Ripley County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Acorn
Description:Name of a discontinued post office for the old railroad station Sinsabaugh (q.v.) in the southeastern part of Harris Township. Named for the large acorns of the cow oak, or overcup oak that grew in that vicinity. (Postal Guide 1907-1932; J.K. Langford; Mrs. E. O'Neil)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Acorn School
Description:Named for the post office Acorn (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Amity Church, No. 2
Description:See Amity Missionary Baptist Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Amity Missionary Baptist Church
Description:In 1833 the church site was given by George W. Young and the Baptist Church was organized October 3, 1883. As there were a number of Methodists, Christians, and Presbyterians in the community, they were welcome to call one of their ministers and use the house at any time--thus the name. About 1892 the Baptists sold the house to the Methodists (see Bethany Church), but prior to this, as early as 1889, a group of the Baptists had left the Amity Church and built a house two and a half miles south, known as Amity No. 2 for a time. Eventually this number was dropped from the name, the Christians and Presbyterians were scattered, and the two churches remain--Bethany Methodist and Amity Baptist. (Wm. Ponder; Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Tate; W.H. Roberson; MINUTES OF CANE CREEK ASSOCIATION; Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Antioch Christian Church
Description:Five miles south of Doniphan. It was organized about 1910 by Reverend J.M. Stout. Since the membership moved to Ponder and Doniphan, the church has not been used for several years. For the name cf. above. (J.F. Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Antioch Church
Description:See Hopewell Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Arnold Cemetery
Description:One and a half miles southwest of Fairdealing (q.v.). It was started during the Civil War as a family burial ground on the James Arnold farm. Now used by the public. (D.A. Chinn; Mrs. Margaret Arnold)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Backwoods School
Description:See Ormsby School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bardley
Description:A village and post office in the southwestern part of Pine Township. J. Peter Woodring, a merchant here, offered the name Bordley, his old home town in Union County, Kentucky, which he had left about 1891. Somehow a mistake was made and the Postal Department spelled it with an "a." The nickname, "Tight Wad," was sometimes applied because some merchants dealt so closely in trade. (Postal Guide 1895; George Dale; C. Myatt; Mrs. Jack Woodring; C.F. Franken)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bardley Camp
Description:A C.C.C. camp near Bardley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bardley Cemetery
Description:About one mile north of the village. Earlier known as the Woodring Graveyard for J. Peter Woodring. See Bardley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barfield
Description:Now Naylor (q.v.). Established and named by the Iron Mountain Railroad officials, when the Doniphan Branch of the road was built for Oscar F. Barfield, a large landowner and farmer, who gave the site. His father, Louis K. Barfield, had come from Illinois before the Civil War and entered land in Ripley County. (Postal Guide 1886-1892; I.H. Barnhill; F.M. Van Dover; Mrs. Mattie Barfield)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barfield Station
Description:An early name sometimes given to Barfield (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barkadaro School
Description:In Harris Township. Said to have been named by the donor of the site, J.L. Stilwell, for the name of a school in northern Missouri, his old home; but no such school has been identified. Miss Hoskinson writes that the name was coined by her father, B.F. Hoskinson, at the time the school was organized about 1900, from the Spanish embarcadero, possibly with some such sense in mind as "voyage." The source must be considered doubtful. (Mrs. Maud Stilwell; Mrs. H.I. Withrow; Miss Hazel Hoskinson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barn Hollow
Description:It leads into Orchard Hollow at one of the barns on Andrew J. Whitwell's farms, an earlier settler from Tennessee in the vicinity of Bennett (q.v.), who had developed a large farm there. (J. Whitwell; A.C. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barren
Description:A post office established during the 1880s, in the home of Louis Hedrick in Kelley Township in Carter County. After the death of Mr. Hedrick in 1908, it was moved into various homes near Big Baren Creek, whence its name until Mr. Lewis (cf. Lewis Cave) took it into his home, where it remained until the rural route was established in 1933. (W.R. Holland; J. Whitwell; A.C. Randall; Postal Guide 1888- 1932)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barren Creek
Description:See Big Barren Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Battle Hollow
Description:A valley two and a half miles southwest of Ponder. According to a local informant, it took its name from a considerable skirmish fought there between Captain Reeve's Confederate force and the Union soldiers. The engagement referred to was doubtless the one commonly known as the Ponder's Mill battle, fought on September 20, 1864. It was the opening encounter of Price's famous Missouri Expedition of August 29 to Secember 2, 1864, and one of the most notable of Confederate successes on that last ill- fated effort of the Southern arms in the state. According to Wiley Britton's history, the raid began with the entrance into Missouri of the Confederate column under General Joseph Shelby. Near Ponder's Mill the Confederates came upon and surrounded a detachment of eighty men under Lieutenant Erich Pape. A full account is given in the official records compiled in THE WAR OF THE REBELLION, from which it appears that the skirmish took place on Little Black River, and that all but ten of the Union forces were either captured or killed. There is no mention in either of these authorities of the Southern officer named Reeves in connection with this particular engagement, but he is doubtless to be identified with the well known Colonel Timothy Reeves, for whom see under Reeves Station in Butler County. Colonel (not Captain) Reeves may well have been in command of that part of the confederate forces immediately engaged at Ponder's Mill. (Wm. S. Doherty; Wiley Britton, THE CIVIL WAR ON THE BORDER (1904) II.390; THE WAR OF THE REBELLION: A COMPILATION OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF THE UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES (1901 Series 1, Vol. xii, Part 1, p. 454)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bay Creek
Description:Heads in Gatewood Township and flows southwest across the corner of Oregon County into Eleven Points River in Arkansas. A family name. (W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bay Mill
Description:See Mabrey Springand Righter's Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Beaver Dam Creek
Description:Rises in southeast Johnson Township in Carter County and flows across Johnson Township in Ripley County, into Little Black River (q.v.) in Butler County. Beavers were numerous in this vicinity in the pioneer days and the animals' dens or dams were common along the stream. (J.K. Langford; Polly Powers; Mrs. Rachel Riggin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Beaverdam
Description:A discontinued post office in Johnson Township. Holly Powers, the first postmaster, cared for the mail in his home, but ran the Powers Mill (q.v.) just over the line in Butler County. It was given the name of the stream nearby. (A. Ferguson; Mrs. A. Mahan; Mrs. M. Arnold; Postal Guide 1897)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bee Rock
Description:In Pine Township. A pool of living water in Little Barren Creek, surrounded by rocky hills and small bluffs, the only remains of the old logging camp of the Ozark Land and Lumber Company, abandoned about 1902. A watering place for wild bees. (Mrs. Eva Franken; A. Shehorn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Beech Ridge
Description:A small sandy ridge in southeastern Thomas Township. The land was generally swampy, but the few sandy ridges were, in the early days, covered with timber. Here a few tall silvery beech trees grew in the forests. (Mrs. Alice Hopkins; Green Bros.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Beech Ridge School
Description:Also Lone Beech, for the one beech tree that stood for some years. See Beech Ridge, for which it doubtless was named. (Mrs. Alice Hopkins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bell and Cotton Springs
Description:Three good springs one mile east of Doniphan, near the boundary line separating the farms formerly owned by two prominent Baptist ministers, Alec Bell and Morgan Cotton. Now owned by Albert Norman. Often mentioned separately as Bell Spring or Cotton Spring. (J.K. Langford; Mrs. Emma Dunningham; Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bell School
Description:See Bellview School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bell Spring
Description:See Bell and Cotton Springs
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bellview (East) School
Description:See Bellview School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bellview Missionary Baptist Church
Description:An old church nine miles northeast of Doniphan, organized as early as 1889 at least; Mr. Young thinks it was much earlier. One church record gives the date of organization as 1898, but Mr. Roberson explains it is much older and that about that time a new house was built and the church was much revived. It took its name from the old school, Bellview (q.v.). (Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young; W.H. Roberson; M.G.B.A. 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bellview Road
Description:Mr. Doherty explains that it is an old traditional landmark, an early pioneer road that led from the northern part of Howell County through the Irish Wilderness (q.v.) where it intersects with the Gatewood Ponder Road which extends on to Doniphan. Mr. Doherty thinks the Bellview School was named for the road, but Mr. Misel thinks the road was named for the Bellview School. I am inclined to believe, since Mr. Misel's explanation corresponds with the map, that he is correct in saying that the road took the school name. (Wm. S. Doherty; S.B. Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bellview School [1 of 2]
Description:One of the old schools in Flatwood Township, built on land belonging to F.W. Bell, who came from Pennsylvania in 1870, and owned a farm northeast of Doniphan. He later became postmaster in Doniphan. For a number of years it was known as Bell School, also, for Mr. Bell. When the community outgrew the old box house and erected another building its name became Bellview East School to distinguish it from the Bellview School (q.v.) in Union Township. The name is of double origin, named for Mr. Bell and for the topography of that part of the county. The region is nearly level and one could see for some distance when the view was not obstructed with timber. The suffix "view" appears to be a favorite in this section of the county. Cf. High View School and Fairview School. (Wm. Ponder; S. McPheeters; Mr. and Mrs. J.R. Borth)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bellview School [2 of 2]
Description:Another Bellview School, in Union Township. For many years it was the only school in that community on the old Bellview Road (q.v.). It later acquired the name of Bellview (West) School to be designated as a different one from Bellview (East) School (q.v.). (W.H. Roberson; Wm. S. Doherty; S.B. Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bellview West School
Description:See Bellview School in Union Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bennett
Description:A village and post office in Kelly Township. Named by Andrew J. Whitwell, the first postmaster, for Wm. Bennett, an old resident and landowner, who had made the petition for the post office before he moved to Texas in 1876. (Postal Guide Polk (1883) 85; Postal Guide 1883; J.K. Langford; Mr. and Mrs. George Dale; L.P. Whitwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bennett Church
Description:See Liberty Hill Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bennett Point School
Description:In Gatwood Township. Established in 1895, built on the point of a hill near the headwaters of Ryan Creek (q.v.). Named for Claud Bennett who gave the site. It was at first generally known as Bennett's Point School, but gradually the possesive element was lost. (Mrs. E. O'Neill; W.R. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bennett School
Description:One of the oldest schools in Kelley Township, one and a half miles northwest of Bennett (q.v.). Named for Wm. Bennett who gave the land. (J.K. Langford; Mr. and Mrs. George Dale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bennett's Point School
Description:See Bennett Point School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Berthold
Description:A star route post office established in the farm home of Berthold P. Ladd, five and a half miles southeast of Doniphan. Ladd, for whom the office was named, was captain of Company E. from Ripley County in the Spanish-American War. His daughter carried the mail and probably suggested the name. Ladd died in Panama. (J.K. Langford; Postal Guide 1913-1915)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethany Cemetery
Description:See Young Cemetery.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethany Methodist Church
Description:About four miles northeast of Doniphan. Formerly known as Amity (q.v.). The church was organized in a farm home, Henry Tschudin's, by Reverend S.C. Biffle in the winter of 1890. In 1892 or 1893 the Methodist congregation bought the Amity Church house from the Baptists. At Mr. W.H. Tate's suggestion, the name was changed to Bethany, for the home of Lazarus, Martha, and Mary. (J.K. Langford; Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Tate; John 11:1; Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethel Bridge
Description:This old bridge, across Little Black River near the present location of Torch, had a puncheon floor. It took the name from Bethel Lake, a long narrow lake, in Thomas Township, now drained by ditch No. 2. This lake was very fine for fishing and hunting wild ducks in the earlier days. William and John Bethel owned the land and they are said to have built the bridge. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Thagmartin; Mr. and Mrs. D.A. Chinn; Mrs. J.F. Kelley; Wm. Ponder)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church, organized in 1930, near Torch and named for William Bethel a prominent resident who died in 1933. Another informant explained it was named for its meaning, the house of God (cf. Bethel Bridge). (E. Prior; J.W. Dodd; Mrs. S. Osborn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethel Lake
Description:See Bethel Bridge
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethlehem Church [1 of 2]
Description:The Church of Christ at Gatewood. Organized in 1870 by Reverend N.J. Chance. Named for Bethlehem, the place of Christ's birth. It now has a very small membership, but had for several years as many as one hundred twenty members. (Mrs. L. Pulliam; W.R. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethlehem Church [2 of 2]
Description:A defunct Missionary Baptist Church in Dudley neighborhood southeast of Doniphan, organized as early as 1889 and was active as late as 1919 (cf. above). (W.H. Roberson, Minutes of Cave Creek Association)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Bailey Creek
Description:Shown on Campbell's Map 1873 as the name for Big Barren Creek, but I find no one who ever heard of the name. Probably it is a misprint.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Barren Cave
Description:See Lewis Cave
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Barren Church
Description:In Kelley Township. The church, Missionary Baptist, was built in 1905; but the organization is much older, before 1877. Prior to 1905 Big Barren School, which name it acquired, was used for their services. The church as retained the old school name, but it is now used by any denomination. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis; W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Barren Creek
Description:It rises in Kelley Township, in Carter County and flows across Pine and Kelley townships of Ripley County into Current River. Annual fires for many years prevented the growth of larger timber, but vast stretches of the country were covered with a heavy growth of grass, good for grazing. "The Barrens" were excellent pasture lands during the earlier days, and cattle owners, even fifteen miles away, whould drive their herds into these regions where they could live far into the winter. No doubt, the stream acquired its name from these grassy lands. The map of 1842 gives the name Barren Creek. The 1855 map gives the name of this stream 18 Mile Creek; informants say the stream is about eighteen or nineteen miles long. On the 1867 map, it is named Big Barren Creek. Doubtless the adjective "big" was added after Little Barren Creek (q.v.) acquired its name, which time must have been soon after the Civil War when this section was being rapidly settled. It is shown on the 1873 map as Big Bailey Creek (q.v.). It is sometimes known as Sinking Creek, because it flows underground for some distance. (H.D. Condray; J. Lewis; J.J. Chilton; W.D. Randel; C.E. Drain)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Barren School
Description:In the northern part of Kelley Township, about one and a quarter miles from its original location. It was established prior to 1877 near the creek, from which it took its name. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Cave on Barren
Description:See Lewis Cave
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Logan Creek
Description:See Cypress Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bill's Creek
Description:A small tributary of Current River in Doniphan Township. Named for William Richmond, a later landowner and farmer in the community. (J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Church
Description:A derisive name given by a few of the community to the Bardley Christian Church after that denomination had disbanded and the Pentecost congregation began using the house about 1933. (Mr. and Mrs. George Dale; C.E. Drain)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blackley School
Description:Another name by which Logan Creek School was sometimes known after Eli Blackley, a prominent farmer, bought land in the community. (Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Hole
Description:A spring- fed deeper bay, bluish in color, of Clear Creek (q.v.) east of Pine (q.v.). It is one of the mill camps of the Missouri Land and Mining Company, established in 1896 or 1897. It was also known as Thaxton Camp because it was on J.A. Thaxton's land. Now generally known only as Blue Hole Spring. (J.K. Langdon; C.F. Franken; J.N. Sparks; J.A. Thaxton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Hole Spring
Description:See Blue Hole
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bluff Spring
Description:A good spring, very useful in the earlier days, situated at the foot of an abrupt hill near the eastern edge of Doniphan. (Mrs. E. O'Neill; Mrs. Emma Cunningham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bollinger Mill
Description:See Ferguson Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bonanza Springs
Description:An abandoned village in Flatwoods Township, laid out by Gus. H. Rife in 1909. The water, analyzed by the state, was reported pure and of the finest quality. The founder gave the name with the idea that he would develop a splendid health and pleasure resort, but the dream was never realized. The name is an American colloquialism meaning anything that yields a large income. (Websters Dictionary; J.K. Langford; Mrs. D. Varner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bond's Branch
Description:A small branch of Ryan Creek in Union Township. Named for Josiah Bond, an early settler. (Mr. and Mrs. E. Cline; C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Borth
Description:A lumber village and post office on the Doniphan Branch Railroad. Congressman William Dawson suggested the name for his friend Herman Borth who had a sawmill at the place. Born of German parents in St. Louis, Mr. Borth came to the county during the timber boom and later was a merchant in Doniphan for a number of years. Nothing remains of the place now, but the Borth Spring, which took the name of the village. (J.K. Langford; J.R. Borth; Postal Guide 1887-1888)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Borth Spring
Description:See Borth
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Box
Description:A post office in Kelley Township, established in 1892 through the efforts of Mr. Willis A. Randel, who owned and operated a store in the timber works community. In answer to the request of the postal department that the name be short, his box-style store building suggested to him the name. (C. Myatt; L.P. Whitwell; W.A. Randel; Postal Guide 1897-1901)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Briar
