St. Charles County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Academy of the Sacred Heart
Description:This mission at 619 Second Street in St. Charles was the first foundation established by the order of the Sacred Haert of Jesus in America. Madame Duchesne, who had long been zealous to devote her life to the salvation of the Indians, came with her co-laborers, Madame Eugenie Ande, Octavia Berthold, and two other helpers, sisters Margaret and Catharine, and established a little mission in St. Charles in 1818 or in 1819. This building was a two-room log hut on the present site of the academy. Not far away were the home of the Sioux. Poverty forced the missionairies to move first to St. Louis in September 1818 and later to St. Ferdinand, or Florissant. However, they took with them five pupils from St. Charles. The missionaries succeeded in St. Ferdinand; and in 1828 some of them returned to St. Charles, where they met with better success than formerly. The school is named for the Sacred Heart of Jesus, an object of special Catholic devotion. (Bryan & Rose, 437- 438; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 321; TELEPHONE DIRECTORY, 31; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Africa
Description:A settlement in St. Charles which is so named because it is a negro residential section. (ST. C. C-M, May 8, 1901; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:African School
Description:An elementary school in the extreme northwestern part of Callaway Township, south of Foristell, south of Perruque Creek. Cf. above. (SCHROWANG Road Map; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:All Saints Catholic Church
Description:A Catholic institution located at St. Peters, eight or ten miles west of St. Charles. It is also known as All Saint's Parish and is so named for the saints in general. The church grew out of an early Jesuit mission, known as St. Peter's Mission, for the Apostle, which was established here about 1819. (Campbell, 490; COUNTY ATLAS, 1875, 12, 14; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 461, 462; Conard V, 472; Eaton, 58; ST. C. C-M, Aug. 20, 1924, ; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:All Saint's Parish
Description:See All Saints Catholic Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:All Saint's Parish Hall
Description:A hall at All Saint's Catholic Church at St. Peters. It is so named for the parish. (ST. C. C-M, Aug., 20, 1924)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Allen's Prairie
Description:A prairie region in the southeastern part of Cuivre Township, six miles west of O'Fallon. The first land here was entered about 1822 by Colonel Daniel (?) Keithley. It was named for the family of Pines Allen, a Methodist Episcopal clergyman, who was born in Virginia in 1784, moved to Missouri in 1829, located on what has since been known as Allen's Prairie, and died in 1846. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14, 30; Bryan & Rose, 126; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Alton Ferry Landing
Description:A ferry boat landing which was so named for its position in the northeastern part of Portage des Sioux Township, on the Mississippi River, opposite Alton, Illinois. The first ferry of this name was on Captain La Motte's land, but a later ferry traversed Pike's Island. It is no longer in existence. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Alton Island
Description:See Lake Island
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Alton Slough
Description:A lake- like lowland near Alton, Illinois, for which it is so named. Formerly the House-Loomis Ice and Transportation Company maintained twenty-seven ice houses in this region and obtained its ice from the frozen slough. The coming of artificial ice brought ruin to this natural ice business. (Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Apple Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River, north of Dardenne Township. Dardenne Island laps over a fork of Apple Island. It is not far from Orchard Farm, formerly a great fruit producing section, and it is also near Calhoun County, Illinois, a noted apple growing area. It is doubtless so named because it was a shipping point for apples in the early days. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 25; Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Assumption Roman Catholic Church
Description:A Catholic institution at O'Fallon. It was built in 1857 and was so named for the Assumption, or taking up into heaven, of the Virgin Mary, celebrated by Catholics on August 15. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 461; Brewester, 368-9; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Audrain's Mill
Description:See Bull's Hell Mill.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Augusta
Description:A postal town in the southern part of Femme Osage Township, on the Missouri River. The early settlers were brought here by Louis Eversmann. It was platted in 1836 by Leonard Harold, who named it for his wife, Augusta. Conard, HIST. ST. CHARLES, and Benjamin Emmons say the town was first called Mount Pleasant, a complimentary name for its situation; but this was surprised by Harrold's name at least by 1842, since which date it has been a post office. Up until 1872 Augusta had a splendid landing under the hills that front the Missouri; but during that year, the river changed its course, filled up the main channel opposite the town, and opened a new one on the Franklin County side. The landing is now twelve miles down the river. (Hayward; Goodwin; Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14, 72; HIST. ST. CHARLES 236-237; Conard II, 72; Eaton, 57; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bacon School
Description:A rural grade school in the northeastern part of Femme Osage Township. It is a family name. (ROAD MAP ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Baird Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River, off the southwest part of Portage des Sioux Township. It is now probably attached to the main shore of Dardenne Township. It was named for Willis J. Baird, who owned it. (Red Book 1913, 452b; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Baldwin Farm
Description:A 2,900-acre farm which lies between the Mississippi River and Dardenne Creek. It is named in honor of W.R. Baldwin, an Illinois man. (Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 591; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Baldwin School
Description:A rural elementary school in the northern part of Dardenne Township, near Perruque. It is so named for the Baldwin family, who owned some 2,000 acres of land here. It is also called Peruque School for the town. It was formerly known as Fish Slough School for an old slough in the vicinity. (ROAD MAP, ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ballau Creek
Description:See Belleau Creek
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ballou Creek
Description:See Belleau Creek
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ballow Creek
Description:See Belleau Creek
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Band Mill
Description:See Cog- Wheel Mill
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Barrett's Creek
Description:See Perruque Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Baylass Island
Description:See Lake Island
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Baylis Island
Description:See Lake Island
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beck's Landing
Description:A boat landing off the northwestern part of Dardenne Township, on the Mississippi River above Dardenne Creek. It was probably so named for a local family. (SCHROWANG ROAD MAP; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Belland Creek
Description:See Belleau Creek
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Belland's Ferry
Description:On the Missouri River at St. Charles. On March 19, 1805, John B. Belland was licensed to run a ferry. (Hertich (1934), 20- 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Belle Aire School
Description:A rural elementary school in District No. 36, situated near St. Charles. The name is interpreted locally as "pleasant air," for its desirable location. (B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Belleau Creek
Description:A stream in the northwestern part of Dardenne Township, near O'Fallon. It was originally known as Belland Creek in honor of a landowner, John Batiste Belland, maternal grandfather of Benjamin Emmons. The Germans corrupted the name to Bellow, and the highway department and others have changed the name so that it appears as Belleau Creek, Ballau Creek, Ballow Creek, or Ballou Creek. (Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 560; HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES 1940; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bellow Creek
Description:See Belleau Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Benton School
Description:A school which is probably in St. Charles. It was named in honor of Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858), famous Missouri statesman, U.S. Senator from 1821-1851. (Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethlehem Church
Description:A Methodist Church in the west-central part of Cuivre Township between Flint Hill and Wentzville. The church was built in 1836-37. In this church about 1841 Enoch M. Marvin, later a famous Methodist bishop, preached his first sermon. Cf. above. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 11; Bryan & Rose, 420; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Reverend R.M. Hardaway)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Road
Description:See Boone's Lick Road
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bigelow Creek
Description:A stream in the southwestern part of Femme Osage Township, near Augusta. The name may be personal in origin. (HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES 1940)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Black Jack School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of St. Charles Township. The name is descriptive of the trees. (ROAD MAP ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Black Walnut
Description:A town in the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township. A post office was established here in 1875 through the efforts of Loman H. Haigler, but he was not postmaster until later. He built a store at the town and did much to promote its growth. The black walnut trees in the vicinity gave it its name. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 273; COM. ATLAS, 229; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Black Walnut Grove School
Description:A rural school in District No. 7. Cf. above. (B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Black Walnut School
Description:A rural elementary school ten miles northwest of St. Charles. Cf. above. (PORT. & BIOG. REC., 124; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blanchette Creek
Description:See Factory Branch
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blanchette Park
Description:A city park in the northwestern part of St. Charles at Randolph Street and the city limits. It was named in honor of the famous French-Canadian, Louis Blanchette, who came down the Mississippi River about 1765, was the first settler of St. Charles about 1769, and died about 1793. He was the first civil and military governor in this region. (Barns, 120; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 88, 94, 95; TELEPHONE DIRECTORY; Miss Kathryn Linnemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blanchette's Creek
Description:See Factory Branch
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blaze
Description:A shipping point and elevator in the southwestern part of Portage des Sioux Township. It was named for a farmer who owned the land there. In 1831 it was the original home of Wallace Kirkpatrick, where Mr. Emmon's wife was later born. (COM. ATLAS, 229; Earl C. Gray; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bluff Spring School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Callaway Township. The name is descriptive of its location. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bolter Island
Description:See Boulder Island
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bon Homme Island
Description:A large island in the Missouri River, off the southeastern part of St. Charles Township. It was formerly known as Isle au Bon Homme. It is near the mouth of Bonhomme Creek in St. Louis County, for which it was obviously named. On the Evans, or Mackay, Map it appears in the English form of Good Man's Island, or I. au Bon Homme. (EWT XXII, 239; HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES 1940)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone Lick Road
Description:See Boone's Lick Road
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone's Fort
Description:See Daniel M. Boone's Fort
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone's Lick Road
Description:Originally an old Indian trail or trace which led from St. Louis via St. Charles westward into the wilderness of Boone's Lick. Daniel Boone and his sons, Nathan and Dan M., made trips over this road to the famous lick in Howard County. In 1806 or in 1807, Nathan and Dan M. Boone moved out to Boone's Lick over the approximate line of the road, evaporated salt, sealed it in hollow logs, and floated it down the river to St. Louis. MISSOURI CROSS-STATE HIGHWAY says that the road was the first state road to be surveyed and that Daniel Boone did the work in 1814, but the same authority also states that Colonel Nathan Boone surveyed, marked and straightened the road. In 1815, the road ran 154 miles from St. Charles to Old Franklin in Howard County. The first stagecoach was established over the road in 1819. Daniel Boone led its blazing along this length. Other variants of the name are: Boone's Lick Trail, Boonslick Road, Boons' Lick Road, Boonslick Trace, Boon's Lick Road, Boonslick Trail, and Boone Lick Road. It was named for Daniel Boone (see above) or for Boone's Lick. The road was also called Big Road in ante-bellum days as a tribute to its importance. (Wetmore; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; Bryan & Rose, 48; HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES, 961; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 568; PORT. AND BIOG. RED., 498; Stevens II, 670; CROSS-STATE, 1-2; OLD TRAILS; SHOW ME, 61; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 12-15; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; W.G. Davis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone's Lick Trail
Description:See Boone's Lick Road.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boon's Lick Road
Description:See Boone's Lick Road.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boons' Lick Road
Description:See Boone's Lick Road.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boonslick Road
Description:See Boone's Lick Road.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boonslick Trace
Description:See Boone's Lick Road
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boonslick Trail
Description:See Boone's Lick Road
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boschertown [1 of 2]
Description:See King's Highway
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boschertown [2 of 2]
Description:A town in the central part of St. Charles Township, northwest of St. Charles. It is also frequently spelled Boscherttown. It was named in honor of John Boscher, an early settler. Prior to that it was a Royal Domain under the Spanish king. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 269; COM. ATLAS, 229; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boscherttown
Description:See Boschertown
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boulder Island
Description:An old island in the Mississippi River off the southwestern part of Portage des Sioux Township. It was originally Bolter Island in honor of John Bolter, an early settler. The change to Boulder is obviously a folk-etymology. (RED BOOK 1913, 452 b; SCHROWANG ROAD MAP; Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bradshaw Island
Description:An island off the southeastern part of Portage des Sioux Township. It was named for Robert Bruce Bradshaw. It has been washed away, except for a part absorbed by Cora Island. (RED BOOK 1912-14, 452b; HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES 1940; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brick House Slough
Description:A lowland which extends for some distance along the northeastern part of Portage des Sioux Township, north of Smelser Lake School. Probably named for a house. (HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES 1940; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brushy Fork Creek
Description:One of the branches in the center part of Femme Osage Township which unites with Clear Fork to form Femme Osage Creek. Cf. above. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 33; Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buck Church
Description:See Fifth Street Methodist Church
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bull's Hell Mill
Description:An early tread mill of Perruque Creek, north of O'Fallon. It was formerly known as Audrain's Mill in honor of its builder, James H. Audrain, who ,was commissioned Captain of Volunteers in the War of 1812, was afterward appointed Colonel of the Militia, came to St. Charles County in 1816 and built the mill and distillery in that year, was elected a member of the Legislature in 1830, and died at the home of Governor Clark in St. Louis, November 10, 1831. His body was brought back to St. Charles County in the first hearse ever seen in the county. When Audrain County was organized in 1836, it was named in honor of Colonel Audrain. Since he used young bulls as the motive power for the mill and often has as many as twenty of the animals at one time, a loquacious citizen dubbed it Bull's Hell Mill, by which name it was generally known. (Bryan & Rose, 128; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116, 448; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Burlington Railroad
Description:See Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Butler Way
Description:A drive at Lindenwood College, St. Charles. It was doubtless named for Colonel James Butler, businessman, church leader, and military commander, who once served as a member of the Board of Directors of Lindenwood College. He was born in Michigan in 1840 and later served in the Union Army where he became a colonel, major, etc. (Templin, REMINISCENCES, 76, 131; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Calamus Spring School
Description:A rural grade school in District 65, probably near Defiance and Hamburg. The name is descriptive of its location near a spring which is surrounded by calumus (properly spelled "calamus") plants, or sweet-flags. (B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Callaway Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the southwestern part of Hickory Grove Township, flows south into the extreme northeastern part of Charrette Township, thence east into St. Charles County. It was named for the family of Flanders Callaway, who came here with the Boones at the close of the 18th or the beginning of the 19th century and established Callaway's Post (q.v.) shortly before the War of 1812. (Bryan & Rose, 99-100; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 9; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 958, 961, 974, 1029; COUNTY MAP 1908; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 659; Bryan, MISSOURI HIST. SOC. COLLECTIONS VI, 1-18; WARREN CENTENNIAL, 8; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 1; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; E.C. Kehr; Mrs. George Luppold)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Callaway Fork Creek
Description:One of the tributaries of Femme Osage Creek in Femme Osage Township. The name is also sometimes found as Calaway Fork, Callaway's Fork, or Fork Callaway, all of which are variants of the same name. It was doubtless named for the famous Callaways, probably Captain James Callaway and Thomas Callaway, who lived within the limits of the township. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 33; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116, 134, 284; HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES 1940; Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Callaway Township
Description:A township which lies north of Femme Osage Township and south of Cuivre Township. It was named either for Captain James Callaway, a famous pioneer and Indian fighter, or for Captain Callaway and Thomas Callaway, both of whom lived within the limits of the present township. (County Atlas 1875, 12; Davis & Durrie, 433; HISTORY OF ST. CHATLES, 284; Conard IV, 560; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Callaway's Fork
Description:See Callaway Fork Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Krekel
Description:A camp near Cottleville, which was named for Judge Arnold Krekel. Judge Krekel was born at Bergheim, Germany, March 12, 1815, and came to America in 1829. He was a graduate of St. Charles College, a surveyor, a justice of the peace, a newspaper man, a lawyer, and an ardent abolitionist. Mr. Krekel was instrumental in establishing Lincoln Institute at Jefferson City. He became a lieutenant colonel who commanded forces in northwest Missouri, was a Judge of the U.S. District Court, and gained a national reputation. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 107, 181; ST. C. C-M, June 11, 1902; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cannon School
Description:A rural school in the extreme northwestern part of Cuivre Township. Also known as Maple Grove School and Grothe School. The former is a descriptive name, and Cannon and Grothe are personal names. (B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cappeln
Description:A post office in the northwestern part of Femme Osage Township, two miles southeast of Wentzville. A German settlement, said to have been named for a place in Germany, which may have been Kapellen, Luxemburg. Now extinct. (Campbell, 487; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cappeln Custom and Merchant Mills
Description:Mills at Capeln in the northwestern corner of Femme Osage Township. The establishment was built by Henry Karrenbrock and his brother Gerhard W. Karrenbrock in 1857. It included a flour mill, a corn mill, a sawmill, and wood-carving machinery. Gerhard W. Karrenbrock retired in 1884 and left Henry W. Karrenbrock to be sole proprietor. The latter was born in Germany, June 19, 1829 and came to St. Charles when he was a youth. The mills were named for the town. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 251; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Castilo Island
Description:An island off the southern part of Dardenne Township in the Missouri River. It was named for a Mr. Castilo who owned it. (Emmons Plat; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Castilo's Fort
Description:A wooden fort near Howell's Prairie which was built as a place where the pioneers could find safety in time of Indian attack. It was probably named for John Castilo, of Tennessee, who came to St. Charles County in 1806. One of his sons, John H. Castilo, married the widow of Captain James Callaway, whose maiden name was Nancy Howell. John H. Castilo had a son named John C. Castilo. The correct spelling of the name is preserved in Castilo Island (q.v.). (Bryan & Rose, 212; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 152, 495; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cave Spring
Description:A large, fresh-water spring in the center part of St. Charles Township. Cf. above. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 298; Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Pyramid
Description:A curious natural formation of friable sandstone which formerly stood in Darst's Bottom on a 200 ft. cliff along the Missouri River, in the southeastern part of Femme Osage Township. The column of rock was about 160 ft. high and projected 12 or 15 ft. in front of the cliff. It was so named for a living cedar which stood 15 or 20 ft. high on the summit of the column. Apparently, at some anterior time the Missouri flowed part and washed the base of Cedar Pyramid. (Eaton, 57; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; MHR XXVII, 380-81; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cemetery Slough
