St. Francois County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:African Methodist Church
Description:Organized in 1878 in Bonne Terre for colored people. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Air Lead Shaft
Description:Owned by St. Joseph Lead Company; now abandoned. An air shaft is defined in the Century Dictionary as a pit or shaft in a mine used for ventilation; also called an airpit. (Buckley (1908) I, 141; Century Dict.)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Alexander and Burk's Granite Quarry
Description:Sec. 29, T. 35, R. 6E, east of Hill-O'Mera Construction Company's quarry. A crushing plant was erected in 1900 by Corbin Alexander. After Burks purchased an interest in 1903, it operated under the joint name. (Buckley and Buehler (1904) 77)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Allen Branch
Description:Rises four miles south of Doe Run and flows into Doe Run Creek one and a half miles southwest of Doe Run. Named for the landowner. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; Dewey Thurman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Alley's Mines
Description:The mines were discovered in 1797 by Abraham Baker and Thomas Alley, in the neighborhood of Big River. (Houck (1908) I, 373)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:American Mines
Description:See Mine a Maneto
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Anderson's Quarry
Description:In Liberty Township; owned by Andrew Anderson, born in Guttenburg (modern Goteberg), Sweden, in 1852. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 619)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Andrews Branch
Description:Rises northeast of Jaydee and flows into Terre Bleue near Fair View Baptist Church. Named for the landowner. (Farmington Quadrangle Map; Mrs. J.H. Snyder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Annie Lloyd School
Description:An elementary school at Farmington. Named for Mrs. Annie Lloyd, a teacher for many years in the system. Formerly called North Ward School and Washington School from its location. (W.L. Johns)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Appleberry Lead Shaft
Description:At Halifax. Named for the man who sank the shaft. (Henry Thurman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ash Hill
Description:The top of the divide which runs from Loughboro to the Mississippi River, a stop on the St. Francois County Electric Railroad, in St. Francois Township. Paca Ashburn lived on the farm here. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ash Landing
Description:A car stop on the St. Francois County Electric Railroad at Paca Ashburn's residence. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Asplof Granite Quarry
Description:One half mile west of Knob Lick; operated by A.J. Asplof on land owned by Edward Price. (Buckley and Buehler (1904) 77)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Assumption of Blessed Virgin Mary Greek Catholic Church
Description:At Desloge. A church of the Ukranian Greek Catholic Diocese. The Assumption is a festival commemorating Christ's assuming to Heaven the body and soul of Mary upon her death. (Catholic Directory (1937) 593; Rev. Michael Lukasky)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Attucks School
Description:For negroes at Boone Terre. Named for Crispus Attucks, the colored man who lost his life in the Boston Massacre, on March 5, 1770. The Boston Massacre was one of the incidents leading up to the Revolutionary War, and Attucks, a half-breed Indian or mulatto, the alleged leader of the mob that attacked British soldiers and the first to fall in their return fire, is venerated as a patriotic martyr by his race. (Miss Dayse Baker)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Aulsbury Baptist Chapel
Description:In Marion Township. Organied in 1888. Named for a preacher. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927; Mrs. J.H. Snyder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Aulsbury Chapel School
Description:See Cave Springs School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Back Creek
Description:A tributary of Wolf Creek, into which it issues two miles above the latter's entrance into St. Francois River. Flowing into Wolf Creek at a right angle, its waters are held back by Wolf Creek after heavy rains. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Conard (1901) V, 430; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bains Hill [1 of 2]
Description:Two miles north of Libertyville. Named for James W. Bains, landowner. (F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bains Hill [2 of 2]
Description:Another Bains Hill, three and a half miles south of Libertyville. Named for Peter Bains, landowner. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bald Knob
Description:Southeast of King School, in Iron Township. There are no trees on its top. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; John McBrien)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Banister Branch
Description:Rises two and a half miles south of Elvins and flows into Flat River one mile southwest of Elvins. Named for a landowner. (Bonne Terre Quanrangle Map; Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Barry School
Description:One and a half miles west of Doe Run. It was built soon after the Civil War and is no longer in existence. Named for an early settler. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927; F.J. Antoine)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Barry Town
Description:A short distance south of Doe Run. Named for an early settler. (F.J. Antoine)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Barton School
Description:In St. Francois Township. Named for the donor of the land. (Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bear Creek
Description:Rises near Germania School in Perry Township and flows into Big River seven miles north of its source. Wallows along the creek, supposedly those of bears, gave this name to the creek. (Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; G.C. Long)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Beck Mountain
Description:Two and a half miles southeast of Farmington. Named for an early settler, Andrew Beck. (John McBrien)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bee Run
Description:Rises near Silver Springs and flows into Big River about four miles south of Silver Springs. There were many wild bees in the locality years ago. (Mr. and Mrs. Willis Moon)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Belmont Branch
Description:First extension of St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad south, completed in 1869, covering a distance of 120 miles from Bismarck to Belmont, in Mississippi County; hence the name. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 34)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Benoist
Description:A town, practically extinct today, which was owned by the Esther Real Estate Company, of which Eugene H. Benoist was president. It was surveyed in 1906 and located near Esther. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 59)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Beth El Temple
Description:The first Jewish synagogue in southeast Missouri. It was built in Flat River in 1925-1926. For the name, cf. above. (LEAD BELT NEWS, June 10, 1938)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bethel German Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:Erected in 1867, two miles west of the present town of Doe Run. For the name, cf. above. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Big Fill Hollow
Description:Three miles north of Knob Lick. A "fill" or embankment, made for the Belmont Branch of the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad. (John McBrien)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Big Hill
Description:Two miles south of Libertyville. Named for its size. Known also as Pole Hill, because of the corduroy road, Made of poles or logs laid transversely, that ran over the hill. (F.L. Graham: Fredericktown Quadrangle Map)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Big River
Description:A stream rising in Kaolin Township in Iron County, winding through Washington and St. Francois Counties, and flowing into the Meramec River in north-central Meramec Township of Jefferson County. It was discovered about 1720 by Philippe Francois Renault, a Frenchman who came up from Ste. Genevieve, looking for mines. When Renault saw the river, he was entranced by the beauty of the stream and exclaimed, "Grande Riviere!" He used "grande" in the sense of beautiful, magnificient, or sublime, but it has been translated into "big," which is a misnomer, for it is not big. As late as 1800 the river as far down as Houses Spring in Jefferson County was called in official documents Renault's Fork of the Meramec. Soon after this territory came into the possession of the United States the river was known as Negro Fork of the Meramec. No plausible reason for this name has been discovered. Beck says that it is sometimes called Grand River, which is close to the original French name. Wetmore gives the name as Big River or Negro Fork of Merrimac. Parker and the HAND-BOOK FOR MISSOURI call it Negro Creek. (Beck (1823); Wetmore (1837); Parker (1865); HAND-BOOK MISSOURI (1881); MHR II, 188-194; Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Big River Mills [1 of 3]
Description:In Perry Township. Named from the settlement. The first school was built about 1850. (Farmington NEWS, Feb. 14, 1941)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Big River Mills [2 of 3]
Description:A post office from 1825-1889. One of the oldest settlements in Perry Township. Named for a water mill built in 1825 on Big River. It is sometimes known as Skintown, a name which, according to a story told locally, had its origin in a remark made by a farmer from whose wagon a sheep skin was stolen when he brought his corn to the mill, "This is a skin town." Cf. other humorous names listed below, under Cornstalk Lead Diggins. (Green's Postal Guide (1831); Wetmore (1837); Hayward (1853); Colton (1857); Goodwin (1867); Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Postal Guide; Douglass (1912) I, 63; Farmington NEWS, Feb. 14, 1941)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Big River Mills [3 of 3]
Description:On Big River, from which it takes its name. Thomas George and his son-in-law, William Evans, began to build the mill in 1823. Completed in 1825, it was known as George's Mill. It was later known as Tyler for a purchaser. This grist mill was the second one in the county. A little hoe-cake trap had been built earlier by a Mr. Montgomery on Flat River, about one-half mile above its mouth, but it had been destroyed by a freshet before George and Evans began their mill. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Big River Township
Description:In the northwestern part of the county. It was formed in 1863. The name was derived from Big River, which flows through it. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 4; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Big Spring Methodist Church
Description:On the southern side of Esther on Koen Creek. Built before the Civil War, it was discontinued in the 1880s. Named from a large spring nearby. (Sam McHenry)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bisch Mine
Description:See Chadburn Mine
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bismarck
Description:A town in northwest Iron Township, at the junction of the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad main line and its Belmont Branch. First laid out and surveyed by P.R. Van Frank and others in 1868. The post office was established December 22, 1868, replacing that of Dent's Station (q.v.). Named for the famous German statesman, Otto Eduard Leopold, Prince von Bismarck-Schonhausen (1815- 1898), first chancellor of the German Empire. An attempt, which did not succeed, was made during the first World War to change the name of the town to the more patriotic name of Loyal. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Postal Guide; Eaton; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 56; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Black Oak Flat
Description:Two miles east of Burch School, where Polecat Creek rises. Named for the trees. (J.W. Burch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Black River Township
Description:Created in 1840 in that part of the county out of which a part of Iron County was later formed, February 17, 1857. Black River flows through the edge of it. (Douglass (1912) I, 303; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 4; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Blackwell
Description:A town in the extreme northern part of the county in Big River Township. The post office was listed as Blackwell's Station 1867-1886; since 1886, as Blackwell. Named for the owners of the land upon which the town was located, Lavinia Blackwell and Margaret Blackwell. (Postal Guide; Goodwin (1867); Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 580) See our JEFFERSON COUNTY HERITAGE p. 143-146 after Jeremiah Blackwell.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Blackwell School
Description:In Big River Township. Named from the settlement. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Blackwell's Station
Description:See Blackwell
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Blairsville
Description:A town in western Randolph Township, one mile north of Bismarck. Its plat was filed April 14, 1858. It is now extinct. Presumably a personal name. (Parker (1865); Nicely (1867); Goddard (1869); Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Thom. H. Holman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Blue Goose Hill
Description:In the town of Flat River. There was a saloon there by that name in the 1900s, which had on its sign a blue goose. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bogy Mine
Description:See Desloge Mines
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bogy Tract
Description:Between Desloge and Leadwood. Land upon which "Mine a Joe" was located was later prospected by Bogy Lead and Mining Company; hence the name. (Buckley (1908) I, 196)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bogytown
Description:Little village, once outside the limits of Bonne Terre. Named for an old French family. (Conard (1901) I, 319; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 60; Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bonne Terre
Description:A town in Perry Township, on the Mississippi River and Bonne Terre Railroad, with a post office since 1868. It was first settled by the French. The time must have been around the year 1825, for the La Grave Mines were located there at this time. During early mining the name "bonne terre," meaning "good earth," was given by miners to clay containing lead, to distinguish it from the barren clay adjacent. The settlement was also known as St. Joe Mines. This name is sometimes explained as borrowed from the St. Joseph Lead Company, which obtained the land in 1864; but probably the relation should be reversed, and the mining company took its name from the mine. The name St. Joe Mines is far older than 1864, and goes back to the early French period; cf. Mine a Joe in St. Francois County. The French lead miners probably named it for St. Joseph, husband of the Virgin Mary, who was thought to be a patron of miners, perhaps because of the precious gold brought to the infant Jesus by the Magi. The post office was first established May 13, 1868, and called Bontear; evidently a crude attempt to spell the name phonetically. In 1895 it was spelled as one word. In 1906 the spelling was again changed to its present form. (Postal Guide; Eaton; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 47; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bonne Terre Heights
Description:An addition to Bonne Terre. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930; Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bonneterre
Description:See Bonne Terre
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bontear
Description:See Bonne Terre
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Boone Terre Lake
Description:At Bonne Terre, owned by the St. Joseph Lead Company, who constructed it. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Boyce School
Description:See Burch School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Boyd Branch
Description:Rises near Rouggly School and flows into Plattin Creek two miles northwest of Koester's mill. Named for a landowner. (Mrs. Arthur Koester)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Boyer's Prairie
Description:Twelve miles north of Farmington. It was a Spanish grant to Boyer of wild prairie land, where roamed wild horses. A straight race track, one mile long, was established there. According to Dorrance, "in the hills behind the hamlet of Racola in Washington County today there is a long straight clearing still known as the Race Track." (Dorrance, 37; Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Boyer's Run
Description:Rises about ten miles east of Bonne Terre and flows into Terre Bleue near Fair View Baptist Church. For the name, cf. above. (Mrs. J.H. Snyder; Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bread Tray Mountain
Description:Northeast of King School. Named for its shape; it is flat on top. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; John McBrien)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brick Methodist Church
Description:An old church formerly at Big River Mills, built of brick. (Sam McHenry)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brickey Road
Description:Runs from French Village to Brickey's Landing on the Mississippi River, where farmers took grain. Named for its terminus. (F.C. Aubuchon)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brightstone Presbyterian Church
Description:In Liberty Township. Organized December 19, 1912. Said to have been so called from the color of the paint used. Another reason given is that the name is derived from the shiny cleavage surfaces of the feldspar in the granitie in the vicinity. (Permelly Chamberlain; Elsie & Clara Marshall)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brightstone School
Description:In Liberty Township. Formerly known as O'Bannon School for an early settler. It was moved one mile southwest of its former site and named Brightstone from the nearby Brightstone Presbyterian Church. (Permelly Chamberlain; Elsie & Clara Marshall)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Brown Mountain
Description:Three and a half miles east of Iron Mountain Lake. Named for a collier who burned charcoal there. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; John Amelung)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Bryan's Mines
Description:On Hazel Run, north of Big River, in SW 1/4 of Sec. 33, T. 37N. 5E. Also known as Hazel Run Lead Diggings from their location. Possibly these mines were named for James Bryan, the son-in-law of Moses Austin, at whose home at Hazel Run Austin died. These mines were in operation in 1806. (Schoolcraft, VIEW OF LEAD MINES (1819) 66; Litton (1855) 39; Winslow (1894) II, 676; Barker (1925) 31)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Buck Mountain
Description:Southeast of King School. This was excellent country for deer hunting. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; Dewey Thurman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Burch School
Description:In Pendleton Township. Named for James Wesley Burch, landowner. The school was formerly called Boyce School. Presumably a personal name, for the Boyces were an early family of Farmington. Also known as Washita School, from the creek of that name. (Mrs. Emma Burch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Burks Creek
Description:Rises seven miles northeast of Farmington in Ste. Genevieve County and flows into Wolf Creek near Valley Forge in St. Francois County. Named for Charles Burks, landowner in the vicinity. (W.F. Yeager; L.T. Yeager; Jerry B. Burks)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Burks Road