Description:A post office and village on Highway 42 in Sherley Township. Lemuel Fogle, a merchant and the first postmaster, named it Briar Creek for the stream nearby. The postal department shortened the name to Briar in 1937. (J.K. Langford; Geo. Dale; E. Fogle; P.L. Polk (1883) 85; Postal Guide 1886-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Briar Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A small stream in Sherley Township, flowing into Current River. It was also known earlier as Green Briar Creek for the saw briar or bamboo vine, commonly known as green briar. This vine remains green and often holds many of its leaves which remain green for the entire winter. This vine is very common in southern Missouri. (Mrs. Jack Woodring; George Dale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Briar Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A village. See Briar.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Briar Creek Township
Description:Formed August 4, 1880, from that part of Doniphan Township west of Current River. Named for its largest creek. On August 10, 1892, it was made a part of Sherley Township. (County Court Records, F.87, H. 605; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brinkerhoff Spur
Description:An abandoned timber station three and a half miles south of Doniphan on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Established in 1907 for loading lumber, ties, and piling during the thriving timber days. Named by railroad officials for S.L. Brinkerhoff, who came from Ohio and operated sawmills in this vicinity. (J.K. Langford; C. Myatt; C.D. Sinsabaugh)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown School
Description:See Slayton School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown's Mill
Description:A mill village, now extinct, in Sherley Township on South Fork of Buffalo Creek. William A. Brown operated a sawmill there from about 1912-1925. (J.K. Langford; C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buckskull
Description:See Current View
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Budapest
Description:A discontinued post office in Johnson Township, established by foreigners, chiefly Austrians and Bohemians from New York and Chicago, who purchased from the Missouri Lumber and Mining Company cut-over land and developed a thriving settlement about 1910. Their leader, the first postmaster, Gabriel Oberney, who had come from Austria, probably suggested the name for the capital city of Hungary. (J.K. Langford; L.P. Whitwell; Reverend H.H. Smelser; Postal Guide 1913-1922)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Budapest School
Description:Named for the post office.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buffalo Cemetery
Description:See Buffalo Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buffalo Church
Description:A Primitive Baptist Church one-half mile east of Bennett (q.v.). Organized in the Buffalo School house, from which it was named, at least as early as 1885, by Reverend A.J. Whitwell who gave the site. Buffalo Cemetery marks the site of the little box church house that was used for a number of years. The cemetery was known as the Chestnut Cemetery also, for Thomas Chestnut, on whose land it was started. The burial ground is still used by the public but is owned by the Chestnut heirs. (A.C. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buffalo Creek
Description:Western tributary of Current River. Formed by the junction of North Fork and South Fork in Kelley Township. On the Plat of the County, Survey of March, 1821, the name is spelled "Buffaloe." It is said that during the pioneer days a few buffaloes were found. Others think the name came from the abundance of buffalo fish found in the lower part of the stream. (J.K. Langford; H. Thaxton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buffalo School
Description:In Kelley Township, near the junction of the two branches that form Buffalo Creek, from which it took its name. Organized as early as 1875 and situated originally in the southern side of Prong (q.v.). (Mrs. J.A. Thaxton; George Dale; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buffalo Wallow
Description:A pond in Pine Township, one mile east of Handy (q.v.). Tradition says it was really made by the buffaloes. Mr. Drain explains that it appears to be like those he has seen in Kansas. (C.E. Drain)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buncomb Cemetery
Description:See Buncomb School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buncomb Ridge
Description:A low sandy ridge extending from Success, Arkansas, into Thomas Township across the southwestern corner of Butler County. The name is found in Franklin County and used for several places in the southern states, especially Buncombe County, North Carolina, which gave rise to the famous Americanism "talking for Buncombe," hence buncombe, bunk == "hot air" (see Dictionary of American English). Gannett says all were originally named for Colonel Edward Buncombe of the Continental Army. Colonel Edward Buncombe was born in the West Indies, came to the American colonies and settled in Tyrrel County, North Carolina. In the Revolutionary War he raised and commanded the 5th North Carolina Regiment, and fought at the battles of Brandywine and Germantown. In the latter engagement he was severely wounded, captured, and died of his wounds in Philadelphia in 1777. His name was given to the North Carolina County in 1791. (APPLETON'S CYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY). The phrase "talking to (or for) Buncombe (or bunkum)" is first cited by the DAE in 1828; the story of its origin in a Congressional speech is told in Bartlett's DICTIONARY OF AMERICANISMS in 1848. (S. Pottenger; A.F. Gray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buncomb School
Description:In Thomas Township on the northern part of Buncomb Ridge which name it took when it was established about 1907. Buncomb Cemetery, near, was earlier known as Eaton Graveyard, for Henry M. Eaton, who during the 1870s gave an acre for the burial ground. (Mrs. Alice Hopkins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buncomb Slough
Description:Another name for Red Sea (q.v.), which lies parallel with Buncomb Ridge, from which it doubtless took its name (cf. Buncomb Ridge).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Burnham School
Description:In Washington Township. John Burnham gave the land for the site. (M.F. Van Dover; P. Hurlson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Burr
Description:An abandoned village and post office in Union Township near the state line. For several years Moses Burr operated a cotton gin and store. The post office which he kept in his store was given his name. (Postal Guide 1901-1919; J.K. Langford; S.B. Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buzzard's Run
Description:A small tributary of Little Black River in Washington and Varner townships. Mr. Langford attributes the name to the fact that buzzards had roosting places in that vicinity. Mr. Young explains that it is a family name. He knew one of the family, John Buzzard, whose father had lived in the community during the 1870s. (Lee Young; J.K. Langford; C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Caldwell Creek
Description:A small stream rising in Washington Township and flowing into Logan Creek in Varner Township. The Caldwells were very early settlers there. The spelling "Calwell" on one map is evidently a mistake. (Mrs. A. Mahan; Green Bros.; J.P. Campbell; W.H. Roberson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Roy
Description:A tie and logging camp at the head of Terrible Creek in Pine Township during the late timber days from about 1912 to 1925. The land is now in farms. Named for Roy Chroinski who was foreman for the Western Tie and Timber Company. The Camp Roy Sawmill was situated one and a half miles northeast, nearer South Fork of Buffalo Creek. (J.K. Langford; C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Roy Sawmill
Description:See Camp Roy
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Capps Creek
Description:An eastern tributary of Current River in Jordan Township. Named for Nimrod Capps, who owned a large tract of land and operated a mill for grinding corn and sawing lumber during pioneer days. (J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carie
Description:A post office in Sherley Township. Discontinued in 1913, and the mail sent to Briar Creek (q.v.), two and a half miles away. James F. Young, who was instrumental in getting the office established in a country store belonging to his father Van Young, is said to have given the name. Some of the informants thought the origin of the name was Mr. Young's wife or an old sweetheart, But Mr. Young's own statement is emphatic: "Not for any certain person; I just looked for a short, unusual name and just thought of it." Possibly Mr. Young found the name already in use, for it is an old family name (usually spelled Cary) in the county. (E. Fagle; A.C. Randel; J.W. Dodd; J.F. Young; Postal Guide 1901-1913)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carlyle School
Description:See Fernhook and Lone Star School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carrico School
Description:See Dunn School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Casteel Spring
Description:The early name of the spring at Spring Hill Church (q.v.). Two brothers, George and John Casteel, lived there. (J.W. Lereau; Mrs. Margaret Arnold)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Catholic Cemetery
Description:An old burial ground one-half mile southeast of Ponder (q.v.), that marks the site of a church built there in 1878 by a settlement of Irish who had gone there during the Civil War from the Irish Wilderness (q.v.). The house, in gradual decay, disappeared about twenty years ago. The cemetery which is still used, was originally known as the Clark Graveyard, for James Clark (dead years ago), an early settler who lived there. (J.W. Dodd; J.P. Campbell; Mrs. E. O'Neill; Mr. and Mrs. L. Pullium)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cave Spring
Description:See Lewis Cave
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Bluff
Description:A bluff, covered with cedar trees, on Logan Creek, marked a good fishing place during the earlier days. (Mrs. Emma Cunningham; C.F. Franken)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Creek
Description:A small stream in Jordan Township flowing into Current River. Many cedar trees formerly grew along the creek. (C.F. Franken)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Lodge Club House
Description:A log building on Current River in Harris Township built by George Ederer about 1917. Descriptive name for cedar trees there. (Mr. and Mrs. C.M. O'Brien)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Celynda
Description:A post office in Gatewood Township, in the extreme southwestern part. Established about 1899 by Wm. L. Hudson, a farmer, who had a store and blacksmith shop at this place. Some think the name was taken from the given name of some member of the family, but Mr. Shipman explains that Mrs. Hudson had told him that the postal authorities rejected the name her husband sent in and offered this name. It is very probably a feminine Christian name. Cf. June Switch and Joan Spur. (Wm. S. Doherty; E. Weeks; F. Shipman; Postal Guide 1901-1904)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Center Hill Missionary Baptist Church
Description:Situated about seven miles east of Doniphan, on the highest elevation, near the center of Logan School Community (q.v.). Established in 1908. (Mrs. A. Mahan; Wm. Ponder; M.B.G.A. 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cherokee Bay Road
Description:A noted old pioneer road extending southwest from the Military Road (q.v.) from the Cane Creek Settlement through Naylor, Ripley County (q.v.), to the old Cherokee Indian Settlement in northern Arkansas, called Cherokee Bay. From Houck's map, II, 227, it appears to be a part of the old Natchitoches Path. The road has recently received considerable improvement and is used extensively. (Mrs. Melvina Pottenger; A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chestnut Cemetery
Description:See Buffalo Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clark Graveyard
Description:See Catholic Cemetery
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clear Creek
Description:Heads near Pine (q.v.) and flows east into North Fork of Buffalo Creek. The clear, sparkling appearance suggested the name. (C.F. Franken)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cogshell Branch
Description:A branch of Cypress Creek, heading near Fairdealing. Caleb Cogshell owned land there before 1859. (Mrs. A. Mahan; Reverend Wm. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Colvin Creek
Description:A small tributary of Current River in Jordan Township. A very early family of this name lived there, long before the Civil War. (Mrs. Martha Nunnellee; Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Colvin School
Description:One of the older schools, near the creek for which it is named. Later divided into Pleasant Grove and Macedonia schools. (W.D. Randel; N. Sullivan; L.P. Whitwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Compton Creek
Description:In Kelley Township, a western tributary of Current River. The stream and valley, Compton Hollow, took the name of the first settler there, John Compton. (J.K. Langford; L.P. Whitwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Compton Hollow
Description:See Compton Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Conway Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township. It leads into Current River. It is a pioneer family name. (J. Lewis; W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cope Branch
Description:A small stream in Washington Township, flowing into Little Black River. It took the name of Sandy Cope, the informant's grandfather, who came from Tennessee, but originally from North Carolina, and entered land here in 1846. (Fred Cope)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Corinth Church
Description:A General Baptist Church one mile from the old Gum Spring (q.v.), which was organized about 1920. Corinth was the old capital of Achaia, Greece, where Paul and Timothy preached. (Mrs. A. Mahan; Reeverend J.A. Leroux; Mr. and Mrs. F.M. Van Dover; Cor. 1:1; Acts 1:1.18)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Corrigan Spring
Description:Another name given for Griffin Spring (q.v.). A family name, very likely one of the early Irish settlers. (See Irish Settlement, Oregon County). It is now on land owned by the heirs of James Sanders, by whose name the spring is sometimes known. The name Terrapin Spring was given because so many of these dry land turtles are found there. (J.W. Dodd; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Dale; Mrs. E. O'Neill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cotton Spring
Description:See Bell and Cotton Springs
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crook Spring
Description:The spring at the old Matthew School (q.v.) on land entered during the 1840s by Green Crook who came from South Carolina. A Mr. Botton owns the land and spring now. (Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cross Roads
Description:See Gamburg
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cross Roads Church
Description:See New Hope Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cross Roads School
Description:In Varner Township. Named from its situation on two neighborhood roads. (Mr. and Mrs. D. Varner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cuba School
Description:See Walnut Grove School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Current River
Description:This stream, considered by many persons the most beautiful one of the Ozarks, has its headwaters in two branches, one of which is Jack's Fork rising in Texas County, the other and main stream heads in Dent County. These two units in Shannon County, and the stream flows through Carter and Ripley counties, and into Arkansas where it unites with Big Black River at Pocahontas, Arkansas. Schoolcraft remarks of it in his TOUR INTO MISSOURI, p. 85: "...a noble stream, 1000 feet wide at the ferry Hick's or Hix's...originates in springs in the Missouri barrens two hundred fifty miles west." McCane explains that the stream flows from huge springs in Montauk State Park. Various spellings have been found for the name. Schoolcraft on p. 59 of the above mentioned book, spells in "Current's," but in later pages the apostrophe is dropped. On maps of 1822, 1824, 1922, 1842 the spelling is "Current." Beck spells it "Currents." Various persons have been given as the donor of the name. Goodspeed says that John Shaw, who came to this stream in 1808, called it "Current" for its swiftness. Mr. Hinchey mentions this statement but he says the first name Swift Water, was given by the Indians; but I have found no definite proof of this nor a trace of the Indian name. Dr. Dorrance explains that after the Red Man, the French name of the stream was La Riviere Courante; after them, the Spanish Rio Corrents; then the name, which is apparently lost, signified "Swift Water;" the French translated this adequately as "La Riviere Courante, since the French adjective "courant" means "running or rapid." The present name Current River is rather an anglicisation of the French than a translation. (A. Hinchey; Conard II, 208; McCanse 32' THOSE OZARK STREAMS., 37; TOUR INTO MISSOURI, 59, 85)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Current River Fishing and Hunting Club House
Description:It was established about 1925, five miles south of Doniphan on the western side of Current River, by St. Louis and Doniphan people. It burned in 1935. (Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Current River Township
Description:A small division on the southern border. As relocated and bounded in 1871, it occupied a large part of the southern border, including most of what is now included in parts of Harris, Doniphan, Paynor, Union, and all of Current River divisions. Named for its main stream. (J.K. Langford; County Record E, 167)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Current View
Description:A very small village in Harris Township on Current River. Being on a navigable stream, steamboats came this far in the early day and it became quite a little village during the late 1880s and 1890s. Thomas J. Wilson, who owned the land, laid off the lots and several homes sprang up. The post office was established about 1895, and the name given, one informant understands, by Thomas J. Wilson, from whose home one could get a beautiful view of the river current for some distance. Up to this time the place, a mere trading post on the river, was known as Buckskull, but the exact origin of this name is shrouded in legend. One reports that a large buck was killed and the skull hung up at the post; another that in 1858 the place was known by this name; another informant was told by J.R. Kelley that he saw the skull. There were many deer in the section, and hunting and trapping were important industries. The old Indian name was Donawali--one informant thinks Cherokee; another, Osage. Cherokee is likely correct because a section of north Arkansas between Black and Current Rivers is known as Cherokee Bay. Cf. the note on possible Cherokee origin of Low Wassie Creek in Oregon County. (J.K. Langford; J.R. Hume; Green Bros.; Mrs. J.R. Kelley; Lee Young; Reverend Wm. McPheeters; Mrs. T. Hancock; Postal Guide 1897-1913; Mrs. M. Arnold)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cyclone Cemetery
Description:See Cyclone School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cyclone Church
Description:See Cyclone School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cyclone School
Description:In Harris Township. About 1891, soon after a tornado had laid waste a section of the country here, the school was established and named for the event. Any strong wind storm was generally known as a "cyclone." Across the road from the school were the Primitive Baptist Church and the cemetery, which took the name of the school. The old church is gone, but the cemetery is still used. (Mrs. S. Osborn; Mrs. C.M. Yeats)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cypress Creek
Description:Heads in Doniphan Township, flows across the southwestern corner of Flatwood Township, across Washington Township, and into Logan Creek in Varner Township. Later it was also known as the headwaters of Big Logan Creek (q.v.). An old plat, survey of June, 1825, shows the lower part of Logan Creek as Cypress Creek. This clearly explains the name, for much cypress timber did grow along the lower part of what is now Logan Creek. Informants seemed to think there was very little cypress growing on what is now called Cypress Creek (see Logan Creek). (J.K. Langford; Mrs. E. Cunningham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cypress Creek Cemetery
Description:See Cypress Creek School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cypress Creek Methodist Church
Description:See Cypress Creek School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cypress Creek School
Description:The site of the original log building is now marked by the Cypress Creek Cemetery in Washington Township, earlier known as the Hasting Graveyard for George Hasting, an early settler, who owned land on this creek and deeded the burial ground. This school name was lost, as it was divided into other schools, chiefly Flatwoods (q.v.). About 1868, the Cypress Creek Methodist Church was organized in the old school house, and a building erected one-quarter of a mile away. A new church was erected about 1884, but the house was destroyed in 1927 by a tornado. (Mrs. A. Mahan; Sam McPheeters; Mrs. E. Cunningham; Green Bros.; Reverend Wm. McPheeters; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dalton's Graveyard