Description:A lowland along the Missouri River, north of St. Charles at Werremeyer's place. The name may be descriptive. (ST. C. C-M. June 10, 1903, 3)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chain of Rocks Ferry
Description:A ferry on Cuivre River along the northern side of Cuivre Township. It is so named for its location near a series of partly exposed rocks in the river bed (cf. above). For a similar but better known "Chain of Rocks" in the Mississippi of St. Louis, see Miss Welty's thesis. (COUNTY ATLAS 1876, 40; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Charlesworth Farm
Description:One of the most historic tracts in the county, in the Cul de Sac neighborhood. It was so named for the Charlesworth family who owned the land for ninety years before it was sold to the late Captain Henry B. Denker. It was originally known as Janis Park in honor of Antoine Janis, who purchased it July 10, 1796. Before Jefferson Barracks was built, the government tried to buy this land but the price was too high. Later the barracks were built in St. Louis. (MHR XXVII, 300)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad
Description:Crosses the extreme northern part of Warren County, the southern half of Lincoln County, and the northern edge of St. Charles County to West Alton in this section. This great system of roads extends from Chicago westerly, reaching St. Paul and Minneapolis, St. Louis, Kansas City, Omaha, Denver, Cheyenne, Black Hills, South Dakota, and Billings, Montana. The railroad was organized in 1849. In June 1864, it was consolidated and since merged the Chicago, Burlington, & Northern; Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs Railroad; the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad commenced at Hannibal in the fall of 1851. It received one and a half million dollars worth of bonds in 1851 as a grant from the State Legislature. By the autumn of 1855, about 100 miles of road were in the process of construction. Although very little railroad building was done during the Civil War, the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad was completed; and except during 1862, it met its interest payments. In St. Charles and Lincoln Counties, the road forms a junction with the M.K. & T. Railroad, and runs northwest up the Mississippi River. In 1904 the road was built from Old Monroe to Mexico, Missouri. It forms a short line between St. Louis and Kansas City. It has been jointly used by the Burlington & Chicago & Alton Railroad for passenger service. The road was named for its terminal points. It is often called the Burlington Railroad, and was formerly known as the St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern Railroad. All names the railroad has borne have been given for termini on the railroad. (HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES, 228; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 404; RED BOOK 1913-14, 349; HIGHWAY MAPS, 1940; MHR Oct., 1920, 146-153; R. & I. COMPENDIUM, May 29, 1941, 54; Miss Welty's thesis; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; E.S. Aydelott; Andy J. Brown; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chouteau Island
Description:See Dresser Island
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:City of St. Charles
Description:See St. Charles
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clear Fork
Description:A small creek in the center part of Femme Osage Township. It unites with Brushy Fork Creek to form Femme Osage Creek. The name is descriptive. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 33; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cog-Wheel Mill
Description:The second mill to be built north of the Missouri River and located in Howell's Prairie. It was first known as the Band Mill because it was run by a long band or belt. It was built by the well-known pioneer, Francis Howell (1761-1834), whose place was a noted resort in early times. Musters and drills were frequently held there, and Indian agents who were conducting Indians to and from St. Louis often stopped there for supplies. A later mill, the Cog-Wheel Mill, which was so named because it was operated by a large cog-wheel, replaced the earlier mill. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 286; Bryan & Rose, 155)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Comegris' Mill
Description:An early mill in the northeastern part of the county in the region known as Dog Prairie. It was named for a Mr. Comegris who built it. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Bryan & Rose)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Comegris' Prairie
Description:See Dog Prairie
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Common Fields
Description:Fields one arpent wide and forty arpents long which contained about thirty-four acres and were located in the outlots of the St. Charles Common Fields. Every inhabitant was given one of these fields, which were so named because they were for the common use of the farmers who tilled them. George W. Redmon, who emigrated to St. Charles from Clark County, Kentucky, in 1828, was one of the citizens who was associated with Nathan Boone in taking steps toward incorporating the town of St. Charles and laying out the commons, which were leased for a period of 999 years. Mr. Redmon died in 1833. Common fields, which were areas designated for cultivation, should not be confused with commons, says McDermott, who defines a commons as "the area of land set apart and used in common by all of the inhabitants of the village for the gathering of firewood and the pasturage of animals." (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 10; McDermott; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Common Fields of Portage des Sioux
Description:In the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township, south of Portage des Sioux, for which they were named. These fields, which are also known as the Common Lots of Portage des Sioux, are among the few of their kind left in the United States. The town still owns all of its 1,400 acres except a small part condemned by the Burlington and Katy Railroad from which it recieves a yearly rental under perpetual leases of 6%, on a valuation set by the county assessor. Since there is no tax and only state and county taxes are levied, the fees derived from the rental are used to pay for school and street maintenance. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; TOWNSHIP PLATS I; MHR XXX; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Common Lots of Portage des Sioux
Description:See Common Fields of Portage des Sioux.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Commons of Portage des Sioux
Description:In the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township, south of the Common Fields of Portage des Sioux. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Commons of St. Charles
Description:In the center part of St. Charles Township, west of St. Charles, for which it is named. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Convent of the Sacred Heart
Description:A Catholic school in St. Charles. It is named for the Sacred Heart of Jesus, an object of special Catholic devotion. This school closed in 1972. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cool Spring School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Dardenne Township. The name is doubtless descriptive. (ROAD MAP of ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Coon's Mill
Description:An early mill on the Dardenne, in the southeastern part of Dardenne Township. Benjamin Emmons says it was named for Nicholas Coonz (q.v. Coonz's Fort), a forefather of Admiral Coonz; but Dr. Kate Gregg infers in MHR that it was named for John Coonz, a brother of Nicholas Coonz. John Coonz had established two mills on the Dardenne prior to December 12, 1803. On that day he traded his mills, which had been badly damaged by water, to Warren Cottle for the right to use them every fourth week, when Cottle should rebuild them on a ford between his house and the farm of Nicholas Coonz. With the Americanized spelling, which has many variants, cf. Coonz's Fort, below. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; MHR XXVII; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Coontz's Fort
Description:See Coonz's Fort
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Coonz' Fort
Description:An early fortification ten miles west of St. Charles in the eastern part of Dardenne Township, near Cottleville. It is named in honor of Nicholas Coonz, a forefather of the famous Admiral Robert Edward Coonz, who was born at Hannibal, Missouri, in 1864, served with distinction in the Alaskan service, was governor of Guam, 1912-13, and was confired Chief of Naval Operations in 1919. Nicholas Coonz (or Coontz), was in the county by 1791 and possessed land here prior to December, 1803. On his land near a large natural pond, rangers built the fort about 1808 to serve as protection against the Indians. Here in later years when the tide of immigration began to come after the War of 1812, Mr. Coonz established a tavern-stand, the first stopping place west of St. Charles on the Boonslick Road. There are numerous variant spellings of the name such as Kountz' Fort, Coontz's Fort, and probably Koontz' Fort. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Bryan & Rose, 94; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 152; Williams N. E. MISSOURI I, 559; TOWNSHIP PLATS I; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; WHO'S WHO 1922-23; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cora Island
Description:An island off the eastern part of Portage des Sioux Township. It was probably named for a woman who lived nearby. Cf. Bradshaw Island, above. (Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cottle's Mill
Description:An early mill on Dardenne Creek. It was named for Dr. Warren Cottle, father of Captain Lorenzo Cottle. Dr. Cottle came here from Vermont in 1799 or 1800, obtained land in the county, opened one of the first mills, and died near what is now Cottleville in 1821. (Bryan & Rose, 138-39; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116, 369; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cottleville
Description:A post office town on the Boone's Lick Road, ten miles west of St. Charles, in the eastern part of Dardenne Township. Settlement was made in the neighborhood of the site in the fall and winter of 1799 or in the spring of 1800. Warren Cottle, Sr., Warren Cottle, Jr., and Ira Cottle had concessions on the land which they chose. They obtained these grants from the Spanish Government about 1803. The town was laid out in 1829 or in 1840 by Captain Lorenzo Cottle, for whom it was named. Captain Cottle, a son of Dr. and Mrs. Warren Cottle, pioneers who came from Vermont in 1799 or 1800, was born near the present site of Cottleville, September 13, 1811, and saw military service. The post office was established by 1853. (Hayward; Goodwin; Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12, 14; Bryan & Rose, 138-39; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 236, 7, 368-371, 452; Eaton, 58; MHR XXVII, 380- 1)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cow Mire Island
Description:In the Missouri River and claimed by St. Charles County in 1907. Named for the creek. (PLAT BOOK 1909)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cribbin's Grove
Description:See Kuhlmann's Grove
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Croghan Island
Description:An island in the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township, so named for its owner. It has been absorbed by Cora Island (q.v.). (HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES 1940; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crows Creek
Description:A short creek which rises in the southern part of Femme Osage Township, northwest of Augusta, and flows south into the Missouri River. There is some conflict as to the origin of the name. Mr. Emmons thinks it was named for the bird, and Mr. Gray suggests it was named for a Mr. Crow. The latter solution seems more plausible as John Crow had 382.81 arpents of land on survey 438 in Township 44 N., R. 1, E., which is in this region. The "s" on the end of the word denotes a personal name also, although the apostrophe is no longer used. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12, 14; TOWNSHIP PLATS I; Earl C. Gray; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cuivre Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River, northeast of Cuivre Township and just off the mouth of the Cuivre River. Cf. abve. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; COUNTY ATLAS 1899; Andy J. Brown)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cuivre River
Description:Formed by the junction of the West Cuivre and North Cuivre Rivers (or the West Fork and North Fork of Cuivre) in Bedford Township, about three miles northwest of Troy. It takes a southeastern and then an eastern direction, forming the boundaries between Lincoln and St. Charles Counties, until it empties into the Mississippi River by way of Cuivre Slough at the southeast corner of the county. The Feench name was Riviere au Cuivre. It was so named, no doubt, because the French had been led to believe by the Indians that there was copper there has caused some to conjecture that the original word was "cuvre," meaning "fish pool," but there is not the slightest foundation for this. "Cuvre" is a rare word in French, and the change to Cuivre would still have to be explained. The French were quite capable of basing false hopes of mineral wealth upon Indian reports, as in the case of Lead Creek (q.v.), Copper Spring, etc. There is, as a matter of fact, plenty of copper not far away, in the counties south of the Missouri River. The word takes many different forms, among which are Quesvere, La Quevr, and the phonetic Quiver River of Louis and Clark, also Cuvier. According to Coues, it was often translated as Copper River. Pike, curiously enough, calles it Buffaloe River or River au Boeuf, or aux Boeufs, which Coues states was an alternative name with the French; but this is probably a confusion with the Beef or Buffalo River of Franklin County, emptying into the Missouri River. Also Quivre River. The name is mispelled River Aux Cuivre in the COUNTY ATLAS. (Pike, 2; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 12; Barns, 173; Conard VI, 442; Benjamin Emmons; Miss Leech's thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cuivre Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Cuivre River, on the southeast by Dardenne Township, and on the west by Warren County. It is the northwestern township in the county. It was doubtless organized in 1818 when the county reached its present limits. The name is spelled Cuvier by Davis & Durrie. Cf. above. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 9, 12, 14; Davis & Durrie, 433; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cul de Sac Common Fields
Description:See Cul de Sac Field
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cul de Sac Field
Description:A common field in the northeast-center part of St. Charles Township, which was so named for Cul de Sac Road (q.v.). An early settlement was made at this place, which was also known as the Cul de Sac Common Fields. (TOWNSHIP PLATS I; MHR XVIII, 518; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cul de Sac Road
Description:A road which was probably near Cul de Sac Field in the northeast-central part of St. Charles Township. The name is a descriptive French term for a road open at only one end. (Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cul de Sac School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of St. Charles Township, which was so named for a pocket in the river. This pocket was more noticeable in the past than at the present. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cuvier Township
Description:See Cuivre Township
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dalhoff
Description:A post office in the west-central part of Dardenne Township, but it is not listed in the available Postal Guides. It was so named for an elderly woman who had a store and tavern there. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12, 14; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Daniel Boone Homestead
Description:See Old Boone Home
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Daniel Boone's Spring
Description:In the southwestern part of Femme Osage Township, near the Judgment Tree and the Old Boone Home (q.v.). This spring, which was instrumental in causing Daniel Boone to settle here at the end of the 18th century, was named in his honor. The spring still flows. It formerly attracted many people because they thought it possessed medical value. (WARREN CENTENNIAL, 16; ST. C. C-M, February 3, 1926; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Daniel M. Boone's Fort
Description:The strongest wooden fort built as a refuge from Indian attacks in St. Charles County, located in Darst's Bottom in the southeastern part of Femme Osage Township. It was named in honor of Colonel Daniel Boone's son, Daniel M. Boone, who built a house in Darst's Bottom, adjoining the 1,000-arpent tract granted to his father by the Spanish Government. The fortification was built either in 1800 or during the War of 1812. It was also known as Boone's Fort. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Bryan & Rose, 47, 94; Barns, 171; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 151 TOWNSHIP PLATS I; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Darden Creek
Description:See Dardenne Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardene River
Description:See Dardenne Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne
Description:A town in the central-northwestern part of Dardenne Township, which was named for Dardenne Creek in the same neighborhood. The post office was organized by 1831, discontinued by 1853, reestablished by 1876, and again discontinued by 1915. (Green; Wetmore; Postal Guide; Eaton, 58; RED BOOK 1913, 452b; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne Bridge [1 of 2]
Description:A early bridge probably in the northeastern part of Dardenne Township on Dardenne Creek, near where it empties into the Mississippi River. It was doubtless so named for its position on the stream. (Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne Bridge [2 of 2]
Description:See Kampville
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne Creek
Description:Once a splendid mill stream which rises in the southeastern part of Hickory Grove Township and flows east into St. Charles County, where it runs in a northeastern direction until it enters the Mississippi River in the northern part of the county. In the early documents the name appears as Dardonne Creek, Darden Creek, Dardenne River, or Dardonne River. In Houck's history of 1908, Dardene River is also found. Some authorities suggest that the name was derived from "Terre d' Inde," which they say means "Turkey Land." Since "Turkey Land" in French is "Terre des Dindons," the above explanation is not plausible. A better explanation is that the name was borrowed from the Dardenne family, early pioneers in the Mississippi Valley. "A Touissant Dardenne from Montreal, Canada, married Marie Francoise Lever, 'veuve de feu Michal Vieu,' at St. Anne de Fort Chartres, November 21, 1747. One of these Dardennes may have first camped and hunted on this creek and thus given it his name." One of the earliest settlers on the Dardenne was Jean Baptiste Blondeau, who was also found on the Perruque. (Wetmore; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 97; COUNTY MAP 1908; Hevenor, ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Mrs. George Luppold; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne Island
Description:In the Mississippi River, off the southwestern part of Portage des Sioux Township. It was named for the creek. (RED BOOK 1913, 453b; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne Lake
Description:A lake on Dardenne Island for which it was named. The lake is probably filled now. (Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne Prairie
Description:A prairie region which begins at St. Peters and extends north of Dardenne Creek, almost to Perrugue Creek. It was so named for the stream. (Bryan & Rose, 94; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 151; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne Presbyterian Church
Description:The first Presbyterian Church established west of St. Louis and located in the central part of Dardenne Township. It was organized by Reverend Charles S. Robinson, at the home of Mr. John Naylor, on Dardenne Prairie, in 1818 or 1819. The first church was built in 1823. It was so named either for Dardenne Prairie or for Dardenne Creek, but probably for the former since it was on the prairie. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 9, 11-12; Bryan & Rose, 191; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 465; Guy Motley; Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne River
Description:See Dardenne Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Dardenne Township. It was named for the Dardenne family. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardenne Township
Description:Bordered on the east by St. Charles Township, on the south by the Missouri River, on the southwest by Femme Osage Township, on the west by Callaway Township, on the northwest by Cuivre Township, and on the north by the Mississippi River. It was doubtless organized in 1818 when the county reached its present size. It was named for the stream. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12, 14; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 126-127; Eaton, 58; Hevenor, ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardonne Creek
Description:See Dardenne Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dardonne River
Description:See Dardenne Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dartmound
Description:A town once platted along the Missouri River, in the southern part of Femme Osage Township, one mile west of Augusta. Julius and Conrad Mallinckrodt, from Westphalia, Germany, platted and laid off the town in 1837 and named it for their native section in Germany. Wetmore gives the more correct and evidently earlier spelling Dortmund, that of an important German city in Westphalia. The later Americanized form is obviously the product of folk-etymology. Since the Missouri River changed its course and left the place without a waterfront, the town never materialized. (Wetmore; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 41; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 236-37; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Defiance
Description:A village in the southwestern part of Femme Osage Township. It has had a post office since 1895 and was so named by Robert Lee Fulkerson because the people there were angry with Harve Matson, who promoted the town of Matson (q.v.). (Postal Guide; COM. ATLAS, 229; B.H. Jolly; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Defiance School
Description:See Walnut Grove School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Denny's Mill
Description:An early water mill on Dardenne Creek near the present town of St. Peters. It was named for Charles Denny, who built the mill. He is said to have been a native of Germany, in spite of his English name, and to have settled within the limits of Missouri while the region still belonged to Spain. He was an herb doctor, a dentist, a miller, etc. When he became tired of milling, he erected a distillery; but as this did not pay well, he returned to milling. Finally, Mr. Denny sold his mill and moved to the Fever lead mines, where he was unfortunate and lost all his property. He then returned to the Dardenne; and with the assistance of his old neighbors, repurchased the mill. (Bryan & Rose, 146; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116, 452; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dibbit's Mill
Description:Nothing can be ascertained about this mill. It may possibly be confused with Denny's Mill (q.v.). (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:District of St. Charles [1 of 2]
Description:See St. Charles County
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:District of St. Charles [2 of 2]