Description:Runs from Farmington through Sprott, seven miles east of Farmington, to Plank Road, 1/4 mile east of Weingarten. For the name, cf. above. (Jerry B. Burks)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Burns Branch
Description:Rises two and a half miles west of Farmington and flows into St. Francois River below Doe Run Junction. Named for a landowner. (J.D. Flanery)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Butcher Lead Diggings
Description:Old diggings on the land of what is now the Central Lead Company. Probably a personal name. (Winslow (1894) II, 667)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Butler Hill
Description:Two and a half miles west of Knob Lick. Named for a landowner. (Fredericktown Quadrangle; Bert Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Butts School
Description:See Pleasant Mound School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Buzzard Mountain
Description:See Oak Mountain.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Buzzard Rock
Description:Three miles southeast of Doe Run. Named from the bird. (Ben Herbst)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cabanne Course
Description:Rises three miles southwest of Bonne Terre and flows into Big River three and a half miles northwest of Bonne Terre. "Course" is apparently used here in one sense of the French "cours," stream or current. The Cabannes were an old French family who lived in this region. (Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; Finis Turley)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Caledonia Road
Description:From Farmington west through Loughboro to Bismarck to Caledonia in Washington County. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Calico Springs
Description:One mile east of Loughboro on Belmont Branch. A humorous nickname given by railroad men because of the women living there. Cf. others listed under Cornstalk Lead Diggings. (Mrs. J.L. Ritter)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Camp Branch
Description:Rises six miles northeast of Farmington and flows into Wolf Creek near Colony Baptist Church. There is an excellent spring about four feet in diameter at the place where it flows into Wolf Creek, which provides a good place to camp; this may be a reason for its name. (W.F. Yeager; Wm. O'Sullivan)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Camp Lead Shaft
Description:Owned by St. Joseph Lead Company; now abandoned. The source of the name could not be ascertained. (Buckley (1908) I, 141)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Candlestick Rocks
Description:About twelve miles south of Farmington. So named because of their shape. (Mrs. Emma Burch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cantwell
Description:A small town in northeastern Randolph Township, with a post office since 1915. Organized by H.J. Cantwell, the president of the St. Francois Town-Site and Mining Company. A survey was made in 1900. (Postal Guide; Miles HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 58)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cape Girardeau Northern Railroad
Description:Louis Houck was the greatest pioneer in railroad building in Southeast Missouri. He built a railroad from Chester, Illinois, to Perryville. In 1904 he formed a company known as the Cape Girardeau and Chester Railroad Company and built a railroad from Cape Girardeau by way of Jackson to Perryville, where connection was made with the road from West Chester. In 1906 the Saline Valley Railroad was incorporated, and work was begun at Saline Junction of the Cape Girardeau and Chester Railroad to Farmington in St. Francois County, which was completed in 1912. The entire system was then reorganized as the Cape Girardeau Northern Railroad. The road was abandoned in 1917. All the names were taken from the termini and direction of the lines. It was more familiarly known as Houck's Railroad, for its builder. (Miles, HIST. ST. F. (1935) 39- 40)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Carleton College
Description:Founded in 1854 by Miss Eliza A. Carleton, under the name of Carleton Institute, about eight miles north of Farmington. It was moved to Farmington in 1878 and its name changed to Carleton College. It remained open until 1916, under the patronage of the Methodist Episcopal Church. So called in honor of her father, Jacob Carleton (1804-1864). (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 443; Conard (1901) I, 492; Douglass (1912) I, 420, 554; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 62)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Carleton Institute
Description:See Carleton College
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Carleton Memorial Methodist Church
Description:At Farmington. Named for Miss Eliza A. Carleton, founder of Carleton College. (Dr. C.C. Schuttler)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Carrow School
Description:In Marion Township. Named for a family in the community. It is now a part of French Village district. (F.C. Aubuchon)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cartee School
Description:In Pendleton Township. Named for a family in the community. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Casebolt Hill
Description:Four miles west of Knob Lick. Named for a family in the community. (Misses Clara & Elsie Marshall; Knowles Klob)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Castor River
Description:A large stream rising in Ste. Genevieve and St. Francois counties and flowing south into New Madrid County, where it empties into Little River. Miss Hamlett says of this stream: "It was called Crooked Creek, probably because of its winding or crooked appearance, by the early settlers. It is so called by Schoolcraft in 1818; and in 1823 is designated Castor or Crooked Creek by Beck. In 1837 Wetmore refers to it as Castor River, but it continued to be known as Crooked Creek until 1873. "Castor" is a French word meaning beaver, and the name was doubtless given by the early French settlers in St. Francois County, where the river rises." (Douglass (1912) I, xii; Miss Hamlett's thesis)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cave Springs School
Description:In Marion Township. Named from location near springs. Formerly known as Shed School from its being at first a brush shed; later as Aulsbury Chapel School from Aulsbury Baptist Chapel; and also as Sinkhole School from its location in a depression or hollow. (Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cedar Falls Branch
Description:Rises one mile southeast of Cedar Falls School and flows into Cedar Run one mile north of school. Named from the trees and the character of the stream. (John Eaton)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cedar Falls Methodist Church
Description:See Russell Methodist Chapel
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cedar Falls School
Description:In Perry Township. Named from the stream. (John Eaton; J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cedar Run
Description:Rises two miles north of Cedar Falls School and flows into Big River three miles southeast of East Bonne Terre. Named from cedar growth. (John Eaton)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Centenary Methodist Church
Description:Organized in 1882 at Bonne Terre. The centenary that suggested the name was probably that of the organization of the principal American branch, the Methodist Episcopal Church, in 1784. Cf. Centenary Church in St. Louis, organized in 1839, and made to commemorate the year 1739, when Methodism is usually said to have started in Great Britain. (Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Central
Description:See Rivermines
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Central Lead Shaft
Description:See Federal No. 6 Lead Shaft
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Chadburn Mine
Description:T. 38N., R. 5E, Sec. 18, W. 1/2 of N.E. 1/4, adjoining Perry's Mine. It was discovered about the same time as Valle Mines. Operations were begun probably in 1825. Named for its owner. It was formerly called Bisch Mine, for its owner, A. Bisch. (Litton (1855) 38- 39; HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 205; Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Chalk Hill
Description:On Highway W, one-half mile northeast of Doe Run. Named from chalk formation there. (John Hulsey)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Charles Creek
Description:See Second Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Charter Creek
Description:See Second Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Chartier Creek
Description:See Second Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cherrytown
Description:See Wortham
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cherryville
Description:See Wortham
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cholohollay River
Description:See St. Francois River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Christian Union Church of Bonne Terre
Description:See First Congregational Church of Bonne Terre.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Clardy
Description:A stop on St. Francis County Electric Railroad about one mile west of Farmington on the farm of Martin L. Clardy. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Clardy's Grove
Description:About one mile west of Farmington on the farm of Martin L. Clardy. Popular place for picnics. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Clare Lead Shaft
Description:Owned by St. Joseph Lead Company; now abandoned. (Buckley (1908) I, 141)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Clark National Forest
Description:Two of the four divisions of this national forest are found in these five counties. Parts of Crawford and Washington counties are in the Meramec Division; parts of St. Francois, Iron, and Ste. Genevieve, in the St. Francois Division. Named for Champ Clark (1850-1921), representative from Missouri, 1893-1895; 1897-1921, and speaker of the Sixty-second and Sixty-third Congresses. He was always an advocate of conservation work and a Federal conservative program. (St. Louis POST-DISPATCH, Apr. 10, 1934; Biog. Dict. Am. Congress)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Claytown
Description:See Frankclay
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Clearview School
Description:In Liberty Township. Named from its location. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Clinton Lead Shaft
Description:Owned by St. Joseph Lead Company; now abandoned. (Buckley (1908) I, 141)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Colony Baptist Church
Description:Three miles east of Farmington. There have been no services there since 1904. Named from the fact that it was built in a settlement, --one meaning of the French word "colonie." Also called Lick Church from a deer lick nearby. (Tong (1888) 42; Douglass (1912) I, 463; J.E. Gossett; Mrs. Wm. Green)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Columbia
Description:See Esther
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Columbia Park
Description:Between Esther and Leadington. A tract of land near Columbia Lead Company's mill where company officials resided. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cook's Settlement
Description:See Libertyville
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Coonville Creek
Description:Rises near Bonne Terre, flows southwest, and flows into Big River about three miles little east of north of Bonne Terre. There was an abundance of raccoons in the vicinity. (Buckley (1908) I, 6; Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Coonville School
Description:In Big River Township. Cf. Coonville Creek. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Copenhagen
Description:A district south of Farmington. Apparently named for the capital of Denmark, but for what reason has not been ascertained. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Copenhagen German Methodist Church
Description:First German Methodist Episcopal church in the county. The congregation was organized and the church built under the name Immanuel German Methodist Church between 1856-58 in a district called Copenhagen, two miles south of Farmington. From its location it was familiarly called Copenhagen Church. The name Immanuel is a favorite name for churches, from the title given to Christ in Matthew 1:23. Cemetery attached. Church building was sold and moved away in 1936. (Margaret et al, JUBILAEUMSBUCH DER ST. LOUIS DEUTSCHEN Konferenz, 137; Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927; C.C. Schuttler)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Copenhagen School
Description:In St. Francois Township. Named from its location in the district of Copenhagen. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cornstalk Lead Diggings
Description:At Hazel Run. The reason for the name has not been learned. It is probably one of the humorous nicknames beloved by the miners; cf. Crowbar Lead Shaft, Red Onion Lead Shaft, also Dogtown, Jay Bird Town, and Skintown, Blue Goose Hill, Possum Hollow, and Calico Springs. (Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cottonwood Lead Shaft
Description:Owned by St. Joseph Lead Company; now abandoned. Probably named for surrounding cottonwoods. (Buckley (1908) I, 141)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Crawford Christian Church
Description:Near Doe Run; an old log church, no longer standing. Named for the donors of the land. (Mrs. John Hulsey)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Crawford Town
Description:South of Doe Run. Named for a family. (F.J. Antoine)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Crawley Bottom
Description:A town in northwestern St. Francois Township. Named for Samuel Crawley, who owned property where the nearby Crawley Lead Mine was located. (Hixson's Plat Book; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Crawley Lead Mine
Description:On Samuel Crawley's property, between Flat River and Esther. The shaft was completed in 1893. (Buckley (1908) I, 155; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Crooked Creek
Description:See Castor River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cross Roads
Description:A settlement at the crossing of two roads in Liberty Township. Probably this is the same town in southeastern Liberty Township called Crossville, which is mentioned in some references. (Parker (1865); Nicely (1867); Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Roy Helm)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Cross Roads School
Description:In Liberty Township. Named from the settlement. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Crossville
Description:See Cross Roads
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dace Branch
Description:Rises near Dolomite Mines and flows into Big River at the site of the Big River Mills. Named for an early settler. (R.E. Tesreau)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Davis Creek
Description:Rises in the hills southeast of the town of Flat River and flows into the stream so named at the town. Named for the landowner. (Conard (1901) V, 430)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Davis Crossing
Description:A town in central Randolph Township between Bismarck and Elvins, on the Missouri-Illinois Railroad. Named for a family who owned land there. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Day Town
Description:One mile east of Leadwood. Named for the Day family who owned land there. No longer in existence. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:De Lassus
Description:A village in the southern part of St. Francois Township, about two miles southwest of Farmington. Near it runs Luziere Creek (q.v.). It is a station on the Belmont Branch of the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad. The village was surveyed October, 1869, the same year the Belmont Branch was completed. A post office was established there in 1870, but discontinued in 1915. The survey was made on an ambitious scale, for a town of twenty-four and a half blocks with two set aside for public buildings; and it was hoped with the coming of the railroad that the place would become a commercial center. In the late 1870s there was a movement for transferring the county courthouse from Farmington to De Lassus, making the new town the county seat. The proposal was defeated, however, and the promises of growth were never fulfilled. De Lassus has served merely as a shipping point for Farmington and Doe Run. Its chief claim to distinction lies in its name and its origin. Both De Lassus, the village, and the adjoining Luziere Creek lie on the estate originally granted by the Spanish Government to the last Spanish Lieutenant Governor of Upper Louisiana, Charles de Hault de Lassus de Luziere, or Don Carlos as the Spanish called him; and both were named in his honor, making use of different parts of his noble cognomen. Four generations of the De Lassus family, probably the most aristocratic French family to settle in Missouri, have played an important and distinguished part in its history. The first to come was the Lieutenant Governor's father, Pierre de Hault de Lassus de Luziere, called Don Pedro by the Spanish, and often referred to, so as to distinguish him from his more famous son, as the Chevalier de Luziere. Before the French Revolution he had belonged to the rich landed aristocracy of Flanders, with estates near Hainault, where the De Lassus had been hereditary mayors for many centuries. He was Chevalier of the Grande Croix de l'Ordre de Saint Michel, and is even said to have been a member of the Royal Council of Louis XVI. His wife had been lady-in-waiting to Queen Marie Antoinette. Tissot says he was known in France under the name of De Hault de Lassus, to which he added during the French Revolution, old "Louisieres," as he was sometimes called, took a strenuous part in royalist plots and rebellion. When the cause was finally lost, he became an exile, and with many other aristocratic French emigres joined in the ill-fated attempt to found a colony at Gallipolis, Ohio. There he became interested in a scheme to induce the French settlers at Gallipolis to remove to Spanish territory in Missouri. In April, 1793, he came to New Orleans and conferred with Baron de Carondelet, Governor of Louisiana. Carondelet, whose letters and dispatches are given at length in Houck's SPANISH REGIME, was enthusiastic over the plan to bring about 100 French families of blood and breeding out to Missouri, and in order to make the scheme more attractive he offered to found a new settlement for them "at a little distance from that of Santa Genoveva," to be appropriately known as "Nueva Borbon." He appointed the Chevalier as the first civil and military commandant of Nouvelle Bourbon (q.v.), as it was called by the French. De Lassus arrived at Nouvelle Bourbon in August, 1793. Few of his aristocratic friends followed him; but he brought his wife and family by boat from Gallipolis in February, 1794. He kept his post as Commandant of Nouvelle Bourbon until the American annexation of 1804, and remained there as an American citizen until his death sometime in the 1830s, leaving numerous descendants. His eldest son Charles, or Don Carlos (1764-1842), did not follow his father to Missouri till three years later. Born at Hainault, Flanders, he is said to have been educated in Germany, where he made mineralogy a special study. In 1732 he entered the Spanish military service, where he distinguished himself on European battlefields fighting for the Spanish crown against the revolutionists of his native France. In order to be with or near his father and brothers, he asked to be transferred to the Spanish service in Louisiana. His request was granted, and in 1796 he was sent up the river to Upper Louisiana to become Commandant at New Madrid, the most important post south of New Bourob. After three years of successful adminstration there, he was made Lieutenant Governor of Upper Louisiana (1799-1804) at St. Louis. The last Spanish administrator before the consumation of the Louisiana Purchase by the United States, he was also the most popular, liked and respected by the French and Americans alike. In 1804 he participated with dignity in the final lowering of the French flag and handed over the colony to the first American governor of Missouri Territory, General Amos Stoddar, thereupon retiring to New Orleans. The Spanish government recognized the services of the De Lassus family by liberal grants of land. Among others Don Jacques Marcelin Ceran de Hault de Lassus de St. Vrain, younger brother of Don Carlos, received in 1797 a grant for leagues from Ste. Genevieve on the Riviere aux Vases, at a place called "Les Sucreries" where he wished to establish a mill. The Lieutenant Governor himself received a grant of one square league in what is now St. Francois County. On this tract the present village of De Lassus, as well as the little stream called Luziere Creek, both were located, and both, as has been said above, were named for their owner. Perhaps drawn by his estate, the ex-governor returned to St. Louis after the death of his wife in 1816, and lived there and in St. Francois County for ten years (1816-1826). The last half of his life, however, was spent in New Orleans, where he died in 1842, in his 78th year. His only child, Auguste (or Augustus) Delassus, was born in New Orleans July 4, 1813. He was educated partly in St. Louis and partly in New Orleans, and served one term in the Louisiana State Legislature. Auguste's wife, Marie (Jeanne Blanque) Delassus, born in New Orleans in 1815, presented him with six children. Since 1849 she lived in Paris. Auguste, however, came to Missouri in 1872, where he lived on the estate at De Lassus with his son Placide till his death January 15, 1888. The fourth generation found numerous representatives of the De Lassus family on Missouri soil. Of them the best known was Placide Delassus, son of Auguste, born in New Orleans in 1839. He was educated in France, returned to the United States in 1860, and enlisted in the Confederate Army, serving with distinction for three years. At the close of the Civil War, he came to St. Louis in 1866, where he married Miss Mary Clark, daughter of Henry Clark of St. Louis and Ste. Genevieve. In 1868 he went to live on the family estate. The next year, when the village of De Lassus was inaugurated, the property on which it was laid out was recorded as belonging to his mother Marie Jean Blanque de Lassus, with his father Auguste de Lassus acting as trustee. (Postal Guide; Eaton; Dorrance, 16; Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Billon (1886) 385-8; HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 652; Houck (1908) I, 363 f.; Houck, SPANISH REG. (1909) I, 373-409, II, 69 f.; Miles; HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 54)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:De Lassus School