Description:See Dalton's Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dalton's Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill set up near the mouth of Mill Creek on Fourche Creek by Elijah Dalton, who came here from Tennessee before 1820. Later a son, Joe Dalton, made improvements and put in a turbine wheel. The mill, long since in ruins, was the voting place for years. The Dalton Graveyard near, named for Elijah Dalton, was begun as a family burial ground. It was later known as McCord Cemetery, for Calvin McCord, who owned land near. (J.W. Dodd; L. Pulliam; J.K. Langford; Joe Dalton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davidson's Store
Description:A country store and filling station on Highway 42, six miles west of Fairdealing, built recently and operated by Mrs. Elsie Davidson. (Mrs. Elsie Davidson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis School
Description:An old school that lost its identity as newer districts were formed. The County Court Records show it to have been the voting place in 1910. It was in a Davis Settlement. (J.W. Dodd; Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Deer Leap
Description:High bluff (100 ft.), on Current River seven miles north of Doniphan. Tradition says that early hunters chased a deer upon this bluff from which it leaped. (Mrs. H.P. Stone; MISSOURI GUIDE, 544)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Deerey Creek
Description:A small tributary of Current River in Harris Township. It is also called Wolf Creek, obviously because it was the habitat of wolves in pioneer days. One informant thinks "Deerey" was an old family name; but I have found no one else who knows the name, nor does there seem to be any evidence of the existence of such a surname anywhere in the region. It seems more probable that the word was an adjective "deer-y" coined from the word deer, signifying a place abounding in deer. The region did abound in deer in pioneer days, as is evidenced by the name Lick Spring (q.v.) near the stream. It is true that no such word as "deery" or "deerey" is recorded in any dictionary, but it would have been an entirely natural formation. Compare what Miss Bell has written about the prevalence of the suffix -y in the place-names of the neighboring section of southwest Missouri (p. 75): "An Ozark characteristic is fondness for the dimunitive ending. Among our place-names we find five of these dimunitives: 'piney,' 'brushy,' 'clifty,' 'gravelly,' and 'caney." (J.K. Langford; Mr. and Mrs. C.M. O'Brien; Miss Bell's thesis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Devil's Backbone
Description:A narrow rough elevation about one mile long south of Lewis Cave (q.v.), that forms a part of the divide between Little Barren and Big Barren creeks. The slopes are very rough and deep. Hence the name. Also known locally as Jennie's Ridge, from the fact that in the late 1890s Lewis Hardcastle had a good little fruit farm at the upper part of the ridge and also kept some jennets. This word is usually so pronounced by the unlettered. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. One
Description:Cf. Lateral Ditch and Ditch No. Two.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. Two
Description:It drains Bethel Lake (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dizmang Cemetery
Description:A public cemetery in Poynor Township. Originally the old family cemetery of the Dizmang family, who came as pioneers from Kentucky. (S.B. Misel; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dizmang School
Description:In Poynor Township. Established in 1880 on land formerly owned by John Dizmang, for whom it was named. (S.B. Misel; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doherty
Description:The early name for Ponder (q.v.). In the spring of 1878, Wm. S. Doherty and his brother Thomas set up a country store where the old Greenville road crossed Fourche Creek (see Ponder). (Mrs. Ellen O'Neill; W.R. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doherty Spring
Description:A good spring of living water that furnishes water for the whole community, one and a half mile east of Ponder, during dry seasons. Situated on the farm now owned by Wm. S. Doherty. (Wm. S. Doherty)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Donawali
Description:The name of the Indian village that once existed at the present site of Current View. The Land Mark Club reports a trading post by this name there as early as 1804, which was of considerable importance for fur trading in pioneer days. The source and meaning of the name have not been ascertained. (Land Mark Club; Mrs. M. Arnold)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doniphan
Description:On Current River and the Missouri Pacific Railroad in Doniphan Township. When Carter County was organized in 1859 with Van Buren (q.v.) as its county seat, Doniphan, which had been settled about 1847 was selected as the seat of justice for Ripley County. Abraham Martin, who had entered land here, suggested the name, explains Mr. Langford, for Colonel Doniphan, under whom he had fought during the Mexican War. Miss Williams says the donor of the name was George Lee whose residence stood at the present site of the Odd Fellows Lodge Hall, and who gave twenty-one acres for the village and cemetery. Alexander William Doniphan, born in Macon County, Kentucky, in 1808, the youngest of ten children, a noted lawyer and orator, was elected as colonel of the Missouri troops during the Mexican War. This troop, numbering about 800 men and led in person by Colonel Doniphan, was called to active service in May, 1846. At a peace conference in Washington 1861, President Lincoln recognized the former Colonel as the one who had made a "wild march against the Comanches and Mexicans." Doniphan died in Richmond, Virginia in 1887. The Indians had a village here, but I have been unable to find the Indian name. As early as 1802, according to the Land Mark Club of Doniphan, the trading post there was known as Galigini, but the source of that name has not been found. During the Civil War the village was pillaged and burned. (Miss M. Williams; J.K. Langford; Switzler, HISTORY OF MISSOURI, 260; MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW 24, 612; Conard, 2; 292; Douglass I, 292; Land Mark Club; P.L. 1860 Sutherland, 740; Postal Guide 1886- 1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doniphan and Poplar Bluff Road
Description:The early road connecting the two towns. Parts of the road are now highways 67 and 42.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doniphan Branch
Description:A branch of the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad, constructed from Neelyville to Doniphan. It was opened for traffic May 1, 1883. (Maps 1884 ff.; St. Louis Railroad office by G.R. Mabie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doniphan Township
Description:The east-central division, formed from Current River Township. Organized and relocated in June, 1871, and named for the chief town (q.v.). (J.K. Langford; Court Record E, 167)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doyle
Description:A post office discontinued when rural routes were established in southeastern Sherley Township. Calvin Doyle, landowner, kept a small store and the office in his farm home. James F. Young, who owned the store and got the office established named it for the storekeeper, his father-in-law. (E. Cline; S.B. Misel; J.F. Young; Postal Guide 1901-1915)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Drunkard Spring
Description:About two miles northeast of Doniphan. The location of a distillery in the pioneer days. There was much drinking. (Mrs. E. O'Neill; J. Lewis; Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Branch
Description:A small branch, which disappears in dry weather, of Cypress Creek in Flatwoods Township. (Sam McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Spring [1 of 2]
Description:A spring in Poynor Township. See Dry Spring post office.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Spring [2 of 2]
Description:A post office in Poynor Township near the state line. It took the name of the spring nearby, which was not a living stream. It was kept for a long time by Wm. Meisel, who owned land and kept a store. The office was discontinued when Poynor (q.v.) was established. (S.B. Misel; P.L. 1860; Sutherland, 740; Postal Guide 1867-1892)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dryden
Description:A post office ten miles northeast of Doniphan, established by Daniel Fagan and kept in his home. A Dr. Douglas, relative of the Fagans, suggested the name for a lawyer, Nathaniel Dryden, then a member of the legislature. (J.K. Langford; Lee Young; Mrs. C. Gomer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dudley Creek
Description:An eastern tributary of Current River in Doniphan Township. Named for Willis Dudley, a pioneer who came from Tennessee in 1837 with a large family of sons and settled along the stream. The community was known for many years as the Dudley Settlement. (J.K. Langford; C. Myatt; W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dudley Mill
Description:See Ferguson Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dudley Settlement
Description:See Dudley Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dug Ford
Description:There are three places so named in Ripley County: one located near the old Military Road Crossing on Current River, one on Little Black River in Varner Township where a bridge was later built, and another at the Current River Road Crossing on Current River just below the mouth of Big Barren Creek. For the name, cf. "dug road" and "dugway" defined in the DAE as "a road dug in a cliff, along the bank of a river, etc." In all the places so called one or both of the banks had to be dug down to make the crossing possible or easier. (H. Thaxton; T. Kenzie; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dunn School
Description:In Sherley Township. John Dunn, a very successful farmer, owned land near the school. The earlier old log school was known as Carrico for a Mr. Carrico who owned land there. (F. Shipman; Mrs. E. O'Neill; Geo. Dale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:East Branch of Fourche Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:East Fork of Fourche Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:East Prong of Fourche River
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eaton Graveyard
Description:See Suncomb School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eighteen Mile Creek
Description:See Big Barren Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elizabeth Methodist Church
Description:Near Fernook (q.v.). The house was built in 1901 and the name given at this time for Mrs. Thomas McKinney formerly a teacher, whose given name was Elizabeth, the oldest charter member. The body, organizdd by Reverend Elmore Carlyle several years before 1901, had held services in the Bellview schoolhouse, where it was organized, and in the Bellview Baptist Church. The church gradually declined and in 1936 was sold to Jacob Hardcastel who used it in building a barn. One map marks the place Mt. Elizabeth. This is evidently a mistake for none of the informants had heard this name. (Mrs. G.G. Davis; W.H. Roberson; Lee Young; Sam McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elkins Spring
Description:A good, living spring, large for this section, on the farm now owned by Robert Elkins in Sherley Township. (C. Myatt; E. Cline)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elm Grove Church
Description:The General Baptist Church house built in Naylor about 1915 in a grove of elm trees. Prior to that they had held services in homes and a store building. Still an active church. (J.W. Leroux)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elm School
Description:See Ponder School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Emmaus Baptist Church
Description:The name of the old church ar Fairdealing, organized before the Civil War. Later known as the Fairdealing Church. The church of the latter name is not mentioned in the Association Minutes after 1912. The members scattered; the building has been gone for several years. Emmaus is a Bible name for a town of Judea. (Luke 24:13; Mrs. M. Arnold)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Emmons School
Description:In Johnson Township in the Emmons Settlement. Wm. Emmons was a landowner and farmer. An old family name. (W.D. Randel; E. O'Neill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:English Ferry
Description:See Gaines Ferry
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ernest
Description:A post office in Flatwoods Township. Established in the home of Mrs. Mabel Hill, the first postmistress who suggested the name of her nephew, Ernest B. Slayton. (J.K. Langford; E.B. Slayton; Postal Guide 1910-1918)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fair Dealing
Description:See Fairdealing
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fair View School
Description:In Johnson Township. On a small elevation in a nearly level region. (N. Sullivan; S. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fairdealing
Description:A village and post office in Washington Township on the old Military Road and Highway 14. Before the Civil War, William Rife owned a farm here, and put in a small store where the post office now stands. The town was laid out January 20, 1871, by the owner; but later the citizens appealed to the County Court, and the town organization was nullified; hence there are no legal numbers to the lots. In 1886, through the efforts of Gus Rife, son of William, the post office was established. The name of the village Fair Dealing was changed to Fairdealing by the postal authorities. The exact origin of the name seems lost and exists only in legend. There are two prevailing stories: In the early day, a stranger passing by, traded for a saddle here; feeling that he had got his money's worth, he remarked that that was a pretty fair dealing place. The idea of dealing fairly came to be a sort of joke, and thus the name Fair Dealing grew up long before the post office was established. Another story told is that during the Civil War, a rough character, going through the vicinity, stole a fine horse but left the saddle. The expression that he had dealt fairly suggested the name for the place. (Mrs. M. Arnold; J.K. Langford; M.F. Van Dover; E.G. Hurlson; Green Bros. THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC; P.L. Campbell, 1874; Postal Guide 1886-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fairdealing Academy
Description:Established in 1880, chiefly through the efforts of Gus Rife, County Commissioner of Shoals. A private school for upper grade and high school subjects. It was very influential up to the earliest years of the present century. (E.G. Hurlson; Miss Myrtle Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fairdealing Church
Description:See Emmaus Baptist Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ferguson Mill
Description:Originally Kittrell's Mill (q.v.). Then it was taken over by one of the early pioneers, David Bollinger, long before the Civil War. Later bought and operated by Jarret H. Dudley. James Ferguson then bought the mill in the 1880s and sold it to James McKenzie, under whose ownership it was demolished. At first a small grist mill, it had become very important in the 1870s as a corn and wheat mill and a carding factory. The old mill site, about two miles south of Doniphan, is in the city park, established in 1934. (Miss Myrtle Williams; J.K. Langford; J.R. Borth; Reverend J.A. Lereau)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fernnook
Description:An old post office in Jordan Township, established through the efforts of Reverend Elmore Carlyle, and kept at first in the home of E.J. Way. Mrs. E.J. Way suggested the postical name from the romantic appearance of the place--a beautiful valley with ferns, near Flat Creek. (Mrs. G.G. Davis; J.K. Langford; Mrs. C. Gomer; C. Butler; Postal Guide 1889-1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fernnook School
Description:Named for the village.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Flat Creek
Description:Rises in Jordan Township. Flows into Little Black River in Johnson Township. It took its name from the topography of the section. (S. McPheeters; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Flat Top School
Description:See Hill Top School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Flatwoods
Description:A discontinued post office kept in various homes and country stores in the community northwest of Fairdealing. Established in 1900 in the home of W.A. Ford who gave the name from the topography of the region. The school established later was named for the post office. (J.K. Langford; S. McPheeters; Mrs. A. Mahan; E.B. Slayton; Postal Guide 1901-1932)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Flatwoods School
Description:See Flatwoods
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Flatwoods Township
Description:One of the east-central border divisions, formed November 16, 1910, from parts of Doniphan, Johnson and Washington townships. Named for the post office near the center. (Court Record N, 109; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fogle Store
Description:A small grocery store and Shell filling station one mile west of Briar on Highway 14. Established in 1935 by Earl Fogle. (E. Fogle)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Forshe Township
Description:A west-central border division, organized and re-located in June, 1871. A misspelling for "fourche," its largest stream. This township was later divided among Gatewood, Sherley, Kelley, and Pine townships as they were formed. On County Court Record I, p. 196 the spelling is Fourche. (J.K. Langford; County Court Record E, 167)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fourche a Dumas
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fourche a Thomas
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fourche Creek
Description:This stream, to use its present name, rises in southwestern Sherley Township and flows southeast through Union Township into northern Arkansas, where it empties into Big Black River. Near the center of Union Township it is joined by two large branches, both larger than the upper part of the main stream. One of them, now known as the East Fork of Fourche Creek, rises in southern Pine Township, just south of Bardley. A little below the junction of the three, Fourche Creek recieves from the west Mill Creek, which rises in western Gatewood Township and flows almost due east, about halfway between Gatewood and Tucker, on into Union Township till it joins the Fourche about two miles west of Poynor. Another western tributary of Fourche Creek is the one now known as Dry Creek, which rises in southern Gatewood Township and flows east through southern Union Township across the State line into Arkansas, where it empties into the Fourche several miles farther south. This tangle of little streams has received during its history an even greater tangle of different names. The oldest name of the main stream was Fourche a Thomas, evidently bestowed by the French. It is so called by Schoolcraft (1821), the first to mention it so far as I have yet discovered. The name is repeated by Beck (1823), and on the maps of 1845, 1867, and 1873. Schoolcraft describes the "Fourche a Thomas River" as "a stream of lesser size than either Strawberry or Eleven-Points, which unites with Black River after winding a course of fifty miles." Beck says: "Fourche a Thomas (Thomas' Fork) rises in the hills which extend through the southwestern part of the state, and, running in a southeasterly course, falls into Black River between Spring and Current Rivers." The name was obviously given for an early settler or trapper, presumably a Frenchman, about whom nothing has been recorded. According to McDermott, the French preposition "a" was used regularly as the quivalent of the possessive "de." Houck in his HISTORY OF MISSOURI says the stream was also known as Fourche de Thomas, which was sometimes abbreviated to Fourche de Mas. This abbreviated form probably accounts, through phonetic misunderstanding, for the variant Fourche a Dumas, which appears on the maps for 1844, 1850, and 1855, also as Fourche Dumas on the map for 1867. Various conjectures have been made about a supposed individual named Dumas, but it is reasonably certain that his name was merely a mistake for the much earlier Thomas. This is confirmed by the use of the translated form Thomas Fork, as mentioned above, by Beck (1823), which also appears on the maps for 1822, 1825, 1827, and 1842. Another confusion, doubtless due to American mishearing of the French pronunciation, has produced the form Fourche de Main River, given by Campbell (1874) and repeated by Douglas (1912). On recent maps the name of the old Frenchman has disappeared entirely, and the stream is set down merely as Fourche River (1910), or Fourche Creek (Highway Map, 1940). Present inhabitants pronounce the name making it a clear dissyllable. The final syllable may be the vestigial survival of the French preposition "a" in the original name Fourche a Thomas. Whatever may be its source, it has led to ill-founded conjectures that the stream was named for some recent American settler called Forsee or Forshey. The eastern tributary now known tantologically as the East Fork of Fourche Creek (which is equivalent to "east fork of the fork") has also been called the East Branch or the East Prong, and occasionally Pearl Ponder Creek, for Mr. Pearl Ponder, formerly a prominent farmer and landowner in the vicinity. Similarly the West Fork of Fourche Creek is also known as West Branch or West Prong. It is also sometimes called locally the North Prong, obviously by way of distinction from Mill Creek lower down, which is often known as South Prong. All these, of course, are names of direction or position. The upper part of the main stream, above the junction with the East and West Fork, is named on some maps the Middle Fork or Prong. It was also formerly called Ryan Creek, for Patrick Ryan, father of my informant Mrs. E. O'Neill. He was originally from Ireland, and came here from northern Missouri in 1858; he was away during the Civil War, but returned afterwards and became an influential farmer and landowner in the community. At present, however, it is generally known as Gimlin Creek, for William Gimlin, landowner, who lived in the neighborhhod until his death about twenty-five years ago. Mill Creek, or South Prong, on which stood the former post office of Mill Creek (q.v.), is said to have acquired its name because one Elijah Dalton had a mill there before the Civil War. According to some authorities, the name Mill Creek was formerly applied to the West Fork, where a Mr. Murdock had a mill; but this is doubtful. Finally, Dry Creek, the southernmost tributary of all, bears its common descriptive name because it runs dry during part of the year. (Schoolcraft's TOUR IN MISSOURI AND ARKANSAS, 84; Beck, 280; Wetmore, 246; Campbell, 479; Douglas I.180; Houck I.227; maps for years mentioned above; Mr. and Mrs. E. Cline; J.W. Dodd; A. Ferguson; Dr. J.R. Hume; J.K. Langford; C. Myatt; Mrs. E. O'Neill; Mrs. Jack Woodring)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fourche de Main River
