under De Lassus, above, and cf. Sugar Creek, below. According to McDermott, the term "sucrerie" was used by the Mississippi French for any sugar making establishment: in Canada, for maple-sugar; in Louisiana, for cane sugar. (Houck (1908) I, 364; McDermott)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lick Hollow
Description:One half mile west of New Offenburg. The licks here were places salted to entice deer. (Mrs. R.J. Morek; Chas. Morek)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lincoln School
Description:For negroes in St. Mary's. Named for Abraham Lincoln. (Miss Dayse Baker)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lipp Hill
Description:One mile southwest of Ozora, between Ozora and Minnith. Named for the Lipp family. (Chas. Weiler)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little Bottom Creek
Description:Rises one mile northeast of New Offenburg and flows into Indian Creek three miles west of Zell. A descriptive name. So called to distinguish it from the nearby Big Bottom Creek (q.v.). (Felix A. Fallert)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little Rock Landing
Description:River landing of Ste. Genevieve. The older French name was Petit Rocher. Just what "little rock" on the shore may have suggested the name is unknown; of course the river has completely changed in course of time, but the banks are still very rocky. (Houck (1908) II, 366)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little Saline Creek
Description:Rises four miles north of Coffman and flows into Big Saline (q.v.) six miles east of Minnith. (Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little Vine Baptist Church
Description:Near Sprott, in Union Township. Organized in 1870, the church was built in 1881. Morgan Smith wished to call it Young Vine, since it was a new, little church. Joseph Vansickle, the first minister, named it Little Vine. This is a favorite name for churches, doubtless with reference to John 15:5: "I am the vine; ye are the branches." (Mrs. Sarah A. Reeder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little Vine Hill
Description:Near Little Vine Baptist Church, from which it takes its name. (Mr. & Mrs. R.J. Reeder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little Vine School
Description:In Union Township. Named from Little Vine Baptist Church. Formerly Rickard School. Named for Jacob Rickard, who donated land for the schoolhouse and graveyard. (Mrs. Sarah A. Reeder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Long Hollow
Description:West of Avon Lookout Tower. Named from its length. (W.J. Lenz)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Madden Creek
Description:Rises two miles northwest of Avon and flows into Saline Creek about five miles east of Coffman. Named for Thomas Madden, who entered the land. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); C.A. Boyd)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Madden Hill
Description:Two miles north of Coffman. Named for Thomas Madden, landowner. (J.C. Nations)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Madison School
Description:In Saline Township. Named for Dr. Madison, who lived in the vicinity. (H.N. Vaugh)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Marlo
Description:A railroad siding of the Missouri, Illinois Railroad at the Inkley Marble Quarry. The name, which was conferred by the Railroad Company, is doubtfully said to have been suggested by the name of their product. Possibly it was a "blend" of "marble" and the personal name, Marlowe. (Louis J. Donze)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Maxwell's Hill
Description:Elevation about one mile above Ste. Genevieve, near "Little Rock Landing," overlooking the Mississippi River. Named in honor of Father James Maxwell, appointed Vicar-General over the English and American settlers of Upper Louisiana, Nov. 22, 1794, who came to Ste. Genevieve in 1796. He was active in securing concessions of land. (Houck (1908) II, 304-306; CATH. HIST. REV. IV, 154)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:McDaniels
Description:A siding of the Cape Girardeau Northern Railroad near the St. Francois and Ste. Genevieve county line. Named for E.E. McDaniel, on whose land it was located. (Joseph H. Klein)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Meek's Creek
Description:Rises two miles northeast of Womack and flows into Saline Creek four miles east of Avon. Named for a family. (C.A. Boyd)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Memorial Park
Description:The Old Cemetery of Ste. Genevieve was a part of a grant of the Spanish government to parishioners for a cemetery. It was used up to 1883 as a burial ground, whence the name. By special permission, Mrs. Odile Pratte Valle, widow of Felix Valle, was buried there in 1894. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mertell Hill
Description:One quarter mile west of River Aux Vases, the town. Named for a family. (John H. Patterson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Micheau Creek
Description:See Kinsey Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mill
Description:A post office from 1886-1904, in Union Township. Established in Turley Mill, from which it derived its name. (Postal Guide; Mrs. C.F. Meyer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mill Creek
Description:Rises near Coffman and flows into River Aux Vases, three miles east of River Aux Vases, the town. So named from mills on it. (Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Miller's Switch
Description:A switch spur of the Missouri-Illinois Railroad, between Weingarten and Sprott, where railroad ties were loaded on the property of L.R. Miller. (L.R. Miller)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Minnith
Description:A small town in southern Beauvois Township, with a post office since 1886. Named by Judge Miles A. Gilbert of St. Marys because of its abundance of wheat. A Biblical name: "Judah, and the land of Israel, they were they merchants: they traded in they market wheat of Minnith, and Pannag, and honey, and oil, and balm" (Ezekiel 27:17). Minnith was a city in the land of Ammon, east of the Jordan; it is also mentioned in Judges 11:33: "And he smote them from Aroer, even till thou come to Minnith, twenty cities." (Postal Guide; Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Minnith School
Description:At Minnith in Beauvois Township. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Misere
Description:See Ste. Genevieve (town)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mississippi Lime Company Kilns
Description:West of Ste. Genevieve. Named for the company. (John Walker)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mississippi River
Description:The Mississippi River, which forms the eastern boundary of Ste. Genevieve County and of the State of Missouri, was first seen by white men in 1519, by the Spanish explorer Pineda, and was officially discovered by Hernando de Soto in 1541. De Soto called in Rio Grande de Espiritu Santo (the Great River of the Holy Ghost). The next explorers to find it were Father Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet (or Jolliet), who together descended its upper half in 1673. Father Marquette wished to name it Riviere de la Conception, in fulfilment of a vow made to the Virgin if he succeeded in his expedition; this name refers to the Catholic doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary, i.e., the freedom from original sin possessed by her from the time of her conception in the womb of her mother. Joliet entered the river upon his map as Riviere Buade, in honor of his patron Louis de Buade, Comte de Frontenac et Palluau (1620-1698), Governor of New France from 1672-1698, and better known as Frontenac. In 1681 Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle, descended the stream for the first time to its mouth, and on his return baptized it as the Riviere Colbert, for the famous French statesman Jean Baptiste Colbert (1619-1683), minister of finance under Louis XIV, who helped to finance La Salle's expedition. Later French Jesuit missionaries who traveled up and down the river called it Riviere de St. Louis; this name, like that of the city of St. Louis founded in 1764, was in honor of the royal saint Louis IX, who ruled France in the thirteenth century, but indirectly paid compliment to the reigning monarch Louis XV. All of these various proposed names for the mighty stream, however, were eventually discarded, and the name finally accepted by current usage was one of Indian origin, an Algonquin combination of two words "missi" (great) and "seepee" or "sippi" (river). It is a curious coincidence that the name which finally prevailed has exactly the same significance as the one earliest proposed by De Soto, the Rio Grande. (Buel, 240-241; MHR, II, 191; Dict. Am. Biog.; Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Missouri-Illinois Railroad