Description:This district was framed under the Spaniards in 1769. It included all the inhabited country between the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, extending to the north indefinitely, and to the Pacific on the west. It became St. Charles County in 1813. The town of St. Charles was founded on the northern bank of the Missouri River in 1769 by Blanchette surnamed "Le Chasseur." The Spaniards acquired the territory from the French by secret treaty in 1762 (See Upper Louisiana), and in 1769 divided it into five districts; District of St. Genevieve (1735); District of St. Louis (1764); District of St. Charles (1769). In the two remaining districts, that of Cape Girardeau and New Madrid, the posts were established later, the first in 1794, the latter in 1787. This appears a plausible explanation of the name as applied to this part of Missouri. There was a fort also that bore the name of Charles, established by a Spanish officer one year earlier, 1768, on the edge of this district. Louis St. Ange de Belle Rive, (written also Bellerive), a distinguished French officer, took command of the post of St. Louis in 1765. During his command, Captain Francisco Rios, a Spanish officer, in 1768, attempted to take possession of Upper Louisiana (q.v.) without displacing St. Ange. Captain Rios erected a fort on a high bluff on the south side of the Missouri River about fourteen miles north of St. Louis, and this he named "Fort Prince Charles." The fort was afterwards occupied by General James Wilkerson in the year 1805 with U.S. troops. Captain Rios seems to have attempted to exercise no civil authority. He returned to New Orleans in 1769. Charles III was on the throne at this time. His son became Charles IV in 1788. The replacement of Charles by St. Charles is not to be regarded as an attempt to canonize an all too human monarch. It was rather a gesture of humility, by which the king's name was replaced by that of his patron saint, just as the city founded in 1764 was named, not, as is often stated for the reigning monarch, Louis XV, who was certainly anything but a saint, but for the good St. Louis, i.e. Louis IX. In the same spirit Peter the Great of Russia named his new capital St. Petersburg, and Joseph Robidoux in 1843 named the new metropolis of Buchanan County St. Joseph, --in both cases not for themselves but for their patron saints, or "name" saints. Those who do not understand the Catholic attitude toward their saints often mistake for egotism what was at least intended for piety and reverence. It is true that St. Charles is hard to identify. There was certainly no saint among all the host of monarchs named Charles,--French, Spanish, German, English, and others, in spite of certain unsuccessful attempts to canonize the unfortunate Charles I of England. But there have been a few acknowledged saints who have borne the name, among whom perhaps the most important, and the one most likely to have been venerated by the Spanish officers of Charles III and IV, was St. Charles Borromeo (1538-1584), Archbishop of Milan, Papal Secretary of State under Pius IV, and one of the chief factors in the Catholic Counter-Reformation (see the Catholic Encyclopedia). (Davis and Durrie, 47, 186; Shepard, 14, 49; Rozier, 55, 56, 96, 105, 142, 145, 146, 170, 179, 193, 223; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Doeblin School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Callaway Township. No explanation for the name has yet been found. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dog Prairie
Description:A prairie region in the northeastern part of St. Charles County. It was early known as White's Prairie in honor of Captain James White (q.v. White's Fort) of Ohio, who was the first white settler here; and during the Indian War he buiilt a fort which also bore his name. Some years after this, a Mr. Comegris built a mill on the prairie, and the name was subsequently changed to Comegris' Prairie. According to Bryan & Rose, it retained this name until 1830, when it received the name of Dog Prairie which it has since borne, from a celebrated dog fight, which took place at the mill. This explanation is obviously apocryphal, or at least the dog fight, however celebrated, must have taken place long before 1830; for the earliest name of all is the French Prairie du Chien, given in the LEWIS and CLARK JOURNALS in 1804, and Dog Prairie is obviously an English translation of this. The French name probably referred to the prairie dog, called by the French "petit chien," or to the kit fox, known as "chien de prairie" (see McDermott). Cf. Prairie du Chien in Wisconsin. (Thwaites II, 7; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Bryan & Rose, 526; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dolbow
Description:A station in the northern part of Cuivre Township, near Horse Shoe Lake. It was probably named for a section boss on the railroad. (COM. ATLAS, 229; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dortmund
Description:See Dartmound
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dresser Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River, north of Portage des Sioux Township. It was so named for Thomas Dresser, who was a late owner of the island. It has also formerly been known as Piasa or Piaso Island, Grand Island, and Chouteau Island. The name Piasa or Piaso was given because it is opposite Piasa Bluff, near the town of Piasa in Illinois. It has been called Grand Island as a name descriptive of its size. The name Chouteau Island was applied because it once belonged to August Chouteau. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; RED BOOK 1913, 452b; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Lake
Description:A former lake in the northwest part of Dardenne Township. The name was evidently descriptive, as there is only a low place here now. The former lake bed is traversed by a road. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dugdell School
Description:A rural school six miles northeast of St. Charles. It is no longer in existence, at least under this name. The source of the name has not been discovered. (PORT. & BIOG. REC., 124)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dyer School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Cuivre Township. It was so named for the Dyer family. It is also known as the Star of the Prairie School, a euphonious name. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eagle Fork
Description:A fork of the Cuivre River. It was probably so named for the bird. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 142; Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:El Camino Real
Description:See King's Highway
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ellis Island
Description:A large island off the northeast coast of Portage des Sioux Township, in the Mississippi River. The source of the name has not been discovered. (HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES 1940)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elm Point
Description:A village in the central part of St. Charles Township, three miles northwest of St. Charles. There was a post office here in 1890 and 1891. It was so named for its elm trees. It appears in the COUNTY ATLAS as Elm Points. (Postal Guide; Campbell, 488; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 9; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elm Point School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of St. Charles Township. The name is descriptive because elm trees form a point here. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elm Points
Description:See Elm Point
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Emanuel Evangelical Church
Description:A church at Weldon Springs in the northeastern part of Dardenne Township. It was organized in 1866. The name is a Biblical name for Christ (Mat. 1:23). The spelling Immanuel is closer to the original Hebrew and Emmanuel to the Greek; but Luther's translation uses Emanuel, with a single m, which is accordingly often preferred by German churches. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 465; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Miss Kathryn Linnemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Emmanuel's Lutheran School
Description:A school in St. Charles. Cf. above. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 405; Miss Kathryn Linnemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Emmaus Grove
Description:Near Evangelical Emmaus Home (q.v.), from which it obviously got its name. (ST. C. C-M, August 20, 1924)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Emmaus Home
Description:See Evangelical Emmaus Home
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Enon
Description:A place near Gilmore. A Bible name (cf. below), but the reason for its adoption has not been learned. (ST. C. C-M, September 12, 1900)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Evangelical Emmaus Home
Description:An institution for the treatment of epileptics at St. Charles. The original home was founded at Marthasville in 1892, but in 1901 it was divided and part of the institution was taken to St. Charles. It is also known as Emmaus Home. Emmaus was a village near Jerusalem where Christ appeared to two of his disciples after the Resurrection (LU. 24:13). (ST. C. C-M, December 1, 1926; EMMAUS MESSENGER, March, 1941)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Evangelical Lutheran Immanuel Church
Description:A church at Sixth and Jefferson Streets, St. Charles. Originally the German Protestants worshipped together in a stone church two miles west of St. Charles. Soon the Lutherans withdrew, united with other Lutherans below St. Charles, and laid the foundation for a Lutheran church in 1848. For a time the congregation used the First Presbyterian Church on Sunday afternoons, but in 1849 the group dedicated its own church. The name is Biblical; cf. Emanuel, above. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 349-50; Miss Kathryn Linnemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Factory Branch
Description:A small stream in the eastern part of St. Charles Township, which flows through the upper part of the township. Sometime about 1769 or 1770 a young, adventurous hunter named Louis Blanchette built a house and established a trading post along the stream now known as Factory Branch. "Factory" here preserves the earlier French "factorie" or "factorerie." Blanchette was a French- Canadian, whom the Indians called Le Chasseur, the hunter. At that time the creek was known as Blanchette Creek or Blanchette's Creek in his honor. Next it was named Redmond (or Redmon) Branch for John W. Redmon, a wealthy businessman. His father was George W. Redmon, who emigrated to St. Charles County from Clark County, Kentucky, in 1828, and was one of the citizens who, in conjunction with Nathan Boone, took the first steps toward incorporating the town of St. Charles, and laying the commons, which were leased for a period of 999 years. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Barns, 170; Williams N.E. Missouri I, 553; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fairmount School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of St. Charles Township. The name is descriptive of a knoll there. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Femme Osage
Description:A postal village in the center part of Femme Osage Township, on a site settled by Germans in 1831. The post office was established by 1831, was not listed in 1837, was re-established by 1853, and was discontinued between 1904 and 1910. Oddly enough, the name was formerly often written Femme Osage, although the circumflex accent is quite without justification in French usage. It was named for Femme Osage Creek. (Green; Wetmore; Hayward; Goodwin; Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 44; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Femme Osage Baptist Church
Description:A church once located on Femme Osage Creek. It was founded previous to 1817 and was the first meeting place of the Missouri Association in 1818. It has long ceased to exist. Cf. above. (Duncan, 77, 84; Rev. C.C. Ellis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Femme Osage Creek
Description:A creek that rises in southeastern Warren County, near the headwaters of the Dardenne and Perruque, and flows east through Femme Osage Township in St. Charles County, to empty into the Missouri River near Hamburg. This is one of the oldest and most puzzling French names in the state. It puzzled the exploreres of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, who passed its mouth on May 23, 1904, and they attempted to translate the French name in various ways, none of which seemed to have survived them. Clark writes (I. 27); "...to the mouth of a Creek on the Stbd. Side called Osage Womans R, about 30 yds. Wide, opposite a large Island and Settlement. On this creek 30 or 40 famlys are Settled." Floyd calls it "the wife of Osage River;" and Ordway (Quaife's ed., p. 80) says "passed the wife or faim of the Hoozaw River." For Ordway's spelling "Hoozaw" for Osage, cf. Whosau Trace, below. A fuller description of the stream is given by Lewis in his "Summary View of Rivers and Creeks" (VI. 30): "at the distance of nine miles higher up" (i.e., above Bonhomme Creek), "we pass the mouth of the OSAGE WOMAN'S river, which discharges itself on the north side; it is thirty yards wide at it's entrance, heads with two small streams which discharge themselves into the Mississippi a small distance from the mouth of the Illinois River, is navigable for perogues some miles during the spring season, and waters a fertile well timbered country inhabited by about fifty American families. This part of the country is generally called Boon's settlement, having derived its name from its first inhabitant Colo. Daniel Boon, a gentleman well known in the early settlement of the state of Kentucky." Cf. the note by the editor Thwaites: (I. 27) "The American settlement referred to...was the Kentucky colony recently founded on Femme Osage River, about six miles above its mouth; among these settlers was Daniel Boone, who in 1798 had obtained a grant of land there from the Spanish authorities, whereon he resided until 1804. His death occurred at Feeme Osage, on September 26, 1820." The original French name must, of course, have been much older than Lewis and Clark, although no earlier published example has been found. Its ultimate origin is, indeed, lost beyond recall. There have, of course, been imaginative attempts to supply an explanation, such as that the stream was named from the finding in it of the body of a drowned Osage squaw, or else that the French so named it because they saw an Indian woman there when they first reached its banks. Similar stories have been invented to explain the similar and equally early French names Bon Homme Creek and Bonne Femme Creek, for a nearby stream which also empties into the Missouri River. Very probably all three names were French translations of the original Indian appellations. (L&C, ed. Thwaites; Ordway JOURNAL, ed. Quaife; EWT. ed. Thwaites; Conard II, 422; Barns, 173; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 681; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Miss Leech's thesis; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Femme Osage District
Description:An early territorial region, so named for the stream within its boundaries. June 11, 1800, Delassus, Lieutenant Governor, appointed Colonel Daniel Boone commandant, or syndic, of this district. Colonel Boone satisfactorily performed both civil and military duties until the transfer of the region to the United States in 1804. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 96; Kirk Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Femme Osage Prairie
Description:A prairie region in the northwestern part of Femme Osage Township. It was named for the creek. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 27; Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Femme Osage River
Description:See Femme Osage Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Femme Osage Township
Description:The southernmost township in the county, bordered by the Missouri River on the south and east, Warren County on the west, Callaway Township on the north, and Dardenne Township on the northeast. It was doubtless organized in 1818 when the county was reduced to its present size. It was named for the creek that runs through it. The name is misspelled Pomme Osage in Goodwin. (Goodwin; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Davis & Durrie, 433; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 126-7; Hevenor, ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ferry Road
Description:A road which branched from the Marthasville Road seventeen miles southwest of St. Charles, passed through Mechanicsville and New Melle and then southwest to the county line, and thus traversed a distance of thirteen miles. It was named for Howell's Ferry. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 143; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fifth Street Methodist Church
Description:At Fifth Street in St. Charles. Named for its location. Originally it belonged to the Lutherans, who used to call it the Buck Church. This perhaps was the American pronunciation of Bock, for Bock beer, applied humorously because the Germans were fond of this well-known brand usually drunk in the springtime. (Rev. R.M. Hardaway)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Firma
Description:A station on the Burlington Railroad in the northern part of Cuivre Township, southeast of Dolbow. It is said to have been named for a railroad man. (COM. ATLAS, 227; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Firma School
Description:See Maple Lake School
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:First Presbyterian Church
Description:A Southern Presbyterian Church on Madison Street in St. Charles. It was organized in 1818, and was the first Presbyterian church in St. Charles. When the denomination divided into the Southern and Northern branches, known respectively as U.S. and U.S.A., it went with the Southern branch, but kept its old name. The Northern sympathizers separated and formed the Jefferson Street Presbyterian Church (q.v.). (MHR XXX; Guy Motley; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fish Slough
Description:A tributary of Cuivre River, in the northeastern part of Cuivre Township. Cf. above. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 32; B.H. Jolly; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fish Slough School
Description:See Baldwin School
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Flint Hill
Description:A town in the central part of Cuivre Township, established by Taliaferro P. Grantham in 1836 or 1838. He settled in the county about 1835 and not long afterward built a house in the new town and kept it as a store. When the war with Mexico began, he enlisted and was commissioned a Capatain of volunteers. Mr. Grantham named the village for Flint Hill, Rappahannock County, Virginia, which is not far from the famous Luray Cavern. A number of the early settlers were from Virginia and found here a flint hill that remined them of their original home. (Goodwin; Bryan & Rose, 153; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 499; Eaton; B.H. Jolly; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Foristell
Description:A town in the western part of Cuivre Township. A very early town called Mellville, or Millville, on a site 3/4 mile from the present Foristell, seems to have been the nucleus for the latter town. No reason as to why Mellville, or Millville, was chosen has been found, although the Millville in Ray County (see Miss Atcheson's thesis) may account for the change to Foristell. Millville is a stock name for American towns, being found in at least fifteen other states. A third name, that of Snow Hill, must be considered in connection with this name. For many years, even long after Foristell was established as a town on its present site, the name Snow Hill was applied to the post office and was doubtless a name borrowed from some other place as it is a place-name found in five other states. Considerable confusion exists in the various authorities as to the time when Foristell was laid out as the dates 1836, 1856, and 1857 are all found. Since old settlers state that Foristell received its present name and location shortly before the Civil War and since some authorities list 1856 or 1857 as the date when the town was laid out by the owner, J.A. Davis, we may assume that it had its beginning as a town name about that time. However, the post office was still known as Snow Hill until 1876 or 1877, when it was changed on account of the confusion said to be caused by another post office of the same name. However, the old name of Mellville, or Millville, was still sometimes used for the town as late as 1875. Mr. Davis named the place in honor of Pierre Foristell, an honored citizen of the community who was born in Ireland and died in 1893. (Postal Guide; Campbell, 488, 490; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12, 14; 73; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 504; Eaton, 58; Mrs. P.O. Foristell; Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fork Callaway
Description:See Callaway Fork Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fort Duquette
Description:A mysterious, round, stone building which formerly stood on a hill overlooking St. Charles. The original purpose of this structure is largely a matter of conjecture. Some persons assume that it was used for a mill, but others think that it was intended for a fort. According to one authority, the square on which it stood was private property until it was granted to Duquette in 1796; but according to Williams, Duquette had the building erected about 1785. The structure, which was three stories high, had a north and a south entrance, portholes around the entire building, and an opening of 3 x 4 ft. on the third floor overlooking the Missouri River, must have required several years for its construction on account of its size and the weight of its stones. The place, which is now generally known as Fort Duquette, is so named for its builder, Francis Duquette, a French-Canadian, who fostered and sustained the Catholic Church in St. Charles. He was born in 1774 and died in 1816. The building was also formerly known as Round Fort, Old Round Tower, and Round Tower for its shape; as Old Stone Mill for its stone construction; and as Old Spanish Tower in honor of the Spanish regime. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 11; Bryan & Rose, 125, 435; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 318-19; Williams N.E. Missouri I, 559; MHR, July, 1924, 152-3; ST. C. C-M, February 3, 1915; Benjamin Emmons; Miss Kathryn Linnemann; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Francis Howell Consolidated School
Description:A rural school which was formerly in the southern part of Dardenne Township, but now is in the southwestern part of St. Charles Township. This change in location was occasioned by the building of the T.N.T. plant near Weldon Springs. It was named in honor of Francis Howell (see Howell Institute), an early settler and promoter of education. (83rd REPORT; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Franklin School
Description:A school at 716 N. Third Street, St. Charles. The building came into possession of the board of education in 1870. Doubtless named for Benjamin Franklin. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 226; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Franklin Street Baptist Church
Description:A religious institution so named for its position on Franklin Street in St. Charles. It was organized February 10, 1871, with ten members. It is no longer in existence. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 347; Rev. C.C. Ellis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Freedon School
Description:See Friedens School
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:French Town
Description:See Frenchtown
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:French Trail
Description:An early road which led from St. Charles to old Charrette. It was so named because it was used by the early French settlers. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Frenchtown
Description:A section of St. Charles, in the northern part of the present town. It was so named because it was formerly inhabited by French residents. The architecture of the house is distinctively French. The name is also found as French Town. (Miss Kathryn Linnemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Frieden Gemeinde