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fourche de Mas
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fourche Dumas
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fourche River
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fourche Township
Description:See Forshe Township
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fowler's Store
Description:A small country store about one mile southeast of Fairdealing, operated by Homer Fowler. Established in 1933. (Mrs. M. Arnold; Mr. and Mrs. M.F. Van Dover)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Freedom Church
Description:An old Cumberland Presbyterian Church built one and a half miles southeast of Doniphan, but any denomination was welcome to use the building; hence the ideal name. It was abandoned about 1905 and used in building the County Home. (J.K. Langford; Mrs. J. Toules)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fristoe Unit of the U.S. Forest
Description:It includes northeastern Oregon, southeastern Shannon, southwestern Carter, and northwestern Ripley counties. Mr., Bailey thinks that a Mr. Fristoe was a commissioned officer in the Civil War, and the name probably came from him. Mr. Sollars, who had much experience during the timber days in this section says that J.W. Fristoe was a partner of the Moss Tie Company that worked off the inferior oak timber in this section of the Ozarks. By his marriage to the widow of the former company president, Thomas J. Moss, Mr. Fristoe became the president of the company. He died in 1933. It seems most probable, as Mr. Sollars thinks, that the name was given for this company executive. (E. Bailey; W. Heiskell; J.A. Sollars)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fugate
Description:A post office kept by Benjamin Fugate, a school teacher, in his farm home in Current River Township. It was established in the early 1890s (shown on 1895 map), and discontinued when Pratt (q.v.) was made a post office. (J.K. Langford; J. Shepard; Map 1895)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gaines Ferry
Description:A site on Current River just south of the old Indian Ford (q.v.) known at various times by the names of the different owners. The earliest found was that of Robertson for an early pioneer; later Towles for H.H. Towles, an early settler. It then carried the name of John H. English who got it from Towles. From English it became known as Gaines for Wm. G. Gaines who owned it as late as 1915. It then passed into the hands of John Ruff, and is now (1937), operated by Mrs. John Ruff. It is known by both the names Gaines and Ruff. (J.K. Langford; C. Butler; Mrs. J.F. Kelley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Galigini
Description:As early as 1802, this was the name of a trading post at the present site of Doniphan (q.v.), but the origin of the name has not been found. It sounds like an Indian name. (Land Mark Club)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gamblin School
Description:See Gamburg
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gamburg
Description:A little village and post office, now extinct, about three miles southwest of Fairdealing (q.v.). When the post office was established, this name was coined from the syllable Gam- for Gamblin, because there were Gamblins in the community, and the suffix -burg. The earleir name was Cross Roads for its location at the crossing of the Old Doniphan and Poplar Bluff Road and the Military Road. The old Gamblin School, later divided into other school districts, was near the location of Torch. (E. Abington; Mr. and Mrs. D. Varner; Mr. and Mrs. J.R. Borth; J.K. Langford; Reverend Wm. McPheeters; P.L. 1883, Polk; Postal Guide 1886- 1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gatewood
Description:A post office and declining village in Gatewood Township. The office, now in the Cronin store, was established before the Civil War in the home of Richard C. Hudson and named for an old settler near, Richard Gatewood, who had entered land there about 1850. Before the office was moved to the present location in 1882 it was kept in various homes and stores. It was moved to the present location of Ponder about 1880, where it was known as Doherty for about two years. Then the office was re-established as Gatewood at its present site.The village took the name of the post office. (Mrs. E. Cline; W.R. Holland; Mrs. E. O'Neill; Wm. S. Doherty; S.C. Sisk; P.L. 1860, Sutherland, 740; P.L. 1874, Campbell, 480; Postal Guide 1886-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gatewood Township
Description:In the southwestern corner of the county. Organized September 11, 1882 from Union and Forshe townships and named for the post office. (C. Myatt; W.R. Holland; Court Records F, 359)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:George Ederer Club House
Description:On the western side of Current River near the mouth of Wild Cat Hollow (q.v.). In 1927 Mr. Ederer established it for the purpose of renting to hunters and fishermen. (W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gibson's Mill
Description:See Keel's Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gimlin Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Glenn
Description:A post office and timber village in Varner Township. Earnest Hess named the place for his son Glenn. (Mr. and Mrs. Dan Chinn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Good Hope General Baptist Church
Description:See Good Hope School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Good Hope School
Description:In Jordan Township. Formed as early as 1898 from Macedonia School. It is used for church also. An idealistic name. (N. Sullivan; Mrs. G.G. Davis; Mrs. M. Nunnellee; W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gooseneck Pond
Description:A bay in Current River in Harris Township formed in the shape of the neck of a goose, so that it makes a good trap for fish as they get into this eddy. (Mr. and Mrs. C.M. O'Brien)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Graveyard Hollow
Description:On the eastern side of Devil's Backbone (q.v.). Here is located the Lewis Cemetery, formerly belonging to John C. Lewis, the informant's father, who died in 1878 and was the second person buried there. Now deeded to the public. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Green Briar Creek
Description:See Briar Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Green Community
Description:See Green School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Green School
Description:In Washington Township. One of the oldest schools, established in 1869 in the Green Community, 1/4 mile southwest of the present site. In 1866 and 1867 four families of Greens--Ira, Williams, Jesse, and John--came from Gray's County, Kentucky, and bought land here. The old log house with its wide fireplace was first known as Polsgrove School for Jacob Polsgrove who gave the site. (Mrs. M. Arnold; Mrs. A. Mahan; Green Bros.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Greenville and Doniphan Road
Description:The first "three notch road" in this section, was made about 1852 and led from Greenville, in Wayne County, to Poplar Bluff, and then over the hills to Doniphan. Main Street of Poplar Bluff is a part of this old road. Tradition has it that this road was measured with a grapevine measure. (THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC, May 15, 1929)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenwood School
Description:In Harris Township. A descriptive name for its location near a dense forest. (Mrs. J.R. Kelley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Griffin Spring
Description:A spring near Handy post office in Pine Township, on land originally owned by Wm. Griffin, one of the Irish settlers (see Wilderness). An exceptionally strong stream of good water that was quite famous in the pioneer days, as it was near the old Bellview Road, over which there was considerable travel and freighting. It was a good camping place. (Jno. Chilton; Geo. Dale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grindstaff Hollow
Description:A small branch of Big Barren Creek in Pine Township. There is a spring of the same name in the hollow. John Grindstaff, an old resident, owned a farm here. (J. Lewis; W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grindstaff Spring
Description:See Grindstaff Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gum Cemetery
Description:See Gum Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gum School
Description:See Gum Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gum Spring
Description:An old spring on land now belonging to V. Dobnikar, who came from Jugoslavis in 1901, two and a half miles north of Naylor. The spring was earlier curbed in with a section of a hollow log, thus giving the name gum, a kind of tree, which is probably the one used for such purpose. The school and cemetery took the name of the spring. The school, a box house was built about 1888. Cf. Gum Spring in Dallas County (Miss O'Brien's thesis). (Mrs. Eva Patterson; Mrs. Lillie Hilborn; Mr. and Mrs. F.M. Van Dover; Mr. and Mrs. V. Dobnikar)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hall Cemetery
Description:A family burial ground about four miles east of Doniphan, started by Joseph Hall on his land as early as 1885. Seldom used now. (Wm. Ponder)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hancock Cemetery
Description:See Hancock School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hancock School
Description:One of the older schools built before 1882 for school and church. Later divided into other districts, chiefly Barkadaro (q.v.) and West Point (q.v.). Hancock Cemetery, the old burial ground, named for the landowner, in Barkadara district marks the location of the old school. A pioneer farmer doctor, Dr. J.G. Hancock, gave the land. (Mrs. T. Hancock; Reverend Wm. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Handy
Description:A post office in Pine Township. Established in Noah Haney's small country store. The story is told that because of poor penmanship in the petition, the postal authorities mistook the suggested name Haney for Handy. Some remarked that the name was appropriate for it would now be so "handy"--convenient--to get the mail twice a week right at home, instead of going the long distance to Pine. (A.C. Randel; J. Whitwell; Harry Thaxton; Postal Guide 1915-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Handy School
Description:Named for the post office (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hannar's Graveyard
Description:A small burial ground two and a half miles southeast of Lewis Cave started after 1877. Clayburn Hannar, a resident of the vicinity, was the first person buried there. Doubtless the correct spelling is Hanna's. Cf. Hanna in Carter County. (A.C. Randel; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Happy Hollow
Description:Known by this name because of the location there, one and a half miles east of Liebig (q.v.), of a little log house used by the Freewill Baptist Church for a few years, prior to about 1915. The name comes from the fact that these people believed in and practiced shouting and the washing of feet. It is a widespread humorous or derisive name throughout the state for localities or sections somewhat looked down on by their neighbors: cf. the Happy Hollow in Webster County. (Miss Bell's thesis), in Lafayette County (Miss Atchison's thesis), in Marion County (Miss Elliott's thesis), and others. (C. Mayatt; Reverend J.A. Leroux)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harley Sipes Club House
Description:It was established at Sandlin Bay (q.v.) about 1930, by Harley Sipes, a farmer, carpenter, and landowner there. (L. Young; W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harris Creek
Description:Rises in Doniphan Township and flows into Little Black River in Varner Township. It took the name of a pioneer settler, Washington Harris. (J.K. Langford; F.M. Van Dover)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harris Mill
Description:See Waddle's Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harris Township
Description:On the southern border of the county. As relocated and established in June, 1871, it included the southeastern part of the county. Named for Travis Harris, farmer and landowner, the first representative from the county to Jefferson City after the Civil War. (J.K. Langford; F.M. Van Dover)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hastings Graveyard
Description:See Cypress Creek School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hawes Club House
Description:A well equipped lodge on the eastern side of Current River eight miles north of Doniphan. Harry B. Hawes (1869-) owned the place and it has retained his name although it is now owned by A.H. Handlan of St. Louis. Mr. Hawes served as U.S. Senator (1927- 1933). (Mr. and Mrs. L. Young; W.H. Roberson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hemenway
Description:A post office established in Wm. Taylor's store on the Frisco Railroad three miles southwest of Naylor. Wm. Taylor, who had come from Indiana, gave the name for James Hemenway, congressman and senator from Indiana. James Alexander Hemenway (1860- 1923), served as representative in Congress from 1895-1905, and as Senator from Indiana from 1905-1909 (BIOG. DICT. OF THE AMERICAN CONGRESS, 1774-1927). (Mr. and Mrs. D.A. Chinn; C.D. Sinsabaugh; Postal Guide 1909-1919)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hengler Branch
Description:A small stream flowing into Hurricane Creek. Named for Michael Hengler who owns a good farm on the creek. (S.B. Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:High View School
Description:In Flatwoods Township. Formed in 1903 from Matthews and Flatwoods schools. Named from its location on the low divide between the northern part of Little Black and Logan counties. (Mrs. W.H. Tate; Mrs. C. Gomer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hill Top Inn
Description:A store, filling station, cabins, bench room, and dance hall, on Highway 14, one and a half miles north of Doniphan, situated on a high elevation. Established and named by Tom Crook in 1928. (Mrs. T. Crook; E.M. McNew)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hill Top School
Description:In Sherley Township. Named from its topographical situation. Also called Flat Top School, because the present building has a flat roof portion with sloping sides. (C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hodo Camp
Description:At Hodo Spring (q.v.). A camp of the Western Tie and Timber Company. See Camp Roy.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hodo Spring
Description:In northwestern Pine Township; it is the chief source of Running Water Creek. It took the name of Martin Hodo who lived there for a number of years. (Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Franken; J.N. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Holford Service Station
Description:Established in 1929 on Highway 14, seven miles west of Doniphan by George Holford, a World War veteran. Operated until 1933. (Mrs. Geo. Holford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Holland Spring
Description:A living spring east of Sycamore Hole (q.v.). It was walled up by John Holland who came from Tennessee and entered the land before the Civil War. (Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hopewell Church
Description:A very old Methodist Church, a good hewed log house, one mile east of Oxly (q.v.), which was earlier used for school, too. It is an idealistic name. In the early 1880s, the house was sold to the Baptists who changed the name to Antioch for the city of Syria, a famous Bible name. They later erected the frame building which is still used. (Mrs. M. Arnold; J.K. Langford; Green Bros.; Acts 13:14)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Horse Hollow
Description:A logging camp on Little Barren Creek. Doubtless horses were used for the timber work there, says Mr. Lewis. Possibly a camp was there, too, where the teams were kept. (J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Howell Township
Description:See Howell Township in Howell County
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hufstedler Hollow
Description:A small branch of Little Barren Creek. John Wesley Hufstedler from Perry County, Tennessee bought land and lived here. His son, Samuel R. Hufstedler lives there now. (A.C. Randel; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hurricane Creek
Description:A western tributary, flowing into Current River in Current River Township. Tradition says that over a hundred years ago, a severe wind storm destroyed all the timber in the vicinity, thus suggesting the name to the early settlers. It is also known as Logan Creek for Stephen Logan who owned land there in the earlier days. (J.K. Langford; Mrs. Sarah Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Illinois, Missouri and Texas Railroad
Description:This was the name when the road building was begun through Butler and Ripley Counties in 1901. Later under new management it was the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway, which name is abbreviated to "The Frisco." When the road was extended from Hoxie, Arkansas to Poplar Bluff about 1901-1902, it was locally known as the Hoxie Branch. (THE COMMONWEALTH OF MISSOURI, 617)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Indian Branch
Description:A small branch of Briar Creek in Sherley Township. There are many Indian mounds in this vicinity. (H. George; E. Fogle)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Indian Ford
Description:About three miles north of the Arkansas line on Current River. During Jackson's administration when the Indians were being moved by way of the old Military Road, the owner at Pittman's Ferry, Arkansas, asked too much for the use of their ferry. The authorities cut out a road and forded the river. The name Indian Ford remained for many years. This is probably the same place that was later known as Dug Ford (q.v.). (J.K. Langford; C. Butler)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Irish Wilderness
Description:See Irish Settlement
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Isaac's Creek
Description:An eastern tributary of Current River in Jordan and Doniphan townships. Named for Isaac Payne, a pioneer from Tennessee who settled here long before the Civil War. (J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jennies Ridge
Description:See Devil's Backbone
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jim Jones Spring
Description:Head of Indian Creek (q.v.). The name of a former owner. Now owned by Henry George. (H. George; E. Fogle)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson Graveyard
Description:Near King Bee (q.v.). It is an old family name of the county. (F. Cope)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson Township
Description:In the northeastern corner of the county. Reorganized and relocated in June, 1871. It took the name from a pioneer family, William Johnson who came in the early 1820s. (J.K. Langford; J.R. Hume; County Court Record E, 166; I, 460)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnston's Cemetery
Description:See Johnston's Chapel
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnston's Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church one mile south of Ponder, still used. The first house of logs was built probably one hundred years ago. Named for Lewis Johnston who owned a farm nearby. The old house was used for school also. The cemetery, not so old, took the name of the church. (Mrs. L. Pulliam; C. Myatt; Mr. and Mrs. E. Cline)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jones Mill
Description:See Righter's Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jordan Township
Description:One of the north-central border townships reorganized and relocated in 1871. It is an old pioneer name. Smith Jordan, one of the "forty-niners," and his brother George were prominent farmers here. Their father, David Jordan, came from Kentucky. (Reverend H.H. Smelser; S. McPheeters; Mrs. M. Nunnellee; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Keel's Mill
Description:A grist mill on Fourche Creek in Union Township. Operated for many years by John G. Keel. Now owned by Jesse Gibson. (J.K. Langford; L. Pulliam)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Keel's Store