Description:The Illinois Southern Railroad had been built from Salem, Illinois to a point opposite Ste. Genevieve. In about 1905 it was constructed through Ste. Genevieve and St. Francois counties to Bismarck on the main line of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain, and Southern Railroad. The railroad passed through Ste. Genevieve, New Offenburg, Weingarten, Miller's Switch, Sprott, and through the Lead Belt to Bismarck. During the World War a steel hull boat for transporting the trains across the Mississippi River was purchased by the Government who had charge of the railroad at a cost of $100,000. Since the original owner was unable to pay this bill after the war, it went into receivership. After the reorganization of the Illinois Southern it became known as the Missouri-Illinois Railroad. It is controlled today by the Missouri-Pacific Railroad. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS COUNTY (1935) 38-39)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Molasses Dale
Description:A hollow one and a half miles east of Zell, in Ste. Genevieve Township. Molasses was made there from sugar cane. (Henry A. Huck)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Molasses Dale Road
Description:From Zell through Molasses Dale to Highway 25. (Henry A. Huck)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Morning Shade School
Description:In Beauvois Township. So named because the school is shaded in the morning. Cf. Evening Shade School nearby. Formerly called Boarman School for a man in the community. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Morning Sun School
Description:In Beauvois Township. So named because it got the sun in the morning. Discontinued since 1933. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Morrison Hollow
Description:Two-thirds of a mile north of Brickey's, in northern Jackson Township. Named for a family. (Albert Reed)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mosher
Description:A railroad siding on the Missouri-Illinois Railroad two miles west of Ste. Genevieve. Named for Ferdinand Moser, owner of tract where one of the earliest lime kilns was located. Pronunciation probably accounts for the spelling; the earlier form of the French surname was probably Mosier, Mosieur, or the like; cf. Brashear from Brazier. (Lucille Basler; Joseph H. Klein)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Nachitoches Path
Description:An Indian path or trail leading from St. Anthonys on Ste. Genevieve County, in a southwestern direction through Wayne County, near Greenville, and on to Nachitoches, one of the Spanish posts of Mexico, now Louisiana. This path connected with the Virginia Warrior's Path and with a path leading north to the Osage. After the country was settled, the Nachitoches path became the military and wagon road of the immigrants to Arkansas, crossing the Mississippi River at Bainbridge or Cape Girardeau, thence moving to the St. Francois, crossing at the Indian ford, thence to Black River crossing near Poplar Bluff and Current River at what was known as Pittman's ferry. (Houck I 227- 228)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Nations Mill
Description:A post office from 1927-1929. An old gristmill and sawmill run by water, it was named for the mill owner. (Postal Guide; Arthur Womack; Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Needmore
Description:Two miles west of Brickey's, in Jackson Township. Some of the workers at the lime plant near Brickey's, opened in 1905, settled here to be more independent, since they did not like restrictions imposed on company property. In derision the neighbors said the people in the new settlement were always needing more. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Albert Reed)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Bourbon
Description:See Nouvelle Bourbon
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Bourbon Common Field
Description:In 1798 Lieutenant-Governor Don Zenon Trudeau made a grant of a common field to inhabitants of Nouvelle Bourbon (New Bourbon). It was known later as Grand Park or Hill Field. The French used "parc," meaning an enclosed field, as an equivalent of "champ;" for the significance of the "common field" see under Big Field, above. Hill Field describes the topography. (Houck (1908) I, 365; Sauer (1920) 85; Hixson's Plat Book (1930); McDermott)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Breman
Description:Between Ste. Genevieve and Ozora, one and a quarter mile from the latter. Probably named after the port from which the German settlers sailed. Bremen, on the Weser River, is, next to Hamburg, the chief seaport in Germany. The post office in 1893 was known as Bremen. No longer in existence. (Postal Guide; Yealy's SAINTE GENEVIEVE (1935) 114; Chas. Weiler)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Church
Description:Two miles east of Avon, in Saline Township. Built of pine logs about 1869 on two acres of land donated by John Coffman. Formerly Christian, now Baptist. Called New to distinguish it from the older Stone Church within a few miles. Known also as Pine Log Church, for its construction. (Ralph Coffman; Frank E. Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Church School
Description:In Saline Township. Named from the Baptist Church nearby. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Offenburg
Description:A post office from 1867-1889, and since 1892, in the western part of Ste. Genevieve Township. A station on the Missouri-Illinois Railroad. Named for Offenburg, a town in Baden, Germany, from which early settlers came. New Offenburg is the general name for the district. (Goodwin (1867); Postal Guide; Eaton; Mrs. R.J. Morek; Rev. Joseph A. Gassner; Rev. Chas. A. Weinig)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Tennessee
Description:In Saline Township, a settlement made about the beginning of the nineteenth century. Families formerly of Tennessee settled there; hence the name. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 254; Douglass (1912) I, 62; Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Tennessee United Baptist Church
Description:At Coffman. Church services were held formerly in the school at Avon. Now they are held in the building at Coffman donated by Tom Boyd. Named for the settlement. (Rev. A.H. Vaugh)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:North Fork Jonca
Description:See Jonca Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:North Fork of Saline Creek
Description:Rises near Libertyville in St. Francois County and flows into Big Saline Creek five miles east of Minnith. (Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:North Gabouri Creek
Description:Rises near Zell and flows into the Mississippi River north of Ste. Genevieve. Called "La Fourche" (i.e. "The Fork"), by old villagers of Ste. Genevieve. Named for an early settler. The oldest known document of Ste. Genevieve is a bill of sale of December, 1754, of Laurent Gabourie. It is called North Gabouri Creek to distinguish it from South Gabouri Creek (q.v.). The name appears as Gabarrie Creek in Wetmore (1837). (Wetmore (1837) 246; Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Yealy, SAINTE GENEVIEVE (1935) 30, 62; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Nouvelle Bourbon