Description:A German Evangelical Church in the southwestern part of St. Charles Township, about three miles from St. Charles. It was organized in 1836, and has ever since been known as "Frieden Gemeinde," which means "Congregation of Peace." The congregation formerly comprised many families who resided in the city; but in 1868 the city members organized a separate church which allied itself with the German Evangelical Synod of the West, to which the mother church also belonged. The new church was known as St. John's Church (q.v.). The church is also known as Friedens Church. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 347; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Miss Kathryn Linnemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Friedens Church
Description:See Frieden Gemeinde
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Friedens School
Description:A rural school, probably in the southern part of St. Charles Township. It is so named for Friedens Church. It seems to be "Freedom School" on the ROAD MAP, and if the schools are the same, the latter term is an obvious example of folk etymology. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gallatin
Description:Listed as a St. Charles County post office by Wetmore in 1837, doubtless by mistake. There is a town named Gallatin in Daviess County in northwestern Missouri, laid out in 1837 as the county seat and named for the famous financier, Albert Gallatin, who served in the cabinets of Jefferson and Madison. See Mrs. Ewing's thesis. (Wetmore; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:German Evangelical Protestant St. Paul's Church
Description:A church between Fourth and Fifth Streets and Washington and Monroe Streets, in St. Charles. It is now a Methodist Church since the building was sold to the Methodist congregation. It was named for St. Paul, the Apostle. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 50; Miss Kathruyn Linnemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:German Methodist Church of St. Charles
Description:A church on Fourth Street, St. Charles. It was organized in 1847 by Rev. F. Horstman with a membership of sixteen. A church was built in 1849, and a parsonage was erected in 1850. In 1869 a larger church was constructed. The name is descriptive of the German sermons and German congregation, as above. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 347; Rev. R.M. Hardaway)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gillet's Bridge
Description:An early bridge, probably not far from Yarnell's Lane, so named for Benons Gillet, who often passed over it. (MHR XXVIII, 13)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gilmore
Description:A town in the southeastern part of Cuivre Township. The post office was established here by 1886. It was named by John Ira Blair, of New Jersey, in honor of Thomas Gilmore (or Gillmore), a gunsmith who settled in Cuivre Township during the last half of the 18th or early part of the 19th centuries. Mr. Gilmore was one of a company who marched against the British at Rock Island, and he met death at the hands of the Indians. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Eaton, 58; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Good Man's Island
Description:See Bon Homme Island
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Goose Island
Description:In the Missouri River, off the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township. The island, which no longer exists, was probably so named for the wild geese that come there. (RED BOOK 1912-14, 452b; Benjamin Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grafton Landing
Description:A boat landing in the northern part of Portage des Sioux Township, on the Mississippi River, northeast of Marais Becket. It was so named for Grafton, Illinois, which is just across the river. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 21; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grand Island
Description:See Dresser Island
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Green Island
Description:An island off the southeastern part of Portage des Sioux Township, in the mouth of the Missouri River. It is so named for James Green, an early settler. Cf. Green's Bottom. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Green's Bottom
Description:A lowland, probably in the southwestern part of St. Charles Township. It was doubtless so named in honor of James Green, who came here as its first settler in 1799 after he had received a Spanish grant for 800 arpents of land. He was a farmer and frequently ran for office, undisturbed by his consistent defeats. (Bryan & Rose, 151; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 132, 453)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Griffeth's Flouring Mill
Description:The oldest flour mill in St. Charles. It was built in 1838 by George Collier. Daniel Griffeth, for whom it was named, was its last owner. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 334, Benjamin Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Griminal Island
Description:A small island in the Mississippi River, southeast of Perruque Island. The origin of the name could not be ascertained. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 32)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grothe School
Description:See Cannon School
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hall Ferry
Description:See Musick's Ferry
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hamburg
Description:A postal village in the southern part of Dardenne Township, settled by Germans, who named it for Hamburg, Germany, the commercial center of northern Europe. The town, which is also spelled Hamburgh, was plotted and laid out in 1841 by Henry Schneider. The post office was established by 1853. (Hayward; Postal Guide; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 463; Eaton; INT. ENCYC.; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hamburgh
Description:See Hamburg
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hammell's Prairie
Description:A prairie region in the east-central part of Dardenne Township, about sixteen miles west of St. Charles. It was named in honor of its first settler, Francis Hammell, who came here in the spring of 1800. He was said to be the first and only settler at that time between St. Charles and Charrette in Warren County. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hancock's Bottom
Description:A lowland in the southern part of Charrette Township, near Marthasville, and in the southwestern portion of Femme Osage Township, near Augusta. It was settled by William and Benjamin Hancock and named for them. William Hancock was a pioneer of both Kentucky and Missouri and came to what is now Warren County about 1798. He was a jovial man. He and Anthony Wyatt and David Darst are said to have made a trip to a Mississippi River town where they decided to earn a little extra money. They showed David Darst a wild man of the forest and realized a tidy compensation for their efforts. Wyatt and Hancock were both candidates for the Legislature, but the election resulted in a tie. A second ballot was taken, but still the tie remained. Hancock withdrew, and Wyatt accepted the office. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 143, 235, 959, 1030; COUNTY MAP 1908; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 660; WARRENTON BANNER, Dec. 18, 1914, 1; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad
Description:See Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Happy Glen School
Description:An elementary school in the south-central part of Femme Osage Township. Although it is formally named Happy Glen School, a pleasing name for the location, it is also called Schluersburg School for the town. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Harvester
Description:A town in the southwestern part of St. Charles Township. The post office was established by 1886 to take the place of Six Mile House, a post office which had been there since 1876 or earlier. Harvester was so named by Colonel Benj. Emmons in 1881 because of the great wheat harvests in the section. It was formerly called Six Mile House because it was a favorite stopping place for travellers located six miles from St. Charles. (Postal Guide; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hayden School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Cuivre Township. The name was given in honor of a family. It is also called Oak Grove School, a descriptive name. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hay's Mill
Description:A water mill on Femme Osage Creek. It was probably so named for John B. Hays, who was born in St. Charles County in 1836 and was a farmer and miller, or for his father, Daniel Hays, who was also a miller. In 1862 John B. Hays enlisted in Captain Johnson's Company under Captain Dorsey, a Confederate. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116, 249; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Grove Christian Church
Description:A church at Foristell, which was organized by Reverend Robert Milns in October, 1847. It was probably named for its location. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 505)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Grove School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Femme Osage Township. The name is descriptive. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hoeberville
Description:A town in the northwestern part of Cuivre Township, named in honor of Frank G. Hoeber, its first postmaster and merchant. The post office here was established by 1886 and discontinued by 1915. (Postal Guide; Eaton; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hoffman's Mill
Description:An early water mill on the Dardenne. It was probably named for its owner. Several Hoffmans settled here in the first years of the 19th century, George Hoffman, Sr., George Hoffman, Jr., and Peter Hoffman. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116, MHR, July, 1933)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hog Island
Description:An island off the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township, in the Missouri River. It was cut off from the river by St. Louis County. The conjecture has been made that it was so called because a man named Keen (or Keene) "hogged" it,--i.e., appropriated it by "squatting" there. This seems, however, a speculative and doubtful explanation. More probably it was named for the animal, possibly applied originally in the sense of the French "cochon" or "cochon de bois," which according to McDermott was used for the opossum. Cf. "chien," dog, for the prairie dog, and "boeuf," beef, or cow, for the buffalo. (RED BOOK 1913, 452b; HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES 1940; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hoozaw River
Description:See Femme Osage Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Horse Shoe Lake
Description:See Horseshoe Lake
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Horse Shoe Lake Station
Description:A railroad stop in the northeastern part of Cuivre Township, northeast of Horse Shoe Lake, for which it is named. (SCHROWANG ROAD MAP; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Horseshoe Lake
Description:A large lake in the northeastern part of Cuivre Township, named for its shape. The name also appears as Horse Shoe Lake. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 32; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Howell
Description:A town in the extreme southern part of Dardenne Township, in the region now occupied by the T.N.T. Plant. It was named in honor of Francis Howell, a pioneer and founder of Howell Institute (q.v.). It was formerly known as Mechanicsville, a name which resembles such names as Farmersville in Ralls County, and probably signified that the town was started by, or was especially proud of, its mechanical workmen. The post office named Mechanicsville appeared by 1876 and was changed to Howell in 1902 and discontinued between 1915 and 1918. (Postal Guide; Eaton; ST. CH. C-M, Jan. 13, 1915; Mrs. Pierre Foristell; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Howell Institute
Description:A non-sectarian school at the former Mechanicsville. It was named for Francis Howell, who came to Missouri about 1797 and to St. Charles County about 1800, and later helped found the institute. When he died in 1843, he left a fund for the school. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 462; Williams N.E. MISSOURI, 586-7; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Howell Island
Description:An island off the southern part of Dardenne Township, named for Thomas or John H. Howell, early settlers. (HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES 1940; Benj. Emmons; Kirk Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Howell's Ferry
Description:A former ferry in the southern part of Dardenne Township, named for a Howell, perhaps Thomas or John H. Howell, pioneer settlers. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 143; EMMONS PLAT; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Howell's Ferry Road
Description:A road which ran from Flint Hill to Howell's Ferry; named for its southern terminus. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 143; Mrs. Pierre Foristell; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Howell's Prairie
Description:A prairie region in the northwestern part of Dardenne Township, fifteen miles west of St. Charles. It has been known as Howell's Prairie ever since Francis Howell settled here in 1797. Here he built the third mill in the county, a band mill, and later erected a cog mill. He died in 1843 at the age of 73. His home was the meeting place for militia drill and public functions. (Bryan & Rose, 154-5; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 455; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 587; Eaton; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Mrs. P.O. Foristell)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Immaculate Conception Church
Description:A Catholic Church in Cuivre Township. It was organized in 1874 and named for the Catholic doctrine. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 506; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Immanuel Lutheran Church
Description:A church at Wentzville. It was founded in 1874. For its name cf. above and Emanuel Evangelical Church. (ST. C. C-M, Sept. 10, 1924)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Independence School
Description:A rural school in District No. 54. The name is idealistic. (B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Camp Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the northeastern part of Warren County and flows into Big Creek in the northwestern part of St. Charles County. It is named for a former Indian camp. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 131; Mrs. P.O. Foristell)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Camp Creek
Description:A large stream which rises in the eastern part of Elkhorn Township and runs north and east into Hickory Grove Township, east into St. Charles, and then into Lincoln County, emptying into the Cuivre River. During 1810 and for several years following, many settlers came to what is now Warren County. At this time Nathan Clever and James Dickson settled on this creek about five miles northeast of Wright City. The stream is also known as Indian Creek, Camp Creek, or Camp Branch. All names are given for the Indian camp which was once along the creek. (Campbell, 626; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 10; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 959; COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; COUNTY MAP 1908; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 661; Hevenor, LINCOLN COUNTY John Mason; Forrest W. Hughes; W. Schmidt; William Hollenbeck)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Iowa Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River, off the western part of Portage des Sioux Township. No explantion for the name has been found in any record. Possibly it was connected with the Iowa tribe of Indians, who occasionally descended the river from their home farther north. Cf. Kickapoo Island. (HIGHWAY MAP, St. Charles, 1940)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Island No. 40
Description:A very small island, north of Perruque Island in the Mississippi River. It was probably so named as the fortieth island in the river above a certain point, but the point of reference used has not been ascertained. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Isle au Bon Homme
Description:See Bon Homme Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Janis Park
Description:See Charlesworth Farm. (St. Charles)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jefferson School
Description:A school at Jefferson and Fourth Streets, St. Charles. It was erected in 1866 and doubtless so named for the location. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 226; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jefferson Street Presbyterian Church
Description:A church on Jefferson Street, St. Charles, so named for its location. It was probably established about 1860. It was an offshoot from the First Presbyterian Church of St. Charles (q.v.). After the division in the Presbyterian Church at St. Charles during the Civil War, the First Presbyterian Church adhered to the Southern or U.S. Branch and kept the old name. The Jefferson Street Church separated and joined the Northern or U.S.A. branch. (Guy Motley; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jonathan Bryan's Mill
Description:The first water-mill west of the Mississippi and the first mill in St. Charles County, located on a small stream which empties into Femme Osage Creek, in the southern part of Femme Osage Township, one mile from Nathan Boone's home. For days before the mill was ready for use, the creek bottom was filled with hungry men who were patiently waiting for the mill to be completed so that they might return home with a supply of meal for the daily bread. This one-story frame mill was built in 1801 and had a daily capacity of 6-10 bushels. At first it would grind only corn which had to be sifted after it was ground as there were no bolts or gearing. Bryan & Rose tell us aptly that "the stones were carried from Kentucky on horseback, a spring branch supplied the water power, and an old musket barrel formed the sluice or water race." The mill was named for its owner, Jonathan Bryan, who moved his family to Missouri in a keel-boat and landed at the mouth of the Femme Osage on Christmas day of that year. Although he first settled in Lincoln County near the present site of Cap-au-Gris, the unhealthful surroundings and the danger of Indian attacks caused him to move to Femme Osage Creek shortly afterward. (Bryan & Rose, 133; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116, 124, 126; Township Plats I)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Josephsville
Description:See Josephville
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Josephville
Description:The post office was established in 1886 and discontinued by 1910. Eaton, who misspells the name as Josephsville, says it was named for Joseph Wilmer, its first postmaster; but Mr. Emmons and Mr. Gray remember his surname as Wilmes. (Postal Guide; Eaton; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Josephville School
Description:An elementary school in the central part of Cuivre Township. Named for the town. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Judgment Tree
Description:An ancient elm tree in the southwestern part of Femme Osage Township, near a stone house which Nathan Boone built in the early part of the 19th century. Under this tree, Daniel Boone sat as the judge or syndic appointed by the Spanish governor to settle disputes among his neighbors. The tree still lives in a good state of preservation. (SHOW ME, 61; ST. C. C-M, Jan. 6, 1926; IBID., Feb. 3, 1926; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kampville
Description:A village in the northeastern part of Dardenne Township, where the Dardenne empties into the Mississippi River. It was also the probable location of Dardenne, a post office listed by Green in 1831, and doubtless named for Dardenne Bridge. Kampville is named for the Kamp family. (Green; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kampville School
Description:An elementary school in the extreme northwestern part of St. Charles Township and named for the town. It was formerly known as Dardenne School for its location on the creek. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Katy Railroad
Description:See Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kepp's Lane
Description:A road about four miles from St. Charles, presumably named for its owner. (ST. C. C-M, Ap. 22, 1925)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:King's Commons
Description:In the north-central part of St. Charles Township, north of St. Charles. This was a royal domain, so named for the King of Spain. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12, 14; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:King's Domain
Description:A tract of land north of St. Charles. It is so named for the Spanish king. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kings Highway
Description:See King's Highway
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:King's Highway
Description:A road or street which runs through St. Charles past Lindenwood College. It continues as King's Highway through St. Louis and all the way down to New Madrid. The original Spanish name, El Camino Real, was conferred by Colonel George Morgan in honor of Charles IV, the reigning King of Spain (1788-1808). It is translated by the French as Le Chemin du Roi, or Rue Royale, and by the Americans as King's Highway, or King's Trace. It is also known as the Royal Road of the King's Domain, and as the Boschertown Road. The latter name is given for its terminus. The name is sometimes written Kings Highway. (Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 585; MHR, July, 1924; Mrs. P.O. Foristell; Kirk Emmons; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:King's Highway Baptist Church
Description:A church which was established in 1860 and named for its position on King's Highway in St. Charles. (Rev. C.C. Ellis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:King's Trace
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Klinger's Mill
Description:A mill in the center part of St. Charles Township, in the commons of St. Charles. It was named for its owner, George A. Klinger. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12, 62; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Klondike
Description:See Klondike Station and Becker.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Klondike Station
Description:A town in the southern part of Femme Osage Township. The post office was established here by 1899. The Pittsburg Glass Company mines great quantities of silica here for glass and sends deposits to Alton, Illinois. Mr. Emmons thinks the place was named for Klondike, Canada, because there is so much wealth in the silica that is mined here. His belief strengthened by the fact that the great rush to the Klondike district in northwestern Canada occurred just about the time the post office was established. Klondike Station is also known as Klondike. (Encyc. Brit., 14th ed.; COM. ATLAS, 229; Hevenor, ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Koontz' Fort
Description:See Coonz's Fort.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kountz' Fort
Description:See Coonz's Fort.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kraut Run
Description:A small stream near the northeastern part of Howell's Prairie. It was named sometime after May, 1805, by Captain James Callaway, eldest son of Flanders Callaway and Jemima Boone. Captain Callaway was born in Lafayette County, Kentucky, September 13, 1783. He served as deputy sheriff of St. Charles County for several years under Captain Murray, and in 1813 raised his first company of rangers for service against the Indians. He also organized other companies and was killed by the Indians at Prairie Fork on March 7, 1815. No reason for his selection of the name has been found. (Bryan & Rose 95-100)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kuhlmann's Grove