Description:In St. Francois Township. Named from the town. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Deloney Shaft
Description:On the western hill of Perry's Lead Mine. Probably a personal name. (Litton (1855) 36)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dent School
Description:Now a part of Bismarck district. Named for a family in the community. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dent's Settlement
Description:In Iron Township south of the present town of Bismarck. One of the very early settlements of the county. Now extinct. Its name came from the first settlers, some of these being Mark Dent, Absalom Dent, and John Dent. It was situated on the main line of the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad. The post office of Dent's Station was established July 20, 1860. It was replaced by Bismarck in 1868. (Goodwin (1867); Miles; HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 58; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dent's Station
Description:See Dent's Settlement
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Derby
Description:See Derby Lead Mine
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Derby Lead Mine
Description:One mile southwest of Elvins. Named for the Derby Lead Company, whose ore was milled and smelted by the Central Lead Company at Central, now Rivermines. The place is also known simply as Derby. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Desloge
Description:A town in northeastern Randolph Township, with a post office since 1893. It was named in honor of Firmin Desloge of St. Francois and Washington counties, who organized the Desloge Consolidated Lead Company in 1887. The production of lead started in 1894. (Postal Guide; Eaton; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 56; R.M. ATLAS (1937)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Desloge Mine
Description:Near the town of Desloge. The mine was opened in 1875 by a company of which Firmin Desloge was the superintendent and one of the principal stockholders. The mill burned in March, 1886, and soon after the property was transferred to the St. Joseph Company. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 207)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Desloge Mines
Description:On Flat River, fourteen miles southeast of Mine a Burton. Discovered by Baker and Ally, American settlers, in September, 1801, it was taken from them in 1802 by the government. The mine was on a tract granted to Joseph Bogy, who carried on the mining on the old plan for a number of years. Early names were Mine a Joe and Bogy Mine, both doubtless of Joseph Bogy. Its present name was derived from Firmin Desloge, who later developed it. (Austin (1804) 14; Schoolcraft (1819) 66; HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 204)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Desloge School
Description:An early school at Bonne Terre. Named for Firmin Desloge, mine owner. (H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Diettrich Hill
Description:Four miles northeast of Farmington. Probably a personal name. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dines Hill
Description:At Cross Roads. Named for the landowner. (W.J. Lenz)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Doe Run
Description:A small town in northern Pendleton Township, with a post office since 1888. Named from the creek. Little is known of the town before 1880; but after lead was discovered there about 1885, it became one of the most rapidly growing towns in the state. Lead was produced continuously from 1887 to 1895. The Doe Run Lead Company's interests have been moved away, and the population has greatly decreased. (Postal Guide; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 54; R.M. ATLAS (1937)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Doe Run Creek
Description:Rises northwest of Doe Run and flows into the St. Francois River four miles west of Knob Lick. The name is thought to have been derived from the female deer which roved that part of the county in the early days. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Miles; HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 54; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Doe Run Junction
Description:The junction of the Mississippi River and Bonne Terre Railroad with the Belmont Branch of the St. Louis and I.M. Railroad (now a part of the Missouri Pacific system), five miles southwest of Farmington, near Doe Run. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Doe Run Lead Company's Shaft
Description:Close to Flat River Depot. No. 1 at Flat River of Doe Run Lead Company. (Winslow (1894) II, 669; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Doe Run Lead Mines
Description:On Doe Run Creek at Doe Run. Mining was begun in the 1880s, with Judge W.R. Taylor as promoter. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 210-211; Winslow (1894) II, 671)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dog Town
Description:A former settlement, now extinct, at the Federal Lead Company's No. 9 Shaft where workes of the shaft lived, who owned many dogs. Probaly it was one of the miners' humorous nicknames; cf others listed above under Cornstalk Lead Diggings. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Doggett Lead Mine
Description:Discovered by Jacob Doggett in 1799 and included in a grant made to De Lassus in October, 1799. formerly known as Mine a la Platte or Mine a la Plate from the creek, presumably the one now known as Flat River. Austin says that the mine was located two miles from its junction with Grand River. (Austin (1804) 13; Schoolcraft (1819) 66; HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 204; Houck (1908) I, 376)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dolly
Description:Nothing could be learned about this place. It is apparently a feminine first name; cf. Peg's Knob, Minerva Hole, and Esther. (R.M. ATLAS (1937)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dolomtie Mines
Description:Between Bonne Terre and Desloge. The Dolomite Company came to St. Francois County from Granite City, Illinois, in 1935. Dolomite, a calcium-magnesium carbonate, is used to protect the bottom of open hearth steel furnaces. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Douglass School
Description:For negroes at Farmington. Named for Frederick Douglass (1817-1895), a noted negro orator and writer. Born a slave, he escaped to Massachusetts in 1838 and became an agent of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society. He edited a number of abolition journals and after the Civil War was rewarded by being made U.S. Marshall for the District of Columbia (1876-81) and minister to Haiti (1889-91). (Miss Dayse Baker)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dry Branch
Description:Rises near Mostiller School and flows into Terre Blue. It is a flat branch, usually dry. (Farmington Quadrangle Map; Mrs. J.H. Snyder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dry Creek
Description:Rises near Bismarck in St. Francois County and flows into Big River one mile north of Ironsdale in Concord Township. Cf. above. (Laux, IRONDALE YESTERDAY & TODAY)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dry Creek [1 of 2]
Description:Rises five miles south of Elvins and flows into Flat River at Davis Crossing. It is dry the greater part of the time. (Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dry Creek [2 of 2]
Description:Rises at Buford Mountain and flows into St. Francois River two miles north of Iron Mountain. The stream is usually dry. First, Second, and Dry creeks form headwaters of St. Francois River. (Marion Anderson; W.A. Anderson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Dry Fork
Description:Rises near French Village in St. Francois County, runs through the northwestern corner of Jackson Township in Ste. Genevieve County, and flows into Plattin Creek in Jefferson County. It is usually dry. (T.A. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:East Bonne Terre
Description:A post office from 1889-1903, 1906-1913. The eastern part of the town of Bonne Terre. Onece known as Elvinsville, for Jesse M. Elvins, who built the town upon his land. (Conard (1901) V, 319; Postal Guide; H.C. Thompson; Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:East Flat River
Description:The eastern part of the town of Flat River. Formerly called Norwine Town for a family. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:East Ward School
Description:See Emerson School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Eaton Branch
Description:Rises about four miles north of Bismarck and flows into Big River at Leadwood. Named for Jesse Eaton, landowner. (Buckley (1908) I, 5; Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Electric Place
Description:A town in the south-central part of St. Francois Township. The original survey was made in 1907. The electric railway runs on the eastern side of the town. Also known as the Power House, because the St. Francois Company Electric Railroad generating station was there. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 59; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Elmwood Academy
Description:The academy was started about 1842 by Mr. M.P. Cayce in Farmington. It was built in a grove of elms. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888); Conard (1901) II, 373; J.F.Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Elmwood Seminary and Presbyterian Normal School for Young Ladies
Description:Established in 1886, and put under the Presbyteries of St. Louis and Potosi in 1888. It was looked upon as a revival of Elmwood Academy. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888); Conard (1901) II, 373; Douglass (1912) I, 419)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Elvins
Description:A village on the eastern border of Randolph Township, about six miles south of Bonne Terre; a station on the Mississippi River and Bonne Terre Railroad. A post office was first established there on April 1, 1891, under the name of Setz. It was named for Gus Setz, local landowner. On May 24, 1892, the name was changed to Elvins. According to Eaton, the new name was given for Politte Elvins, a member of Congress at the time the post office was established. The record of Mr. Elvin's Career, however, shows that Eaton's statement is impossible. Politte Elvins was born in 1878, at French Village; he took the degree of Bachelor of Laws at the University of Missouri in 1899; he was elected, as a Republican, to the 61st Congress in 1908, and served two years (1909-1911). He was an unsuccessful candidate for re-election to the 62nd Congress, resumed the practice of law in Elvins, and moved to Bonne Terre in 1917. It is much more probable that the name was given for Mr. Politte Elvin's father, Jesse M. Elvins (1841-1910), who was born in St. Francois County and became a prominent landowner. When the site of the future post office was first surveyed in 1881, the property was recorded as owned by Jesse M. Elvins and Zelma Elvins his wife. Two other places are known to have been named for Jesse Elvins: Elvinstown School (q.v.) and Elvinsville, now called East Boone Terre (q.v.). Both were built on his land. The Elvins family has been closely identidied with St. Francois County since Mr. Politte Elvin's grandfather, Moses Elvins, emigrated from Baltimore and established a home at Farmington in 1840. (Postal Guide; Eaton; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 57; Biog. Dict. Am. Congress; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Elvinstown School
Description:An early school in what is now East Bonne Terre. Named for Jesse M. Elvins, landowner. (H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Elvinsville
Description:See East Bonne Terre
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Emerson School
Description:An elementary school in Flat River. Named for Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), the American author. Formerly called East Ward School from its location. (Mrs. F.M. Horton)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Esther
Description:A town in northwestern St. Francois Township, with a post office since 1901. Formerly called Columbia, for the Columbia Lead Company, which had a mine and mill there. Probably named for the daughter of Harry Cantwell, an owner of Columbia Lead Company. (Postal Guide; Miles; HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 59; A.M. Hoy; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Eugene Field School
Description:An elementary school in Flat River. Named for Eugene Field (1850-1895), the American writer. Formerly called North Ward School from its location. (Mrs. F.M. Horton)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Fairview
Description:See Haggai
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:In Liberty Township. A complimentary name for the location. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Farmington
Description:A town in St. Francois Township, with a post office since March 25, 1825. It has been the county seat since its organization. It was laid out by Henry Poston in 1822, upon land donated by David Murphy. It takes its name from its location in the richest farming section of the county. Farmington is a stock name, found in more than twenty-five other states, doubtless conferred for similar reasons. It was first known as Murphy's Settlement. William Murphy of East Tennessee made claims here in 1798. He died on the return trip home. His widow and children came to Missouri to claim the land secured by Mr. Murphy; several sons came in 1800; the widow, in 1802. (Green's Postal Guide (1831); Wetmore (1837); Hayward (1853); Eaton; Goodwin (1867); Postal Guide; Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 49; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Farmington College
Description:An educational institution established in 1886 at Farmington under the auspices of the Baptists of the Franklin Association. It was closed about the year 1900. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888); Conard (1901) II, 417; Douglass (1912) I, 419)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Farmington Junction
Description:See Ogborn
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Federal
Description:This town in northwestern St. Francois Township includes the plant and improvements of the Federal Lead Company, properties now owned by the St. Joseph Lead Company. It is often known as Federal Hill, for its location. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 59; R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Federal Hill
Description:See Federal
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Federal No. 6 Lead Shaft
Description:About 2,580 ft. south 37 degrees east of Central Station on M.R. & B.T. Railroad. First known as Central Lead Shaft, it was owned and operated by the Central Lead Company, by whom it was completed in 1893. Named Federal No. 6, when purchased by the Federal Lead Company in 1904. (Buckley (1908) I, 110-111; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Federal No. 7 Lead Shaft
Description:About 1,850 ft. south 55 degrees east of Central Lead Shaft. Formerly known as Rogers Lead Shaft for the mine captain, it was owned by the Central Lead Company, whose miners nicknamed it the "Tumble Bug." (Buckley (1908) I, 110-111)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:First Congregational Church of Bonne Terre
Description:Organized February 20, 1878, taking the name "Christian Union Church of Bonne Terre," but usually called the "Union Congregational Church." Its name was changed to the present one October 19, 1887. The cornerstone of the present church was laid July 6, 1909. It is the only one of this denomination in the county. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:First Creek
Description:Rises one mile south of Iron Mountain and flows into St. Francois River one mile north of Iron Mountain. Named from its position with nearby Second Creek. First, Second and Dry creeks form headwaters of St. Francois River. (Marion Anderson; W.A. Anderson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Flanery Branch
Description:Rises three miles west of Farminton and flows into St. Francois River one mile southwest of Flanery School. Named for the landowner. Cf. Flanery School. (J.D. Flanery)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Flanery School
Description:In St. Francois Township. Named for Isaac Flanery, who donated the land. (J.D. Flanery)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Flat Lead Mines
Description:A group of mines on Flat River, two and a half miles above its mouth. Old diggings are found east of Taylor shaft and below Flat River station. (Winslow (1894) I, 278)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Flat River [1 of 2]
Description:The most important tributary of Big River, it rises in the hills directly west of Bismarck, flows north, then northeast, and empties into Big River about three miles northeast of Desloge. It is a flat and shallow stream. Presumably this is the River la Plate mentioned by Austin as the location of Mine a la Platte or Plate, two miles from its junction with Grand River, now Big River. (Austin (1804) 13; Conard (1901) V, 430; Buckley (1908) I, 5; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Flat River [2 of 2]
Description:A town in northwestern St. Francois Township, with a post office since 1887. Its name is derived from the river flowing through it. (Postal Guide; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Fletcher Lead Shaft