Description:On Highway 14, fifteen miles west of Doniphan. In 1932 James M. Keel set up the store and filling station. (J.M. Keel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelley Township
Description:One of the northern border divisions, reorganized and relocated in June, 1871. A pioneer name. Probably named for the first settler on Buffalo Creek, Wesley Kelley, who reared a large family. It was one of the original divisions. Cf. Kelley Township in Carter County. (County Court Record E, 166; Geo. Dale; J.R. Hume; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kenyon Cemetery
Description:An old and large burial ground northwest of Ponder in Sherley Township. On land formerly owned by Thomas Kenyon. (Wm. S. Doherty)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kernic Hollow
Description:In Sherley Township. Leads into Fourche Creek. Lewis Kernic, a shipbuilder directly from Germany, settled there after the Civil War. (J.W. Dodd; W.R. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:King Bee
Description:Later Kingbee. An abandoned mill village and post office in Flatwoods Township. Established by Thomas L. Wright, the owner of the mill, in 1895. It was the largest mill in the county at that time. Besides grinding grain, they sawed and planed lumber. Telephone service was extended to the place. The name was given to signify the importance of the place. For this interesting Americanism, see the MARK TWAIN LEXICON, by R.L. Ramsay and Frances G. Emberson, University of Missouri Studies, 1938, with a quotation from Mark Twain's Joan of Arc (II.vii.236): "He was king-bee of the little village." The meaning is obviously "supreme ruler, master, autocrat." This sense is not given in any dictionary, but is cited in DIALECT NOTES, vol. IV, from Virginia. It is a figurative use from the obsolete use of "king-bee" for "queen-bee," cited in the OED as early as 1679. Earlier English writers, after the Latin, labored under the misapprehension that the ruler of the beehive was masculine, and citations applying the term "king" to the queen-bee are given in the OED from about 1386-1710. (J.K. Langford; E.B. Slayton; Postal Guide 1897-1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kingbee
Description:See King Bee
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kingbee Service Station
Description:A small store and filling station on Highway 14, three miles west of Fairdealing. Built in 1929 by Mrs. L.R. Strand, who gave the old village name (q.v.). (Mrs. L.R. Strand)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kittrell's Mill
Description:A pioneer grist and carding mill about one mile south of Doniphan on Current River. It was set up by a large pioneer landowner, Lemuel Kittrell the first permanent settler of that vicinity, who came from Kentucky in 1819 with none but Indians for his neighbors. He entered large tracts of land, had many slaves, and became a wealthy and influential citizen of the county. The mill remained through the Civil War. (C. Myatt; L. Pulliam; Polly Ann Powers; MISSOURI IN 1867, 376; Douglas I.305)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Klenn Creek
Description:In Sherley Township. Heads near Flat Top School and flows into Current River. It took the name of the landowner, Frank Klenn. (C. Myatt; S.B. Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ladd Pond
Description:A one- acre fish pond on Thomas Hancock's farm about four miles south of Doniphan. The farm was owned by Berthold Ladd, who made the pond. Cf. Berthold. (Mrs. T. Hancock; Wm. Ponder)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lat Ditch
Description:Evidently a name of position, the abbreviated form for lateral, as it is the most western ditch in the county. As shown by the maps of 1912 and 1926 it is the same as Lateral Ditch in Ripley County. It is a short ditch heading in Butler County and leading into Ditch No. One in Thomas Township of Ripley County.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lateral Ditch
Description:See Lat Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lebanon Church
Description:An old two-story log building 3/4 mile southwest of Tucker. Built before the Civil War. Used for services by the Methodist, Baptist, and Christian churches, for school, and for the Farmer's Grange. Prior to its being torn down about 1920, it had been used for some time as a barn. One stipulation of the deed was that it should revert to the owner of the land when no longer used for church or school. A Bible name, the Lebanon Mountains in Syria, whence Solomon brought cedars for building the temple. (E. Weeks; F.M. Shipman; J.P. Campbell; W.R. Holland; 1 Kings 2:7; F.M. Shipman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lebanon Spring
Description:Marks the location of Lebanon Church (q.v.), for which it is named.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lewis Cave
Description:In Kelley Township three and a half miles from Current River. It is at least twenty feet high and fifty feet wide at its mouth, and a large, spring-fed stream flows from it into Big Barren Creek 1/2 mile east. There are several rooms in the cave and boats can go back for some distance. Mushrooms are cultivated, and the cave is noted, locally, for its stalagmites and stalactites and blind fish. Mr. James Lewis, the owner who came from Tennessee in 1877, has put in electric lights and the place is popular with tourists, fishermen, and picnickers. It was earlier known as Big Cave on Barren or Big Barren Cave. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis; J.R. Borth; MISSOURI GUIDE, 544)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lewis Creek
Description:A small stream in Poynor Township flowing into Current River. Named for John A. Lewis who came from Tennessee in 1877 and homesteaded. It is also known as Mill Creek, because the landowner had a small timber mill on the stream. (Mrs. S. Misel; C. Myatt; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lewis Mill
Description:See Lewis Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Liberty Hill Church
Description:Now Bennett Church, situated on a hill one mile northwest of Bennett (q.v.) now used by all denominations of the community. It was built at least as early as 1892 by the Presbyterians and named by their preacher, Reverend Egbert Whitwell, because other denominations should be welcome to use the building. As the Presbyterians scattered, the Missionary Baptists organized in 1922 and took over the house. The name gradually took on the present name Bennett Church. (H. Thaxton; J. Whitwell; A.C. Randel; M.B.G.A. 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lick Spring
Description:In Harris Township near a deer lick near Wolf Creek. (J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Liebig
Description:A discontinued post office in Union Township. A family name. John Liebig of St. Louis County, originally from Germany, homesteaded land in this part of the county in the early 1870s. (J.K. Langford; C. Myatt; Postal Guide 1909-1930)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lingo Branch
Description:A small branch of Briar Creek , on the Oscar Randels farm in Sherley Township. Mr. Young thinks it is an old family name. (Lee Young; H. George)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Barren Creek
Description:It rises in Pine Township and flows across Kelley Township into Current River approximately four miles south of the mouth of Big Barren Creek, which see.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Barren School
Description:In Kelley Township, on the stream, from which it derived its name. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Beaverdam Creek
Description:A small western tributary of Beaver Dam Creek in Johnson Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Black
Description:See Little Black River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Black
Description:A post office that was kept in various homes and stores for a number of years, but finally lost its name when Gamburg (q.v.) was established. Named for the largest stream in the vicinity. (Mrs. M. Arnold; Reverend Wm. S. McPheeters; P.L. 1860 Sutherland, 741; P.L. 1867 Goodwin and West, 49; P.L. 1876 Polk, 17)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Black River
Description:"A stream of clear water 90 ft. wide with a swift current," rising in Carter County, and flowing acorss Butler and Ripley counties into Black River in Arkansas. The descriptive name was doubtless given by the pioneers to distinguish this stream from the larger one, Big Black River (q.v.). The river is formed by the junction, in Johnson Township, Ripley County, of North Fork of Little Black River and South Fork of Little Black River. North Fork rises in southeastern Carter County. South Fork heads about twelve miles north of Doniphan. Mr. Slayton explains that it was named by the government surveyors in 1821. The diminutive term distinguishes it from the larger stream, Big Black River. Locally it is often called Little Black, omitting the element "River." (E.B. Slayton; Schoolcraft, 85)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Graveyard
Description:An old burial ground in Sherley Township southwest of Briar Creek. Named for Hardy Little who deeded the ground. (Wm. S. Doherty; C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Logan Creek
Description:See Logan Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Rock
Description:The site of the old log cabin of Lemuel Kittrell, the first settler in what is now Ripley County. He came from Kentucky in 1819, entered large tracts of land along Current River and set up a grist mill just south of the site of Doniphan. He also had a brick yard. Doubtless the name grew up in later years for the rocky cliff at the old homestead. Cf. Kittrell's Mill. (Mr. and Mrs. L. Pulliam; Miss M. Williams; S. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little School
Description:See Pleasant Hill School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Willis School
Description:A school near the present site of Tucker, built during the middle 1880s on land belonging to William Smelser, who wanted to call it Shiloh and placed the name over the door, but the community refused to accept that name and jokingly gave it the name of Little Willis for a variety of corn, which at that time was gaining popularity. "Uncle William" was very enthusiastic about this kind of corn and would grow no other. The new school, erected in a pine grove which developed from two trees, near Tucker, in 1928, was named Pine Grove. It is now often known as Tucker School for the post office. (Mr. and Mrs. L. Pulliam; S.B. Misel; F.M. Shipman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Log Cabin
Description:A small store and dance hall on Highway 14, five and a half miles west of Doniphan. Established in 1935 by Homer Shepard from Success, Arkansas. Now (1937) owned by Dewit Fogle of Briar; operated by Mrs. Homer Shepard. A descriptive name for the style of building. (Mrs. Home Shepard)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Logan Creek
Description:Another Logan Creek, a tributary of Current River. See Hurricane Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Logan Creek
Description:Rises in Jordan Township, flows across Doniphan Township, and empties into Little Black River in Varner Township. That part of the stream about the mouth of Cypress Creek is also known as Little Logan Creek. What is now Cypress Creek and the lower part of what is now Logan Creek was known as Big Logan Creek. The Logans, settlers who came in the 1830s or 1840s settled near the junction of Cypress Creek with Logan Creek. See Cypress Creek. (J.K. Langford; Mrs. E. Cunningham; Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Logan Creek Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church on Logan Creek in the vicinity of Logan School. The old log house was used for school and this church which was organized before 1869. One informant explains that "we used to go in ox wagons over hill and valley to this church." The church was later disbanded and some members went to Antioch Church (q.v.). (Mrs. M. Arnold; Reverend Wm. McPheeters; MINUTES OF CANE CREEK ASSOCIATION)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Logan Creek School
Description:In Washington Township. The district was formed from Bell and Cypress Creek schools, through the efforts of Reverend Wm. McPheeters, who suggested the name for the creek 1/2 mile away. It was often called Logan School for the pioneer settlers. (Reverend Wm. McPheeters; Mrs. M. Arnold)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Logan School
Description:See Logan Creek School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Beech School
Description:See Beech Ridge School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Star (East) School
Description:See Lone Star School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Star (West) School
Description:See Lone Star School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Star School [1 of 2]
Description:There were two schools by this name, one in Jordan Township and one in Sherley Township. The one in Jordan Township was also known as Fernnook School and Carlyle School. Cf. Fernnook. Later when the other Lone Star School was formed west of Current River, the direction names were added to distinguish them. Thus the Johnson Township school became Lone Star (East) School, and the other one Lone Star (West) School. The carpenters placed a large wooden star in the gable end of both of the early schools. (N. Sullivan; Mr. and Mrs. G.G. Davis; W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Star School [2 of 2]
Description:Another Lone Star School for which see Lone Star above.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lorey Club House
Description:In 1925, Donald Lorey, a farmer and landowner, established and operated the place as a tourist camp. It is six and a half miles south of Doniphan. He sold it to a Mr. Block of St. Louis. It is only an ordinary place, but is still used. (L. Young; W.H. Roberson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lowery Creek
Description:Another name for Deerey Creek (q.v.). One of the early settlers, John Lowerey, owned a farm here. (Mr. and Mrs. C.M. O'Brien)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mabrey Bay
Description:See Mabrey Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mabrey Graveyard
Description:See Mabrey Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mabrey Mill
Description:See Mabrey Springs
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mabrey Springs
Description:Near the mouth of Big Barrens Creek 1/2 mile from Current River. Thomas Mabrey had a grist and sawmill there as early as 1877. The mill which burned in 1885 was never replaced. A dam was made to furnish water power, thus forming a bay which gave rise to the names Mabrey Bay and Bay Mill. Pinkney Mabrey, a brother, also lived there. The cemetery of this name marks the place. (A.C. Randel; D.S. Bates; H. Thaxton; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Macedonia Cemetery
Description:See Macedonia Church for which it was named.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Macedonia Church
Description:A Methodist Church on South Prong of Little Black River about eight miles south of Grandin (q.v.) in Jordan Township. Before the Civil War a small log house was built for church and subscription schools. A few families--Benjamin Thompson from Tennessee, Elgin McKinney from Alabama, Jordan, and a few others--had settled here just before the Civil War. Far from home and very much dissatisfied, Mrs. Nunnelly, a daughter of Benjamin Thompson, explained that they gave their church this Bible name. After the war a hewed log house was erected for school and church services for both the Methodists and Baptists. In 1887 the Methodists erected a new house near the old site, and the Baptists built a house about three miles north on North Prong of Little Black River called Shiloh Church (q.v.). Elgin McKinney deeded two acres for the Macedonia School and Cemetery, and later his son Thomas deeded an adjoining acre on which stood the church house. The school and cemetery took the church name. Macedonia was the country north of Greece where Paul did missionary work, and about which he had a vision calling him to this field. (Mrs. M. Nunnelly; Acts 16:9)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mansco Hollow
Description:A small valley in Kelley Township, which drains into Buffalo Creek. An old settler of the name lived there before the Civil War. The family was all gone before 1880. (A.C. Randel; Mr. and Mrs. Geo Dale; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Marlin Cemetery
Description:Eaton Graveyard was also known by this name for James Marlin who owned land and lived near in the 1880s. (Mrs. S.E. Sands)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Martin Cemetery
Description:Near Oxly (q.v.). It was started during the Civil War on land belonging to John F. Martin. (Mrs. M. Arnold; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Martinsburg
Description:John F. Martin, a landowner, had a store and kept the post office near the present site of Oxly. (S. McPheeters; M.P. Van Dover; P.L. Haywood (1853) 824; P.L. Goodwin and West (1867) 49; Map 1850)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Matthews School
Description:In Doniphan Township. One of the oldest schools situated about 1/2 mile from the site of the original log house. Green Matthews an early pioneer gave the land. (Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young; Mrs. E. O'Neill; Mrs. E. Cunningham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McCord Cemetery
Description:See Dalton's Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McGee Graveyard
Description:In Jordan Township, three miles north of Doniphan. Started before the Civil War on a farm belonging to William McGee. (W.H. Roberson; Reverend J.A. Leroux)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McIlroy
Description:A post office of short duration, established about 1895, and kept by William T. McIlroy in his small store near the old Dalton Mill (q.v.). (J.K. Langford; C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McKinney School
Description:A name by which Shiloh School was often known for the McKinney Mill (q.v.) and the owner. (Reverend H.H. Smelser)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McKinney's Mill
Description:A post office and mill in Jordan Township established by Thomas McKinley who set up the water power grist mill on Little Black River as early as 1859. After the Civil War he rebuilt the grist mill and put in a sash saw for furnishing neighborhood lumber. It was all run by a gasoline engine. Although the mill was owned by others it acquired only one other name, Shiloh for the community in which it was located. Thomas McKinney was postmaster until the post office was transferred to Fernnook. (J.K. Langford; Mrs. M. Nunnellee; J.R. Borth; Mrs. A. Mahan; Reverend Wm. McPheeters; Postal Guide 1886-1888; P.L. Polk, 90)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Merrell Branch
Description:A small tributary of Current River in Paynor Township. John and James Merrell lived there and had a large sugar maple orchard. They were very early settlers. The stream was often known as Sugar Branch. (S.B. Misel; Mrs. Sarah Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Merrell School
Description:The earlier name for Pratt School (q.v.). John and James Merrell lived near. (Mrs. E. O'Neill; S.B. Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Middle Prong of Fourche Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midway
Description:In 1925 Jason W. Dodd established a store and filling station near his home on Highway 14 halfway between Doniphan and Alton. Three years later, when he discontinued the store and station, he erected a building for the Pentecost Church. This church took the name of the store. Now used for a dwelling house. (Mrs. B. Hayes; J.W. Dodd)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midway Church
Description:See Midway
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Military Road
Description:It is a part of one of the most famous trails, the Natchitoches Path (q.v.). Dr. John R. Hume wrote as quoted in the MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW, Vol. 24, p. 613: "One of the oldest and most interesting roads in the Middle West, because it is woven into the warp and woof of our pioneer life in such a way as to make it inseparable from our national history." Houck wrote: "After the settlement of the country, the Natchitoches Path became the military and wagon road of the immigrants moving into Arkansas, crossing the Mississippi River at Bainbridge or Cape Girardeau, thence moving to the St. Francois River, crossing the same at the Indian Ford, thence to Black River, there crossing near Poplar Bluff and then Current River at what was long as Pittman's Ferry." Tradition says that it was along this road that the Kittrells (cf. Kittrell Store in Butler County and Kittrell's Mill in Ripley County) came, and that it was along this trail that under President Jackson's command was cut out the road over which the United States moved the Indians in 1839 (cf. Indian Ford in Ripley County). Older settlers mention the road in connection with General Price and his army during the Civil War and point out occasionaly insulators in the Cane Creek community, where wires were extended by him for sending messages (cf. Reeves Station in Butler County and Battle Hollow in Ripley County). Colonel William Monks of West Plains, who remembered the Cherokee Indians in Alabama, wrote that his father, James Monks, who with his family came from Alabama, and located first in Fulton County, Arkansas (later came to Howell County), "came by way of Jackson, Missouri, traveled the old military road made by the government troops in removing the Cherokee Indians from the State of Alabama to their present location." He further states that it was the only road leading west. The MISSOURI CASH BOOK, August 6, 1936 has an interesting article on the removal of the Cherokee Indians from North and South Carolina, east Tennessee, northern Georgia, and northern Alabama to Arkansas, and Indian Territory. The writer explains that in 1817 some of the dissatisfied Cherokees traded their rights for lands west of the Mississippi along the upper branches of Red and White rivers. They located in northwestern Arkansas. Then in 1838-1839, because of encroachments of the Whites, the other branch of the Cherokees, by a treaty of 1835, were moved by military force from their old home to the Cherokee Reservation (now in Oklahoma), where those of Arkansas joined them. Dr . Hume also mentions an old trail leading from Sunflower Landing on the Mississippi River and up the river to the now famous Cherokee Bay and northward. These statements add weight to the local reports that a portion of the Military Road in Butler and Ripley counties was also known as the Cherokee Bay Road (q.v.). Some of the oldest settlers interviewed spoke of the country about Corning, Arkansas, as the Cherokee Bay section. It seems quite certain that both names, the Military Road and Cherokee Bay Road derive their names from these Indians; the first, for their forced removal, the latter for the early settlement in Arkansas. (C. Pottenger; Mrs. G. Powers; Houck I.227; MISSOURI HIST. REV. Vol. 24; 613; THE CASH BOOK)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek [1 of 4]