Description:A picnic ground four miles west of St. Charles on the Boone's Lick Road. It was formerly known as Cribbin's Grove. Both names were probably given for the owners. (ST. C. C-M, May 15, 1901)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:La Perruque
Description:See Peruque
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Creek
Description:A historic stream which flows into the southeastern part of Charrette Township from St. Charles County. It is misspelled Lick Creek on the 1908 map, but it has long been known as Lake Creek as proved by a letter written by Gottfried Duden in 1825. It is so named because high water sometimes forms lakes in the low places. (Campbell, 627; HIGHWAY MAP 1936; MHR XII, 258; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Island
Description:A historic island in the Mississippi River, opposite Alton, Illinois. It was formerly a famous dueling ground on account of its seclusion and its accessibility from Illinois, which forbade dueling. At that time, the laws of Missouri took no cognizance of the dueling habit and considered it to be an excellent way to settle disputes. In 1841 Abraham Lincoln was dissastisfied with the stand that James A. Shields, State Auditor of Illinois, had taken when he and some other executives demanded that state taxes be paid in some form of currency other than the practically worthless banknotes circulated at that time. Lincoln maintained that this was a means whereby certain state officials would save themselves from the financial troubles of their countrymen. Soon after the statement of the auditor, a caustic newspaper article, reported to have been written by an indignant country widow, attacked Shields. Letters followed which even offered marriage to a man so well able to weather the financial crisis of the time. Although Lincoln had written only the first articles, he accepted all the responsibility for authorship to protect two mischievous young women for their part in writing the later contributions. Shields was so angry that he challenged Lincoln to a duel. All efforts to talk the auditor out of his plans were of no avail. Finally, the two antagonists, accompanied by their seconds, set out for the fated Baylis Island across the river in Missouri. Since Lincoln had the choice of weapon, he suggested "cannon at fifty paces." This absurd proposal provoked laughter from the seconds, who succeeded in convincing the auditor of the humor of the situation and the absurdity of a duel over a practical joke. Shields relented and became a personal friend of Lincoln. On the way back to Alton, the future president covered a log with some clothes and laid it in a conspicuous place in the bottom of the boat. When the curious citizens of the town came to see what had been the outcome of the duel, they were met with the sight of what appeared to be the body of a man. Just then Lincoln dramatically dumped the log into the river. Originally known as Alton Island, for its former owner, Alton Easton, son of Rufus Eaton, founder of Alton, Illinois, and the first postmaster of St. Louis. When it came into the possession of Mrs. Baylis (or Baylass), it was then called Baylis (or Baylass) Island, the name it bore during its famouis dueling days. It is now owned by the House Loomis Ice and Transportation Company, and is named Lake Island for Alton Slough, (q.v.). (RED BOOK, 1912-14, 452b; ST. C. C-M, March 12, 1902; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake View Presbyterian Church
Description:A small congregation named for its location at Lake View School in the west-central part of Portage des Sioux Township. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Guy Motley; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake View School
Description:A rural school in the west-central part of Portage des Sioux Township. The name is descriptive of its position overlooking a lake. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lamotte Place
Description:A post office which existed from 1886 until at least 1894 in the northeastern part of Portage des Sioux Township. It was named for Captain Lamotte, a steamboat captain who, according to Mr. Emmons, was "another Colonel Mulberry Sellers." Captain Lamotte owned land in this section. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12, 16; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Las Pequenas Cuestas
Description:See St. Charles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lasouris
Description:An Indian village once located on the Mississippi River, in the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township. It was so named for an Indian chief and is evidently a French nickname which means the "Mouse." The HIST. ST. CHARLES spells the name Lassouris. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 10; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 262)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lassouris
Description:See Lasouris.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lauer Island
Description:See Lewveke Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lawveke Island
Description:See Lewveke Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Le Chemin du Roi
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Le Village des Cotes (Village of the Hills)
Description:See St. Charles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Le Village du Cote
Description:See St. Charles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lea Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Dardenne Township. The name is descriptive of its location. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.F. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Les Mamelles
Description:Two hills in the northeastern part of St. Charles Township, east of St. Charles, at the termination of the bluffs of the Missouri and the Mississippi. The early French settlers so named it for a fancy resemblance to "les mamelles," "the breasts." McDermott says that in the Mississippi Valley French the term "mamelle" was frequently used for hills that possessed a particular grouping and shape. The mamelles in St. Charles County are from 80 to 100 ft. high. The phonetic spelling "Mau Melles" is given in Williams. (Wetmore; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 553; McDermott)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Les Petites Cotes
Description:See St. Charles
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lewveke Island
Description:An island in the Missouri River off the southern part of Dardenne Township, near Howell Island. The name is also spelled Lawveke Island and Lauer Island. Although the patent was granted in 1902 for 22.24 acres of land, the island is now very large. Its owners recently paid $10,961.00 back taxes on the property. It was named for Anton Lewveke, of Clayton. (EMMONS PLAT; SCHROWANG ROAD MAP; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:L'Habitation
Description:A place down the Missouri River, near St. Charles. It also appears in its English form, "the Habitation." No reason has been found for the giving of the name, but the term means a farm, including the farm house and other buildings. A "habitation" was a smaller grant of land than was a "concession." (Evans or Mackay, Map; McDermott)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lincoln School
Description:A school at 625 South Sixth Street in St. Charles. It was probably named in honor of Abraham Lincoln, the famous president. Although the HIST. ST. CHARLES says the school is for negro children, it is said to be used for white pupils at present. The building was purchased shortly after 1870. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 226; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Linden Wood
Description:See Lindenwood College.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lindenwood College
Description:A girl's school situated on King's Highway in the western part of St. Charles. Sometime between 1827 and 1829, the college was established on 120 acres of land which Major George C. Sibley had recieved because he had paid a $20,000 bond-debt for a friend. The school operated until 1843 and closed for one year, to be reopened again. By 1835 it was firmly established, but did not grow until 1853. When Major Sibley and his wife, Mary Easton Sibley, were converted and joined the church, they decided to use the land for a Christian college for young women, and named the institution Linden Wood for its beautiful grove of Linden trees. In 1853 Major Sibley called the school Lindenwood Female College, at which time he offered the property to the Presbytery of St. Louis. The property was accepted and was placed under the control of fifteen directors appointed by the Presbytery. Although never a seminary in the ecclesiastical sense, the school is often called Lindenwood Seminary,--a term formerly of general application. Major George C. Sibley was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, April 1, 1782 and was educated at Fayetteville, North Carolina. In 1805 he came to Missouri and served as a clerk in the new Indian store or factory which the U.S. Government had established at Fort Osage. In 1810 he was made Indian Agent and was placed in charge of the post at that place. In 1816 he was appointed Justice of the Peace for a large district in Missouri, then known as Howard County. In 1820 he was appointed Postmaster at Fort Osage. He did much to cultivate friendship between the early settler and the Indians. In 1844 he was defeated for the State Senate by forty-nine votes, and in 1851 he helped organize the State Lunatic Asylum at Fulton. From 1851 until his death in 1863, he was a semi-invalid, but took an active part in the affairs of college and state. Major Sibley's wife was Mary Easton Sibley, a daughter of Rufus Easton of St. Louis, who was the first postmaster of that town and was one of the first United States Judges of the Territorial Court in Missouri. Mary Easton was born in 1800 and died in 1878. She attended Mrs. Tevis' Boarding School for Young Ladies, at Shelbyville, Kentucky; and at the age of fifteen, she married Major Sibley. She was vitally interested in the college and public affairs, and had the first piano west of the Mississippi. The school is called Lindenwood College for Young Ladies in HIST. ST. CHARLES. All forms for the name were given for the linden trees. One reference gives Major Sibley's name as George S. Sibley, but all college records consulted list it as George C. Sibley. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 71, 315; Williams N.E. MISSOURI I, 559; Templin, REMINISCENCES, 8, 49-50; THE SIBLEYS, 3-15; Guy Motley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lindenwood College for Young Ladies
Description:See Lindenwood College.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lindenwood Female College
Description:See Lindenwood College.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lindenwood Seminary
Description:See Lindenwood College.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Dardenne Creek
Description:A stream in the center part of Callaway Township. The name is descriptive of its small size. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 45; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Hills
Description:See St. Charles
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Lake
Description:In the northern part of Dardenne Township, so named for its small size. (SCHROWANG ROAD MAP; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little's Island
Description:A former island off the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township in the Missouri River near Machens. Mr. Emmons says the island was named for its owner, a Mr. Little of St. Louis. Mr. Gray states that there are still Littles living near Machens. (RED BOOK 1913, 452b; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Long Lake
Description:A slough- like lake in the northern part of Portage des Sioux Township, northeast of Marais Becket. The name is descriptive of its one and a half miles length. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 21; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Machens
Description:A postal town in the south-central part of Portage des Sioux Township. The post office was established in 1897. The town is probably named for Andrew Machens, Sr. (Postal Guide; Eaton; B.H. Jolly; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Machens School
Description:An elementary school in the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township. Mr. Jolly says it was named for a Machens family; however, there is a town in this section by the same name. It is also called Mertz School in honor of a Mertz family. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maple Grove School
Description:See Cannon School
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maple Lake
Description:A lake in the eastern part of Cuivre Township. It is so named for the trees. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 32; B.H. Jolly; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maple Lake School
Description:An elementary school in the northeastern part of Cuivre Township. The name is borrowed from Maple Lake, although the school is also called Firma School, from a railroad station that was formerly in the vicinity. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maple Lake Station
Description:A railroad station in the northeastern part of Cuivre Township, northeast of Maple Lake, for which it is named. (SCHROWANG ROAD MAP; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marais Becket
Description:A lake in the northwest part of Portage des Sioux Township. The name means "Becket Marsh," and was probably personal in origin. The French term "maraias," meaning marsh, swampy, or slough, is often misspelled "Marias" of "Maries" in this and the following names,---obviously under the influence of folk etymology. Cf. Maries County, originally Marais County (see Mr. Weber's thesis). But the original French pronunciation "ma're" is usually pretty well preserved in St. Charles County. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marais Boisen Lake
Description:A lake in the northwest part of Dardenne Township, between Dry Lake and Marais Rondeau Lake. The name is probably personal in origin. The spelling "Marias" is found in the COUNTY ATLAS (q.v. Marais Becket). Literally, the term "marais" means "swamp," but it is usually more properly rendered as "lake" or "pond." McDermott says, "In the central part of the Mississippi Valley "marais" was generally used for ox-bow lakes." (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 29; McDermott; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marais Croche
Description:A long crooked, marsh-like lake made of the former bed of two rivers, in the northern part of St. Charles Township. Its descriptive name means "crooked lake" rather than "crooked swamp." Peter Conoier, a Frenchman, was one of the early settlers on the lake. The name is sometimes spelled Marais Croche (q.v. Marais Becket). (Wetmore; Parker, 385; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Barns 173; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 305)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marais Rondeau Lake
Description:A lake in the northwestern part of Dardenne Township, so named for its round shape. The addition of "Lake" to the French name is superflous, for the French word "Rondeau" is a noun, here evidently used in the sense of a more or less circular body of water. This meaning of the word must have developed in Missouri French, for it is not given even in Littre's Dictionary, nor is it mentioned by McDermott. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 29, 32; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marais Temps Clair
Description:A former lake in the western half of Portage des Sioux Township. It takes its name from a Kickapoo Chief whose name was "Tempe Clair" or in English, "Fair Weather." The Kickapoo village where he lived here sometime in the eighteenth century, was almost depopulated by smallpox and soon afterward abandoned by the survivors. The lake is given the superflous name "Lake" in the HIST. ST. CHARLES (q.v. Marais Rondeau Lake). The spelling Marias Temps Clair or Claire is also found. (q.v. Marais Becket). (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Barns, 173; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 143; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marais Temps Clair Ditch
Description:A drainage ditch about three miles long, which drains the area which was once a part of Marais Temps Clair, in the northeastern part of St. Charles Township. It was so named for the lake. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 21; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marias Becket
Description:See Marais Becket.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marias Boisen Lake
Description:See Marais Boisen Lake.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marias Croche
Description:See Marais Croche.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marias Temps Clair
Description:See Marais Temps Clair.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marias Temps Clair Lake
Description:See Marais Temps Clair.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marthasville Road
Description:A road which branched from the Boone's Lick Road, about eight miles west of St. Charles, and ran thence southward and southwestward through Weldon Spring, Missouriton, and Augusta to Marthasville, a distance of about forty miles. It was so named for its terminus in Warren County. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 142-3; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mason Island
Description:In the Mississippi River, off the northwestern part of Portage des Sioux Township. The name is probably given for its owner. (HIGHWAY MAP ST. CHARLES 1940)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Matson
Description:A town in the southeastern part of Femme Osage Township. The post office here was established about 1895. It was named for an early settler, Abraham Matson, or some member of his family. He came to St. Charles County when he was a boy and married Miss Phoebe A. Coshow in 1839. Harve (probably Harvey) Matson, a son of Abraham Matson, was instrumental in promoting the town and incurred the hostility of some persons in the section who built another town about two miles northeast of Matson and called it Defiance, (q.v.) to show their anger. (Postal Guide; Eaton; B.H. Jolly; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mau melles
Description:See Les Mamelles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McCoy's Creek
Description:A stream which traverses the northwestern part of Cuivre Township. It is named for Daniel McCoy and John McCoy, two brothers who came to Missouri, or Upper Louisiana, in company with Henry Zumwaldt in 1797 and settled in this region. (Bryan & Rose, 174; COUNTY MAP 1940; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McCoy's Creek Church
Description:An early Baptist organization which was probably named for its location on McCoy's Creek. It no longer exists. (Duncan, 205; Rev. C.C. Ellis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McKinley School
Description:A school at 210 Howard Street in St. Charles. It was named for President William McKinley (1843-1901; President 1896-1901). (Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McPike's Island
Description:An island largely owned now by the government, lying northwest of Portage des Sioux Township. It was named for a Mr. McPike, presumably an early owner. (SCHROWANG ROAD MAP; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McSpaddin's Mill
Description:An early water mill on Callaway's Fork. The mill, which no longer exists, was probably named for a Mr. McSpaddin. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mechanicsville
Description:See Howell.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mellville
Description:See Foristell.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meridian School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Callaway Township, in the extreme western part of the county. The district extends into Warren County. It is so named for its location on the 91st meridian of longitude, which, according to the U.S. Land Survey System is known as the Fifth Principal Meridian. (83RD REPORT; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; SCHOOL MAP OF WARREN COUNTY; B.H. Jolly; A.W. Ebeling; F.W. Kehr; W.G. Davis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mertz Lake
Description:See Machens School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mexico Road
Description:One of the earliest roads in the state, which branched from Salt River Road four and a half miles west of St. Charles and ran west to Howell's Ferry Road, about twenty miles from St. Charles. It was so named because it was the original road to the town of Mexico. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 142; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Millville
Description:See Foristell.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mississippi River
Description:This mightiest of American rivers, which forms the eastern boundary of the state, enjoyed a considerable variety of names that were at least proposed for it in the earliest period after it became known to white men, before common usage finally accepted the name it now bears. Fernando de Soto, who discovered it in May, 1541, desired it to be called Rio Grande de Espiritu Santo, i.e., the Great River of the Holy Ghost. When it was next visited by Europeans, however, De Soto's name had been forgotten. Father Jacques Marquette, who descended it with Louis Joliet (or Jolliet) in 1673, suggested the name Rivere de la Conception, in fulfillment of a vow he had made to the Virgin if he succeeded in his expedition. Joliet preferred the name Rivere Buade, and actually entered this name on his map of the rivers he discovered in 1673 and 1674. Joliet's name was designed to honor his patron Governor Frontenac, whose family name was Baude: Louis de Baude, Comte de Frontenac et Palluau (1620-1698), Governor of New France from 1672 to 1698. Frontenac was the son of Henri de Baude, colonel in the regiment of Navarre, although he is better known by the name he received when he was ennobled. Still a different name was proposed by the first explorer to reach the mouth of the river, Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, in 1682. He christened it Rivere de Colbert, in honor of Jean Baptiste Colbert (1619-1683), minister of finance under Louis XIV, who had financed his expedition. Later French Jesuit explorers who moved up and down the stream referred to it frequently as the Rivere de St. Louis. This name, like that of the city of St. Louis founded and named by Auguste Chouteau and Pierre Liguest Laclede in 1764, was indirectly in honor of King Louis XV of France, but directly, after the Catholic fashion, in honor of the king's patron saint, St. Louis, or Louis IX, who had ruled France in the thirteenth century. Perhaps if the French and Spanish explorers had been able to agree on a single name, or a single person to honor, their choice of a name for the great river might have prevailed. As it was, however, the final victory in the long rivalry of nomenclature went to one of the names used by the aborigines. The Indians also had a multiplicity of names for the stream: among them was the Pekitanoui River and the Mississippi. Into the lively controversy over the etymology and correct spelling of these Indian names the present writer is not competent to enter. Suffice it to say that is seems probable that the name finally accepted, the Mississippi, is of Algonquian origin, a compound of two stems meaning "great" and "river;" so that the name is excatly equivalent in its significance to that of another great American stream, the Rio Grande. The present spelling, out of a large number of variant forms, was adopted about the time of the Louisiana Purchase. (MHR, Apr. 1908, 191; Buel, 240-; STEEL POINTS, 8; DAB; COUNTY MAP 1939; thesis by Miss Hamlet and Miss Welty)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri Bluff
Description:A bluff so named for its location along the Missouri River between St. Charles and Augusta. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri River