Description:At Halifax. Named for the man who sank the shaft. (Henry Thurman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Four House Town
Description:See Leadington
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Four Town
Description:See Leadington
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Frankclay
Description:A town in Randolph Township, with a post office since 1910. Also called Claytown. On some maps they are shown as separate communities, Frankclay lying immediately south of Claytown. Both names are derived from the owner of the property from which the town was made, Frank E. Clay. (Postal Guide; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 59; R.M. ATLAS (1937)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Fredericktown Road
Description:From Farmington south to Fredericktown in Madison County, passing Copenhagen Church, Fairview School, and intersecting present Highway 61 and 67 at Rock Creek School. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:French Village
Description:A town in central Marion Township, with a post office since June 29, 1857. It was first called Petit Canada, or Little Canada, for its original settlers were French-Canadians. A camp on the trail branching off the King's Highway at Bloomsdale and leading to the mines at Mine a Breton and Old Mines was located here in the early days. (Goodwin (1867); Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Postal Guide; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 56; Mrs. Edward Schaaf; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:French Village School
Description:In Marion Township. Named from the town. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Fullerton
Description:A town in central Perry Township. Now a part of Bonne Terre. Named for Fuller, landowner. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Fulton Shaft
Description:Between the east and west hills of Perry's Lead Mines. Probably a personal name. (Litton (1855) 37)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:George's Mill
Description:See Big River Mills
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Germania School
Description:In Perry Township. Named from its location in a community settled by Germans. Its former name, Germany School, was changed to Germania at the time of the first World War. (Finis Turley)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Germany Missionary Baptist Church
Description:Three miles west of Bonne Terre. Organized September 11, 1831, it is the oldest Missionary Baptist church in existence in the county. The locality was settled by Germans; hence the name. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927; Finis Turley)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Germany School
Description:See Germania School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gibson Hill
Description:three- quarters mile east of Libertyville. Named for a landowner. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gobble Hollow
Description:Three miles southeast of Libertyville. There were many wild turkeys there. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Goff Springs
Description:three- quarters mile east of Primrose Baptist Church. Said to contain medicinal properties. Named for its owner, J.L. Goff. (Willis Moon)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gofftown
Description:East of Federal Hill, now a part of Flat River. D.P. Goff had a store there. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Goose Creek
Description:Rises two miles northeast of Knob Lick and flows into Wills Branch two and a half miles east of Knob Lick. Presumably named for the wild fowl. (Bert Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Goose Creek
Description:Rises at French Village and flows into Fourche a Du Clos two miles northeast of Lawrenceton. Many geese were found along its banks. (Mrs. Martin Carron; Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Goose Neck
Description:A section extending two miles southeast of Libertyville. A descriptive name, for the shape. (F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Grand River
Description:See Big River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Grays and Doggett's Lead Mine
Description:At Hazel Run. Doubtless named for its owners. (Winslow (1894) I, 273)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Greasy Mine
Description:One and a quarter miles west of Burch School in Pendleton Township. Before the first World War, the mine was being operated by the Formistat Mining Company. The product was an ingredient used for pain, which gave a shiny appearance. (J.W. Burch; Thom H. Holman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gruner Hill
Description:Four and a half miles east of Farmington. Named for a local family. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gum Spring
Description:Near Colony Baptist Church, three and a half miles northeast of Farmington. The water came from inside a gum tree stump, about four ft. in diameter, where Camp Branch flows into Wolf Creek. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gumbo
Description:This town, northwest of Desloge, in northern Randolph Township, was controlled in 1923, the year of its survey, by the Bonne Terre Farming and Cattle Company. The shaft there owned by the St. Joseph Lead Company was called Gumbo Shaft. The name is probably derived from the soil. The Missouri French word "gombo" is defined by McDermott and Dorrance as thick, heavy, marshy soil, which well describes the land here. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 59; R.M. ATLAS (1937); McDermott; Dorrance; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gumbo Lead Mines
Description:See Gumbo Lead Shaft
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gumbo Lead Shaft
Description:Between Leadwood and Desloge. Cf. above. According to Winslow, the mines here, known as Gumbo Lead Mines, were worked a little from 1820 to 1821, abandoned in 1823, and thought to be exhausted. For the name cf. Gumbo. (Winslow (1894) I, 278; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Gumbo School
Description:In Randolph Township. Named from the settlement. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Haefner Shaft
Description:At Loughboro. Named for Joseph Haefner, who sank the shaft. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 644)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Haggai
Description:A town of considerable importance at one time between Iron Mountain and Doe Run. The town arose because of restrictions of the Iron Mountain concession nearby. No stores or shops other than those of the company were allowed there. Individuals built their stores outside the concession. Cf. Middlebrook in Iron County. The name in Rand McNally's GUIDE of 1890 is spelled as it is pronounced, Hog Eye. Miles, however, spells it Haggai, like the name of the Old Testament prophet. Fairview, a complimentary name for the prospect, seems to have been the original name. Probably the miners of Iron Mountain gave it the humorous nickname of Hog Eye, signifying its smallness and little importance. Perhaps the spelling Haggai is an attempt to give the name prestige. One informant told the story of a man with eyes similar to the structure of a hog's eyes; hence the name. (HANDBOOK OF MISSOURI (1881) 241; Rand McNally GUIDE (1890); Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 59; John Amelung; Henry Ruh; Wm. O'Sullivan)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hale Shaft
Description:On the east hill of Perry's Lead Mine. Probably a personal name. (Litton (1855) 36)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Halifax
Description:A post office from 1889-1925 in Big River Township, in a lead mining community. An earlier name, Stony Point, was derived from the rocky countryside. The reasons for choosing the name of the Canadian city, capital of Nova Scotia, have not been ascertained. Halifax is something of a stock name in the United States, being found in seven other states besides Missouri. Halifax, Canada, was founded in 1749, and was so named in honor of Lord Halifax, president of the board of trade under George II, who in turn took his title from the town of Halifax in Yorkshire. (Postal Guide; R.M. ATLAS (1937); Henry Thurman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hall School
Description:In Marion Township. Named for a family in the community. Now a part of the French Village district. (F.C. Aubuchon)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Haller Limestone Quarry
Description:Just north of Hawn Quarry in Farmington. It was operated by George Haller. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 89-90)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hamilton Town
Description:Three-quarters of a mile east of Doe Run. Named for an early settler, a preacher. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 60; F.J. Antonine)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Harris Branch
Description:Rises two miles south of Elvins and flows into Flat River at Elvins. Named for Henry Harris, landowner. (Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Harris Shaft
Description:On the eastern hill of Perry's Lead Mine. Probably a personal name. (Litton (1855) 36-37)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hathaway Lead Shaft
Description:Owned by St. Joseph Lead Company; now abandoned. Probably a personal name. (Buckley (1908) I, 141)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hawkin Ford
Description:A crossing over the St. Francois River above Snake Den. Named for a local family. (Misses Elsie & Clara Marshall; Knowles Klob)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hawn Limestone Quarry
Description:Near the northeastern limits of Farmington. It was opened in 1900 by E.K. Hawn. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 89)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hayden Creek
Description:Rises about seven miles west of Elvins and flows into Big River one mile north of Frankclay. Named for the landowner. (Buckley (1908) I, 5; Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hazel Run [1 of 2]
Description:Rises in the foothills north of Pike Run and flows into Terre Bleue two miles northeast of Bonne Terre. Named from the growth of hazel brush on its banks. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 57; Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hazel Run [2 of 2]
Description:A town in Marion Township, whose post office was established in 1844. It was listed as Hazel Run Mills in 1867, as Hazel Run 1876-1928. Named from the creek, near which were lead mines, discovered in 1806. (Postal Guide; Goodwin (1867); Winslow (1894) I, 272; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 57; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hazel Run Lead Diggings
Description:See Bryan's Mines
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hazel Run Mills
Description:See Hazel Run
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Herod's Ford
Description:Over Big River near Desloge. Named for a family who owned a farm there. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hickory Flat
Description:A tract of land nine miles southeast of Farmington, formerly covered with hickory growth. (F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Highley Ford
Description:A crossing between Leadwood and Potosi on Big River. Named for a family who owned land there. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hildebrand's Cave
Description:A cave on Big River near Bonne Terre. Named for the notorious outlaw, Samuel S. Hildebrand, who used it for a safe retreat. He remained in this cave for a month in 1869, recovering from a wound received from a pursuer. (Conard (1901) III, 244)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hildebrecht School
Description:In Pendleton Township. Named for a family in the community. Sometimes the pronunciation-spelling, Hildebright, is used. (F.J. Antoine)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hildebright School
Description:See Hildebrecht School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hill-O'Mera Construction Company's Granite Quarry
Description:A St. Louis firm. The quarry was located in Sec. 30, T. 35, R. 6E. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 78)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hillsboro Road
Description:Rus west of north from Farmington to Hillsboro, the county seat of Jefferson County. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hilltown
Description:A little village, once outside the limits of Bonne Terre, now included in it. Named for the Hill family. (Conard (1901) V, 319; Hixson's Plat Book (1930); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hoadley Lead Shaft
Description:Owned by St. Joseph Lead Company, now abandoned. Probably a personal name. (Buckley (1908) I, 141)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hoffman
Description:Part of the town of Leadwood. Named for the Hoffman family, who owned land on which the Hoffman shaft was sunk. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hoffman Branch Junction
Description:A point on the Missouri Illinois Railroad near Bonne Terre. The branch led to the Hoffman Lead Shafts. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hoffman Lead Shafts
Description:At Leadwood. Named for the landowner. (Buckley (1908) I, 142; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hog Eye
Description:See Haggai
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Honeysuckle Hill
Description:Two and a half miles south of Libertyville. Named for its profuse growth of azalea, commonly called wild honeysuckle in Missouri. This particular azalea is the Azalea Nudiflora Linnaeus. (F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Houck's Railroad
Description:See Cape Girardeau Northern Railroad.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hunt
Description:A stop on the St. Francois County Electric Railroad near Ash Hill in St. Francois Township. Named for a family, who owned the land. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hunt Lead Shaft
Description:Northeast of Leadwood near Big River, in Perry Township. Named for a landowner. (Buckley (1908) I, 142; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hunt School [1 of 2]
Description:Near Doe Run Junction in Pendleton Township. An old school, no longer there. Named for a family in the vicinity. (Mrs. J.S. West)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hunt School [2 of 2]
Description:In Perry Township. Now a part of the Frankclay district. Named for a family. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Huntington
Description:Settlement around Hunt Lead Shaft in Perry Township, near Leadwood. Probably named from the shaft. (Williams Missouri (1904) 503; J.F. Zimmer
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hunt's Ford
Description:A crossing midway between Bonne Terre in Perry Township and Leadwood over Big River. Named for a landowner. Apparently there were three landowners or families named Hunt, one of whom was the source of the old Hunt School in Pendleton Township, another of the stop on the St. Francois County Railroad near Ash Hill in St. Francois Township, and the third of the names Huntington, Hunt's Ford, Hunt Lead Shaft, and the other Hunt School, all in Perry Township. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Hurryville
Description:A town in northern St. Francois Township. In 1902 prior to the survey the land on which the town stands was owned by L.E. and E.A. Hurry. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 59; R.M. ATLAS (1937)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Illinois Southern Railroad
Description:See Missouri-Illinois Railroad
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Immaculate Conception Catholic Church [1 of 2]
Description:At Iron Mountain. The parish was established in 1870. No longer there. For the name cf. above. (Rothensteiner (1928) II, 538-539)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Immaculate Conception Catholic Church [2 of 2]
Description:At Desloge. Organized in 1897. Named for the Catholic doctrine of the conception or birth of the Virgin free of original sin. (Frev. J.J. D'Arcy)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Immanuel German Methodist Church
Description:See Copenhagen German Methodist Church
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Independence School
Description:In St. Francois Township. An ideal name. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:Rises at Iron Mountain, where the dam overflows, and flows into St. Francois River four miles south of Bismarck. There was an Indian settlement at the foot of Iron Mountain. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Iron Mountain [1 of 2]
Description:In Iron Township. The original height of Iron Mountain was 228 feet above the valley, and its base covered an area of 500 acres of land; its shape was of a conical character. Featherstonhaugh's geological report to Congress in 1836 stated that it was a single deposit of iron offering all the resources of Sweden, and of which it was impossible to estimate the value by any other terms than of a nation's wants. The Iron Mountain was an original grant by the Spaniards to the Francois Valle heirs, containing 24,000 acres of land which was confirmed to Joseph Pratte by Congress July 4, 1836. The "Missouri Iron Company" was formed in 1836. Ambitious plans were formulated; among them was the location of two cities, "Missouri City," at what is now St. Mary's, to be the eastern terminus of a railroad from Missouri City. Plans for Missouri City included a university, so that there would be free education for all, through college. Because of the panic of 1837 the plans did not materialize. In 1845 a new company, the "American Iron Company," was organized and the iron deposits were mined. Between 1848 and 1860 there were approximately 1200 men on the payroll, whose average wage was from ninety cents to one dollar and ten cents for a twelve-hour day. After the surface ore became exhausted, the company gradually ceased to operate on a large scale. Operations ceased in the 1890s. The mines were opened during the first World War, but were closed in 1930. Now owned by M.A. Hanna Company of Cleveland through its subsidiary, Ozark Ore Company, also of Cleveland, they will be reopened and will be back in major production by June, 1944. (PROSPECTUS OF THE MISSOURI IRON COMPANY (1837); Hayward (1853); Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Eaton; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 53; St. Louis POST-DISPATCH, Jan. 16, 1944)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Iron Mountain [2 of 2]
Description:A town in Iron Township, with a post office from 1853-1893 and since 1910. The name was derived from the mountain at whose base the town was located. (Hayward (1853); Postal Guide; Campbell's ATLAS (1873); HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 53; R.M. ATLAS (1937)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Iron Mountain Lake
Description:In Iron Township, near Iron Mountain, from which it derives its name. It was created by the Iron Mountain Company. It has long been a favorite place for recreation. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Iron Mountain School
Description:In Iron Township. Named from the town. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Iron Mountain, Salem and Springfield Road
Description:Named for the termini. (W.L. Scoggin)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Iron Township
Description:In the southwestern part of the county. It was formed in 1850. Iron Mountain is within its bounds. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 4; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ironton Road
Description:From Farmington southwest of Roselle in Madison County, then to Lake Killarney and to Ironton in Iron County. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jack Branch
Description:Rises two miles northeast of Libertyville and flows into Back Creek two miles north of Libertyville. Probably a personal name. (F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jackson Road