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek [2 of 4]
Description:A settlement and post office at the present location of Ponder (q.v.). This name is shown on maps of 1867, 1870, 1873 and 1884. On map 1889 it appears to be Segin (q.v.), while on the 1891 map and thereafter it is Ponder. It is on the West Fork of Fourche Creek (q.v.) which was known as Mill Creek in the earlier days, because a man by the name of Murdock had a mill there before rhe Civil War. The Ponders and Murdocks were living there in 1858. Evidently the settlement took the name of the stream. (Mrs. Ellen O'Neill; P.L. 1862)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek [3 of 4]
Description:Another Mill Creek. It is also known as Lewis Creek (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek [4 of 4]
Description:It heads west of Gatewood (q.v.) and flows south into Fourche Creek. Its name grew up because a pioneer grist mill was located near its mouth. See Dalton's Mill. Father Hogan tells of an experience of his at this place, thirteen miles south from the Irish Settlement and one mile north of the Arkansas line, when he was there on a sick call in December, 1859. Here his life was endangered by an ex-convict, but he was protected by Judge Hutcheson on Mill Creek. Parker speaks of Mill Creeks. (S.B. Misel; MISSION IN MISSOURI, 67-68, 71; Parker, MISSOURI HANDBOOK (1865) 147)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek School
Description:In Paynor Township. Named for the creek nearby.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Hollow
Description:On the headwarters of Buffalo Creek in Pine Township. The old trail from this community to Boze Mill (q.v.) in Oregon County followed this hollow. (A.C. Randel; J. Lewis; G. Whitwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Misel Cemetery
Description:In Poynor Township. Originally the family cemetery of the Misel family, who came from Tennessee in 1850. It was recently deeded to the public by Mrs. Sarah Misel. (Mrs. Sarah Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Elizabeth
Description:See Elizabeth Methodist Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Moriah Church
Description:In northwestern Jordan Township. A Bible name: the hill where Abraham went to sacrifice Isaac, and where later the temple was built by King Solomon (Gen. 22:2; II Chron. 3:1)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Olive Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church two miles east of Tucker (q.v.), built in 1889. Formerly they had used the Walnut Grove School for services. It existed only about fifteen years. A Bible name, a mountain near Jerusalem. (L. Pulliam; W.R. Holland; Matt. 21:1; 24:3)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Olive Union Church
Description:Built in 1907 by the community four miles southwest of Doniphan for community gatherings. A union Sunday School is still maintained. A Bible name, the mountain near Jerusalem where Jesus often went. (Mr. and Mrs. J.F. Young; Matt. 21:1; 24:3)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Pisgah School
Description:Another name by which Little Willis School (q.v.) was known. Here is revealed rivalry, not so congenial, perhaps, at some other places. Cf. Brannum School. Both Methodists (organization name, Mount Pisgah), and Baptists (Shiloh), met here for worship. It was named for the Bible mountain whence Moses viewed the Promised Land (Deut. 34:1), and also in honor of "Uncle" John Pisgah Smith, and elderly leader of the Methodists in the community. The Baptist name appears not to have been accepted for the place, but they succeeded in getting another of their names, Little Willis School (q.v.) to honor one of their leaders, William Smelser. (Mrs. L. Pulliam; J.R. Holland; J. Pulliam; E. Weeks; J.W. Dodd)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Pleasant Church [1 of 3]
Description:The Methodist Church, generally known now as Fairdealing Church of that village. The present house 1/4 mile south of the old site, was built about 1893. The old hewed log two-story building was used jointly by the church and Masons during and before the Civil War. Soldiers camped in the house during a part of the Civil War. The site is on a high elevation. (Mrs. A. Mahan; Mrs. M. Arnold; S. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Pleasant Church [2 of 3]
Description:A General Baptist Church organized in 1884 in the Simpson Creek School (q.v.), house, which at that time was of hewed logs. The organization was supervised by the Reverends L.J. Thornburg, J.A. Leroux, and D. Poynor. Later a good building was erected by the community for the school and church. The house is sometimes known as Mount Pleasant. The church remains active. (Reverend J.A. Leroux; Mo. Lib. Bap., 244)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Pleasant Church [3 of 3]
Description:A defunct Missionary Baptist Church which was organized before 1857. The log building was situated on a small hill north of Little Black River about two miles west of Pennington Mill (q.v.). It was also known as Pennington Church for Reverend Isaac Pennington, an influential member who owned land near, and served as pastor for years. The church dwindled and was disbanded during the late 1880s. Reverend Pennington moved to the Bethel Church, Butler County community, and some of the members helped to organize the Spring Hill Church (q.v.), about three miles south of this church. (S. McPheeters; Reverend J.R. Leroux; MINUTES OF CANE CREEK ASSOCIATION; HISTORY OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS, 152)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mud Creek
Description:See Stanley Branch. A descriptive name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mulberry Creek
Description:A western tributary of Current River in Sherley and Union townships. Named for the heavy growth of mulberry trees in the section. (C. Myatt; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mullen
Description:Also known as Mullen's Switch and Mullens. A small village, established by the officials of the Doniphan Br. Railroad, about four miles east of Doniphan. Named for Michael Mullen, a landowner and farmer there, who operated a lumber mill. (Mrs. E. O'Neill; Mrs. D. Varner; R. Borth)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mullens
Description:See Mullen
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mullen's Switch
Description:See Mullen
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Murdock Mill
Description:See Mill Creek the settlement and Fourche Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Myatt Spring
Description:A good spring in Union Township on a farm owned by Calvin Myatt. A splendid center for hunters and campers. (C. Myatt; E. Cline)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Natchitoches Path
Description:An old Indian trail on the southern side of the Mississippi River, starting from near the present site of Cape Girardeau, and diverging "southwest to Natchitoches, one of the ancient Spanish posts of Mexico, now in Louisiana." Houck (II, 104) says it crosses the St. Francis River at "Indian Ford." By his map (I, 227) the Indian Ford is questionably the one later called William's Ferry (q.v.) and Pollard's Ferry (q.v.), for the trail is shown as crossing Butler County from the extreme northeast corner in a southwestern direction northwest of Poplar Bluff, and across the southeast corner of Ripley County into Arkansas. Later known as the Military Road (q.v.). It leads to Natchitoches, on Red River, an old French mission town, founded in 1714. It is now the seat of Natchitoches Parish. Its origin is that of an Indian tribe, the Natchez along the lower Mississippi River and westward. (Houck I.227; II.104)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Naylor
Description:A small town at the junction of the Frisco and Doniphan Br. railroads in Thomas Township. Formerly Barfield (q.v.). Because freight destination was confused wirh Barfield, Arkansas, the Horton Land and Lumber Company, operating in the vicinity, asked that a change of name be made. The mill officials suggested the name for Wm. A. Naylor, their land surveyor, who was a Federal Captain from Indians. (F.M. Van Dover; Mrs. S.E. Sands; Postal Guide 1893-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Home Church
Description:A Freewill Baptist Church on Bay Creek, four miles southwest of Tucker (q.v.), erected in 1900 on land given by H.T. Redus. Originally some members from Mount Carmel Church (q.v.), then in need of repairs, some from Little Willis School, and possibly others of the community composed this earlier United Baptist Church. The name is an ideal one, for the place was indeed a new home for the members. (W.R. Holland; Mrs. L. Pulliam)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Hope Cemetery
Description:It took the name of the church at which it is situated.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Hope Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in Harris Township across the road from Cross Roads School. In 1887, it was organized during a revival meeting in a brush arbor in the Pope and Kelley neighborhood, one and a half miles north of Current View (q.v.), by Reverend John Summers who was also a teacher. In 1900 a new house was erected two and a half miles northeast at the present location. The name is idealistic. It is often known as Cross Roads Church for the school nearby. (Reverend J.A. Leroux; Mrs. Sam Osborne; Mrs. C.M. O'Brien; M.B.G.A. 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Hope School
Description:In Jordan Township. Formed from Macedonia School (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Lebanon Baptist Church
Description:About 1885 the Baptist of Belanon (q.v.) built a church 1/4 mile west of Tucker and called it New Lebanon, but became inactive after several years. In 1934 the Missionary Baptist organized a new body. Now generally known as Tucker Church. (W.R. Holland; W.H. Roberson; E. Weeks; M.B.G.A.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Liberty Church
Description:A defunct Church of Christ, established southeast of Poynor about 1904. The prefix "New" was added to distinguish it from the older Liberty Church near Calm (q.v.). (W.R. Holland; S.B. Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Macedonia Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church three miles southwest of Ponder. Organized in the early 1920s and given this name to distinguish it from Macedonia Church in Hordan Township. (W.R. Holland; C. Myatt; Mr. and Mrs. E. Cline)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Union Cemetery
Description:See New Union Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Union Church
Description:The box house was erected in the late 1880s on land belonging to James Sheehan (cf. Sheehan), who gave the name because he said all churches should use the house. The Freewill Baptists, of whom Mr. Sheehan was a member, was organized by Eld. J.N. Carner. Nothing remains now but the cemetery, New Union. (Reverend J. Leroux; History of Lib. Bap., 242)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Fork of Buffalo Creek
Description:Rises in King Township of Oregon County and flows across Pine Township into Kelley Township where it joins South Fork to form the main stream. Locally known as North Prong.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Fork of Little Black River
Description:See Little Black River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Prong
Description:See North Fork of Buffalo Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Prong of Fourche Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Novak Store
Description:On Highway 14. Three miles west of Fairdealing. Michael Novak operates the small store and filling station which he established in 1932. (Mrs. Michael Novak)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove (East) School
Description:See Oak Grove School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove (West) School
Description:In Pine Township. Established about 1914 in a section originally covered with large pine trees, but here grew some oak timber. "West" was appended at the time it was established to distinguish it from the older Oak Grove School northeast of Doniphan. It was sometimes known as Wild Cat School because there were so many of these animals in the forest. (J.W. Dodd; H. Thaxton; C.F. Franken; Geo. Dale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove Cemetery
Description:Near Oak Grove Church (q.v.). Also known as Sullivan Graveyard. The land was given by James Sullivan in the 1890s. (N. Sullivan; Mrs. E. O'Neill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove Church
Description:A Church of God erected about 1922 near Oak Grove School from which it took its name. (Reverend J.A. Leroux; N. Sullivan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:In Doniphan Township. The first house was erected as early as 1892 to be used for school and church. Much oak timber grew in this region. After a school of the same name was established in Pine Township, this school gradually added "East" to its name to distinguish it from the newer school. (Reverend J.A. Leroux; J.W. Dodd)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Ridge Church
Description:In Sherley Township on Highway 14. The Church of God Congregation, which had organized in the Dunn School house, erected this very splendid rural church in 1927. The name is descriptive. (J.M. Dodd; J.M. Keel; Mrs. Bertha Hayes)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oakdale
Description:A later name for Martinsburg (q.v.). The change was made when Daniel Varner married the widow of John F. Martin and took charge of the store and office. A descriptive name. (M.F. Van Dover; L. Young; Postal Guide 1890-1904)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old Lebanon Church
Description:A name which Lebanon Church (q.v.) later acquired. Cf. New Lebanon Baptist Church. Many older residents are proudly and joyfully reminiscent of the vivid life there in former times. (J.P. Campbell; W.R. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Orchard Hollow
Description:It leads into North Fork of Buffalo Creek. Named for an orchard on the Whitwell farm. See Barn Hollow and Peach Orchard Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ormsby School
Description:In Flatwoods Township. Established about 1910. James F. Ormsby and his brother Charles, who gave the site, were prominent farmers in the community. The school was often known as Backwoods School because it was in a less highly developed part of the county. (Green Bros.; S. McPheeters; Mrs. A. Mahan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Owenmont
Description:A post office near Brinkerhoff, kept by Dewitt Stanton in his store. Named for George Owen a lumberman who lived there. Nothing marks the site now but the small elevation. (Wm. Ponder; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oxly
Description:A village and post office in Varner Township, formerly known as Varner (q.v.) the railroad station and Oakdale (q.v.), the post office James Adams, who had come from Kentucky in 1885 put in another store and was made postmaster. He became one of the leaders in the village and furnished much timber from this section for the Oxley Stave Factory at Poplar Bluff. There was some confusion about the freight because there was also a Varner, Arkansas. James Adams suggested the new name, a shortened form, for F.G. Oxley of Cincinnati, Ohio, the owner of the Poplar Bluff factory. (M.F. Van Dover; S. Pottenger; L. Young; Mrs. E.H. Spitler; Postal Guide 1909-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Paradise Ridge Church
Description:An old disbanded Missionary Baptist Church that stood where Corinth Church (q.v.) now stands. The Church was organized in the old school house, and in 1903 or 1904 the church house was built. The church was mentioned in the Minutes of Cane Creek Association from 1892 to 1909. The building was sold to John Leslie about 1915. The informants explained that they "used to have such good, good meetings there." It is a subjective name. (Mrs. Eva Patterson; Mrs. Lillie Hilborn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Patterson Cemetery
Description:An old burial ground about one mile north of Matthews School. The land was given by John Patterson, who came from Georgia long before the Civil War. The school and spring took his name as they were on his land. (Mrs. E. Cunningham; E. O'Neill; R. Borth)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Patterson School
Description:Later Logan Creek School (q.v.). One of the oldest districts in the county, where subscription schools were taught long before the Civil War. The old log house stood near the Patterson Spring (q.v.). See Patterson Cemetery.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Patterson Spring
Description:See Patterson Cemetery
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Payne School
Description:In Jordan Township. Ike Payne, a farmer, gave the site. (W.D. Randel; J.R. Borth)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Peach Orchard Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township. Leads into North Fork of Buffalo Creek. So called because A.J. Whitwell had a family peach orchard on his farm. Such orchards were very scarce in this part of the county during the 1880s. (A.C. Randel; J. Whitwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pearl Ponder Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pennington Church
Description:See Mount Pleasant Church and Pennington Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pennington Mill
Description:An old pioneer grist mill on Little Black River two miles below the mouth of Flat Creek. Isaac Pennington, a Baptist minister and landowner, kept a little store in his house and set up the mill before the Civil War. (S. McPheeters; Green Bros.; J.R. Borth; Reverend Wm. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pigeon Branch
Description:A small branch of South Fork of Buffalo Creek in Kelley Township. The name was given because so many wild pigeons were seen along the stream in the early days. See Brown's Mill. (Geo. Dale; C. Myatt; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine
Description:A post office and village in southwestern Pine Township. During the timber days it had a sawmill and three stores. Through the efforts of Andrew J. Whitwell, the post office was established and kept by a Mrs. Adams for a time in her home. He named it for the large pine timber there. (J.W. Dodd; W.D. Randel; Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Franken; Postal Guide 1886-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Bluff School
Description:In Doniphan Township. Established about 1898, near the rough hillsides on Logan Creek, where some pine trees grew. Also known as Schick School for John Schick, who lived near and had a large family of children. (S. McPheeters; Mr. and Mrs. L. Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Church
Description:See Pine Grove Missionary Baptist Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Grove Missionary Baptist Church
Description:The original name for the church near Pine (q.v.), now known as Pine Church. It was organized in 1881 by Reverend William O. Gibson and named because of the immense pine forests in the vicinity. The old house is now used for a dwelling, and the house in Pine, Pine Church, is used by any denomination. (W.D. Randel; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Dale; C.W. Drane)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Grove School
Description:See Little Willis School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine School
Description:Near the post office, for which it was named. (W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Township
Description:In the northwestern part of the county. Formed from Kelley and Fourche townships August 5, 1890. Named for the post office. (M. Dodd; L.P. Whitwell; Court Records H, 278-279)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Valley School
Description:In Johnson Township near Beaverdam Creek. A descriptive name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine View School