Description:This mighty stream forms the northern boundary of Franklin County, the southern boundary of Warren County, and the south and southeastern boundary of St. Charles County. Eminent authorities are convinced that had this river been discovered before the Mississippi, the latter would have been considerd the tributary of the former and consequently the name "Missouri" would have been applied to both streams. The erroneous popular conception that the name means "muddy water" arose from the fact that Marquette gave the Indian name "Pekitanoui" ("muddy") to the stream. Early white explorers first called the river Missouri after a tribe of Indians who lived on its banks. "Missouri," in the Indian language, means "People with wooden canoes." These Indians who paddled up and down the Missouri in their canoes were the first of many who used the long river for their thoroughfare. Though this word has been pronounced in various ways, the pronunciations listed in the appendix are taken from Mr. Read's summary of the defensible pronunciations based upon Missouri usage. The Spanish form is Rio Missouri. Early names for the river were also River St. Philip and River St. Louis, given in honor of patron saints. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Hevenor, ST. CHARLES COUNTY; SHOW ME, 11-12; Chappell, HIST. MISSOURI RIVERS, 1, 6-7; Read PRONUN. OF THE WORD MISSOURI, 22FF.; MHR XVII, 377-8; IBID. XII, 81; Conard IV, 412, 432; Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri River Slough
Description:A slough which separated Green Island from the southeastern part of Portage des Sioux Township and is so named because it is connected with the Missouri River at either end. It is now filled with soil until it is merely a low land in which are merged several islands. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 16; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad
Description:This great transportation line has northern terminal at St. Louis, Kansas City and Junction City, Kansas, and extends southward across the Oklahoma and Texas cotton belt to tidewater at Galveston and to San Antonio, Texas. In St. Charles and Warren Counties, it was originally chartered as the Union Pacific Railroad, Southern Branch. Its earliest unit dated from incorporation in Kansas on September 29, 1865. By 1870 it had reached Emporia and came under control of the Missouri-Kansas and Texas Railroad. It extended to St. Charles and Warren Counties about 1894, and was so named for the states it serves. It is more commonly known as the Katy, a word made by combining the initial letters of Kansas and Texas (K-T). (COUNTY ATLAS 1901, 7; Conard VI, 379; DMH III, 427-28; Riegel, 102; HIGHWAY MAPS, ST. CHARLES & WARREN 1940; R & I COMPENDIUM, May 29, 1941, 128; Miss Welty's thesis; Dr. A.W. Ebeling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouriton
Description:A former historic village in the northeast part of Femme Osage Township, on the northwestern bank of the Missouri River. Colonel Daniel Boone and his son, Daniel M. Boone, laid out the town and named it for the Territory of Missouri. For a time the place flourished, and at one time an effort was made to locate the capital of the territory there. However, this plan failed and the town was declined. The original site has washed away until no part of the early town remains, but a post office of the same name appeared later in the same vicinity. A post office of Missouriton is listed by Wetmore in 1837, by Hayward in 1853, by Goodwin in 1867, and in the Postal Guide of 1876; but the name does not appear later. (Wetmore; Hayward; Goodwin; Postal Guide; Campbell, 488; Bryan & Rose, 47; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mobile Island
Description:An island in the eastern part of Portage des Sioux Township, so named because it moved up stream one-half mile from St. Louis County. (RED BOOK 1912-14; 452b; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mollitor's Mill
Description:An early mill on the Perruque. It was named for a Mr. Mollitor, perhaps Casper Mollitor. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Montgomery School
Description:A rural school in the center part of Callaway Township. It was named for a family. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Hope Baptist Church
Description:A missionary Baptist Church in the south-central part of Cuivre Township. It was organized about 1843 by Reverend Joseph Nicholas, who came from England to America and settled in Pennsylvania about 1830. In 1834 he came to Warren County, where he resided until his death in 1872. He was also instrumental in the organization of a Baptist chnurch in Warrenton. The church is no longer in existence. The name is idealistic. (Duncan, 228; B.H. Jolly; Rev. C.C. Ellis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Hope School
Description:An old school in the southeastern part of Cuivre Township, so named for Mount Hope Baptist Church. The school, which was the smallest school in the county in 1936, is over 100 years old. (MHR XXI; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Pleasant
Description:See Augusta
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mt. Zion Baptist Church
Description:A negro church at Fifth and Clay Streets in St. Charles. The name is a Biblical term for the hill at Jerusalem. (Rev. C.C. Ellis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Musick's Ferry
Description:A ferry at Black Walnut. It was established many years ago by a Mr. Hall, for whom it is also known as Hall's Ferry. A few years later a Mr. Musick started the ferry again, and it was named for him. (ST. C. C-M, August 27, 1924)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Musick's Grove
Description:A picnic grove at Wentzville. The name is probably a personal name given for its owner. (ST. C. C-M, Sept. 10, 1924)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Court House
Description:The present courthouse at St. Charles, at Second and Third Streets and Jefferson and Washington Streets. The first courthouse was completed at Main and Madison Streets in 1832 and served until 1849, when a second courthouse was erected. The New Court House, which is so named for its age, was completed in 1903. (ST. C. C-M, Sept. 17, 1902)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Lake
Description:A lake northwest of Pallardy Lake. The name may be descriptive as the lake is thought to be newly created by the building of a levee. (SCHROWANG ROAD MAP; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Melle
Description:A postal town in the southern part of Callway Township. Most authorities agree that the place was laid out in 1850, but the HIST. ST. CHARLES, gives the date as 1848. Authorities disagree again as to the person who laid out the town as the names of Franz Henry Porter and Franz Henry Kemper (or Kamper) are found. It was so named by the early German settlers for their native town of Melle, in Hanover, Germany. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 288; Eaton; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Melle German Methodist Church
Description:A church which is so named for its location at New Melle. Henry William Karrenbrock, who was born in Westphalia, Germany, June 19, 1829, and died in Wentzville, Missouri, November 13, 1908, was one of the organizers of the church. Jobst Henry Sudbrock, who was born in Buer, Germany, February 21, 1830, and settled in St. Charles County in 1852, and died December 1, 1908, was another founder. (WARRENTON BANNER, November 20, 1908; IBID., Dec. 11, 1908)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Wabash Bridge
Description:A railway bridge which spans the Missouri River at St. Charles. The original bridge, built from 1868-1871, was the first railway bridge erected across the Missouri River. This bridge, which was originally known as the St. Charles Bridge in honor of the town or as the St. Louis, Kansas City, and Northern Railway Bridge for the former name of the railroad, and which was later designated as the Old Bridge for its age, was the scene of three great disasters. In 1870 while it was in the process of construction, a mass of metal which weighed over four tons fell and killed nineteen men; in 1879 a span gave way and threw a train of eighteen cars into the river, killing five men; and in 1881 another train went down and killed the engineer and injured two men. The present bridge, which was dedicated October 29, 1936, is known as the New Wabash Bridge for the railroad it serves. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; WABASH SOUVENIR, 18, 22-23, 25-26, 31; MHR XXXI; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Nona
Description:A shipping point for grain in the northwestern part of Femme Osage Township. The name is a feminine Christian name, but why it was used here is unknown. Cf. Augusta, Marthasville, etc. (COM. ATLAS, 229; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:North Missouri Railroad
Description:See Wabash Railroad
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Notre Dame Sisters School
Description:A Catholic school at 217 Clay Street, St. Charles. It was named in honor of Our Lady, the Blessed Virgin. (Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove Cemetery
Description:A burial ground, presumably in St. Charles. The name is probably descriptive. (ST. C. C-M, Nov. 19, 1924)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:See Hayden School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Ridge School
Description:In the eastern part of Cuivre Township. The name is descriptive of its site. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oakdale School
Description:A rural school in the west-central part of Callaway Township. The name is descriptive. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oakland Methodist Episcopal Church, South
Description:A church, probably in Dardenne Township. It was organized in 1870 by the Reverend Tarwater. The name is evidently descriptive of the site. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 365; Rev. R.M. Hardaway)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oakland School
Description:An elementary school, probably near Oakland Church for which it may be named. (B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oakwood
Description:A post office which is listed by Goodwin in 1867 but is not found elsewhere. No one can be found who has heard of it. If it ever existed, the name is obviously topographical. (Goodwin)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:O'Fallon
Description:A postal town in the northwestern part of Dardenne Township. Acorrding to the HIST. ST. CHARLES, the village was surveyed in 1857 under the direction of Nicholas Krekel, a brother of Judge Arnold Krekel, and was named for Colonel John O'Fallon, a capitalist of St. Louis, and a director in the North Missouri Railroad. Colonel O'Fallon was born near Louisville, Kentucky, in 1791. His mother was the youngest sister of Generals George Rogers and William Clark; his father was an Irish-born gentleman who served under Washington as a surveyor in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. John O'Fallon was always a loyal supporter of General W.H. Harrison, the hero of Tippecanoe, and was a liberal giver. He died in 1865. Campbell states that the town was laid out by John C. Edwards, W.C. Williams, Appleton Bradley, and Fred Mathews and that Arnold Krekel made an addition to it. The place is listed as a post office as early as 1867, and Bryan and Rose call it O'Fallon Station. (Goodwin; Postal Guide; Campbell; Bryan & Rose, 195; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 461; Devoy, 243-44; Conard V, 7; Eaton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:O'Fallon Station
Description:See O'Fallon.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Blue
Description:See Old Blue Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Blue Church
Description:A Southern Presbyterian Church at the corner of Madison and Third Streets in St. Charles. The church was built in 1833 by George Sibley, and it joined the Southern or U.S. branch of the Presbyterians in 1866. The name, which also appears as Old Blue, was given for its blue windows. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 10-11; Templin, REMINISCENCES, 46; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Boone Home
Description:A historic stone house in the southwestern part of Femme Osage Township. It is so named in honor of Colonel Daniel Boone and his son, Nathan, who built the house sometime between 1800-1810. It is located on a hill, which was a part of the 1000-arpent grant of land made to Colonel Boone by the Spanish Government in 1799. The timbers in the house were put together by wooden pegs; the morta, which is still in good condition, was ripened in the ground during the winter; the woodwork is of hand-carved walnut; and the walls are 3 ft. blue limestone. It was at one time the largest and finest house west of St. Genevieve and St. Louis. The home contained living quarters for both Colonel Boone and his son, Nathan Boone. It is also known as the Old Daniel Boone Place and the Daniel Boone Homestead in honor of its famous builder. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 254; PORT. & BIOG. REC., 121; ST. C. C-M, Jan. 6, 1926; IBID, Feb. 3, 1926; J.G. Wessendorf; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Bridge
Description:See New Wabash Bridge.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Capitol Building
Description:The first capitol of Missouri, located at 206-12 South Main Street, St. Charles. It was erected and furnished by the citizens of St. Charles when Missouri was admitted to the union in 1821 and was used as a capitol until 1826, when the seat of state government was moved to Jefferson City. The first Legislature met here. The executive office of Governor McNair was also located here. After this two-story building was abandoned as a state house, it was occupied by stores and tenants. A music store was housed in it until the Kohl-Jeck Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars, bought it for a museum. The name is descriptive of its original purpose. (MHR, XXVIII, 250)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old City Cemetery
Description:A former burial ground located between Pike and Tomkin's Streets in St. Charles. The graves were moved about 1920 and a shoe factory took their location. It was so named for its age. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 50; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Daniel Boone Place
Description:See Old Boone Home.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Depot
Description:A railway station between Clark and Adams Streets, on the Missouri River, in St. Charles. Cf. above. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 50; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Monroe Ferry Landing
Description:A boat landing on the Cuivre River, north of Cuivre Township. It was so named for the town of Old Monroe on the opposite bank of the river in Lincoln County. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Round Tower
Description:See Fort Duquette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Spanish Tower
Description:See Fort Duquette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Stone Mill
Description:See Fort Duquette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Windmill
Description:An old building on a little stream at the southern edge of St. Charles. It was built by Pierre Chouteau in 1789. The name is descriptive. (Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 559; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Olivet Presbyterian Church
Description:A church in Dardenne Township, two miles from Flint Hill. It was organized in 1835 or 1836 by John S. Ball. The church, which is now out of existence, was given a Bible name for the Mount of Olives near Jerusalem. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 11; HIST. ST. CHARLES; 465-6; Guy Motley; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Orchard Farm
Description:A town in the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township. The post office was established in 1899. It was so named for the immense orchards which were once in this vicinity. (Postal Guide; COM. ATLAS, 227; B.H. Jolly; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Osage Woman's River
Description:See Femme Osage Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pallardy Lake
Description:A lake in the eastern part of Cuivre Township. It was named for the Pallardy family. A Pallardie (or Pallardy) lived on Perruque Creek by 1800 and died about 1851. His son, Pierre Pallardie, was born in St. Charles in 1800. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 32; Bryan & Rose, 181; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Paud's Fort
Description:See Pond's Fort
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pauldingville
Description:A former well-known town in the extreme western part of the county, west of Wentzville. It is said to have had a post office but none is listed in the available Postal Guides. The name is probably personal in origin. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 142; W.G. Davis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pauldingville Church
Description:An old church located at the former town of Pauldingville, for which it is named. The organization was first Congregational and later Baptist. The members of the latter congregation sold the church and gave the proceeds to the Wright City Baptist Church. The church has not been used since about 1915. (W.G. Davis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pekitanoui River
Description:See Mississippi River
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Perruque Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the central part of Hickory Grove Township, Warren County, and flows east into St. Charles County, where it forms the boundary line between Cuivre, Callaway, and Dardenne Townships, finally emptying into the Mississippi River. Settlement on the creek was made in St. Charles County in 1796 by French Canadians. Louis Marchant, Andrew and Jean Baptiste Blondeau dit Duzey (or Drezy), made a settlement at a place they called La Perruque. In 1811 High Liles and Joshua James settled on the stream above Kennedy's Fort in Warren County. Barns conjectures that it was named because the wig (Perruque) of an early French settler became entangled while he was crossing the stream. This is obviously an imaginative invention: it is much more likely to have been a French personal name or "dit" name, although no such French-man has been actually discovered. The name is often spelled, less correctly, Peruque. The variant name Barrock Creek is also found, possibly a folk etymology or contamination form used by American speakers. Another variant may be Varrett's Creek, which has not been otherwise identified. Locally it is also known as Bear Creek, a still more drastic attempt at folk-etymology. It also appears as Perruque River. (Campbell, 626; Barns, 173; Bryan & Rose, 147; COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5, 17; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 959; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 96; Eaton; W. Schmidt; Perkins Pringle)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Perrurue
Description:See Peruque
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peruque
Description:A town in the southern part of Cuivre Township, so named for Peruque Creek. The original settlement was made by French Canadians in 1796, and called La Perruque, or Perruque. It has also been known as Peruque Station. A post office was established here in 1889. For the change in spelling cf. Perruque Creek. (Goodwin; Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 37; HISTORY OF MISSOURI II, 96; Eaton; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peruque Bridge
Description:Doubtless a bridge on Perruque Creek, from which it took its name. (PORT. & BIOG. REC., 444)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peruque Creek
Description:See Perruque Creek
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peruque Fort
Description:A historic fort between the southeast part of Cuivre Township and the northwest part of Dardenne Township, a few miles west of O'Fallon. The Union Army built this log fort during the Civil War to guard the railroad trestle from Marmaduke's Confederate troops. It is so named for its position on Perruque Creek. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 464; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peruque Island
Description:A large island northeast of Cuivre Township, in the Mississippi River, at the mouth of the creek for which it is named. (COUNTY ATLAS, 12; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peruque School
Description:See Baldwin School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peruque Station
Description:See Peruque.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Petit Cotes
Description:See St. Charles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Petit Marais Rondeau
Description:A lake in the eastern part of Dardenne Township. The name is descriptive of its size and shape. Cf. Marais Rondeau Lake, above. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 25; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Phelps School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Portage des Sioux Township, three miles north of St. Charles. It is also called Phelps' School House in the MANUAL, STATE OF MISSOURI. The names were given for a family. (MANUAL, STATE of MISSOURI 1891-1892, 55; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Phelps' School House
Description:See Phelps School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Piasa Island
Description:See Dresser Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Piaso Island
Description:See Dresser Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pine Valley School
Description:In Ste. Genevieve Township. Named from its situation and surrounding pine trees. (H.J. Carron)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:Pitman's Bridge
Description:An early bridge on Dardenne Creek. It was doubtless named for John Pitman, the first county representative. He came here in 1804 and was a clear-thinking, hard-working farmer whose judgment was respected. In 1812 he was commissioned a colonel in the state militia. (Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 566; 587; MHR, XVIII, 9)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church in Darst's Bottom, in the southeastern part of Femme Osage Township. It was organized in 1856 with D.H. Darst, W.W. Parson, P. Ashy, Emily Schoat, Phoebe Parsons, and John Frazier as constituent members. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 239; Rev. R.M. Hardaway; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Union School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Portage des Sioux Township. The name is ideal. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Point Lavvadie Island
Description:An island in the Missouri River, south of Augusta. It is opposite Point Labaddie (q.v.) in Franklin County, and it is obviously a variant spelling of that name. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 41)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Point Prairie
Description:See Point Prairie Lands
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Point Prairie Lands
Description:Rich bottoms which extend across Portage des Sioux Township, from north to west, between the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers. The name also appears as Point Prairie. The term "Point" here has the sense of the French "points," defined by McDermott as "a wooded point of land" on a river. (Davis & Durrie, 433; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 131; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 556; Earl C. Gray; McDermott)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Point Prairie Presbyterian Church
Description:A church in the central-west part of Portage des Sioux Township. It was organized July 13, 1873 with Thomas H. Barwisa and family, Mr. and Mrs. E.K. Barwisa, and others as original members. The church no longer exists. It was named for Point Prairie. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 265; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Point Prairie School [1 of 2]
Description:A second Point Prairie School in the southwestern part of Cuivre Township, near Wentzville. The name is probably descriptive, although no particular reason for it has been found. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Point Prairie School [2 of 2]