Description:Two and a half miles south of Ste. Genevieve. The village was established in 1793 by order of Baron Carondelet, Governor of Louisiana, and so named, he says, "to put the new settlement under the especial protection of the august sovereign who governs Spain, and also that the descendants of the new colonists may imitate the fidelity and firmness of their fathers toward their king." The sovereign who governed Spain in 1793 was Charles IV (1788-1819), of the Spanish branch of the House of Bourbon. Bourbon, the family name of the royal house of France, Spain, and Naples, came from a castle so called in the former district of the Bourbonair in central France. The first sire of Bourbon was Adhemar or Aimar, who lived about 920. The purpose of the settlement was to establish a number of French royalist families who had settled at Gallipolis in southeastern Ohio, but became dissatisfied there. Pierre De Hault De Lassus de Luziere was appointed first civil and military commandant when he arrived there in August, 1793. (See above, under De Lassus). Known also as the "village des Petites Cotes" (i.e. village of little hills or slopes). Later the English form New Bourbon was used. The village has now disappeared. Cf. Les Petites Cotes, the name used for St. Charles, Missouri for a number of years after its founding. McDermott says it was known as the "settlement of the little hills because the bluffs rolled back from the river rather than rose abruptly from it." (Houck (1908) I, 362, 366; Douglass (1912) I, 62; Yealy, SAINTE GENEVIEVE (1935) 67; McDermott)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Nueve Borbon
Description:See Nouvelle Bourbon
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:In Saline Township. Named from oaks in the vicinity. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Oakland Methodist Church
Description:Six miles northeast of Farmington, in Union Township. Organized about 1898 and built in a black oak grove. Discontinued in 1937. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Oakland School
Description:In Saline Township. Discontinued in 1939. The name was probably derived from the oak timber there. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Our Lady Help of Christians Catholic Church
Description:At Weingarten. Founded in 1872. One of the Catholic terms of adoration for the Virgin. (Rothensteiner (1928) II, 521)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Our Lady of Mt. Carmel
Description:A flourishing house of the Loretto Sisters established at Ste. Genevieve in June, 1837, in the building known as the Detchemendy House, named for a family, where girls of Ste. Genevieve received instruction until 1858. The Sisters of Loretto are especially devoted to the Virgin, whose home at Nazareth is said to have been miraculously transported there in 1294. Mt. Carmel in Palestine was the abode of Christian hermits from the early times of Christianity. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 409)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ozora
Description:A post office from 1901-1910. Three names were submitted: New Bremen (because of the nearby community), Ida and Ozark. Since there was already an Ozark post office in Christian County, the name Ozora was coined from the word Ozark. (Postal Guide; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ozora Marble Quarries
Description:One mile from Ozora. (MISSOURI (Am. Guide Series) 522)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ozora School
Description:At Ozora in Beauvois Township. Until 1939 called Bremen School from its location near the older settlement of New Bremen. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Park Road
Description:The road from Womack to the Coldwater Outing and Game Preserve (q.v.); hence the name. (Arthur Womack)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Petit Rocher
Description:See Little Rock Landing
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pickle
Description:A post office from 1899-1904 in Saline Township. On land owned by William Pickles. The dropping of the 's from Mr. Pickle's name was perhaps due to folk-etymology; i.e. incorrect association with the common noun "pickle." (Postal Guide, Mrs. J.A. Konrad)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pickle Creek
Description:Rises at Pickle Springs and flows into River Aux Vases four miles east of Miller's Switch. On land owned by William Pickles. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Mrs. J.A. Konrad; Joseph B. Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pickle Knob
Description:In Saline Township. Hill on the property owned at one time by William Pickles. (Mrs. J.A. Konrad)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pickle Springs
Description:In Saline Township. On land bought from Wm. F. Donaldson by William Pickles, January 15, 1853. (Mrs. J.A. Konrad)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pike's Peak
Description:Seven miles south of Miller's Switch. Because of its height, its name is probably derived from Pike's Peak in Colorado, which has become a synonym for altitude in the American mind. It is a stock name for any unusual elevation. (Joseph B. Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pin Hook Branch
Description:Rises four miles south of Lawrenceton and flows into Fourche a Du Clos immediately below Lawrenceton. The branch flows to form the shape of a hooked pin. (Mrs. Martin Carron; Ed Bequette)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pine Grove School
Description:In Saline Township. Named from the surrounding pine trees. Formerly called Burns School, for the family on whose land the school was built. (Joseph B. Williams; H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pine Hill School
Description:In Beauvois Township. Named from its elevation and surrounding pine trees. Formerly called Smith School for a family in the community. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pine Log Church
Description:See New Church
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Plank Road
Description:Probably another name for Weingarten, which was on the Plank Road (q.v.). (Goodwin (1867) 33; Leo D. Karl)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pleasant Grove School
Description:See Jackson School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
Description:Four miles west of Coffman. Organized August, 1870, by members dimissed from Texas Baptist Church of Knob Lick to form a congregation. A name of approbation. (Mrs. H.N. Vaugh)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:A former school in Jackson Township. A name of approbation. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pointe Basse
Description:The Grand Champ of Ste. Genevieve was located in the Pointe Basse, in the fabulously fertile river bottoms. (Dorrance, 23)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Politte's Spring
Description:Near Bloomsdale. Named for a family. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ponca
Description:A post office from 1910-1915, at Miller's Switch. The name Jonca, that of the discontinued post office nearby was sent in, but not being plainly written the government read it as Ponca. (Postal Guide; W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Potato Knob
Description:Five miles south of Miller's Switch. The name was derived from its resemblance in shape to a potato. (Joseph B. Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Potosi Road
Description:From Ste. Genevieve tnhrough Bloomsdale, French Village, Valles Mines, to Old Mines and Potosi in Washington County. Named from the county seat of Washington County. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pratte's Ford
Description:See Yallaly's Ford
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Price's Springs
Description:Four miles south of Lawrenceton on the Ben Woulk farm, in northern Union Township. Formerly on land granted to John Price under the Spanish government on or about November 15, 1797. The spring was formerly called Bellfountain or Bellefountain, obviously partly Anglicized from the descriptive French term "belle fontaine." (Ed. Bequette)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pulliam Hollow