Description:Established in 1915 in the central part of Johnson Township. Named because of the large pine trees surrounding the site. (E.B. Slayton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pink Branch
Description:A small stream, in Flatwoods Township, flowing into Logan Creek. An abundance of pink root plants, used for medicine by early settlers, grew in the vicinity. (Reverend Wm. S. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Grove
Description:A post office in Jordan Township. Established in 1878 and kept by W.A. Brooks, who had a rural store, until his death about 1915. A descriptive and complimentary name. (R. Borth; J.K. Langford; P.L. Polk, 91; Postal Guide 1886-1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Grove School
Description:Established about 1890 in Jordan Township about three miles southwest of the post office, for which it is named. (N. Sullivan; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:In Sherley Township. The original school was known as the Little School, a family name. William Little from Tennessee was one of the earliest settlers. The name was changed when a new house was built upon a low hill 1/4 mile from the old site. (Miss Ethel Fogle; E. Fogle)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Plunk School
Description:In Union Township. The name is that of an old family, early settlers. Nicknamed Tick School because there were so many of these insects in the community. (S.B. Misel; C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poe School
Description:In Varner Township. One of the older schools. Named for William Poe on whose land it was built. (Mr. and Mrs. D.A. Chinn; W.D. Randel; Wm. Ponder)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Polsgrove School
Description:See Green School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ponder
Description:A post office and village in Union Township. Earlier known as Doherty (q.v.). Pleasant John Ponder, son of Amos Ponder, one of a pioneer family who came from Tennessee in 1858 became a large landowner. He sold the sites for the Doherty store and for other places of business and homes. When the post office was established it was named for him. The village became quite a trading place with three stores, two blacksmith shops, a saloon, a church, and a cotton gin. Now there is only a store with the post office. (Mrs. E. O'Neill; Wm. S. Doherty; C. Myatt; Wm. Ponder; Postal Guide 1889-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ponder Cemetery
Description:The family burial ground for the Ponder and Murdock families, near Ponder. (W.D. Randel; Wm. Ponder)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ponder Church
Description:The Missionary Baptist Church now at Ponder (q.v.). Originally it was two miles north of the present location, and was named for Pleasant John Ponder, a large landowner and resident there. (Wm. S. Doherty)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ponder Creek
Description:An earlier name for Klenn Creek (q.v.). Jefferson Ponder was an early settler there. (J.K. Langford; Wm. Ponder)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ponder School
Description:Built originally on the land belonging to Amos Ponder who brought his family here from Tennessee in 1858. This old log school one mile northwest from the present location of Ponder post office was also locally known as Elm School because originally an elm tree shadowed the old log building. Later the old tree was cut and the first new house erected over the old stump. (C. Myatt; W.R. Holland; Mrs. E. O'Neill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ponder's Mill
Description:Doubtless another and later name for Murdock Mill, which see. Pleasant John Ponder married into the Murdock family and later owned the mill. See Battle Hollow, Ponder, Ponder Cemetery, and Ponder Church. (W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pope School
Description:The older school in Current View Township, later divided into Current View and Greenwood schools. Named for Addison Pope, an early settler. (Mrs. J.F. Kelley; Mrs. Chas. Osborne)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pope's Chapel
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian Church organized by a Reverend McDowell from Charleston during the 1880s. An elderly member, Addison Pope, gave the site one mile north of Current View. The church became inactive but has recently been revived. More land was added and now a good rural church is built on the three acre lot. (Mrs. J.F. Kelley; L. Pulliam; Mrs. Chas. Osborn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Possum Creek
Description:A small stream flowing into Briar Creek. The name was acquired because there are so many opossums in the valley. (Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Dale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Possum Hollow
Description:See Possum Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Post Oak School
Description:Named for this variety of trees that makes a grove around the school. It is situated about halfway between Gatewood (q.v.) and Ponder (q.v.). (C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Powers School
Description:In Washington Township, not far from the site of the original old log house named for John W. Powers, a farmer, landowner, and pioneer teacher. (Mrs. M. Arnold; Green Bros.; Mrs. D. Varner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poynor
Description:A post office and village in Poynor Township. The village grew up on the Poynor land. Marion C. Poynor and a brother operated a store and mill here in the early 1880s. Marion got the post office established in his store and named it in honor of his father, Reverend David L. Poynor. See Poynor Church. (W.D. Randel; J.K. Langford; W.H. Roberson; Postal Guide 1892-1932)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poynor Cemetery
Description:At the site of the old Poynor Freewill Baptist Church (q.v.) one mile south of the village. A pioneer family name. (S.B. Misel; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poynor Church
Description:The first General Freewill Baptist Church organized in this section of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas. Near the present site of Poynor. Organized in a brush arbor in 1870, by Reverend David L. Poynor, a pioneer Baptist minister, born in North Carolina. This church gradually declined and the Poynor Missionary Baptist Church was organized in 1884. It is still active. (Reverend J.A. Leroux; HISTORY OF LIBERAL BAPTISTS, 235; M.B.G.A. 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poynor School
Description:At Poynor (q.v.). This original school took the name of the early pioneers.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poynor Township
Description:One of the southern border divisions, formed August 5, 1920 from parts of Union and Current View townships. Named for the village. (S.B. Misel; County Court Record Q, 329)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pratt
Description:A village and post office in Poynor Township. When the post office was established in Benjamin Fugate's store it was named for David Pratt, a farmer and influential citizen who came from Alabama about 1885. His daughter, Mary Jane Pratt, was later Commissioner of the Schools for Ripley County. The post office was discontinued in 1933. The school also was named for him. (J.K. Langford; S.B. Misel; Mrs. Sarah Misel; Postal Guide 1897-1933)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pratt Church
Description:Church of God. The house was erected in 1933, 1/4 mile north of Pratt School which this church had used for services. (S.B. Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pratt School
Description:See Pratt
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Price Graveyard
Description:In northwestern Poynor Township. Nathaniel Price, an early pioneer from Tennessee, owned a large farm here. Later Aaron Price who owned land here started the cemetery as a family burial ground. It is now used by some other families. Aaron Price died about 1905. (Mrs. Sarah Misel; S.B. Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Price School
Description:In southeastern Sherley Township. The old school took the name of Nathaniel Price. See Price Graveyard. (Mrs. E. O'Neill; S.B. Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pulaski
Description:A discontinued post office for Mullen (q.v.), a Polish settlement. Chester Kellar, a merchant, was influential in getting the office established and his wife was the first postmistress. Named for Casimir Pulaski (1748-1779), the Polish count who served in the American Revolution. Outlawed by Russia for fighting for the liberty of Poland, he went to France where Franklin induced him to support the American colonies. Landing in Philadelphia in 1777, he served until he was mortally wounded in the attack on Savannah in 1779. Nearly twenty communities in fifteen different states bear his name. (NEW STANDARD ENCYCLOPEDIA, Vol. 8, 1934; C. Butler; J.K. Langford; Postal Guide 1913-1935; L. Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Purman
Description:A small village and post office in Harris Township. Nothing remains of the village but two homes and the old two-story building formerly used for lodge and other community gatherings. J. Blake Bell got the post office established in his store, and named it for an elderly resident of the vicinity. (W.H. Roberson; J.K. Langford; L. Young; Postal Guide 1902-1913)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Race Track Hollow
Description:A long, level valley near Big Barren Creek in Kelley Township. The site of horse racing for the community. (A.C. Randel; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Red Sea
Description:A lowland region that heads in Butler County and leads between Naylor and Neelyville into Little Black River in Arkansas. Before the drainage system was established, it would, during rainy seasons, become an impassable sea. This condition caused the early settlers to give it the Bible name for the sea over which Pharoah tried unsuccessfully to pursue the Israelites in their exodus from Egypt. (W.D. Randel; Rev. J.R. Leroux; I.H. Barnhill; Exodus: 14)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Riga
Description:A flag station on tne Frisco Railroad. Merely a loading dock for that section. Formerly Hemenway (q.v.). According to one informant Samuel Potter who lived there at the time, a Russian, suggested the name. Another thinks S. Potter had nothing to do with the name. Undoubtedly in some way it borrowed it�s name from Riga, the capital and chief sea port of Latvia, formerly a part of Russia. (Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Righter's Mill
Description:Formerly Mabrey Mill (q.v.). William H. Righter, a lawyer of Doniphan, owned the mill for a short time. Then Harry Jones owned and operated the mill until his death in the 1880s, after which the mill was abandoned. (W.D. Randel; J. Lewis; C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Riley Cemetery
Description:A small burial ground on Briar Creek in Sherley Township. An earlier settler, Luke Riley, lived there. (Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ripley Chapel
Description:A Presbyterian Church, organized by Reverend J.W. Beaucamp, in the vicinity of Freedom Church (q.v.), soon after the wrecking of that building. It was named for the county. There is no regular organization now, but the building is used by the community for Sunday School and other gatherings. (Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young; W.H. Roberson; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ripley County
Description:It is one of the southern border divisions lying between Butler County on the east and Oregon County on the west. By an act of the General Assembly of Msisouri, it was formed from Wayne County January 5, 1833. Wetmore defines the boundary: "beginning in Cane Creek, where the southern boundary line of the state crosses the same, in range five east; thence with the state line to a point where the same crosses the north fork of White River; thence running a northwardly direction on the dividing ridge between the headwaters of Spring, Eleven Points, and Current rivers, and the waters Osage and Gasconade rivers, to the southwest corner of Washington County; thence east along the township line between townships thirty-three and thirty-four, to the Madison County line; thence south with said line to Black River; thence with said river, along the middle of the main channel therof, to a point due west of Cedar Cabin; thence with the southwest boundary of Wayne County to the beginning." Thus, Ripley originally was the mother of Howell, Oregon, Carter, and the western part of Butler counties, besides some divisions farther north. The assemby decreed that John Howard and John Greegs of Wayne County and Allen Duncan of Madison County be commissioners to select a seat of justice and that the courts be held in the house of Isaac E. Kelly, until the county court should fix a temporary seat of justice. Van Buren (q.v.) was selected as the county seat. It was named for General Eleazer Wheelock Ripley (1782-1839) of the War of 1812, who was conspicuous for gallantry in the defense of Fort Erie on August 15, 1814. General Ripley was a member of Congress from Louisiana from 1835-1839. (Goodspeed (1888) 183; Williams, HISTORY OF MISSOURI, 572; Douglass I.306; Wetmore, 159; MISSOURI LAWS (1832-1833), 55-56; MISSOURI LAWS, 15th General Assembly, 35-36; DICT. OF AMER. BIOG. XV, 621)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Robertson Ferry
Description:See Gaines Ferry
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rock Hill School
Description:In Flatwoods Township. A descriptive name for the small rocky elevation.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rocky Point School
Description:An old school in Sherley Township, northwest of Ponder, used for church also. Divided later chiefly into Upshaw and Rosson schools. A name descriptive of the limestone glades there. (Mr. and Mrs. L. Pulliam; Mrs. E. O'Neill; Reverend Wm. S. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rogers Graveyard
Description:In the Slayton School district. A pioneer family name. Willoby Rogers lived there. (Mrs. A. Mahan; Reverend Wm. S. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rongey Hollow
Description:A small branch of Little Barren Creek in Kelley Township. John Rongey lived there in the early 1890s. (J. Lewis; A.C. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rosson School
Description:In the southwestern part of Sherley Township. Named for James Rosson from Tennessee who owned land and lived near. (F. Doherty; C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ruff Ferry
Description:See Gaines Ferry
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Running Water Creek
Description:A spring-fed stream in Pine Township, flowing into Little Barren Creek. About 1/2 mile from the source, Hodo Spring (q.v.), the stream sinks and flows underground most of the distance. It is the only living stream in that part of the township. (Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Franken; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Dale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Running Water School
Description:In the northern part of Pine Township. Named for the stream nearby. (Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Franken; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Dale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rush Cemetery
Description:In Gatewood Township, one and a half miles south of Tucker. James Rush, who came from Tennessee soon after the Civil War owned land and lived near. (F. Shipman; W.R. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rush Creek
Description:A northern tributary of Mill Creek in Gatewood Township. It took the name of a landowner. Cf. Rush Cemetery. (J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ryan Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ryan Hollow
Description:It leads into Little Black River. Johnny Ryan lived near the mouth of the hollow. (Reverend H.H. Smelser)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sanders Spring
Description:See Corrigan Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sandlin Bay
Description:An old bayou of Current River in Doniphan Township three and a half miles south of Doniphan. A good fishing place. Thomas Sandlin who inherited this part of the Kittrell estate lived here. See Kittrell's Mill. (Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sanky Hall
Description:A Holiness Church 1/2 mile south of Dizmang School (q.v.), built 1895. A derisive name given to the church because they claim sanctification in the sense of being without sin. However, the name remained. (S.B. Misel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Schick School
Description:See Pine Bluff School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Segin
Description:A post office established during the late 1880s, in a country store 1/2 mile east of Ponder (q.v.). Otto and Albert Lammers, former residents of Sequin, Guadelupe County, Texas, owned land here, set up the store, and got the office which they named for their old home town. The office was kept here only a short time, until it was established at Ponder (q.v.). (J.K. Langford; C. Myatt; Postal Guide 1887)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sewell School
Description:In Varner Township. George and James Sewell who died several years ago lived in the neighborhood. Their father had settled there before the Civil War. (Mrs. D. Varner; M. and Mrs. D.A. Chinn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sharoon Ford
Description:At Sharoon Spring on Logan Creek at the crossing of the old Doniphan and Poplar Bluff Road. It was a fine camping ground during the wagon freighting days. Mrs. Cunningham remembers the old ruins of the grist mill there when she was a child. A man of this name settled there, explained Mr. and Mrs. Lee. (Mrs. E. Cunningham; Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sharoon Spring
Description:The spring on Logan Creek south of Matthews School, near the old Doniphan and Poplar Bluff Road. See Sharoon Ford.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sheehan
Description:A switch on the Doniphan Railroad established about 1910 near the old site of Borth, for loading timber. Named for James A. Sheehan, a farmer living near. (J.K. Langford; M.F. Van Dover)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sherley Cemetery
Description:In Sherley Township near Briar Creek, on land formerly owned by Frank M. Sherley, a Confederate Captain. (W.S. Doherty; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sherley School
Description:Now generally known as Briar Creek School for the village one mile west. Named for Frank M. Sherley. See Sherley Township. (Mrs. Geo. Holford; E. Fogle)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sherley Township
Description:Formed August 10, 1892, by consolidation of Briar Creek Township and Fourche Township and named for Frank M. Sherley, a former landowner and farmer, who was a Captain in the Confederate Army. (J.K. Langford; C. Myatt; County Records H, 605)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh Church
Description:Prior to 1887, the Missionary Baptist of Macedonia Church (q.v.) built a log house on North Prong of Little Black River. Because the membership was small and weak they soon united with the church in Grandin. The church is now (1937) a Freewill Baptist Church. In 1887 it was organized with nine members. Their leader was Reverend Julius A. Leroux, who was born in Paris, France, and had served in the Federal Army during our Civil War. The Present House was erected about 1890 and is still used. The school built about 1/2 mile from the church is known by the church name and as McKinney School (q.v.). The word, Shiloh, meaning resting place, is the city between Bethel and Shechem, where the Israelites, under Joshua, set up the tabernacle after crossing the Red Sea in their flight from Egypt. (Reverend H.H. Smelser; Reverend J.A. Leroux; Mrs. M. Nunnellee; HIST. OF LIB. BAP., 244; Jos. 18:1)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh Mill
Description:See McKinney's Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh School
Description:See Shiloh Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shipman Cemetery
Description:An old burial ground in the southwestern part of Gatewood Township. Named for Daniel Shipman, a pioneer landowner and farmer who came from Tennessee in 1848 and settled near the state line. He was a Confederate soldier. (F. Shipman; W.R. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Short
Description:A post office in Kelley Township established in a commissary owned by Thomas L. Wright during the timber days. Named for William Short, a farmer who owned land nearby. The mail was brought by a gasoline boat from Doniphan. In 1930 the post office was discontinued when the mail route from Bennett (q.v.) was established. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis; A.C. Randel; Mrs. J.A. Thaxton; Postal Guide 1901-1926)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Simons Mill
Description:An old grist mill shown on 1867 map. Later Mabrey Mill (q.v.). "Aunt" Sally Simons lived there. (J. Lewis; J.K. Langford; Colton's map)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Simpson Creek
Description:A small eastern tributary of Current River in Doniphan Township. Peter Simpson settled there in the 1850s. (Jno. Chilton; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Simpson Creek School
Description:Near the stream, from which it took its name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sinking Creek
Description:See Big Barren Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sinsabaugh