Description:From Farmington to Jackson, the county seat of Cape Girardeau County. Now Highway 61. According to county records, the first action of the court to construct a county road was on November 25, 1822, when the route of this road toward Jackson was planned as far as the county line. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 5; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jacob's Creek
Description:Rises in foothills north of Pike Run and flows into Hazel Run near Hazel Run post office. Named for Jacob Mostiller, on whose land it headed. (Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jake Day Shaft
Description:In north-central Randolph Township. Named for the landowner. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jay Bird Lead Shaft
Description:In Flat River, No. 1 Federal. Obviously a humorous nickname. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jay Bird Town
Description:Now a part of Flat River. Workers of Jay Bird Shaft lived there. The name is one of the humorous appellations beloved by the miners, like those listed above under Cornstalk Lead Diggings. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jaydee
Description:A post office established on December 16, 1899, in the northeast part of the county. It continued till 1904. Named for J.D. Kennedy, first postmaster, by means of forming syllables from the initials J.D. (Postal Guide; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 59; Shelt T. Horn; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jefferson School
Description:See W.L. Johns School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Johnson Mountain
Description:See Reservoir Hill
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jones Lead Shaft
Description:Owned by St. Joseph Lead Company; now abandoned. Probably a personal name. It may have been named for J. Wyman Jones, president of the St. Joseph Lead Company soon after its organization in 1863. (Buckley (1908) I, 141)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Jordan Place
Description:Adjacent to Frankclay. Named for George Jordan, landowner, who sold the lots. (Wm. Sago)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Kennedy Branch
Description:Rises north of Farmington and flows into Wolf Creek near the bridge on Highway 61 two miles south of Farmington. Named for an early family who owned land there. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:King School
Description:In Iron Township. Named for early settlers from New Jersey. (John McBrien; F.J. Antoine)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Kinkead
Description:See Libertyville
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Klondike Hill
Description:Four and a half miles south of Doe Run. Its granite quarry was the scene of much activity about the time of the gold rush in the Klondike region of Alaska; hence the name. (Ben Herbst)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Knauss
Description:A stop of the St. Francois County Electric Railroad on the Henry Knauss farm near Ash Hill. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Knights of Pythias Cemetery
Description:South of Farmington. Named for the lodge. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Knob Lick [1 of 2]
Description:A post office since 1876 in southwestern Liberty Township and a station on the Belmont Branch of the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Received its name on account of the knoll whose soil was said to contain properties of salt, which attracted deer. It is said that it was formerly also a buffalo lick. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Postal Guide; Eaton; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 56; George Bremmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Knob Lick [2 of 2]
Description:Cf. Knob Lick, below.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Knob Lick Lookout Tower
Description:On the hill at Knob Lick, from which it took its name. (Clark National Forest Map)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Knob Road
Description:From Pilot Knob in Iron County to Stone, where it intersected the Plank Road. It took its name from Pilot Knob. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Koen Creek
Description:Rises near Hurryville, flows through Esther, and empties into Flat River near Cantwell. Named for the family on whose land it flows. (Conard (1901) V, 430; Miles HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 59; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Koester
Description:A post office from 1895-1915 in northern Marion Township. Named for C.E. Koester, who owned a grist mill there. (Postal Guide; Mrs. Arthur Koester)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Koester School
Description:In Marion Township. Named from the post office. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Kollmeyer Hill
Description:Six miles southeast of Farmington. Named for Henry Kollmeyer, early settler there. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:La Fourche du Porc
Description:Joseph Pratte of Ste. Genevieve had a grant including the Iron Mountain of 20,000 arpens. In 1799 Charles McLane dit English was sent with Lewis Carron and Stephen Deline to ascertain the quality of the iron ore on this tract, included in the fork of a creek called by the French "La Fourche du Porc," a branch of the St. Francois River. This is obviously one of the three creeks, First, Second, and Dry creeks (q.v.) that form the headwaters of the St. Francois close to Iron Mountain; but just which of them it is to be identified with could not be determined. The French name means, of course, Hog Fork. Cf. the town of Hog Eye or Haggai (q.v.) in this neighborhood. (Houck (1908) I, 374)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:La Grave Mines
Description:Where Bonne Terre is now located. Named for Anthony La Grave, owner, who sold 946 acres in 1864 to the St. Joseph Lead Company. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 47-48; Jones (1892) 7)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lambeth School
Description:In Marion Township. Named for the donor of the land. (Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Leadington
Description:A post office in 1895, discontinued until 1927, in northwestern St. Francois Township. The Leadington Lead Company sank a shaft in 1893 and built a small mill. The town was surveyed in 1895. At one time it was called "Four House Town," from the four houses it contained. This name was also shortened to "Four Town." "Leadington" was doubtless coined as the company name from their chief product, on the pattern of "Washington," etc., and then transferred to the town. (Postal Guide; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 58; R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Leadville
Description:On the eastern side of the Mississippi River and Bonne Terre Railroad. Now part of Desloge. National Lead Company mined lead nearby. The name was coined from the product. (Stevens (1921) II, 412; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Leadwood
Description:A town in northern Randolph Township, with a post office since 1H910. A coined name; cf. above. St. Joseph Lead Company operated lead mines in this wooded district. Originally called Owl Creek from the name of a creek near it. So listed as a post office from 1902-1904 under the form Owlcreek. (Postal Guide; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 57; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ledbetters
Description:A stop on the St. Francois County Electric Railroad, on the H.B. Ledbetter farm near Farmington. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Levrard Spring
Description:One quarter of a mile from French Village, where Father Pratte said mass before the erection of St. Anne's Church. Pierre Levrard lived there. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lewis Creek
Description:Rises about three miles east of Libertyville and flows into Tillman Creek one and a half miles south of Libertyville. Named for the landowner, John Lewis. (F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lewis Hill
Description:Two miles south of Libertyville. Named for the landowner, Warner Lewis. (Fredricktown Quadrangle Map; F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Liberty Meeting House
Description:See Libertyville
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Liberty Township
Description:In the southeastern part of the county. One of the original townships made when the county was organized in 1821. An ideal name. Cf. the other patriotically named townships in St. Francois County, for the American heroes Marion, Perry, Pendleton, and Randolph. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 4)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Libertyville
Description:A town in southeastern Liberty Township, in the midst of what was known as Cook's Settlement, located by Nathaniel Cook in about 1797. It was one of the oldest settlements in southeastern Missouri. The post office was established as Kinkead on July 21, 1846, with Samuel Kinkead as postmaster. On March 19, 1857, the post office was moved two miles north of the present town and was called Locust Ridge. This name was derived from its location on a ridge where there were many locust trees. On December 23, 1862, the name was changed to Liberty Meeting House. On February 18, 1863, the name became Libertyville. The post office was discontinued in 1919. The name Libertyville was probably derived from its location in Liberty Township. (Hayward (1853) 8; Parker (1865); Nicely (1867); Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Postal Guide; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 55; F.L. Graham; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Libertyville Christian Church
Description:Organized at what is now Libertyville on the third Sunday in May, 1822, by the Rev. Wm. McMurty. The Sunday school was organized in 1852. The present name is transferred from the town. (Douglass (1912) I, 494; Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lick Branch
Description:Rises at the intersection of Knob Lick and Fredericktown roads and flows into Wolf Creek one and a half miles northwest of its source. Named from a deer lick. (Raymond Kollmeyer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lick Church
Description:See Colony Baptist Church
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little Canada
Description:See French Village
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little Iron Mountain
Description:That part of Iron Mountain which sloped gradually to the west. (Litton (1855) 76)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little Peg Knob
Description:South of Peg's Knob near the Madison County line. It is somewhat smaller than the other knob. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little Rock Creek
Description:Rises three and a half miles south of Libertyville and flows into Little St. Francois River about six miles southwest of Libertyville. The stream has a rocky bottom. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little St. Francois River
Description:Rises in east-central Liberty Township and flows into St. Francois River twelve miles southeast of Fredericktown in Madison County. The name indicates its comparative size. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Little Stono Mountain
Description:North of Stono Mountain. The name indicates its comparative size. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; Henry Ruh; Luther Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Lizz's Cut
Description:About two and a half miles south of Elvins on the Mississippi River and Bonne Terre Railroad, it is one of the steepest grades. Named for Lizz Williams, an old woman who used to live on this hill. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Locust Ridge
Description:See Libertyville
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Loughboro
Description:A village in northern Pendleton Township, two or three miles north of Doe Run. It was surveyed in May, 1870, the year after the Belmont Branch (q.v.) was completed. A post office was established there in 1876, but discontinued in 1904. The name is also spelled Loughborough. Eaton affirms that the name was formed from the given name of Louis Yates, postmaster and merchant there. The explanation seems like a hasty conjecture, and an extremely unlikely one. Anyone who desired to form a town name from Louis could have found much better examples of how to do it in Louisville or St. Louis. It is decidedly more likely that the name was borrowed, for reasons unknown, from Loughborough in Leicestershire, England. (Postal Guide; Eaton; Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 58; Mrs. J.S. West)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Luziere Creek
Description:Rises two miles northwest of Farmington and flows into St. Francois River about one mile southeast of Farmington, passing near the village of De Lassus. For the source of both names see De Lassus, above. (J.H. Stam, J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Manchester Lead Diggings
Description:T, 38., R. 5E, Sec. 31, E. 1/2 of S.E. 1/4. The source of the name is unknown. (Litton (1855) 40)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Marion Township
Description:In the northeastern part of the county. Originally a part of Perry Township, it was formed in August, 1836. Doubtless named for the famous Revolutionary hero General Francois Marion of South Carolina (1732-1795); cf. the other patriotically named townships of St. Francois County, Perry, Pendleton, Randolph, and Liberty. Marion is a famous American place name: there are seventeen Marion counties and over thirty towns named Marion in as many different states. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 4)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Marvin Chapel
Description:Six miles east of Bonne Terre. Dedicated September, 1885, and named in honor of Bishop Enoch Mather Marvin (1823-1877) of Wright City, Missouri, one of the best known of pioneer Methodist preachers. He was selected as outstanding minister of Missouri for the Centennial in 1904. His mother was a member of the family of Cotton Mather in Massachusetts. Cf. Marvin Methodist Church in St. Louis, and Marvin Chapel in Laclede County. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927; Shelton T. Horn; theses by Miss Welty and Miss O'Brien)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Masonic Cemetery
Description:In the town of Farmington. Named for the lodge. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:McCormack Lead Diggings
Description:Near Hazel Run. Named for a family. (Litton (1855) 39; Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:McGuire's Shaft
Description:On the western hill of Perry's Lead Mine. Probably a personal name. (Litton (1855) 36)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:McKee Lead Mines
Description:A group of Flat River diggings, about two miles east of Flat River post office. Presumably a personal name. (Winslow (1894) I, 278; II, 667)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Merryman School
Description:See Oak Hill School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Middle Mountain
Description:Between Simms Mountain and Sulphur Mountain in Randolph Township; hence the name. (Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Middlebrook Creek
Description:Rises near Graniteville and flows in a northeast direction into Iron Mountain Lake. Named from the town. (John Amelung; J.L. Connelly)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mill Creek
Description:Another Mill Creek, which joins Big River from the south. Rises at Bismarck in St. Francois County and flows into Big River near Irondale. There was an upright sawmill and a carding machine on the creek. Formerly called Hays Creek, possibly for a resident. Also nicknamed Wenda Creek because Joe Wenda owns property along the creek. (Laux, IRONDALE YESTERDAY & TODAY; Dr. J.P. Yeargain)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mill Creek
Description:Rises around Hopewell in Breton Township, on the north side of Big River, and flows into Big River atr Blackwell in St. Francois County. Perhaps named for the same reason as Mill Branch. (G.C. Long)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Milne and Gordon Granite Quarry
Description:One mile west of Knob Lick in N.W. 1/4 of S.E. 1/4 of Sec. 5, T. 34, R. 6E. Opened in 1874, it was the first extensive quarry at Syenite. Named for its owners, William Milne and James Gordon. (Buckley and Buehler (1904) 79; Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927; L.A. Page)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mine a Gebore
Description:See Mine a Gerboree
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mine a Gerbore
Description:See Mine a Gerboree
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mine a Gerboree
Description:It was situated on the waters of the St. Francois River, not far from De Lassus Station. According to Austin, it was discovered by Renault in 1745; but this is incorrect, for Renault left the country before that time. Accoding to Buckley, it was the place of first lead operations in the county. Also spelled Gerbore and Gebore. These are presumably variant spellings of the French surname Gabouri or Gabourie, well known in the region; see under North Gabouri Creek in Ste. Genevieve County. (Austin (1804) 17; HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 204; Conard (1901) 431; Buckley (1908) I, 2)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mine a Joe
Description:See Desloge Mines
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mine a La Plate
Description:See Doggett Lead Mine
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mine a la Platte
Description:See Doggett Mine
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mine a Lanye
Description:See Mine a Layne
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mine a Layne
Description:Six miles west of Mine a Joe and sixteen miles south-southeast of the Mine a Burton. Discovered about the year 1795, it bears the name of its discoverer. Spelled Lanye in Austin, which suggests that the original and correct form of the French discoverer's name was Lagne. (Austin (1804) 14; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mine a Maneto
Description:Discovered on Big River in October, 1799, by Americans settled there, twelve miles east- southeast of Mine a Burton. Through concessions of Valle and Pratt of Ste. Genevieve, the Americans were excluded. Also called American Mines, obviously for its discoverers. No recorded information has been found about the old name Mine a Maneto; but it is apparently from the Indian term Manito or Manitou, meaning god, spirit, idol, or image. See the full discussion of this important term in Miss Elliott's thesis under Manitou Creek, now Sugar Creek (q.v.) in Clark County; also Miss Pace's thesis under Moniteau County and Moniteau Creek. The latter owed its name to certain figures drawn by the Indians in red paint on the rocks at its mouth, taken by the settler to be representations of Indian divinities. Similar images may have been found near Mine a Maneto. (Austin (1804) 12)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mineral City
Description:A town in the west-central part of Pendleton Township. The Doe Run Lead Company sank a shaft nearby and laid out the town for its employees. It is no longer in existence. The source of the name is obvious. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mineral Joe
Description:Lead mine in Randolph Township. Apparently a variant form for the old Mine a Joe, which was in the same neighborhood; see under Desloge Mines. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Minerva Hole
Description:A swimming hole one and three-quarter miles south of Doe Run on Doe Run Creek. Named for Mrs. Minerva Crawford, on whose land it was. With this use of a feminine first name, cf. Dolly, Esther and Peg's Knob. (Mr. & Mrs. John Hulsey)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mississippi River and Bonne Terre Railroad