Description:Two and three-quarter miles south of Clearwater, in Saline Township. Dave Pulliam lived there. (J.C. Nations)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Punjaub
Description:See Lawrenceton
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Quarry Hollow
Description:One half mile north of Brickey's, in Jackson Township. It is the site of a rock quarry. (Albert Reed)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Quarrytown
Description:Four and a half miles south of Ste. Genevieve on the road to St. Mary's. Rock for the Eads Bridge in St. Louis was taken from the quarry here. (Davis & Durrie (1876) 436; HANDBOOK OF MISSOURI (1881) 243; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Quarrytown School
Description:In Ste. Genevieve Township. At Quarrytown. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ramey
Description:Mentioned in the HANDBOOK, but nothing could be learned about its location or its name. (HANDBOOK MISSOURI RRC (1934)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Red Hill School
Description:In Ste. Genevieve Township. Named from its location on a hill of red clay. Children of the district now attend the school at Zell. (Henry A. Huck)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Red School
Description:See Jackson School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Richardson Sandstone Quarry
Description:U.S. Survey 307, T. 37, R. 9E., about four miles south of Ste. Genevieve. Named for the landowner. (Buckley and Buehler (1904) 196; T.A. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rickard School
Description:See Little Vine School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rigdon School
Description:In Beauvois Township. Named for a family. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rigdon's Mill
Description:Three miles east of River Aux Vases. This was an old mill built by Joseph Coffman and later acquired by Rigdon. (Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:River Aux Vases [1 of 2]
Description:Rises near Jonca in Union Township and flows into the Mississippi River about two miles north of St. Marys. The French word "vase" means a morass or swamp. The phrase "aux vases" signifies muddy, swampy. The crossings were dangerous because of quicksand. The original French form Riviere aux Vases is used in some references. (McDermott; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:River Aux Vases [2 of 2]
Description:A small town in Beauvois Township, with a post office since 1876. The river nearby gave its name to the settlement. The town is also called Staabtown, from Charles Staab (1848-1925), who opened a store in 1875. The town was built around this store. Mr. Staab was postmaster from June 26, 1879 to 1924. His grandson is the present postmaster and owner of the store. (Postal Guide; F.F. Staab; J.H. Boyd)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Riviere aux Vases
Description:See River Aux Vases
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Riviere Buade
Description:See Mississippi River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Riviere Colbert
Description:See Mississippi River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Riviere de la Conception
Description:See Mississippi River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Riviere de la Saline
Description:See Saline Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Riviere de St. Louis
Description:See Mississippi River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Robbins Lead Mine
Description:T. 39N., 6E., Sec. 13 & 19 to the east. The origin of the name could not be ascertained. (Winslow (1894) II, 700)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rock Spring
Description:One quarter mile north of Coffman. So named because the spring flowed out of rocks. (Mrs. Goforth Ditch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rock Spring School
Description:An old subscription school one-quarterof a mile north of Coffman. Named from Rock Spring. (John H. Patterson; Mrs. Goforth Ditch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rolf
Description:A post office from 1901-1910, four miles west of Kinsey in Jackson Township. No particular reason for the name could be learned. It is spelled Rolfe in Postal Guide 1901. (Postal Guide; Mrs. Sarah J. Poorman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rolfe
Description:See Rolf
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rough Creek
Description:Rises two and a half miles west of Weingarten and flows into Jonca Creek four miles east of Weingarten. A rough, rocky creek. (J.A. Kettinger)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rozier Academy
Description:This is one of the oldest educational institutions in the Middle West. It was organized as a secondary school in December, 1807, and incorporated on June 21, 1808. The earliest name proposed for the school was the Louisiana Academy. This name was evidently chosen for the District of Louisiana, of which the town and county of Ste. Genevieve (q.v.) was a part from 1804 to 1812. After Missouri Territory (q.v.) was formed in 1812, the name was changed to Ste. Genevieve Academy, for the town. The Academy was opened, on Academy Hill (q.v.) in Ste. Genevieve, in 1818. In 1854, after a period of suspension, the old school was reopened as an academy for the education of boys, under the name of English and Classical Academy, by the efforts of a prominent citizen of Ste. Genevieve, General Firmin Andrew Rozier. General Rozier was born there in 1820, became a lawyer, and took an increasingly important part in the political life of his section of the State. In 1851 he was elected mayor of Ste. Genevieve, and a member of the lower house of the State Legislature in 1856. He was an admirer and follower of Senator Thomas H. Benton. Shortly before the Civil War he was made a major-general of the Southeast Missouri Militia. After the war he was elected State Senator in 1872. He was author of a book entitled HISTORY OF THE EARLY SETTLEMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY, published in 1890. He died on February 11, 1897. General Rozier took a deep interest in education throughout his life. He secured title to the property of the Academy near his own home, and contributed freely of his money, his time, and his talents. Later the institution became known in his honor as Rozier Academy. It was closed in 1862, upon the breaking out of the War. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 408-9; Yealy, SAINTE GENEVIEVE, 124-8; U.S. BIOG. DICT., Missouri vol. (1878) under "Rozier")
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rue Royale
Description:See King's Highway
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sacred Heart Catholic Church
Description:At Ozora. The parish was formed in 1899. For the name cf. above. (Rev. Bernard Kramper)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Salem Creek
Description:Rises 3/4 mile northeast of Three Rivers Baptist Church and flows into Three Rivers three and a half miles from its source. Named from Salem Methodist Church. (Mr. & Mrs. R.J. Reeder; W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Salem Methodist Church
Description:In Union Township. A Biblical name: the city of Melchizedek, who met Abraham; supposed to be Jerusalem; Rather the same as Salim, a city near Aenon, on the west of Jordan, now called Shalem. "In Salem also is his tabernacle, and his dwelling place in Zion" (Ps. 76:2). The word in Hebrew means "peace." (Mrs. J.N. Young)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Salem School
Description:In Union Township. Named from Salem Methodist Church. The school in the district was formerly called Doss School for a nearby landowner, Alfred Doss. (J.N. Young; H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Saline Baptist Church
Description:At Minnith, near Saline Creek, for which it is named. (J.H. Boyd)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Saline Creek