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township, near Orchard Farm. It was named for its location on Point Prairie. (B.H. Jolly; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pollard's Ford
Description:A crossing on Eagle Ford of Cuivre River, in the northwestern part of Cuivre Township. It was evidently named for B. Pollard, as there was a ford on his land in this section. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; 40-41; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pomme Osage Township
Description:See Femme Osage Township.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pond Fort
Description:See Pond's Fort.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pond Fort School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Callaway Township. It was so named for Pond's or Pond Fort. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pond's Fort
Description:A wooden fort once used as a refuge in time of Indian attack, in the northeastern part of Callaway Township, a short distance southeast of the present town of Wentzville, in the area known as Dardenne Prairie. Robert Balbridge (or Baldridge), a native of Ireland and one of the first settlers in the county, obtained the Spanish grant upon which the fort was built. The place was called Pond Fort because there were a number of large ponds near it. Williams gives the name as Pond's Fort, perhaps under a misapprehension that it was connected with an individual named Pond. In the COUNTY ATLAS, it is misspelled Paud's Fort. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Bryan & Rose, 94, 134; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 151-52, 450; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 559; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Portage des Scioux
Description:See Portage des Sioux.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Portage des Sioux
Description:A very old town along the Mississippi River, in the north-central part of Portage des Sioux Township. The name was given to the place by the Indians, and this name was adopted by the French settlers. At Portage des Sioux the distance between the Missouri and the Mississippi Rivers is only about two miles. Indians used to carry their canoes from one river to the other and save a distance of twenty-five miles by river. It seems likely that an incident was of help in establishing the name, especially among the Sioux. The story relates that the Sioux, who were being pursued down the Missouri River by the Osages, withdrew from the water and carried their canoes across the narrow neck of land to the Mississippi where Portage des Sioux now stands, and embarked on the latter river. The place where they set out was thus called Portage des Sioux, "the portage of the Sioux," or "the passage of the Sioux." Thwaites spells the name Portage des Scioux. In 1799 Francis Lesieur, of St. Louis, visited the site and induced people mainly from St. Charles and St. Louis to settle at Portage des Sioux. The post office appears here by 1837. (Wetmore; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 10; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 263-264; L&C I, 7, ed Thwaites; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 556; Eaton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Portage des Sioux Township
Description:The northernmost township in the county, borderd on the south by St. Charles Township, on the southeast by the Missouri River, and on the north and west by the Mississippi River. It is not known who the first settlers in the township were, but it is thought that they were French. Samuel Griffeth was the first American who settled outside the town, for which the township was named. It was probably organized in 1818. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 126-27; COM. ATLAS, 229; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie du Chien
Description:See Dog Prairie.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Haute
Description:See Prairie Haute Common Fields.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Haute Common Fields
Description:In the center part of St. Charles Township, northwest of St. Charles. The name, which also appears as Prairie Haute, is descriptive of the elevation and purpose of the land. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Manual St. Missouri, 1892-1892, 55; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prieur's Landing
Description:A boat landing on the Mississippi River. It was named for its owner for many years, Noel Antoine Prieur, son of the first teacher of a school in St. Charles. The school was in operation in 1800 as a French school. (ST. C. C-M, Feb. 3, 1915)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Quivre River
Description:See Cuivre River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ramrod Eddy
Description:A whirlpool in the Missouri River, about five miles above St. Charles. In the account of Maximilian's journey of 1832-34, we note the following: "After stopping a few hours, we continued our voyage till a storm of wind filled the air with sand, from the sand banks, and compelled us to stop after twelve o'clock, above the whirlpool, called Remoux a Baguette; towards dark, however, we reached Isle au Bon Homme, in the vicinity of which we passed the ni(g)ht." The present name, doubtless descriptive, is the American translation of the older form. See remous, remoux, Mid-Missouri French for whirlpool or eddy in McDermott. The name was doubtless conferred by the French for the shape of this straight narrow passage in the river. (EWT XXII, 239)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ramsey's Creek
Description:A small stream in St. Charles County. It was so named for Captain William Ramsey, a soldier of the Revolutionary War. He was in the battle of Yorktown, and witnessed the surrender of the British army under Lord Cornwallis. He came to Missouri in 1800 and settled on the creek. Later he moved to Warren County and established his residence near the present Marthasville. During the Indian War in Missouri, he commanded a company of rangers. Hoe died in Boone County, Missouri, May 22, 1845, at the age of 104. (Bryan & Rose)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Red School
Description:A rural grade school in the extreme eastern part of Portage des Sioux Township. It is so named for the color of the building. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Redmon Branch
Description:See Factory Branch.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Redmond Branch
Description:See Factory Branch.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Remou
Description:A village which is listed by the COUNTY ATLAS but is apparently unknown to the people in this section at the present time. Possibly it was named for Remoux a Baguette, or Ramrod Eddy. (q.v.) (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 10)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Remoux a Baguette
Description:See Ramrod Eddy.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Richmond School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Femme Osage Township. The name is probably borrowed from Richmond, Virginia, or elsewhere. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rio Grande de Espiritu Santo
Description:See Mississippi River
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rio Missouri
Description:See Missouri River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River St. Louis
Description:See Missouri River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River St. Louis
Description:See Mississippi River
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River St. Philip
Description:See Missouri River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River View School
Description:See Riverview School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riverview School
Description:An elementary school in the southeastern part of Portage des Sioux Township, so named for its location overlooking the Missouri River. The name also appears as River View School. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere au Boeuf
Description:See Cuivre River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere Buade
Description:See Mississippi River
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere de Colbert
Description:See Mississippi River
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere de la Conception
Description:See Mississippi River
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere de St. Louis
Description:See Mississippi River
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Round Fort
Description:See Fort Duquette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Round Tower
Description:See Fort Duquette.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Royal Road of the King's Domain
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rue Royale
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sacred Heart Convent
Description:A Catholic institution in St. Charles. It was established in 1818 as a residence for nuns. It is so named for the Sacred Heart of Jesus. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 50; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 559; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Salem Baptist Church
Description:A negro Baptist church in "Africa" in St. Charles. Salem is another name for the Biblical Jerusalem. (ST. C. C-M, May 8, 1901)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Salt River Road
Description:An early road which started on the Boone's Lick Road one mile west of St. Charles and ran through St. Peters, Wellsburg, Flint Hill and then northwest to Eagle Fork of Cuivre River, a distance of twenty-eight miles. It was so named because its final termination was Salt River in Pike County, famous in Pioneer days for its deposits of salt. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 37; HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES, 142; PORT. AND BIOG. REC., 191; INTRO. TO A SURVEY, 95; Miss Leech's thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sam's Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the east-central part of Hickory Grove Township, and flows into St. Charles County. No explanation of the name has been found. Perhaps it is to be associated with Sam Price, for whom Price's Spring Branch (q.v.) not far away, was named. It is also currently known as Shiloh Creek for the Shiloh Methodist Church. (Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 506; Mrs. Pierre Foristell)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:San Carlos
Description:See St. Charles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:San Carlos del Missouri
Description:See St. Charles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:San Carlos del Misuri
Description:See St. Charles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:San Fernando
Description:See St. Charles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sand Bar
Description:A deposit of silica in the Missouri River, probably off the central-southern part of Portage des Sioux Township. The name is descriptive. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 17; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schleursburg
Description:See Schluersburg.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schleursburgh
Description:See Schluersburg.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schluersburg
Description:A post office in the center part of Femme Osage Township. It was established as a post office by 1867 and was discontinued between 1904 and 1910. The name is sometimes misspelled Schleursburgh or Schleursburg. Although it is said to be named for a German town, no such name is found on German maps. (Goodwin; Postal Guide; COM. ATLAS, 229; Earl C. Gray; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schluersburg School
Description:See Happy Glen School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schmucker's Store
Description:A post office in the southeastern part of Cuivre Township, four miles west of O'Fallon. It was named for Henry Schmucker, who was born in Prussia, November 1, 1832, and came to St. Charles County in 1857. In 1885 the store had been in existence a number of years. It is not listed in any available POSTAL GUIDES. (Campbell, 490; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 524-25; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Scott's Branch
Description:A stream, probably not far from Pitman's Bridge on Dardenne Creek. The name is evidently personal and may have been given for F. Scot, who owned land in the county in 1825. (MHR XXVIII, 13)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Scott's Bridge
Description:An early bridge on Scott's Branch, for which it was doubtless named. (MHR, XXVIII, 13)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Seebarger
Description:See Seeburger.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sehrt Creek
Description:A tiny stream west of Augusta, southwestern part of Femme Osage Township. The name is probably personal. (HIGHWAY MAP, St. Charles 1940)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shiloh Creek
Description:See Sam's Creek
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sisters Convent
Description:See Sisters Convent of the Precious Blood.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sisters Convent of the Precious Blood
Description:A convent at O'Fallon. It is named for the Sisters and for the Precious Blood of Christ, an object of special Catholic devotion. The COUNTY ATLAS calls it merely Sisters Convent. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 72; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Six Mile House
Description:See Harvester.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smelser Lake
Description:A lake in the eastern part of Portage des Sioux Township, near Smelser Lake School. It was named for a family. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smelser Lake School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Portage des Sioux Township, near Smelser Lake, from which it takes its name. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Snow Hill
Description:See Foristell.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Dardenne Presbyterian Church
Description:A church at Howell (formerly Mechanisville). The COUNTY ATLAS says it was organized in 1873, but the county history states that the church was organized and the building erected in 1867. Since the church has been purchased by the TNT Plant, the communicants now go largely to Dardenne. Named for its location. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 11; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 465; Guy Motley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spencer Creek
Description:Rises in the northwest part of St. Charles Township and flows north into Dardenne Creek. It was earlier known as Spencer's Branch. It was named for Judge George Spencer, who was born in Yorkshire, January 5, 1777, came to Missouri by 1797, and died in February, 1841. He was the first judge of the Common Pleas Court for the District of St. Charles, having been appointed to that office in 1804; and he was also a chairman of a legislative committee in the House of Representatives. Judge Spencer was able- minded and well-to-do. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 24; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 188; MHR XXVII, 309-10; B.H. Jolly; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spencer School
Description:A rural elementary school in the western part of St. Charles Township, southeast of St. Peters. It was probably named either for a family or for Spencer Creek. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spencer's Branch
Description:See Spencer Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sprekelmeyer Park and Camping Grounds
Description:A road house and camping grounds, two and a half miles west of St. Peters. The place was opened for business in 1925. It was named for its owner, Julius H. Spreckelmeyer. (ST. C. C-M, April 8, 1925)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Brewery
Description:A brewery in St. Charles. In 1875 it was operated by Theodore Runge, but it is now operated by Fischbach Brewing Company. It is so named for a spring in that vicinity. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 69; Benj. Emmons; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Andrew
Description:See St. Charles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles
Description:The county seat of St. Charles County, located in the southern part of St. Charles Township. St. Charles is the oldest settlement in the St. Louis District, and was founded about 1769. The founder was Louis Blanchette, commonly known as Blanchette le Chasseur (the hunter). He was a native of the province of Quebec, Canada. He came down the Mississippi River with a few followers about 1765 and settled here four or five years later. The church he built here was the first church erected west of the Mississippi, and he was the first civil and military governor in this region. Blanchette died in 1793 of a fever, and was buried in the church he had erected in St. Charles. His name is commemorated in Blanchette Park (q.v.), also in the earlier name, Blanchette Creek, now Factory Branch (q.v.), for the stream beside which he built his house and trading post or "factory." The village he founded has had many different names. It was originally known as Les Petites Cotes, or Petit Cotes (Little Hills or Banks), also as Le Village des Cotes or Le Village du Cote, because of the fact that it was situated at the foot of a range of small hills rising up from the northern bank of the Missouri River. Perhaps the settlers called them "Little" in comparison with the bolder slopes along the river bank at St. Louis. On this name McDermott comments: "Saint Charles for a number of years after its founding was known as the 'settlement of the little hills' because the bluffs rolled back from the river rather than rose abruptly from it. In Spanish documents the name was translated directly as Las Pequenas Cuestas. It was not a nickname like Paincourt and Misere." When the settlement grew, and the Kentucky and Virginia rangemen began to come in, about 1784, new names were found for the place. Some authorities think it was called for a time St. Andrew (so Conway and others) but this is probably erroneous. St. Andrew was a small settlement in what is now St. Louis County, now engulfed by the Missouri River. It was founded by James Mackay, from Scotland, one of the first English-speaking settlers in the territory, and was originally known as San Andre del Misuri, or in the mouths of the Americans, St. Andrew, the name being chosen by Mackay doubtless because Andrew was the patron saint of Scotland (See Miss Welty's thesis). The disappearance of St. Andrew in the river no doubt explains its later confusion with the nearby and more fortunate settlement at St. Charles. In 1784, the Spaniards, who had exercised distant control over the territory from New Orleans since its cession to them in 1762, decided to make the little French village the seat of government for all their possessions north of the Missouri River, and conferred upon it a new name. They seem to have hesitated between two names for it, both intimately associated with the Spanish motherland. For a time it was known officially at New Orleans as San Fernando; but shortly before they had to cede the country back to France in 1800, they appear to have definitely decided on the name San Carlos del Musuri, or San Carlos del Missouri. The Spanish names were evidently chosen in honor of Spanish monarchs. The name San Fernando honored the preceding King of Spain, Ferdinand VI (1746-1759), and San Carlos the reigning king Charles III (1759-1788), or his successor Charles IV (1788- 1808). It is incorrect, however, to say that the place was actually named for either monarch, for neither of them could by any stretch of loyalty be described as a saint. What happened was that, in Catholic fashion, just as in the case of St. Louis, the king was honored by the selection for the place of the name of his patron saint, or "name-saint." The saint commemorated by the name San Fernando was an earlier Spanish king, Ferdinand III (1217-1252), who was actually canonized in 1671. Just so St. Louis was not, as is sometimes mistakenly asserted, named for the reigning French monarch Louis XV, who was certainly anything else but a saint, but instead named in his honor for his patron saint, Louis IX, who ruled France in the thirteenth century and was the only French king ever to achieve canonization. The name that finally prevailed, San Carlos, honored the reigning Spanish king by taking that of his patron St. Charles Borromeo (cf. St. Charles Borromeo Church in St. Charles, below). The famous St. Charles or Carlo Borromeo (1538-1584), was by far the most important and best beloved of all the saints who bear the name Charles. He was an Italian, who became Archbishop of Milan and Cardinal, and was one of the chief factors in the rise and success of the Catholic Counter-Reformation. A learned man, who took his doctorate at the University of Pavia in 1552, he became Papal Secretary under Pius IV; he was instrumental in founding and helping many colleges and hospitals. He was also an accomplished musician, and an eloquent preacher, being known as a "second Ambrose." His devoted service and restless industry drove him on to work even while suffering from the fever that caused his death in November, 1554. He was canonized in 1610, and his feast-day is celebrated on November 4. After the country passed from Spain to America by the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, the name was naturally Americanized to St. Charles, sometimes St. Charles City, or City of St. Charles. It is know always known simply as St. Charles. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Davis & Durrie, 434; Barns, 110; Parker, MISSOURI IN 1867, 387; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 309; Conway, 9-13; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI, 553; Eaton; Violette, 39-40; Benj. Emmons; Guy Motley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles Academy and Boarding School
Description:An early school in St. Charles. The instituion was opened in 1819 under the supervision of Reverend Messrs. J.M. Peck and James Craig. John Mason Peck was a well-known Baptist missionary who was born in Connecticut in 1789, came to Missouri in 1817, and was active in Missouri and Illinois for many years, and died in 1858. James Craig was a Baptist preacher who soon disagreed with Mr. Peck. The school was named for its location. (MHR XXIX, 49)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles and Alton Road
Description:A road that connects St. Charles and Alton, Illinois. So named for its termini. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 143; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles and Portage Road
Description:A road which ran from Marais Temps Clair to St. Charles, via Portage. It was so named for the towns it connected. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 143; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles Borromeo Church
Description:A Catholic church in St. Charles. It owes its early origin to the fact that the first settlers in the county were Catholics. In 1792 Reverend Joseph Didier, a Benedictine from the congregation of Ste. Mary of the Royal Abbey of St. Dennis, was the first missionary pastor here. The old church on the corner of Decatur and Second Streets was dedicated in 1828. The former structure has been made of wood. In 1869 a new church, known as St. Charles Borromeo, was begun and was not completed until several years later. The name is given in honor of St. Charles Borromeo, patron saint of the town. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 11; CATH. ENCYC.; Miss Kathryn Linnemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles Bridge
Description:See New Wabash Bridge.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles Catholic Library
Description:A library which is located in St. Charles and named for the town. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 72; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles City
Description:See St. Charles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles College