Description:Constructed by the St. Joseph Lead Company from Bonne Terre to Riverside in Jefferson County, on the Mississippi River, in order to have a shipping point on the Mississippi River and the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad. Later extended south to Doe Run. Completed in 1890. Named for its termini. (Jones (1892) 36; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 38)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Missouri Granite Construction Company's Quarry
Description:N.W. 1/4 Sec. 17, T. 34, R. 6E., about three miles from the St. Louis, Iron Mountain, and Southern Railroad. Opened about 1898. Named for the company. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 81)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Missouri Granite Works
Description:Nine miles southwest of Farmington. Noted for the coral pink granite. Named for the state. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Railroad Company
Description:This railroad was begun at St. Louis in 1851, and was at first called the Pacific Railroad, an ambitious title for the hope, eventually realized, that it would reach the Pacific Ocean. It was incorporated as the Missouri Pacific in 1876. In 1881 it absorbed the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad (q.v.). (Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Missouri-Illinois Railroad
Description:The Illinois Southern Railroad had been built from Salem, Illinois to a point opposite Ste. Genevieve. In about 1905 it was constructed through Ste. Genevieve and St. Francois counties to Bismarck on the main line of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain, and Southern Railroad. The railroad passed through Ste. Genevieve, New Offenburg, Weingarten, Miller's Switch, Sprott, and through the Lead Belt to Bismarck. During the World War a steel hull boat for transporting the trains across the Mississippi River was purchased by the Government who had charge of the railroad at a cost of $100,000. Since the original owner was unable to pay this bill after the war, it went into receivership. After the reorganization of the Illinois Southern it became known as the Missouri-Illinois Railroad. It is controlled today by the Missouri-Pacific Railroad. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS COUNTY (1935) 38-39)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mistletoe
Description:A post office established in 1906 in Pendleton Township, by L.P. Johnson. Discontinued before 1910. The origin of the name has not been ascertained. (Herman Herbst)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mitchell
Description:A town located on land owned by Mr. Quince Mitchell, between Leadwood and Rivermines in Randolph Township. It was surveyed in 1925. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 59; R.M. ATLAS (1937)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mitchell School
Description:In Randolph Township. Named for the landowner, Quince Mitchell. (Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Moontown
Description:A little village, once outside the limits of Bonne Terre, which as not absorbed it. Named for the Moon family. (Conard (1901) V, 319; Hixson's Plat Book (1930); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Morris Town
Description:Just west of Doe Run. Named for a landowner. (F.J. Antoine)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mostiller School
Description:In Marion Township. Named for a family in the community. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mt. Zion Church
Description:About three miles west of Libertyville; it was built on land deeded by Peter and Louise Le Pere in 1881. It was used by German Methodists and Southern Methodists, but is no longer there. For the name cf. above. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mt. Zion Meeting House
Description:At Murphy's Settlement, now Farmington, where the Missouri Annual Conference (Methodist) was appointed to hold its session, September 18, 1818. However, the meeting was held at Goshen Settlement, Illinois, September 5, 1818, instead. For the name cf. above. (Houck (1908) III, 241; Douglass (1912) I, 206; Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mud Creek
Description:Rises near King School in Iron Township and flows into Iron Mountain Lake. The water is usually muddy. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; Henry Ruh; Luther Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mueller and Son Limestone Quarry
Description:One half mile east of Farmington. In 1904 it had been worked intermittently by J.B. Mueller and son since 1899. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 90)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Mund Branch
Description:Rises three and a half miles southwest of Farmington and flows into Doe Run Creek seven miles south of Farmington. Named for the landowner, John Mund. (Ben Herbst)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Murphy Hill
Description:In Pendleton Township, three-quarters of a mile from Madison County line. Named for a family in the community. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; J.W. Burch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Murphy-Long Memorial Methodist Church
Description:At Farmington. Named in memory of Mrs. Sarah Barton Murphy, and her grandson and grandaughter, Dubart Long and Mrs. Jennie A. Long Bisby, September 25, 1927. (Farmington PRESS March 27, 1936)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Murphy's Settlement
Description:See Farmington
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Murrill Hill
Description:North of Gumbo in Randolph Township. Named for the landowner, Tom Murrill. (Wm. Sago)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Murrill School
Description:North of Gumbo. An early school, no longer there. For the name, cf. above. (Wm. Sago)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Murrill Spring
Description:North of Gumbo. For the name, cf. above. (Wm. Sago)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Musco Creek
Description:Rises one-half mile northeast of Knob Lick and flows into Little St. Francois four miles south of Knob Lick. According to a local story, the name is derived from an Indian, who because he was a cripple was left behind when the Indians left the vicinity. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; F.G.A. Rydeen; Bert Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Nachitoches Path
Description:An Indian path or trail leading from St. Anthonys on Ste. Genevieve County, in a southwestern direction through Wayne County, near Greenville, and on to Nachitoches, one of the Spanish posts of Mexico, now Louisiana. This path connected with the Virginia Warrior's Path and with a path leading north to the Osage. After the country was settled, the Nachitoches path became the military and wagon road of the immigrants to Arkansas, crossing the Mississippi River at Bainbridge or Cape Girardeau, thence moving to the St. Francois, crossing at the Indian ford, thence to Black River crossing near Poplar Bluff and Current River at what was known as Pittman's ferry. (Houck I 227- 228)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Negro Creek
Description:See Big River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Negro Fork of Meramec
Description:See Big River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Hope Baptist Church
Description:Organized in 1841, five miles east of Farmington. An ideal name. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 552; Douglass (1912) I, 463)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Hope United Baptist Church
Description:One mile northeast of Bismarck. Probably the church was organized in 1814 from Bethel Church near Jackson. It was razed about 1894. A favorite ideal name for churches. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927; Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Shaft
Description:On the eastern hill of Perry's Lead Mine. Obviously a descriptive name. (Litton (1855) 36)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Newtown
Description:In northwestern St. Francois Township; now a part of Leadington. It was a new division; hence the name. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:North Fork of Saline Creek
Description:Rises near Libertyville in St. Francois County and flows into Big Saline Creek five miles east of Minnith. (Ralph Coffman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:North Ward School [1 of 2]
Description:See Annie Lloyd School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:North Ward School [2 of 2]
Description:See Eugene Field School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Norwine Town
Description:See East Flat River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Oak Grove Free-Will Baptist Church
Description:Organized in the shade of an oak tree at Leadington, near its present site. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Oak Hill
Description:See Oak Mountain.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Oak Hill School
Description:In St. Francois Township. Named from its situation. Formerly called Merryman School, for a local family. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Oak Mountain
Description:East from Pilot Knob to Iron Mountain Lake. Named from the oaks on it. The name Oak Hill is used as well as Oak Mountain. Also called Buzzard Mountain, an older name. Many buzzards were seen in the vicinity. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI 1888, 216; Ironton Quadrangle Map; John Amelung; J.L. Connelly)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:O'Bannon Creek
Description:Rises three-quarters mile southwest of Knob Lick in Liberty Township, and flows into St. Francois River three miles west of Knob Lick. Named for an early settler. (Misses Elsie & Clara Marshall; Knowles Klob)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:O'Bannon School
Description:See Brightstone School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Odd Fellows Cemetery
Description:East of Farmington. Named for the lodge. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ogborn
Description:A prepaid freight station on the Missouri-Illinois Railroad, in northern St. Francois Township. Named for a railroad official. Formerly called Farmington Junction. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Old Maid Springs
Description:On the northwestern edge of Farmington. Humorously named for the Misses Polly and Mahalia Alexander, spinster sisters of J.C. Alexander. (J.H. Stam)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:O'Meara
Description:A prepaid freight station on the Belmont Branch of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, five miles southeast of Farmington. O'Meara owned a granite quarry here. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Orten School
Description:Near Highley's Spring in Desloge. The first school term was in 1876. Named for the donor, Nesbit Orten. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Owl Creek [1 of 2]
Description:See Leadwood
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Owl Creek [2 of 2]
Description:Rises west of Flat River, in Randolph Township, flows a little east of north, and empties into Big River northeast of Desloge shaft No. 4. (Buckley (1908) I, 5; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 57)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Owlcreek
Description:See Leadwood
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Park View Free Will Baptist Church
Description:At Desloge. It withdrew from the Missionary Baptist organization April 17, 1928. Named from its location. (Mrs. Clifton Gibson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Parkview Cemetery
Description:Near Farmington. A descriptive name. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Parsons Lead Shaft
Description:Owned by St. Joseph Lead Company; now abandoned. Presumably a personal name. It may have been named for C.B. Parsons, superintendent of the St. Joseph Lead Company, at Bonne Terre. (Buckley (1908) I, 141)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Patterson School
Description:In Marion Township. Named for the donor of the land, W.H. Patterson. (Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Patton Mountain
Description:Three miles southeast of Iron Mountain. Named for a man who lived there. (A.J. Canter)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Patton Mountain School
Description:In Iron Township. Now consolidated with Iron Mountain School. Named from the mountain where it is located. (A.J. Canter; J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Patton Spring
Description:At the foot of Patton Mountain. Named for a man who lived there. (A.J. Canter)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Peach Orchard Hill
Description:Near Doe Run Junction. Named from a peach orchard there. (Mrs. J.S. West)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Peg's Knob
Description:Two and a half miles south of Libertyville. Cf. Little Peg Knob just south of it. Nothing could be ascertained about the origin of these names. Perhaps the two knobs were thought to resemble wooden pegs in shape; if so, the possessive ending commonly used with Peg's Knob indicates a later impression that it was named for a person with the feminine first name of Peg, pet name for Margaret. Cf. Dolly, Esther, Minerva Hole, Peg's Knob, etc. (Fred Lankford)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pen Lead Diggings
Description:Owned by the St. Joseph Lead Company; now abandoned. The origin of the name has not been ascertained. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 207; Jones (1892) 33; Buckley (1908) I, 141)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pendleton Baptist Church
Description:Organized in 1825 in a settlement six miles west of Farmington. The settlement was made up of immigrants from Pendleton district, South Carolina. (Davis (1912) I, 463)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pendleton Township
Description:In the south-central part of the county. One of the original townships, formed in 1821. Cf. Pendleton Baptist Church. Both doubtless derived their names ultimately from the famous Revolutionary statesman, Edmund Pendleton of Virginia (1721-1803), member of the Continental Congress and author of the resolutions of 1776 instructing the Virginia delegates to Congress to propose a Declaration of Independence. Two counties, in Virginia and Kentucky, are named for him, and ten other places in as many states. Cf. the other patriotically named townships in St. Francois County, Perry, Marion, Randolph, and Liberty. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 4)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Perry Branch
Description:Rises near the Clearview School and flows into Plum Branch about one-quarter of a mile from the latter's entry into Back Creek. Probably a personal name. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Perry Township
Description:In the western part of the county, just south of Big River Township. One of the original townships, formed in 1821. Doubtless named for Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (1785-1819), hero of the famous naval victory at the Battle of Lake Erie in 1813. Perry County, Missouri, formed in 1820, was named for him, and so were ten other counties and over twenty towns in as many states. Cf. the other patriotically named townships in St. Francois County: Marion, Pendleton, Randloph, and Liberty. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 4)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Perry's Lead Mine
Description:South of Valle's Mine, T. 38N., 5E., Sec. 18, E. 1/2 of N.E. 1/4. Included in 6000 acres of land owned by Valle Mines. Discovered by John Perry about 1838. (Litton (1855) 36; HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 205)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Peters Creek
Description:Rises one-half mile east of Primrose Baptist Church and flows into Big River, about two miles southwest of its source. Named for an early settler. (Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; Mr. & Mrs. Willis Moon)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Petit Canada
Description:See French Village
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Philip G. Long's Tannery
Description:Built in 1833 in Farmington. Named for the owner. (Farmington NEWS, July 24, 1942; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pike Run
Description:Rises in the Pike Run Hills and flows into Big River two miles north of Bonne Terre. The mouth of the stream was an excellent place to obtain pike in the early days. (Finis Turley)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pike Run Hills
Description:Two and a half miles east of Silver Springs. Named from the stream which rises there. (Mrs. Evelyn Thurman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pim Tract
Description:East of Land Grant 3272. On it was located No. 7 Shaft of National Lead Company. Named for the owner of the land. (Buckley (1908) I, 185; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pimville
Description:A small settlement on the Pim Tract (q.v.), which grew up around the No. 7 Shaft of the National Lead Company. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pine Mountain
Description:Northeast of Iron Mountain. Named from its pine growth. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; Dewey Thurman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pinnacle Hollow
Description:One quarter mile south of Burch School. The name is suggestive of its height. (J.W. Burch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pleasant Mound School
Description:In Perry Township. A complimentary name for its elevated situation. For a short time it was called Butts School, for a family in the community. (Finis Turley)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pleasant Union United Baptist Church
Description:In St. Francois Township. It has now been amalgamated with Pendleton Baptist Church. An ideal name. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pleasant Valley
Description:Near Elvins. A descriptive name of approbation. (Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:Near Elvins. At one time a part of the Elvins school district. No longer there. Named from the valley. (Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pleasant Valley United Baptist Church
Description:Near Elvins. Organized August 7, 1873. Named from the valley. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927; Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Plum Branch
Description:Rises near Libertyville and flows northwest into Back Creek four and a half miles south of Farmington. The abundance of wild plum trees along the stream probably suggested the name. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pole Hill
Description:See Big Hill
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Polk White Hill
Description:Three miles east of Knob Lick. Named for the landowner. (F.G.A. Rydeen)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Possum Hollow Church
Description:About one mile northwest of Knob Lick in Liberty Township. A very old church, which has now disappeared. Services were conducted here by both Methodists and Baptists. The church name was obviously borrowed from the hollow, which may have been so named because of the many opossums in the locality; more likely, however, it was merely a humorous nickname like those listed above under Cornstalk Lead Diggings. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927; John McBrien)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Possum Hollow School
Description:In Liberty Township. Named because of the many opossums in the locality. (John McBrien)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Potosi Lead Diggings
Description:T. 38N., R. 5E, Sec. 21, S.E. 1/4. The name was doubtless borrowed from Potosi (q.v.) in Washington County. (Litton (1855) 40)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Potosi Road
Description:From Ste. Genevieve tnhrough Bloomsdale, French Village, Valles Mines, to Old Mines and Potosi in Washington County. Named from the county seat of Washington County. (Mrs. Edward Schaaf)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Prairie Hollow