Description:Rises in Perry County and flows into the Mississippi River one mile north of St. Mary's. Often called Big Saline to distinguish it from North Fork of the Saline and Little Saline. On the map of the "course of the Mississipp . . . in the latter end of the year 1765 by Lieutenant Ross . . . London . . . 1775" it is called Salt Pan's River, an attempted Americanization of the original French name. "Riviere de la Saline" according to Penicaut was so named from the two salt springs found there (1700). These were known as the Salines, or in Spanish Las Salinas. In 1541, De Soto had sent Hernando de Silvera and Pedro Moreno from Capaha, with Indian guides, to obtain a supply of salt from a saline stream to the north, presumably the Saline Creek in Ste. Genevieve County. Joutel in his JOURNAL tells that he saw the salt spring (on Saline Creek in Ste. Genevieve County) August 25, 1687. (JOUTEL'S JOURNAL 1684-7 (1906) 186; Houck (1908) I, 113, 247, 277; Bushnell (1914) 643; Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Saline Creek Iron Bank
Description:T. 37, R. 7, E., Sec. 12. The owners or lessees were the Kaufman estate. Named from the creek. (Schmidt (1872) 196)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Saline Township
Description:One of the two original townships. Saline Creek is within its boundaries. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 314)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Saline Valley Railroad
Description:See Cape Girardeau Northern Railroad
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Salt Pan's River
Description:See Saline Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Salt Point
Description:A post office in 1853. No information could be obtained about this old post office. (Hayward (1853)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Saltpeter Cave [1 of 2]
Description:See Saline Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Saltpeter Cave [2 of 2]
Description:A large cavitty near the left bank of Little Saline Creek, about twelve miles southwest of Ste. Genevieve. Saltpetre was made there. (Bushnell (1914) 662; J.H. Boyd)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sand Dale Landing
Description:See White Sand Landing
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Santa Genoveva
Description:See Ste. Genevieve
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sauer School
Description:A former school in Ste. Genevieve Township. Named for a family in the community. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sawmill Creek
Description:Rises two miles west of Weingarten and flows into Establishment Creek four miles east of Weingarten. The name is derived from a large sawmill on the creek. (Mrs. R.J. Morek; Chas. Morek)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sawmill Hollow
Description:See Bidwell Hollow
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Scott School
Description:In Union Township. Named for Dr. Scott, who lived nearest the school. (Wm. O'Sullivan; H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sexauer's Trestle
Description:One half mile east of Marlo on the Missouri-Illinois Railroad, on the property of the Sexauer family. (Louis J. Donze)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Shady Grove School
Description:In Ste. Genevieve Township. Built in a shady grove. Formerly called Kunkle School for a family in the community. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sherlock and Robinson Sawmill
Description:On Jonca Creek. The owners were Ralph and Henry Sherlock and Phil Robinson. (Ralph Coffman; Frank E. Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sherlock Gristmill
Description:On Mill Creek, one half mile from the town River Aux Vases (q.v.). Named for its owner. Formerly owned by Janis, and known as Janis Gristmill. (Ralph Coffman; F.F. Staab)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Silver Point Christian Church
Description:At Womack. Built in 1888, the church building is now called Silver Point Union Church because it is used by more than one denomination. The new Christian Church kept the denominational name of the old church. Built on a point of land, here probably used in the sense of a hill. The reason for the adjective "silver" is not apparent. (Arthur Womack)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Silver Point Union Church
Description:See Silver Point Christian Church
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Smith School
Description:See Pine Hill School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Snell Hollow
Description:One half mile south of Brickey's. Named for a local family. (Albert Reed)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:South Fork
Description:Rises north of Kinsey and flows into Isle au Bois Creek west of Highway 25. The name is descriptive of its direction. (T.A. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:South Fork Jonca
Description:See Jonca Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:South Gabouri Creek
Description:Rises near Zell and flows into the Mississippi River south of Ste. Genevieve. Named for an early settler; cf. North Gabouri Creek. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sprott
Description:A post office from 1904-1918, in Union Township; a station on the Missouri-Illinois Railroad. Named for John Sprott, who had an interest in a store there. (Postal Guide; Mrs. Sarah A. Reeder; W.F. Yeager; Wm. O'Sullivan)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ss. Philip and James Catholic Church
Description:At River Aux Vases. The church was built in 1864. The district school is taught by the Sisters of the Precious Blood. Named for the Apostles. (Rev. J.A. De Moor)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Anthony's Catholic Church
Description:At River aux Vases, where as early as June, 1842, a chapel was dedicated to St. Anthony, sometimes known as Anthony the Great, the founder of Christian asceticism (251-356). It is no longer there. (Rothensteiner (1928) II, 70)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Catherine Catholic Church
Description:At Coffman. Organized in 1919 by Rev. John F. Walsh. Named in honor of St. Catherine of Alexandria (d. 307), patroness of young maidens and female students, who was famous for her intellectual abilities. (Rothensteiner (1928) II, 705; CATH. ENCY. III, 445; Rev. James McGrath)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Francois de Sales Academy
Description:Opened in Ste. Genevieve in 1858 by the Sisters of St. Joseph. Closed after the public school system was established. Named for St. Francis de Sales (1567-1622), who founded in 1607 the Institute of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin, for young girls and widows, who did not have strength or inclination for great orders. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 409; CATH. ENCY. VI, 220)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Joachim
Description:The church of the old village of Ste. Genevieve, whose records date from 1759, was organized in 1749 by Jesuit Father Philibert Watrin. St. Joachim is the traditional name of the father of the Virgin Mary. (Houck (1908) II, 292; Rothensteiner (1928) I, 82; CATH. ENCY. VIII, 406)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Joseph's Catholic Church
Description:At Zell. The cornerstone was laid June 8, 1845, in the heart of a German settlement of some seventy-one families. For the name cf. above. (Douglass (1912) I, 451; Rev. Chas. A. Weinig)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Laurent Creek
Description:Rises in Saline Township of Perry County and flows into the Mississippi River near St. Marys to form a part of the boundary between Ste. Genevieve County and Perry County. Laurent is the French form of Lawrence. St. Lora Creek is another name of the same stream; probably it is merely an Americanized pronunication of the French "Laurent," although there is an obscure woman saint by the name Lora or Laura. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Lawrence's Catholic Church
Description:At Lawrenceton. Dedicated in 1872. Named for St. Lawrence (d. 258), one of the deacons of the Roman church. (Rothensteiner (1928) II, 518; CATH. ENCY. IX, 89)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Lora Creek