Description:A switch on the Frisco Railroad near Acorn (q.v.). In 1902 a mill was put in by the Ohio Hardwood Lumber Company. D.A. Sinsabaugh was the manager and chief owner. (J.K. Langford; C.D. Sinsabaugh)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Slagle
Description:A timber switch and station on the Frisco Railroad at Acorn (q.v.). William W. Slagle, a landowner, operated a sawmill for a time before 1902, and was postmaster of Acorn for several years. (Mr. and Mrs. D.A. Chinn; D.C. Sinsabaugh)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Slayton School
Description:In Flatwoods Township. When the first house was erected in 1883, it was known as the Brown School for a landowner of the community, James Brown. In 1914 the site was changed and the new name given for Benjamin W. Slayton, a prominent family of the community. (E.B. Slayton; Green Bros.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Buffalo School
Description:In Sherley Township on the headwaters of South Fork of Buffalo Creek, from which it received its name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Fork of Buffalo Creek
Description:Heads near Bardley. Flows through Pine, Sherley, and Kelley townships to form the main stream by its junction with North Fork. Locally known as South Prong.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Fork of Little Black River
Description:It heads north of Doniphan ten or twelve miles and flows south and east into Little Black River in Flatwoods Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Prong
Description:See South Fork of Buffalo Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Prong of Fourche Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spain School
Description:See Walnut Grove School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spell School
Description:In Washington Township. It took the name of William Spell, a landowner nearby, who came from Kentucky soon after the Civil War. (Mrs. A. Mahan; Mrs. E. O'Neill; Reverend Wm. S. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring Hill Church
Description:An active Missionary Baptist Church in Flatwoods Township, situated on a hill above Casteel Spring (q.v.) about three miles south of the old Mount Pleasant Church (q.v.). Organized during the 1880s in Cypress Creek School. (L. Young; J.A. Leroux; Mrs. A. Mahan; S. McPheeters; MINUTES OF CANE CREEK ASSOCIATION)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railway
Description:The St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company now owns all the roads in these five counties except the "Cairo Branch" and the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Hence the present name, locally known as "The Frisco." It was taken, of course, from the terminal cities.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Louis, Iron Mountain, and Southern Railway
Description:The road, completed from Iron Mountain (Iron County), through Wayne and Butler Counties, was opened for traffic April 2, 1873. Cf. Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad. (Records in St. Louis Railroad office, by G.R. Mabie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stanley Branch
Description:A small branch of Logan Creek. James Stanley was an old settler here who served in the Civil War. Also known as Mud Creek. (Mrs. E. Cunningham; W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Still House Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township, leading into Big Barren Creek. Soon after the Civil War and possibly earlier there was a still here for making whiskey. (J. Lewis; J. Whitwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stone Graveyard
Description:In Washington Township, four miles northeast of Purman. Early settlers of the name lived nearby. (Mr. and Mrs. C.M. O'Brien)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sugar Branch
Description:See Merrell Branch
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sugar Grove Church
Description:A name locally applied to the Poynor General Baptist Church (q.v.) before their house was built. They had services in the brush arbor in the large sugar maple grove south of Poynor. (Reverend J.A. Leroux)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sugar Tree Grove School
Description:One of the oldest schools in the southern part of the county, in Union Township. It was located in one of the several maple orchards in the vicinity. (S.B. Misel; Mrs. E. O'Neill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sullivan Graveyard
Description:See Oak Grove Cemetery
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sycamore Hole
Description:A deep bayou in Logan Creek, east of Matthew School, where Highway 14 now crosses this creek. It was the old family washing place, the community fishing grounds, and the baptising pool for the early settlers. A very old sycamore tree was cut down when the highway was made. (Mrs. E. Cunningham; Mr. and Mrs. Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sylvan School
Description:In Thomas Township. Formed from the old Taylor School (q.v.). A descriptive name for the forest near.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:T.L. Club House
Description:Established about 1919, on the eastern side of Current River about three miles south of Doniphan. Its name was given for two of the thirteen men of Doniphan who were the owners, T.L. Pulliam, a merchant, and T.L. Moore, a hotel proprietor. (W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Taylor School
Description:The earlier school in Thomas Township. William Taylor owned a large tract of timber land where Torch (q.v.) later grew up. Mr. Taylor was influential in getting the school established. As the population increased in the vicinity of Torch, the old school district was divided into Torch School, named for the post office, and Sylvan School, which was situated out in the forest region. (Mr. and Mrs. D.A. Chinn; Mrs. S.E. Sands)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Team Camp
Description:A logging camp of the Grandin Mills, six miles south of Grandin, where the company kept eighty mules. Many other teams belonging to individuals were used also. (J. McGee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Templeton Rock
Description:A bluff on Current River in Greenwood School District. A pleasant retreat for outings. On one of these picnics early in 1900 Miss Jennie Templeton dropped her ring into the river below, this giving rise to the name. (Mr. and Mrs. C.M. O'Brien)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Terrapin Spring
Description:See Corrigan Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Terrible Creek
Description:A turbulent little stream in Pine Township, flowing into the South Fork of Buffalo Creek. The very abrupt and hilly topography suggested the name. (Mrs. E. O'Neill; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Dale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thaxton Camp
Description:See Blue Hole
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Barrens
Description:During the time of the early settlements in this section, there were large stretches of grassy, near treeless regions very fine for grazing. Eaton says the name came from the Barrens in Kentucky, which seems very plausible because many of the earliest pioneers came from that state. The name is a descriptive word for the landscape. (Mo. Hist. Rev. (July, 1916) 272)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Frisco
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railway.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Hoxie Branch
Description:See the Illinois, Missouri and Texas Railroad.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Pines
Description:A club house established about 1905, on Current River two and a half miles north of Doniphan, by J.D. Gerlach of Doniphan. A more modern building was erected by the Heck brothers about 1914. Not much remains now. The pine timber suggested the name. (W.D. Randel; L. Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thomas Fork
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thomas Township
Description:The southeastern division of the county, formed from Harris Township, July 16, 1872. An old family name there before the Civil War. Ad Thomas was an early landowner there. (J.K. Langford; County Court Records E, 214; Mrs. D. Varner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Three Mile Ridge
Description:Along Terrible Creek on the west. The Bennett Road from Highway 14 follows this ridge that was an early trail. It was named for its approximate length. (E. Fogle; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tick School
Description:See Plunk School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tight Wad
Description:A derisive name. See Bardley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tinker Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township. Leads into Big Barren Creek. Alexander Tinker was an early settler. (J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Torch
Description:A railroad station and post office on the Frisco Railroad in Thomas Township. In 1918 N.R. Townley bought a large tract of timber land in the vicinity and put in mills for planing, making shingles, and sawing. They put in a store and the son, Richard I., was the first postmaster. Some railroad officials suggested the name to Mr. Townley because the flames of the burning mill refuse reminded them of torches. It grew to be a village of 500, but nothing is left now but Torch School, a store, and post office. (Richard Townley; Mrs. J.F. Kelley; Postal Guide 1921-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Torch School
Description:Named for the post office. See Taylor School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Towles Ferry
Description:See Gaines Ferry
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Towles School
Description:In Doniphan Township. It was built on land belonging to H.H. Towles who was at one time sheriff of the county. (L. Pulliam; Mrs. Jno. Towles)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tram Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township. Leads into Big Barren Creek from the north. This hollow led to the tram railroad in Carter County, built out from Grandin by the Missouri Land and Lumber Company. The old road was removed in 1904. (J. Lewis; C.A. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tucker
Description:A discontinued post office in Gatewood Township. About 1888 John Tucker put up a country store. It was known as Tucker's and later as Tuckertown, when a grist mill, a blacksmith shop, another store and a cotton gin were put in. When the post office was establshed the name was shortened to Tucker. Nothing remains but one store. (Wm. S. Doherty; Mr. and Mrs. L. Pulliam; F. Shipman; W.R. Holland; Postal Guide 1892-1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tucker Bay
Description:See Tucker's Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tucker School [1 of 2]
Description:In Washington Township. Named for George Tucker, a farmer and justice of the peace who gave the site before 1900. (Mrs. Anna Sheridan; Reverend Wm. S. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tucker School [2 of 2]
Description:See Little Willis School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tucker Town
Description:See Tucker
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tucker's
Description:See Tucker
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tucker's Mill
Description:A grist and sawmill set up before the Civil War by James Tucker. Father Hogan makes mention of the place at a ford on Current River, the mill and homestead owned by Appollinaris Tucker when he had gone to the place in June, 1852. It was not far from Mabrey Bay, which is also known as Tucker Bay. The mill was not used much after 1880. (W.D. Randel; Mrs. E. O'Neill; D.S. Bates; MISSION IN MISSOURI, 40)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tunnel Bluff
Description:A bluff of limestone formation more than 100 ft. high, fifteen miles (28 miles by river), north of Doniphan, on Current River. There is in it a natural tunnel through which one may see from the river. (Mrs. H.P. Stone; F. Kelley; MISSOURI GUIDE, 544)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turkey Island
Description:In Thomas Township. A sandy elevation southeast of Naylor. When this section was still wild and undrained, wild turkeys would gather here during high water. Thus they were easily served for food. (J. Thagmartin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turkey Knob
Description:One of the highest hills in the southern part of Pine Township near Highway 42. During the early days there were many wild turkeys and the gobblers appeared to frequent this particular elevation. (Geo Dale; Mrs. B.J. Hayes)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turkey Pen Hollow
Description:In Harris Township. Leads into Harris Creek. Formerly owned by Dr. J.G. Hancock. See Hancock School. In the early days they built pens here to trap wild turkeys. (Mrs. Thos. Hancock; Wm. F. Doherty)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Twin Springs
Description:See Mabrey Springs
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tyson School
Description:In Union Township. Established in 1885 and named for a landowner there. When the house burned, the name was changed to Union School (q.v.). (Mr. and Mrs. L. Pulliam; C. Myatt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Cemetery
Description:The burial ground near the old Union Church in Union Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Church [1 of 2]
Description:Methodists and Presbyterians from Illinois settled in Union Township and established the church in 1891. Both organizations have disbanded, and the house was sold in 1930. It is an idealistic name. (Wm. S. Doherty; C. Myatt; Mr. and Mrs. L. Pulliam)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Church [2 of 2]
Description:The old church erected soon after the Civil War for the Baptists and Methodists of Doniphan and vicinity. It was built on the Livensparger homestead near the present site of the Missouri Pacific Railroad depot. The Baptist church had been organized in 1850 according to old resident's reports, but the minutes gave the date as 1856. The Methodists had organized in 1849 with Lemuel Kittrell (cf. Kittrell's Mill) as sponsor. The Methodists erected a building in 1888 and the Baptist continued to use the Union Church until 1894 when their house was built. (Miss Myrtle Williams; M.B.G.A.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union School
Description:In Union Township, erected in 1901 and named for the church nearby (q.v.). (Wm. S. Doherty; C. Myatt; Mr. and Mrs. L. Pulliam)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Township
Description:One of the southern border townships, relocated and bounded in June, 1871. Originally it included all of the southwestern part of the county. An ideal name. (J.K. Langford; C. Myatt; County Court Record E, 167-168; Wm. S. Doherty)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Upshaw Hollow
Description:In the southwestern part of Sherley Township, where Reuben Upshaw, from North Carolina, made an earlier settlement in Fourche Creek Valley. (C. Myatt; J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Upshaw School
Description:One of the older schools in Sherley Township established on land formerly owned by Reuben Upshaw. See Upshaw Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Varner
Description:A former name for Oxly (q.v.). When the Doniphan Railroad was built in 1882, the railroad surveyors gave the name for Daniel Varner, who had a store and the Oakdale post office (q.v.). Mr. Varner, who was also a large landowner, gave the right-of-way for the railroad. (Mrs. D. Varner; M.F. Van Dover; Mrs. M. Barnhill; Postal Guide 1886-1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Varner Township
Description:In the southeastern part of the county. Formed May 7, 1890 from parts of Washington and Harris townships. Named for its chief railroad station at that time. Mr. McPheeters, my informant, circulated the petition for the formation of the township and presented it to the court in the late 1880s. See Varner. (J.K. Langford; Reverend Wm. S. McPheeters; Court Records H, 243)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Venable School
Description:In Varner Township. One of the older schools. Frank and Joe Venable lived in the district. Their father, Frank Venable, entered land here long before the Civil War. (Mrs. D. Varner; Mrs. A. Mahan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Victory School
Description:A local name, often applied earlier, for Emmons School, because they had considerable difficulty in getting it formed from Shiloh and Lone Star districts. (Mr. and Mrs. G.G. Davis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Waddle's Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill on Little Black River. William H. Waddle owned the mill before the Civil War. After the war Travis Harris, for whom Harris Township (q.v.) is named, rebuilt the mill and operated it a few years when it took his name. (Lee Young; J.K. Langford; Reverend Wm. S. McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:An old school, established in Gatewood Township in 1885. The name is descriptive of the black walnut timber growing there. Later some factions developed, and in 1898, just as the Spanish American War (1896-1898) ended, this district was divided into two new schools, Cuba and Spain. The names for Cuba and Spain were quite appropriate for the school names, as the war contention had been between Spain and Cuba. (Reverend Wm. S. McPheeters; W.R. Holland; W.H. Roberson; Mrs. L. Pulliam)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ward School
Description:Now Burnham School (q.v.) 1/2 mile from the old log school with a big fireplace, a long window, and puncheon floor and seats. Henry Ward, who came here from Tennessee in 1855, gave one acre for the site. (Mrs. C. Crosson; Mrs. M. Arnold)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Washington Township
Description:Originally it included all of the southeastern part of the county. Relocated and bounded in June, 1871. Named for George Washington, one informant reports. (J.K. Langford; Green Bros.; County Court Records E, 167)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wells Creek
Description:A small stream in the northern part of Sherley Township, flowing into Current River. Named for John Wells, who entered land there before the Civil War. (J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wells Creek School
Description:In Sherley Township on the creek, from which its name was derived. (J.K. Langford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West Branch of Fourche River
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West Fork of Fourche Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West Point School
Description:An old school northwest of Purman. Doubtless named for the Military Academy at West Point, opened in 1794. Over a dozen towns, and a vast number of schools, have borrowed the name. (Mrs. Chas. S. Osborn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West Prong of Fourche Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Whitwell Spring
Description:A large spring at Bennett, on the farm owned by Andrew J. Whitwell, a pioneer Baptist preacher who came from Perry County, Tennessee, in 1878. (A.C. Randel; J.B. Gibson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wild Cat Hollow
Description:It leads into Current River one mile below the mouth of Buffalo Creek. There were many of these animals during the earlier days. (J. Lewis; W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wild Cat School
Description:See Oak Grove School (West)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wilson Cemetery
Description:In Sherley Township seven miles west of Doniphan. Named for the early settler, William Wilson. (Mrs. Geo. Holford; Geo. Dale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wilson School
Description:In Sherley Township. The oldest school in this part of the county. Named for William Wilson, a landowner and blacksmith who settled here long before the Civil War. (Geo. Dale; H. George)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Winneyham Branch
Description:Into Flat Creek in Flatwoods Township. A very old family name. (Reverend Wm. S. McPheeters; Reverend J.A. Leroux)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wolf Creek
Description:See Deerey Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Woodring Graveyard
Description:See Bardley and Bardley Cemetery
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wright Club House
Description:It was erected across the river from Doniphan by Thomas L. Wright, a sawmill man and lumber contractor, about 1924. (W.D. Randel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wright's Mill
Description:In the vicinity of Shiloh School. T.L. Wright operated a lumber mill for a short time before he established the larger mill at Kingbee (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Young and Wick's Mill
Description:In 1907 Lee Young and John Wicks set up a sawmill on Logan Creek and in 1911 operated the mill southwest of Doniphan. (Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Young Cemetery
Description:Usually known now as Bethany Cemetery for the church nearby (q.v.). The first person buried there was George W. Young in 1886, who had come from Tennessee before the Civil War and entered land here. He was collector and sheriff of the county for several years prior to 1875. His widow, Mrs. Rose Ann Young and her son Lee Young deeded the land for the burial ground. (Mrs. Emma Cunningham; Lee Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

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