Description:Northwest of Libertyville. According to John Graham, who settled near Libertyville in the 1850s, there were not enough woods between Libertyville and Farmington to cut a riding whip. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pratt
Description:A stop on the St. Francois County Electric Railroad, outside the southwest city limits of Farmington. Named for Jesse R. Pratt, who owned land there. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pratt Lead Mine
Description:Earliest mining site among Bonne Terre mines. In progress before 1820. The land, now owned by St. Joseph Lead Company, was originally granted by John B. Pratte and surveyed in 1800. (Winslow (1894) II, 660; LEAD BELT NEWS, June 10, 1938)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Primrose School
Description:In Big River Township. Probably named from the nearby church. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Primrose Temperance Missionary Baptist Church
Description:Five miles north of Bonne Terre, in Big River Township. Organized November 10, 1860. Probably an emblematic name; the primrose is the flower of youth, and signifies the first, earliest, or choicest. The combination indicated an ambition to be first in the cause of temperance. (Mrs. Willis Moon)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Providence Baptist Church
Description:Its location has not been ascertained. A favorite ideal name. (Duncan (1882) 300; HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 561)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pump Lead Shaft
Description:Owned by St. Joseph Lead Company; now abandoned. Presumably so named because a pump had to be used in it. (Buckley (1908) I, 141)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Randolph Township
Description:In the western part of the county. It was formed in 1858. Doubtless named for the famous American orator and statesman John Randolph (1773-1833) of Roanoke, Virginia, long a member of Congress, U.S. Senator, and minister to Russia. Randolph County, Missouri, was named for him when it was formed in 1829, and there are seven other Randolph counties and twenty towns named Randolph, in as many different states. Cf. the other patriotically named townships in St. Francois County: Marion, Perry, Pendleton, and Liberty. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 4)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Red Onion Lead Shaft
Description:One of Columbia Lead Company's shafts south of Leadington. A nickname, one of the humorous appellations that appealed to the miners. See others mentioned above under Cornstalk Lead Diggings. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Red Onion Town
Description:At Red Onion Lead Shaft, where miners lived. Now extinct. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Renault's Fork of Meramec
Description:See Big River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Reservoir Hill
Description:West of Iron Mountain Lake. On it is located the Iron Mountain Reservoir. Also known as Johnson Mountain, for a furnace engineer at Iron Mountain who was buried there. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; John Amelung)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rickus Hill
Description:Three miles southeast of Farmington. Named for Frederick Rickus, landowner. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; Mrs. J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:River la Plate
Description:See Flat River
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rivermines
Description:A post office since 1910, in eastern Randolph Township. The town is the result of the mining interests of Doe Run Lead Company. Formerly called Central, from Central Lead Company, on whose property it was located. Flat River flows through it. (Postal Guide; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 58; R.M. ATLAS; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rock Creek
Description:Rises three and a half miles southeast of Libertyville and flows into Little St. Francois River about two miles northwest of Mine La Motte in Madison County. The stream is rocky, with large boulders along its banks. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; F.J. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rock Creek School
Description:In Liberty Township. Named from Little Rock Creek, on which it is located. (F.J. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rock Creek United Baptist Church
Description:Flourished in the 1880s. Probably on or near Rock Creek, and named for it. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rock Springs
Description:Three miles southwest of Farmington. A large boulder lies against it. A favorite place for picnics. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rockwood School
Description:In Liberty Township. Named for a landowner, Dave Rock, and from its location in wooded country. (Arthur Womack; W.J. Lenz)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rocky Branch
Description:Rises at the north-central corner of Madison County and flows into St. Francois River three miles north of its source. A rocky stream. (Misses Clara & Elsie Marshall; Knowles Klob)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rocky Knob
Description:Two miles east of King School in Iron Township. A descriptive name. (Henry Ruh; Luther Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rodehaver Lead Mine
Description:At Leadington in St. Francois Township, southeast of Flat River on Highway 61. Named for the owner of the property. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rogers Lead Shaft
Description:See Federal No. 7 Lead Shaft
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Rouggly School
Description:In Marion Township. Named for the donor of the land, John L. Rouggly. (Mrs. Betty Rouggly; Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Round Pond
Description:Four and a half miles west of Farmington on St. Francois River. At one time an excellent swimming hole, fourteen feet deep. Named for its shape. (Mrs. J.L. Ritter)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Russell Methodist Chapel
Description:Near Cedar Falls School in Perry Township. In the 1880s the Cedar Falls School building was used for church services, and the congregation was known as the Cedar Falls Methodist Church. Increased interest and membership resulted in a church building being erected about 1890. It was named for Rev. Joseph L. Russell, who had lost an arm in the Civil War. (Mrs. Sam McHenry; John Eaton)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sacred Heart Catholic Church
Description:At Rivermines. Organized about 1907. For the name cf. above. (Rev. J.J. D'Arcy)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Saint Francois
Description:A town in northeastern Randolph Township, with a post office since 1910. It was owned by the National Lead Company, which had its mill, offices, and power plant there. Named for the county. (Postal Guide; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 57)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sainte Williams
Description:A station on the Saline Valley Railroad near Libertyville. No longer there. Named for Mrs. Joseph Williams, the wife of a landowner there. The French feminine form of saint was used to indicate its origin. (J.F. Zimmer; Mrs. H.C. Mell)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Salem Creek
Description:Rises 3/4 mile northeast of Three Rivers Baptist Church and flows into Three Rivers three and a half miles from its source. Named from Salem Methodist Church. (Mr. & Mrs. R.J. Reeder; W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Saline Valley Railroad
Description:See Cape Girardeau Northern Railroad
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sand Creek
Description:Rises in northwestern Ste. Genevieve County and flows into Wolf Creek two and a half miles east of Farmington. It derives its name from an outcropping of the La Motte sandstone near Chestnut Ridge Church. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sarcy
Description:A prepaid freight station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. The source of the name has not been ascertained. (R.M. ATLAS (1937)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Scaggstown
Description:Surveyed in 1887 on land owned by William Scaggs, which included three acres east of Doe Run. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 60)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Second Creek
Description:Rises at Graniteville and flows into St. Francois River one mile north of Iron Mountain. Named from its position with nearby First Creek. An older name is Chartier Creek, probably named for an early French settler. Later spelled Charter and Charles. First, Second and Dry creeks form the headwaters of St. Francois River. (Schoolcraft (1819) 55; Wetmore (1837) 244; Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Conard (1901) V, 430; Marion Anderson; W.A. Anderson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Seego Hollow
Description:Five and a half miles south of Doe Run. Named for a landowner. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; Dewey Thurman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Settletown
Description:This town in central Perry Township was surveyed in 1878 on property owned by William M. Settle and Hattie A. Settle. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 58)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Setz
Description:See Elvins
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Seven Stone Arches Bridge
Description:Constructed in 1938-1940, over Terre Blue Creek at Snyder's Ford. It has seven stone arches. This was the winning name in a contest and was submitted by Earl Blackwell. (Mrs. J.H. Snyder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Shaw Branch
Description:Rises three miles south of the town of Flat River and flows into Flat River at the town. Named for a local family. (Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Shaw Lead Diggings
Description:Two and a half miles northwest of Farmington. Named for the landowner and operator, Philip A. Shaw. (J.D. Flanery)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Shaw Mine
Description:Opened by the Central Mining Company, of which Captain Philip A. Shaw was organizer. The work was suspended by the death of Mr. Shaw in August, 1875. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 211)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Shaw Spring
Description:Near Flat River; it supplies water to Davis Creek. Named for a family who owned land there, probably the same as supplied a name for Shaw Branch (q.v.). (Buckley (1908) I, II; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Shed School
Description:See Cave Springs School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sherrill Mountain
Description:One and a half mile southeast of Bismarck. Named for an early settler. (Emmett Belnap)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Shiloh Presbyterian Church
Description:One half mile from Wesley Chapel. A very old church, built by the Cumberland Presbyterians, but used often by Methodists who got control of it eventually. It has now disappeared. Shiloh is a favorite name for churches, from the reference to the coming Messiah in Gen. 49:10: "The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor a law-giver from between his feet, until Shiloh come." (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Silver Springs
Description:A post office in 1853 in Big River Township. A station on the Missouri-Illinois Railroad. There are clear springs here, flowing from gravel. (Hayward (1853); Parker (1865); Nicely (1867); R.M. ATLAS (1937); Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Simms Mountain
Description:Between Elvins and Bismarck. Named for Louis Simms, landowner. (Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; J.C. Yeargain)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sinkhole School
Description:See Cave Springs School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Skintown
Description:See Big River Mills
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Slime Branch [1 of 2]
Description:Another Slime Branch, named for the same reason, rises near Bonne Terre and flows into Big River two miles north of Bonne Terre. An earlier name is Turkey Creek; evidently named from the wild turkeys of early days. (Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; Finis Turley; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Slime Branch [2 of 2]
Description:Rises south of Wortham and flows into Big River near Leadwood. Slime from the lead mill is emptied into the stream. (Wm. Sago)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Snake Den
Description:Six and a half miles west of Knob Lick on St. Francois River. There is always an abundance of rattlesnakes there. (Misses Elsie & Clara Marshall; Knowles Klob)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Snyder's Ford
Description:A ford across Terre Blue Creek near the eastern side of Marion Township. Seven Stone Arches Bridge (q.v.) has been recently erected to replace it. It was named for a local family. (Mrs. J.H. Snyder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Soper
Description:See Syenite
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:South Spring Hollow
Description:North of Stono Mountain. Named from a spring on the south side. (Henry Ruh; Luther Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:South Ward School
Description:See W.L. Johns School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Anne's Catholic Church
Description:At French Village; the first Catholic chapel in the county, erected in 1828. The traditional name of the mother of the Virgin Mary. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 529; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 56; CATH. ENCY. I, 538)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church
Description:Organized at Doe Run in 1889 as mission from Farmington. Discontinued. St. Francis Xavier (1506-1552) devoted his life to missionary efforts in Asia. In 1747 he was pronounced the patron saint of the East Indies. (Rothensteiner (1928) II, 528; CATH. ENCY. VI, 233)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Francois County
Description:This county was formed out of parts of earlier Ste. Genevieve, Jefferson, and Washington counties. It was established by act of the legislature on December 17, 1821. Irregular in form, it is bounded on the north by Ste. Genevieve and Jefferson counties, on the south by Perry, Madison, and Iron counties, and on the west by Iron and Washington counties. So named from the river of the same name which runs almost entirely through it. (Conard (1901) V, 430; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 3)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Francois County Agricultural and Mechanical Association's Fair Grounds
Description:Located one half mile west of Farmington. (Wilson (1875) 119)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Francois County Electric Railway
Description:Connected Farmington and Flat River. Terminals were at De Lassus on the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad and at Flat River on the Mississippi River and Bonne Terre Railroad. It no longer extends to Flat River, but meets the Missouri-Illinois Railroad at Hurryville. (Douglass (1912) I, 509; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 35-36; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Francois Memorial Park
Description:A cemetery three miles north of Desloge in Perry Township. Named for the county. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Francois Missionary Baptist Church
Description:At Loughboro in Pendleton Township. Organized in 1854. The present building was dedicated in 1886. Probably named for St. Francois River, which flows near it. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927; Mrs. J.S. West)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Francois Mountains
Description:A name applied to the hills in St. Francois, Iron, Washington, and Wayne counties. In origin they are probably the only true mountains in the state. Most of them are found in St. Francois County, and they form the source of the St. Francois River. (Douglass (1912) I, x)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Francois River
Description:A large river, whose headwaters are formed by First, Second, and Dry creeks of Iron and St. Francois counties, flowing through Wayne and Madison counties, forming the western boundaries for Stoddard and Dunklin counties, and finally emptying into the Mississippi River near Helena, Arkansas. It was known to the Indians as Cholohollay meaning "smoky-water." Eaton says it was named by early settlers or explorers for the patron saint of their order. This would be St. Francis of Assisi. However, none of the prominent early explorers were of the Franciscan order, or at least none who descended to the mouth of the St. Francois River. Hennepin was the only Franciscan among the prominent explorers, and he named the St. Francois River in Michigan, now known as the Rum River, so it is not likely that he also named this river; nor did he descend south as far as the St. Francois. De Soto mentions a river answering the description of St. Francois River, but he did not mention its name. Marquette reached a point near where the river empties into the Mississippi River in 1673, and possibly he named it, as he had spent some time at the mission of St. Francois Xavier before starting on this trip. St. Francis Xavier (1506-1552) was a Jesuit missionary, like Marquette, and a friend of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit Society. The river was first used in business proceedings in the grant of New Madrid to Colonel Morgan in 1787. The spelling St. Francis is sometimes seen on recent maps. (Buel, 240-241; Houck (1908) I, 16- 17, quoting from Silliman's JOURNAL OF SCIENCE III: 25; MHR, XIII, 60; Miss Hamlett's thesis)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Francois Township
Description:In the east-central part of the county. One of the original townships. Named for the county. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 4)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Joe Mines
Description:See Bonne Terre
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Joe School
Description:An early school at Bonne Terre. Named from St. Joseph Lead Company. (H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. John's Catholic Church
Description:At Bismarck. A Biblical name: John, the disciple whom Jesus loved (John 13:23). (Cath. Directory (1937) 158)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:Organized in 1870 at Iron Mountain. In 1899 the church was moved to Bismarck. A parochial school was attached at one time. For the name cf. above. (Rev. H.G. Halter)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Joseph Mine
Description:Mine on the La Grove tract, so called by Anthony La Grave. For the name cf. above. (Conard (1901) V, 413)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Joseph's Catholic Church [1 of 2]
Description:At Farmington. The congregation was organized in 1870, when a church was built. A parochial school was attached. For the name cf. above. (HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 528)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Joseph's Catholic Church [2 of 2]
Description:At Bonne Terre. Organized in 1872. A parochial school is attached. For the name cf. above. (Rothensteiner (1928) II, 528; Rev. G.W. Brinkman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railway Company
Description:See St. Louis, Iron Mountain, and Southern Railway Company.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Louis Road
Description:Runs north from Farmington to St. Louis, passing near French Village to Koester in Marion Township, and on through Flucom and Festus in Jefferson County to St. Louis. Named for its terminus. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Louis, Iron Mountain, and Southern Railway Company