Description:See St. Laurent Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Description:This railroad had its origin in the southwestern branch of the Pacific Railroad of Missouri. In 1869 it was called Atlantic and Pacific, but in 1876 it became the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad, for its expected termini. Frisco is the popular name. The southern branch runs south from St. Louis through Jefferson County almost parallel to the Missouri Pacific Railroad, and in Ste. Genevieve County almost parallel to the Mississippi River. Another branch enters Crawford County in Boone Township and leaves it east of Fanning to enter Phelps County, while the Salem branch of the Frisco extends from Cuba Junction to Salem in Dent County. (ENCY. ST. LOUIS (1899) 1855-6; Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Mary
Description:See St. Marys
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Marys
Description:In 1839, Miles A. Gilbert (1810-1901), bought land between River Aux Vases and St. Lora Creek. He succeeded in having a post office located here, which was known as Yankeetown (since Gilbert had come from New England), sometime between 1839 and 1847. Below St. Lora Creek was a landing called Bird's Landing, for its owner. Later this was bought by Joseph Pratte and run by him from 1826 until his death in 1847, and called Pratte's Landing. Freight for the St. Mary's Seminary (est. 1818), at what is now Perryville (in Perry County), was landed there. Gilbert induced Bernard Pratte, son of Joseph Pratte, to move the landing to Yankeetown. Since St. Mary's Seminary (dedicated to the Virgin Mary) received the most freight here, it was called St. Mary's Landing. At present, the Mississippi River does not flow near the town. Wetmore (1837) and Hayward (1853) designated St. Mary's Landing as a post office. Goodwin (1867) called the post office St. Mary's. The post office is now spelled St. Marys. According to the postmaster, the name of the town is now St. Mary. (Wetmore (1837); Hayward (1853); Goodwin (1867); Postal Guide; Mrs. Edward Schaaf; Genevieve M. Pratt)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Mary's
Description:See St. Marys
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Mary's Landing
Description:See St. Marys
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Peter's Catholic Chapel
Description:At what is now Ozora, a chapel was blessed on November 29, 1847. The present church is called Sacred Heart (q.v.). Named for the Apostle. (Rothensteiner (1928) II, 77)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Philomena's Catholic Church
Description:At Bloomsdale. The first church cornerstone was placed and blessed on June 30, 1851. Named for a Roman saint about whom nothing is known. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 529; Rothensteiner (1928) II, 518; CATH. ENCY. XI, 25)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Staabtown
Description:See River Aux Vases
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Staples Hollow
Description:Three miles south of Brickey's. Named for a local family. (Albert Reed)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:State Road
Description:From St. Marys to Jefferson City. So called because the state had it surveyed. (Frank E. Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ste. Genevieve
Description:The oldest permanent settlement in Missouri. Tradition assigns the founding of the old town to 1735. Two old maps of the middle Mississippi, one obviously copied from the other and both dated 1755, have this phrase beneath the name of Sainte Genevieve, "Village Francois etabli depuis 3. ans." This would place the settlement of the village in 1752. The period following the numeral may have been an abbreviation for 30 or 33, or the engraver may have omitted another numeral. In 1764, Father Phillibert Watrin, S.J., said that there was a new village established under the name of Sainte Genevieve fifteen years before. This would make the date 1749. From the position of the phrases the statement could be interpreted that there was an older village which had been moved to a different site in that year. Captain Pittman, writing in 1767, says that "the first settlers of this village removed about twenty-eight years ago from Cascasquias." This would make the date 1739. On May 25, 1732 Father Mercier, the Superior of the mission at Cahokia, wrote to one of the priests at Seminary of Quebec that scarcely a month before he had sent him with Louis Poulin from the parish of Saint Joachim some papers and documents. For many years Saint Joachim was patron of the church at Ste. Genevieve. Evidently St. Joachim was a parish of Ste. Genevieve, and it was in existence as early as 1732. In 1881 a citizen of Ste. Genevieve discovered the remains of an old well near the site of the earlier settlement, on which was cut the date 1732. In 1798 Zenon Trudeau, the Spanish lieutenant governor informed his government that inhabitants of the old village had been subject to inundations for more than sixty years and had to move their homes to higher ground. It was the flood of 1785 that caused many of the inhabitants to abandon the old site. By 1787, almost all the dwellings had been moved to the new site. This would make the date in the 1720s. Some years after the opening of Renault's mines in 1723 in present-day Washington County the lead was taken to Ste. Genevieve for shipment across the river. It may be that this would have led to the founding of a settlement. It can be safely asserted that the village was founded as early as 1732 and perhaps a few years earlier. The inhabitants of Kaskaskia gave the settlement the derisive name Misere (i.e. Poverty). On this nickname McDermott says: "Generally held to signify, jokingly, that the town was a place of little importance. But cf. "pays de misere," which apparently means barrens. Barren and gravelly veins of earth, called by the Canadians pays de misere' (Collot, JOURNEY IN NORTH AMERICA, I, 4, 1796)." Cf. the nicknames Paincourt for St. Louis, Vide Poche and Pain de Sucre for Carondelet, etc. It was named for Sainte Genevieve, patroness of Paris. She is reputed to have saved the city from Attila by her prayers in 451. She died at Paris, January 3, 512. Possibly the name was chosen because the settlement was made on or near her feast day; more probably it was selected in honor of the capital city of the native land of the original settlers. The abbreviation "Ste." preserves the French feminine form "Sainte." (Pittman, EUROPEAN SETTLEMENTS (1906) 95; Houck (1908) I, 337-339; Yealy, SAINTE GENEVIEVE (1935) 21-27; McDermott, under "Misere")
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ste. Genevieve Academy
Description:See Rozier Academy
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ste. Genevieve Catholic Church
Description:At Ste. Genevieve. Named in honor of Ste. Genevieve, patroness of Paris (419 or 422- 512). (CATH. ENCY. VI, 413)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ste. Genevieve County
Description:In 1763 France gave up her territory in America. To England were ceded Canada and all the territory of Louisiana and Illinois east of the Mississippi River, except New Orleans; to Spain were granted by secret treaty the country of Louisiana and Illinois west of the Mississippi River and New Orleans. Ste. Genevieve was one of the original districts. It comprised all the territory between the Meramec River to the north and Apple Creek to the south. There was no western boundary. In 1800 by the treaty of Ildephonso Louisiana, owned by Spain, was ceded back to France. In 1804 the territory was divided, and that north of the 33rd parallel was known as the District of Upper Louisiana. The same five districts were re-established. In 1812 by Act of Congress, Missouri Territory was formed, and the five districts were called counties. Ste. Genevieve County then was established on October 1, 1812, by proclamation of Governor William Clark. Later in 1812 a portion of Ste. Genevieve County around what was called Mine a Breton was set apart as Washington County. In 1818 Jefferson County was established out of St. Louis and Ste. Genevieve counties and Madison County out of Ste. Genevieve and Cape Girardeau counties. In 1820 Perry County was formed from Ste. Genevieve. In 1821 St. Francois County was made from parts of Ste. Genevieve, Jefferson, and Washington counties. On the northeast Ste. Genevieve is bounded by the Mississippi River, on the southeast by Perry County, on the southwest by St. Francois County, and on the northwest by St. Francois and Jefferson counties. Named from the town of Ste. Genevieve. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 183; Eaton; Houck (1908) II, 377-380; Violette (1918) 78-80)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ste. Genevieve Landing