Description:An early Methodist school in St. Charles. It was said to be the oldest collegiate institution west of the Mississippi River, although dates vary from 1825 and 1833 to 1835 as to the time of its organization. The school was founded by Mrs. Catherine Collier, her son, George Collier, and David Barton. It was successfully operated until the beginning of the Civil War, when it was suspended for a time. In 1875 it had been restored to its former control but was then a high school instead of a college. It was named for its location in the town. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Davis & Durrie, 434; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 559; MHR XX; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles Common Fields
Description:See St. Charles Commons.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles Commons
Description:In the center part of St. Charles Township, near the town of St. Charles. It was originally used by the villagers for wood and pasture. This section was first enclosed in 1791 or in 1793, and the first paper grant of commons was made in January, 1797. Though one authority says this land was sold many years ago, two other references maintain that the town still owns about one-half of the original acreage and leases it for a long term at a low rental. The name also appears as St. Charles Common Fields. Both names are given for the town. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 10, 12; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 554, MHR XXX; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles County
Description:A county in eastern Missouri, lying between the Mississippi and the Missouri Rivers and south of Cuivre River. It is just east of the 5th principal meridian of longitude. As at present constituted, it is bounded on the east and northeast by the Mississippi River, on the south by the Missouri River and just across it by St. Louis and Franklin Counties, on the west by Warren County, and on the northwest by Lincoln County. When it was first organized, on October 1, 1812, it was far larger; in fact it was the largest county ever in existence. It extended from the Missouri River to Canada on the north, and to the Pacific Ocean on the west, and so remained until 1816. The county, or "District of St. Charles," or "St. Charles District," as it was often called, really had at that time no definite limits. In 1816, however, Howard County was cut off from the western part of St. Charles and organized separately. Cedar Creek, which now forms the eastern boundary of Boone County, was established as the line between St. Charles and Howard. In December, 1818, Montgomery and Lincoln Counties were organized, and St. Charles, which at first included the present Warren County (q.v.), was finally reduced to its present dimensions. Undoubtedly the county took its name from the town of St. Charles, as the dates make apparent. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 126; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 554; Eaton; Benj. Emmons) See District of St. Charles
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943. Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Charles District
Description:See St. Charles County.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles Road
Description:A country road which ran from New Melle southwest to Femme Osage, then south to Tuque Prairie Road, and thence to Augusta. It was named for the county. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 143; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Charles Township
Description:The southeastern township in St. Charles County, bordered by the Missouri River on the south and east, Dardenne Township on the west and northwest and Portage des Sioux Township on the north. It was evidently organized in 1818 when the county was reduced to its present size. It was so named for the town. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 126-27; COM. ATLAS 229; Hevenor; St. Charles County; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Francis Catholic Church
Description:In the northern part of Portage des Sioux Township. It was built in 1879 and was probably named for the famous St. Francis of Assissi (1182-1226) founder of the Order of Franciscans. The church is also called St. Francis Church. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 59; HIST. ST. CHARLES 266; Brewster, 365; CATH. DIR., 149; Father W.B. Sommerhauser; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Francis Church
Description:See St. Francis Church (?)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. John Evangelical Church
Description:A church in the northwestern part of Femme Osage Township, one and a half miles southeast of Cappeln. The church was organized in 1843 and named for the Apostle. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 288; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Miss Kathryn Linnemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. John's Church
Description:A German Evangelical Church in St. Charles. It was completed and dedicated in October, 1869. Cf. above. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 347; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Miss Kathryn Linnemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Joseph Catholic Church
Description:A church at Allen's Prairie (q.v.), probably in the southeastern part of Cuivre Township. It was organized in 1852 and named for the husband of the Virgin. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 506; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Louis and St. Charles Railroad
Description:See St. Louis, Kansas City and Northern Railroad.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Louis, Jerseyville, and Springfield Railroad
Description:A railway which crosses the Mississippi River at Grafton, then runs to St. Charles and on to St. Louis. The company was organized and the surveys made by 1885. It was named for its termini. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 144)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Louis, Kansas City and Northern Railroad
Description:A railway which traversed the counties westward from St. Charles. This was the successor to the Old North Missouri Railroad chartered in 1851. In 1897 it was consolidated with the Toledo, Wabash & Western, and the Lake Erie, Wabash and St. Louis Railroads to become the Wabash Railroad (q.v.). It was so named for its terminal points. A part of this road once led from St. Charles through St. Peters and was known as the St. Louis and St. Charles Railroad, for its originally proposed termini. The road, which was surveyed by 1885, is not in existence. (COUNTY ATLAS 1877, 5; HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES, 144; HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES & WARREN 1940; Dr. A.W. Ebeling; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Louis, Kansas City and Northern Railway Bridge
Description:See New Wabash Bridge
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Louis, Keokuk and North-Western Railroad
Description:Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Description:A parish at Wentzville. It was so named for the most famous Irish Saint, St. Patrick (372- 463 or 464), whose festival day is March 17. (Brewster, 138-140; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Paul
Description:A village in the center part of Cuivre Township. The post office was established here in 1866. The town was doubtless named for St. Paul's Catholic Church (q.v.). (Postal Guide; CATH. DIR.; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:A church at New Melle. It was organized in 1842 and so named for the Apostle. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 289; Miss Kathryn Linnemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Paul School
Description:See St. Paul's School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Paul's Catholic Church
Description:At St. Paul. Cf. above. (Cath. Dir., Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Paul's School
Description:A Catholic School at St. Paul. It was dubtless named for St. Paul's Catholic Church, and also appears as St. Paul School. (CATH. DIR.; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Peters
Description:A postal village eight or ten miles west of St. Charles, on the low lands along Dardenne Creek, near the border between St. Charles and Dardenne Townships. A Jesuit mission, known as St. Peter's Mission from which has grown All Saints' Catholic Church, was established here about 1819 and lent its name to the town. The post office here was first listed by Hayward in 1853. The village was laid out by 1868 and was surveyed and platted by Henry Reinke and H. Deppe. The name is sometimes spelled St. Peter's. (Postal Guide; Campbell, 490; Hayward; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12, 14; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 461-62; Conard V, 472; Eaton; Benj. Emmons; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Peter's
Description:See St. Peters.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Peter's German Catholic Church
Description:See St. Peter's Parish.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Peter's Mission
Description:See All Saints Catholic Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Peter's Parish
Description:A Catholic institution in St. Charles. The congregation was organized in 1848, soon after the German immigrants, who made up its membership, had become numerous in St. Charles. Although the cornerstone of the original church was laid in that same year, the building was not completed until 1850. This church, a frame building, was destroyed by a tornado, but it was rebuilt in 1861. It was earlier known as St. Peters German Catholic Church in honor of the Apostle and the nationality of its original congregation, but today it usually merely bears the name of the Apostle. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 349; ST. C. C-M, Dec. 31, 1924; Father W.B. Sommerhauser)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Theodore's Catholic Church
Description:At Flinthill. It has been suggested that the saint to whom this church is dedicated is Theodore of Tarsus (602-690), the seventh Archbishop of Canterbury and one of the greatest figures in early English church history; but he was not a saint, for he never was canonized. The most important of several Saint Theodores was St. Theodore of Studium (759-829), famous hymn-writer and zealous champion of the veneration of images. The church was dedicated September 16, 1900. (CATH. ENCYC.; Brewster, 414; ST. C. C-M, Sept. 12, 1900)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Star of the Prairie School
Description:See Dyer School
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Steam Boat Landing
Description:A large boat landing on the Mississippi River, opposite Portage des Sioux, in the northern part of Portage des Sioux Township. The name is descriptive. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 12; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stonebarger Land
Description:A road located somewhere between Boschertown and St. Charles. The name is probably personal in origin. (ST. C. C-M, April 22, 1925)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tavern Creek
Description:See Big Tavern Creek (Franklin).
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Taylor's Mill
Description:A mill on the Femme Osage. It was named for Milton Taylor. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:The Red Houses of the Point
Description:Two red cedar houses once located on Point Prairie, probably in the extreme eastern part of St. Charles Township, near Point Prairie School. The houses were so named because they were built of red cedar logs which had been cut in the Alleghany Mountains and rafted down the Alleghany and Ohio Rivers and brought from Cairo on boats. Major Nelson (or Wilson) Overall, a state representative, built one of the houses. (Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 585; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Thornhill Prairie
Description:A prairie section mentioned by Williams but not well known locally. The only explanation found is that it was probably a farming section. (Williams, N. E. MISSOURI I, 560; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Toonerville
Description:A filling station and lunch room in the southern part of Dardenne Township. Its proprietor was G.C. Fridley, who succeeded in advertising the place by naming it for a trolly car which resembled the "Toonerville Trolly" in the comics. (COUNTY MAP 1904; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Trinity Episcopal Church
Description:A church in St. Charles. The organization was constituted in 1848 with seventeen members, and the building was erected in 1849. It is so named for the Christian doctrine. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 348; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Two Branch Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River, off the northern part of Dardenne Township, half-way between the mouths of the Dardenne and Perruque Creeks. The name may refer to this position between the two streams or "branches." (HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES, 1940)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union School
Description:In the eastern part of Dardenne Township. The name is ideal. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Vine Hill School
Description:A rural school in the center part of Femme Osage Township. The name is descriptive of the setting. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wabash Railroad
Description:This railroad operated 2,400 miles of lines in 1941. It traversed Warren and St. Charles Counties from east to west, starting at St. Charles on the east and extending through Warrenton thence northwest to the northwest corner of Warren County. The road is the outgrowth of two originally independent trunk lines--the old Toledo and Illinois and the North Missouri. They were chartered April 25, 1853, and March 1, respectively, the first by the Legislature of Ohio and the latter by the Legislature of Missouri. The route of the North Missouri Railroad was determined October 16, 1854, and the road was to build from St. Louis to St. Charles and then to a junction with the Hannibal & St. Joseph in Macon County, and from there to the northern boundary line of the state, a distance of 228 miles. The first division of the road was open for business in August 1855, and was found to have cost $52,000 per mile. The St. Louis, Kansas City and Northern, successor to the old North Missouri and the Toledo, Wabash and Western, successor to the Toledo and Illinois, and the Lake Erie, Wabash and St. Louis and Pacific in 1879. It is locally known as the Wabash. All the railroads were so named for their principal termini. (Conard, VI, 379; HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES, 1027; HISTORY OF FRANKLIN, 297; MHR, Oct. 1920, 146-153; R. & I. COMPENDIUM, May 29, 1941, 202; E.S. Aydelott; Andy J. Brown)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wabash, St. Louis and Pacific Railroad
Description:See Wabash Railroad
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:In the eastern part of Femme Osage Township. The name is descriptive of its setting. The popular, but not formal name of Defiance School is also given, for the town. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Weldon Spring
Description:A small hamlet in the southern part of Dardenne Township. The site was settled by German immigrants about 1849, and the town was laid out by J.M. McMillen in 1864. The post office was established by 1876. It was named in honor of Joseph and John Weldon, early settlers. The village is also called Weldon Springs, and has become widely known recently because of the large ordnance works stationed here. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS, 73; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 73, 463; Eaton; COM. ATLAS, 229; HIGHWAY MAP, ST. CHARLES 1940)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Weldon Spring Rock Quarry
Description:A quarry which is so named for its location near Weldon Spring. (ST. C. C-M, June 8, 1927)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Weldon Spring Schoolhouse
Description:A rural school, near Weldon Spring, in the southeastern part of Dardenne Township. It was organized as a district in 1863, but the building was not finished until 1865. A three-month school was held in a vacant house on the farm of Richard Rosenthal. It is named for Weldon Spring. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; ST. C. C-M; Oct. 6, 1915; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Weldon Springs [1 of 2]
Description:Natural springs at Weldon Spring. They were named in honor of Joseph and John Weldon, early settlers. (Eaton; COM. ATLAS, 229)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Weldon Springs [2 of 2]
Description:See Weldon Spring
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Weldon Springs Ordnance Works and T.N.T. Plant
Description:A government defense project in the southern part of Dardenne Township and the northeastern part of Femme Osage Township. The works have been developed within recent years. They are named for the town. (ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Earl C. Gray)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wellsburg
Description:A post office in the east-central part of Cuivre Township, four miles northwest of O'Fallon. The post office was established here by 1837 or earlier and discontinued by 1886. Though Mr. Emmons says it was named for Judge Carter Wells, Jr., a prominent lawyer, a county and circuit clerk of Warren County, a state senator and circuit judge, it seems more probably that the town received its name from his father, John Wells, who settled here and served as postmaster until his death in 1837. Judge Carter Wells moved to Lincoln County in 1839 and died in 1860. The name also appears as Wellsburgh and Williamsburg. (Wetmore; Postal Guide; Campbell, 490; Bryan & Rose, 192; COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 9, 12; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wellsburgh
Description:See Wellsburg.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wentzville
Description:A town in the southern part of Cuivre Township. The post office was established here by 1867. It was named in honor of a Mr. Wentz, chief engineer of the St. Louis, Kansas City and Northern Railroad, under whose direction the place was platted and surveyed in 1855. (Goodwin; Postal Guide; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 504)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:West Alton
Description:See Westalton.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Westalton
Description:A village in the northeastern part of Portage des Sioux Township. The post office was established here in 1896. It was so named for its location on the western bank of the Mississippi River, opposite Alton, Illinois. The name also appears as West Alton. (RED BOOK 1913-14, 451; Eaton; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Whitecorn
Description:A town in the center part of Portage des Sioux Township. It was probably so named because so much white corn was raised in this section. The variety generally grown is St. Charles White and is of superior quality. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 261; COM. ATLAS, 229; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:White's Fort
Description:An early wooden fort on Dog Prairie. It was built during the Indian War to serve as a place of refuge in time of Indian attack. It was named in honor of its builder, Captain James White, of Ohio, who was the first white settler in this vicinity. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 14; Bryan & Rose, 94, 526)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:White's Prairie
Description:See Dog Prairie.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Whosau Trace
Description:An early highway which ran westward into the wilderness, or what was then Howard County, from St. Charles. It was almost parallel with Boone's Lick Road. James Kennedy located the road in 1815. Earlier it was known as Whosau Trail and was used by Daniel Boone. There were traces left of the old road as late as 1885. Whosau is probably a primitive form of the tribal name of the Osage Indians, toward whose territory it led. Houck declares that the original Indian form of the name was Wa ca se, Waw sash e, or Wass ash sha. Coronado in 1541 spoke of them as the Haxa or Hayas. Marquette spelled the word Ouchages and Autrechacha. On Franquelin's map it was spelled Zages, and by Penicault Huzzas, Ous, and Wawhas. Du Tissenet in 1719 named the river Ouschage, from which the translation to the usual French spelling Osage was not difficult. Considering these multifarious renderings of the word, it is not difficult to accept Whosau as another attempt, perhaps surviving in oral usage. The nearest form to Whosau is probably Penicault's Huzzas. Cf. Ordway's spelling Hoozaw for Osage in the name of Femme Osage Creek (q.v.). This probably represented fairly well the current pronunication in early days. (Houck, HISTORY OF MISSOURI I, 133, 177-9; Pike II, 371, ed. Coues; Holcombe's HISTORY VERNON 1887, 94; Thwaites EWT XVI, 273; HISTORY OF ST. CHARLES, 1121; Miss Johnson's thesis, under "Osage River;" William Hollenbeck)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Whosau Trail
Description:See Whosau Trace
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wide Awake School
Description:A rural school district in the southeastern part of Hickory Grove Township and probably in the southwestern part of Cuivre River. The name is ideal. (83RD REPORT; Forrest W. Hughes; F.W. Kehr; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wife of Faim of the Hoozaw River
Description:See Femme Osage Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wilkie
Description:A station in the southern part of Portage des Sioux Township. It is sometimes called Wilkie Station. It was named in honor of John Wilkie, who was born in Hanover, August 12, 1823, came to America in 1842, and served in the militia during the Civil War. He started as a farm hand and finally acquired almost a section of land. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 439; COM. ATLAS, 229; Benj. Emmons)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wilkie Station
Description:See Wilkie.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Williamsburg
Description:See Wellsburg.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Woodlawn Institute
Description:See Woodlawn Seminary.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Woodlawn Seminary
Description:A school near O'Fallon. In 1863 Professor R.H. Pittman opened a school at his home in St. Charles County for the purpose of educating young women for Christian living. The school continued until 1874 when he became president of Harvard College. After two years he retuned and organized Woodlawn Seminary in September 1876, on a new location in the same county. The name is probably descriptive of the setting. The school was also known as Woodlawn Institute. (Lewis, 455; ST. C. C-M, May 30, 1900)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wunsch School
Description:In the northern part of Portage des Sioux Township. It was probably so named for William Wunsch or some member of his family, as he owned land adjoining the school in 1875. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 17; ROAD MAP OF ST. CHARLES COUNTY; B.H. Jolly)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Yarnell's Lane
Description:An early road near the Boone's Lick Road, so named for John Yarnell, an early settler. (MHR, XXVIII, 13)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Zumwalt's Fort
Description:An early fort about one and a half miles northwest of the present town of O'Fallon, on Perruque Creek. The fort, which was originally a hewed log house, often sheltered as many as ten families at one time from Indian attack. Jacob Zumwalt, for whom it was named, was the son of a German immigrant of the same name. He settled on the Perruque in 1796, and built the fort in 1798. (Bryan & Rose, 94, 195; HIST. ST. CHARLES, 152; Williams, N.E. MISSOURI I, 581; Mrs. P.O. Foristell)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Zumwalt's Mill
Description:A water mill on the Perruque. It was possibly named for C. Zumwalt, who owned land on the Perruque in this region. (HIST. ST. CHARLES, 116; TOWNSHIP PLATS I)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

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