Description:This company was formed in 1874 by the consolidation of four railroads, one of which was the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railway Company, so named because it extended from St. Louis through Jefferson and St. Francois counties to Iron Mountain. Later it was extended through Iron County and further south to Texarkana and enlarged its name accordingly. In 1881 it was purchased by the Missouri Pacific Railroad and became part of that system. (Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Luke's A.M.E. Church
Description:Established in Farmington for colored people more than fifty years ago. Named for the apostle. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Mary's Russian Orthodox Church
Description:At Desloge. Organized in 1908. Named in honor of the Virgin. (John Zieba)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Matthew's Lutheran Church
Description:At Bonne Terre. Organized in 1906 by a group of fifty-four Slovaks. Named for the Apostle. (John Durovcik)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Paul Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:Organized in 1877 at Farmington by Rev. Christopher Tayes. It is the oldest church for colored people in the county. Named for the Apostle. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:At Farmington, organized in 1873. A parochial school is attached. Named for the Apostle. (Rev. E.C. Pardieck)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:St. Peter's Episcopal Church
Description:At Bonne Terre. Organized in 1910. It is the only church of this denomination in the county. Named for the Apostle. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:State Hospital Quarry
Description:At Farmington, just east of the road from the main entrance to the buildings of the State Hospital for the Insane. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 90)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Ste. Genevieve, Iron Mountain and Pilot Knob Plank Road
Description:This road extended from Ste. Genevieve to Iron Mountain by way of Farmington, a distance of forty-two miles. The road was incorporated on February 7, 1851, and finished in 1853 with toll gates. The construction consisted of heavy timbers laid lengthwise with the road and oak boards eight feet long nailed crosswise. Iron from Pilot Knob in Iron County and from Iron Mountain was taken to Ste. Genevieve, and freight and supplies were brought back. The road furnished the principal means of transportation for most of the products used in the section until 1857, when the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad was built. Although portions of the road were abandoned as tolls at various times, all tolls of the St. Francois County portion were not removed until 1902. It is commonly called the Plank Road. (Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 26-27)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Stone Methodist Church
Description:At Hazel Run. Originally a union church, erected about 1830 and razed about 1922. It was built of stone. (Farmington NEWS, Oct. 14, 1927; Shelt T. Horn)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Stoney Shaft
Description:On the western hill of Perry's Lead Mine. A descriptive name. (Litton (1855) 36)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Stono
Description:A post office 1867, 1876-1904, in Pendleton Township. An important station in the hauling of iron from Iron Mountain to Ste. Genevieve on the Plank Road. Named from Stono Mountain, near which it is located. (Postal Guide; Goodwin (1867) 49; Henry Ruh; Luther Williams; F.J. Antoine)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Stono Mountain
Description:Five and a half miles east of Iron Mountain. The name has been connected with the many stones naturally found on the mountain side, but this hardly explains the curious form "Stono." There is a Stono River in South Carolina, from which the Missouri name may possibly be borrowed; cf. Pendleton Baptist Church and Pendleton Township in the county, which are also borrowed from South Carolina. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; Henry Ruh; Luther Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Stono School
Description:In Pendleton Township. Named from the post office. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Stony Point
Description:See Halifax
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sugar Grove School
Description:In St. Francois Township. Named from the location in a grove of sugar maple trees. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sulphur Mountain
Description:Adjacent to Middle Mountain in Randolph Township. So called from sulphur springs there. (Bonne Terre Quadrangle Map; Pearl W. Keay)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Sulphur Springs
Description:Three and a half miles east of Iron Mountain. The water has a taste of sulphur. (Henry Ruh; Luther Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Summit Railway
Description:A narrow-gauge railway, completed in 1880, built and owned by St. Joseph Lead Company and Desloge Lead Company. It ran from the mines to Summit in Washington County, a shipping point on the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad (Thirteen and a half miles long). (Jones (1892) 23; Miles, HISTORY OF ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 38)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Swink
Description:Formerly a prepaid freight station and stop on the St. Francois County Electric Railroad, on the E.E. Swink farm. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Syenite
Description:A post office was established here, in southwestern Liberty Township near the St. Francois River, under the name of Soper, on March 18, 1881. The name was changed to Syenite, June 15, 1881. The office was discontinued May 31, 1914. The source of the earlier name has not been ascertained. Syenite is a name for an igneous rock, chiefly feldspar, resembling granite. There were great granite quarries here, which doubtless suggested the name, though no true syenite was found in them. (Postal Guide; Eaton; Douglass (1912) I, 523; H.C. Thompson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Syenite Granite Company's Quarry
Description:Opened at Syenite in August, 1880; abandoned about 1890. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 71)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Taylor
Description:A stop on the St. Francois Electric Railroad, on the Peers Taylor farm. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Taylor Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:Organized in February, 1900, at Flat River. Named from its location. (LEAD BELT NEWS, June 10, 1938)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Taylor Branch
Description:Rises near the Oak Hill School and flows into St. Francois River near Doe Run Junction. Named for early settlers. (Mrs. J.S. West; J.D. Flanery)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Taylor Creek
Description:Rises six miles northeast of Farmington and flows into Wolf Creek one half mile north of Valley Forge. Named for George Taylor, who before and after the Civil War owned 1000 acres in the vicinity. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Taylor Lead Mine
Description:One half mile north of Doe Run Lead Company's shaft. Named for Wm. R. Taylor, mine owner. (Winslow (1894) II, 669; J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Taylor's Shaft
Description:On the western hill of Perry's Lead Mine. Presumably a personal name. (Litton (1855) 36)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Taylortown
Description:A town in northwestern St. Francois Township. Named for Wm. R. Taylor, who opened a lead mine here. It is a part of Flat River now. (Hixson's Plat Book (1930); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Terre Bleu Creek
Description:See Terre Blue Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Terre Bleue Creek
Description:See Terre Blue Creek
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Terre Blue Creek
Description:Rises in Union Township, Ste. Genevieve County, two miles northeast of Sprott and flows into Big River about two miles northeast of Bonne Terre, in Perry Township, St. Francois County. The name was derived from the bluish earth around the stream. Other and older spellings are Terre Bleue and Terre Bleu. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Conard (1901) V, 430; Buckley (1908) I, 6; Hixson's Plat Book (1930); Shelt T. Horn; Mr. & Mrs. R.J. Reeder)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Tetley Hill
Description:Four and a half miles south of Farmington. Named for the landowner. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Tetley Lead Shaft
Description:In Leadington. Named for Robert Tetley, who had an interest in it. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Texas Baptist Church
Description:At Knob Lick, in southern Liberty Township. Formerly a long church one and a half miles north of the present site. No reason for using the state name has been ascertained. Cf. Texas County, so called because it is the largest county in Missouri. (Duncan (1882) 74; HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 552; Mrs. Cora Kinney)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Lead Belt
Description:A general designation of the mining towns of Bonne Terre, Desloge, Flat River, Elvins, Rivermines, Esther, Leadington, and Leadwood. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary Catholic Church
Description:At Leadwood. Organized in 1906. The source of the name is obvious. (Rev. J.J. D'Arcy)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Pinery
Description:The area in which Federal Shafts 9 and 10 are located. The name was derived from the yellow pine growing on the hillsides. (Buckley (1908) I, 120)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Plank Road
Description:See Ste. Genevieve, Iron Mountain and Pilot Knob Plank Road.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:The Power House
Description:See Electric Place
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Theodore Lead Shaft
Description:Between Flat River and Esther. Once owned by the Theodore Lead Company, then sold to the Central Lead Company, and later acquired by the Federal Lead Company. It is now being mined by the St. Joseph Lead Company. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Three Hill Creek
Description:Rises three and a half miles east of Cadet and flows into Big River six miles north of Bonne Terre in St. Francois County. It derives its name from three hills from which it comes. (G.C. Long)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Tillman Creek
Description:Rises east of Libertyville and flows into Williams Creek. Named for a landowner. (F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Toll Gate Hill
Description:The last hill before entering Iron Mountain on the Farmington-Iron Mountain road. Named from a toll gate there of the Plank Road. (Henry Ruh; Luther Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Toll Gate Spring
Description:On Toll Gate Hill. (Henry Ruh; Luther Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Tribby Mountain
Description:Three miles southeast of Iron Mountain. Named for a man who lived there. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; A.J. Canter)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:At Flat River. Organized probably in 1902 or 1903. Named for the Christian doctrine. (Rev. H.C. Rose)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Tumble Bug Lead Shaft
Description:See Federal No. 7 Lead Shaft
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Tunnel
Description:A prepaid freight station on the Mississippi River and Bonne Terre Railroad north of Bonne Terre. The railroad goes through a tunnel here. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Turkey Creek
Description:See Slime Branch
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Turley Mill Road
Description:From Farmington to Turley Mill. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Turpin
Description:In northern Pendleton Township. A granite loading point on a spur of the Mississippi River and Bonne Terre Railroad. Named for Turpin's Granite Quarry. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Turpin's Granite Quarry
Description:In northern Pendleton Township, two miles south of Doe Run. Named for the owner. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Tyler Mill
Description:See Big River Mills
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Tyler's Shaft
Description:Between the eastern and western hills of Perry's Lead Mines. Probably a personal name. (Litton (1855) 37)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Union Congregational Church
Description:See First Congregational Church of Bonne Terre
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Unity School
Description:In St. Francois Township. An ideal name. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Valle Forge
Description:See Valley Forge
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Valley Forge
Description:A post office from 1890-1900 in St. Francois Township. Now extinct. In 1854 bloom furnaces were erected where the Plank Road crossed Wolf Creek. Iron ore from Iron Mountain was melted into blooms here and taken to Ste. Genevieve for shipment. This furnace, known as Valle Forge, became the property of Choteau, Harrison, and Valle in 1858. The name was for the owner Valle, later spelled Valley Forge, obviously by a sort of popular etymology for the famous Revolutionary War site where Washington and the American army passed the winter of 1777-78 amid great privations. The association was obviously an afterthought suggested by accidental similarity of pronunciation. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873); HIST. S.E. MISSOURI (1888) 212; Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS, 55; Postal Guide)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Valley Forge School
Description:In St. Francois Township. Named from the settlement. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:W.L. Johns School
Description:An elementary school at Farmington. Named for W.L. Johns, superintendent of schools since 1914. Formerly called South Ward School and Jefferson School from its location. (W.L. Johns)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:Now a part of the Bismarck school district. Named from its location. (J. Clyde Akers)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Washington School
Description:See Annie Lloyd School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Washita Baptist Church
Description:In Pendleton Township. Cf. Washita School. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Washita Creek
Description:Rises between Bald Mountain and Buck Mountain and joins Brewers Creek three miles south of the Madison County line to flow into nearby St. Francois River. The name, also often spelled Wichita, is that of a well known Indian tribe. The Wichita, a confederacy of Caddoan stock, formerly ranged from about the middle of Arkansas River, Kansas, southward to Brazos River, Texas, of which region they appear to be the aborigines. (Hodge (1910) II, 947; Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; J.W. Burch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Washita Mountain
Description:In Pendleton Township, near Burch School. Cf. above. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Washita School
Description:See Burch School
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Water Shaft
Description:On the eastern hill of Perry's Lead Mine. A descriptive name. (Litton (1855) 36)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Welbourn Town
Description:West of Doe Run. Named for an early settler. (F.J. Antoine)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wenda Creek
Description:See Mill Creek.
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wesley Chapel (Methodist)
Description:Near Libertyville. No longer there. Cemetery attached. Named for John Wesley, founder of Methodism. (Mrs. H.C. Mell)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Western Granite Company's Quarry
Description:About three-quarters mile south of Knob Lick. Named for the company. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 82)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wheelen Spring
Description:One and a half miles west of Brightstone School. Named for a family, formerly of Tennessee, who lived there. (Misses Clara & Elsie Marshall; Knowles Klob)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:White Creek
Description:Rises at Bread Tray Mountain and flows into Indian Creek four miles west of Stono. A descriptive name. (Marion Anderson; W.A. Anderson)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Whitener
Description:A stop on the St. Francois County Electric Railroad, on the Whitener farm. (R.M. ATLAS (1937); J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wiggins Hill
Description:Four and a half miles north of Farmington on the St. Louis Road. Named for a local family. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wildcat Creek
Description:Rises at Pinnacle Hollow and flows into Washita Creek one mile from its source. Named for the animal. (J.W. Burch)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wildcat Hollow
Description:In Pendleton Township, near the Madison County line. Probably named for the animal, or for the creek, which runs through it. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Williams Creek
Description:Rises two miles east of Libertyville and flows into Little St. Francois River about three miles southwest of Libertyville. Named for a landowner. (F.L. Graham)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wills Branch
Description:Rises two and a half miles northeast of Knob Lick and flows into Little St. Francois four miles south of Knob Lick. Named for a negro who lived nearby. (Fredericktown Quadrangle Map; Bert Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wolf Creek [1 of 2]
Description:Rises near Oak Grove School in eastern St. Francois Township and flows into St. Francois River five miles southwest of Farmington. There were many wolves in the early days. (Campbell's ATLAS (1873); Conard (1901) V, 430; J.F. Zimmer; Mrs. W.F. Mell)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wolf Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A watering place for the train on the St. Louis, Iron Mountain, and Southern Railroad, fifteen miles southeast of Bismarck, where Wolf Creek flows into the St. Francois River. Named from the creek. (Campbell's GAZETTEER (1874) 501; Thom. H. Holman)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wolf Creek Hill
Description:Two and a half miles northeast of Farmington. Named from the creek. (W.F. Yeager)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wolf Mountain
Description:Four miles east of Iron Mountain. Named for the animal. (Ironton Quadrangle Map; Henry Ruh; Luther Williams)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Woodland Park
Description:Three and a half miles northwest of Farmington on St. Francois County Electric Railroad. Used for picnics and ball games. Owned by Woodland Land and Lead Company. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Woodlawn Cemetery
Description:At Leadington. A descriptive name. (J.F. Zimmer)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Wortham
Description:A small town in Randolph Township, with a post office since 1925. First laid out under the name Cherrytown by the Cherry Town Site Company in 1904. The town was called Cherryville in 1909, when it was again surveyed. These names were probably for the fruit trees. The present name is for the first postmaster, Ray Wortham. There was a post office Cherryville in Crawford County. (Postal Guide; R.M. ATLAS (1937); Miles, HIST. ST. FRANCOIS (1935) 57; Mrs. George Hughes)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Yankee Lead Diggings
Description:About two miles northwest of Gumbo mines. A group of Flat River mines. Probably a nickname for American owners or workmen. (Winslow (1894) I, 278)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Zeran Gregory Granite Company's Quarry
Description:Sec. 35, T. 35, R. 5E., opened by Zeron Gregory Granite Company of Cairo, Illinois, on the farm of Mr. Zeran Gregory. (Buckley & Buehler (1904) 82)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

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