Description:See Volney
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ste. Genevieve Lime and Quarry Company Kilns
Description:West of Ste. Genevieve. Site of the early lime kiln of Ferdinand Moser. Named for the company. (John Walker)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ste. Genevieve Township
Description:One of the two original townships; named for the town. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 314)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ste. Genevieve, Iron Mountain and Pilot Knob Plank Road
Description:This road extended from Ste. Genevieve to Iron Mountain by way of Farmington, a distance of forty-two miles. The road was incorporated on February 7, 1851, and finished in 1853 with toll gates. The construction consisted of heavy timbers laid lengthwise with the road and oak boards eight feet long nailed crosswise. Iron from Pilot Knob in Iron County and from Iron Mountain was taken to Ste. Genevieve, and freight and supplies were brought back. The road furnished the principal means of transportation for most of the products used in the section until 1857, when the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad was built. Although portions of the road were abandoned as tolls at various times, all tolls of the St. Francois County portion were not removed until 1902. It is commonly called the Plank Road. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 26-27)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Stone Methodist Church
Description:About one and a half mile from New Church near Avon, in Saline Township. A man named McFarland was instrumental in getting it built. It is built of stone. (Ralph Coffman; Frank E. Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Stony Point School
Description:In Jackson Township. The countryside is very rocky. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Suck Lick Creek
Description:Rises at a spring eight miles south of Lawrenceton and flows into Fourche a Du Clos near its intersection with the highway. The deer licked at rocks along its banks for salt; hence the name. (Ed Bequette)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sugar Creek
Description:Rises one mile north of Zell and flows into the Mississippi River about one mile south of White Sand Landing, just north of Ste. Genevieve. It was named for the sugar maple trees along its banks. For the making of maple sugar in early times, elsewhere in the county, see Les Sucreries, above. On some maps this stream is named Frenchman Creek, obviously for the French who were the first settlers in the locality. Another name, evidently the oldest, is Fourche Polite Creek. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 202; Hixson's Plat Book (1930); McDermott; Felix A. Fallert; T.A. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Swansea Copper Mine
Description:Four miles north of Cornwall Copper Mine. Opened in 1876 by Leon Jokerst, who, following the lead of Mr. Harris, named it Swansea. Swansea, in Wales, is a great center of the copper trade. (Bain & Ulrich (1905) 36-37; Weller & Clair (1928) 331)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Swink Hollow
Description:Three miles northeast of Womack. Named for a family. (W.J. Lenz)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Taylor Creek
Description:Rises six miles northeast of Farmington and flows into Wolf Creek one half mile north of Valley Forge. Named for George Taylor, who before and after the Civil War owned 1000 acres in the vicinity. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Taylor School
Description:In Union Township. Named for George Taylor, landowner. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Telegraph Road
Description:See King's Highway
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Terre Bleu Creek
Description:See Terre Blue Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Terre Bleue Creek
Description:See Terre Blue Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Terre Blue Creek
Description:Rises in Union Township, Ste. Genevieve County, two miles northeast of Sprott and flows into Big River about two miles northeast of Bonne Terre, in Perry Township, St. Francois County. The name was derived from the bluish earth around the stream. Other and older spellings are Terre Bleue and Terre Bleu. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Conard (1901) V, 430; Buckley (1908) I, 6; Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Shelt T. Horn; Mr. & Mrs. R.J. Reeder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Asylum
Description:A school opened in 1815 near Ste. Genevieve by Joseph Hertich, a native of Switzerland. It was also called Hertich Academy. It closed some twenty-five years later. This was the first school in the state to put into practice the princples pf education set out by Pestalozzi (1746-1827), the famous Swiss educational reformer, who turned his farm in 1775 into a kind of asylum or industrial home for the children of paupers. The name of Hertich's school was thus used in the true Pestalozzian spirit. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 245, 408, 559; Houck (1908) III, 68; Douglass (1912) I. 556)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Big Field
Description:Common field south of Ste. Genevieve, extending to the River AuxVases on the Mississippi River bottoms. The original French name was "Le Grand Champ." This, according to McDermott, was the usual name for the common-field of a French village; it was also known as the "grand carre" or "quarre." In addition to his house lot each inhabitant was granted one or more lots in the common-fields, that portion of the nearby lands set apart for cultivation. Such lots (generally one arpent front by forty deep), were granted in strips after the manner of land distribution in medieval Europe, and became the private possession of the individual holder. The common-field was separated from the commons by a fence of which each person was required to maintain the section that crossed his land. Houck points out that in 1907 the "big field" of Ste. Genevieve was still cultivated in this manner. Brackenridge gives a detailed account of the common-field at Ste. Genevieve, and Billon and Dorrance describe the case of its fences. The common field is not to be confused with the commons (Fr. la commune), which was an area set apart and used in common by all inhabitants of the village for the gathering of firewood and the pasturage of animals. (Conard (1909) I, 271; Houck (1908) II, 24-25, 233; Douglass (1912) I, 52, 56; Billon, ANNALS, 216-220; Dorrance, 23-24; McDermott, under "champ" and "commune")
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Chalybeate Springs
Description:Situated near the town of Ste. Genevieve on River AuxVases and owned by Judge William James. So called because of the iron content of the water. (Rozier (1890) 326; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Louisiana Academy
Description:See Rozier Academy
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Old Lead Road
Description:The road from Mine La Motte in Madison County to Ste. Genevieve. The journey, conveying lead either on horses or by oxen, consumed not less than two days. Travelers usually camped at the crossing of Saline Creek where the Burnt Mill (in Perry County) is. In the early days, roads or trails were marked by notches cut out of the trees. This road was marked by three notches and is also known as the Three Notch Road. It is said to be the oldest road in Missouri. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf; J.H. Boyd)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Plank Road
Description:See Ste. Genevieve, Iron Mountain and Pilot Knob Plank Road.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Salines
Description:See Las Salinas
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Thomure
Description:A railroad siding at Little Rock Landing. Named for F.J. Thomure, superintendent of the Mississippi River and Bonne Terre Railroad. (HANDBOOK MISSOURI R. R. C. (1934); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Three Notch Road
Description:See The Old Lead Road
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Three Rivers
Description:Rises six miles northeast of Farmington and flows into Terre Blue Creek. The reason for the name is said to be that three creeks come together to form the stream. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Three Rivers Baptist Church
Description:Five miles north of Farmington. Organized in 1832. Named probably from the camp-meeting grounds on the nearby Three Rivers. (Mrs. F.M. Horton)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Thurman
Description:A post office from 1900-1910, in Union Township, on the Potosi Road about two miles east of Scott School. Named for a family. (Postal Guide; W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Thurman School
Description:In Union Township. Named for the donor of the land for the schoolhouse, Green Thurman. (Ed Bequette)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Tom Dodge Hill
Description:Four and a half miles east of Miller's Switch. Named for a sawmill man who lived there. (Joseph B. Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Trotman's Hill
Description:Near Kehl School, in Ste. Genevieve Township. Named for a family who lived on its top. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Turley Mill
Description:A gristmill ten miles north of Farmington. Named for the owners, Rolla Turley and his brother. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Turley Mill Road
Description:From Farmington to Turley Mill. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Turley School
Description:In Union Township. Named for the family. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ulam
Description:A post office from 1890-1904, on Saline Creek six miles east of Avon. A Biblical name chosen by John Dunklin. Ulam was the son of Sheresh, grandson of Manasseh (1Chron. 7:16). The name is thought to mean "solitary." Apparently Mr. Dunklin meant the name to suggest that Ulam was a solitary place. As a matter of fact, a closer examination of the genealogy of the Twelve Tribes given in 1 Chron. reveals that Ulam was the great-grandson, not the grandson of Manasseh, and the latest authorities declare that his name means "foremost." (Postal Guide; C.A. Boyd; Mrs. Wm. Snyder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Union Baptist Church
Description:Organized May 7, 1832, by Elder James Williams, T.B. Green, and James Cundill. An ideal name. (Duncan (1882) 303; Douglass (1912) I, 469)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Union Township
Description:Formed in 1834 from the western portion of Jackson Township. Perhaps the choice of name was suggested by President Jackson's well-known championship of national unity. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 314)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Unity School
Description:In Saline Township. An ideal name. Formerly called Womack School, from the town. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Valle High School
Description:Organized in Ste. Genevieve in 1925, a parochial high school named for Felix and Odile Valle, great benefactors of Ste. Genevieve parish. (Yealy, STE. GENEVIEVE (1935) 133)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Valle Spring
Description:See Valle Spring Branch
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Valle Spring Branch
Description:Rises at Valle Spring one and a half miles south of Ste. Genevieve and flows into the Mississippi River about two miles south of Ste. Genevieve. Named for the family. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 604; Yealy, STE. GENEVIEVE (1935) 62; Lucille Basler)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Valle Spring Cemetery
Description:Near Valle Spring; hence the name. Established in the 1880s after no more burials were allowed in the old cemetery in Ste. Genevieve. (Lucille Basler)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Village des Petites Cotes
Description:See Nouvelle Bourbon
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Volney
Description:A post office in 1837. Formerly known as Ste. Genevieve Landing one mile from Ste. Genevieve. Count Constantin Francois de Chasseboeuf de Volney (1757-1820), famous French author and statesman, has nearly a dozen American places named for him. Volney's RUINS (first published in 1791) was an exceedingly popular book in the earlier days with American readers. (Wetmore (1837) 170)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Weingarten
Description:A small town in western Ste. Genevieve Township and a station on the Missouri-Illinois Railroad, with a post office since 1887. It was platted in 1837 by Jacob Wolf and others. Seraphin B. Donze, the first postmaster, named it for the town in Wurttemberg from which his parents had come. It seems also to have been known as Plank Road (q.v.). (Postal Guide; J.A. Kettinger)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:White Oak Creek
Description:Rises six miles northeast of Farmington and flows into Terre Bleue about eight miles northeast of Farmington. Named from the white oak timber in the vicinity. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:White Sand Landing
Description:A place on the Mississippi River to which pure white sand from caves ten miles northwest of Ste. Genevieve was hauled; hence the name of the landing. An older name is Sand Dale Landing. (Yealy, SAINTE GENEVIEVE (1935) 115, 116; Joseph H. Klein)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wilder Sandstone Quarry
Description:U.S. Survey 307, T. 37, R. 9E. about four miles south of Ste. Genevieve. Named for the landowner. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 197; George Herzog)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Willow Pond
Description:Three miles west of Kinsey, in Jackson Township. So named, because of willows around the pond, by Edward Logn, who had a store there. (Goforth Ditch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wolf Hollow
Description:One and a quarter miles north of Brickey's, in northern Jackson Township. Wolves were found there in the early days. (Albert Reed)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Womack
Description:A small town in the southern tip of Saline Township, with a post office since 1895. Named for R.M. Womack, the first postmaster. (Postal Guide; Arthur Womack)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Womack School
Description:See Unity School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Yallaly's Ford
Description:Two miles east of Minnith over North Fork of Saline Creek. Named for a man who lived there. Also called Pratte's Ford, for an earlier resident. (Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Yankeetown
Description:See St. Marys
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Zell
Description:A town in Ste. Genevieve Township, with a post office from 1886-1922. Named for a town in Baden, Germany, about ten miles southeast of Offenburg, from which the settlers came. (Postal Guide; Rev. Chas. A. Weinig)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Zell Cave
Description:At Zell. A natural cave opened by Lawrence Huck in July, 1938. (Lawrence Huck)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

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