Pettis County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Allen School
Description:A school in the southwestern part of LaMonte Township. Named for Brown Allen, on whose land it was located. (County Plat Book (1916); G.L. Reynolds; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 187; File Co. Schools (1938-1939)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Anderson School [1 of 2]
Description:A school in the western part of Heath's Creek Township. Now a part of the Longwood Consolidated District. Named for a pioneer family in the neighborhood. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 173; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Anderson School [2 of 2]
Description:A school in the northwest part of Flat Creek Township. Named for Royal P. Anderson, on whose land it was located. (Brown Atlas (1903); County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 163; File Co. Schools (1938- 1939)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Antioch Baptist Church
Description:In the southern part of Washington Township; organized in 1868; named for the city where "the disciples were first called Christian" (Acts 11:26). (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 196)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Arator
Description:A pioneer village established about 1830, in the southeastern corner of Bowling Green Township, two miles from Georgetown; laid out in June, 1838. It has now disappeared. No explanation for this unusual name has been preserved. It is possible that it was conferred by some early lover of the classics who thought the Latin word "plowman, tiller of the soil" a suitable name for a farming community. Cf. Farmers' City, which was in the adjoining township. (Campbell (1873); H: MISSOURI GAZ. (1860) 8; J.W. Menefee; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Arator School
Description:See Orator School
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Arator School [1 of 2]
Description:In the northern part of Smithton Township, for white children. Doubtless derives its name from the old community, which was a short distance away. (C.F. Scotten; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Arator School [2 of 2]
Description:A colored school located at 1617 S. Barrett, Sedalia, Missouri. The name must have been transferred in some way from the two Arator Schools for white children; but the circumstances have not been ascertained. (C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Arlington School
Description:A public school in Sedalia at Tenth Street and Arlington Avenue. Named for the street which it adjoins. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 262)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bahner
Description:A post office from 1886-1892, 1903; in the southeast corner of Pettis County, eighteen miles southeast of Sedalia. Edward Bahner was the first postmaster, which probably accounts for the name. (Postal Guide; MISSOURI GAZ. (1883-1884) 151)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Barefoot School
Description:See Oak Point School
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Barker's Creek
Description:Rises in the southwest corner of Pettis County and flows across the northwest corner of Benton County into Henry County, where it empties into Tebo Creek. Named for Dick Barker, an early settler, about 1830-1833, near its mouth in Henry County. (Lay (1876) 22; Miss Johnson's thesis; History of Benton (1876) 17; History of Benton (1889) 456; Conard (1901); Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Basin Fork
Description:A tributary to Flat Creek, in the southern part of Washington Township. It is a shallow branch with flaring sides resembling a basin. Named from its location. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1065; J.W. Menefee; County Plat Book (1916) 25)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beaman
Description:A post office since 1886; in the west-central part of Bowling Green Township, seven miles northeast of Sedalia; a station on the M.K. & T. Railroad. Named for Judge J.W. Beaman, who entered forty acres of land in Bowling Green Township in 1834. Founded in 1873, under the name of Marlin. Named for one of the pioneers, Thomas Marlin, who came from Tennessee. The post office of Marlin was established in 1876. (Postal Guide; HIST. PETTIS (1919), 304; Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 430; Miss Inez Terry)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beaman Church
Description:A Christian Church in Bowling Green Township; built about 1906, has no services at present. Named from the town. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 145)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bear Branch
Description:A branch which rises in the northeast part of Blackwater Township, flowing northeast into South Fork Creek in the center part of the Township. Named for the animal, which used to be common here. (County Plat Book (1916); H: County Plat Book (1896); L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beaver Dam Creek
Description:A peculiarly shaped stream that has its beginning in Blackwater Creek, in the northwest part of Blackwater Township, and loops back to flow into the creek again a short distance north of its beginning. Named for its ideal location for beaver dams. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 806; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bee Branch [1 of 2]
Description:See Sigel.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bee Branch [2 of 2]
Description:Rises in Johnson County and flows northeast through Blackwater Township to join South Fork near the center of the township. Named for bee trees which were found by the early settlers along this branch. (Showalter (1929) 1; Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bennett School
Description:A school in the west-central part of Washington Township. Named for G.L. Bennett, on whose land it was located. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 197; File Co. Schools (1938-1939); County Plat Book (1916); L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bertha
Description:A post office in 1896; in the northwest part of Elk Fork Township. A discontinued post office. Located on the farm of Mr. Waddle and named for his daughter, Bertha. (P.G.; County Plat Book (1896); Loughead DICTIONARY OF GIVEN NAMES (1934); Miss Inez Terry)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethany Church
Description:A Baptist church in Georgetown, Cedar Township, organized in 1887. A Biblical name: the home of Lazarus (John 11:1). (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 149)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A Union church in the northern part of Elk Fork Township, fourteen miles west of Sedalia. A bible name: A city of Palestine, eight miles north of Jerusalem, formerly Luz. Named Bethel by Jacob (Gen. 28:19). (County Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 158)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethel School
Description:A school in the northwest part of Elk Fork Township. Named for the church, which is two miles northeast. (County Plat Book (1896); H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 159; Rep. Pub. Schools (1932) 1141; G.L. Reynolds)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethlehem Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the northern part of Flat Creek Township, seven miles south of Sedalia, organized June 7, 1851. Cf. above. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 300; County Plat Book (1896)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Cedar Creek
Description:Rises in the southeastern part of Cedar Township, and flows northwest until it reaches a point north of the old village of Georgetown, where it flows north until it unites with the Muddy. Named for the large cedar tree which grew at its mouth. Known as Big Cedar to distinguish it from its tributary Little Cedar Creek (q.v.). Also called Cedar Creek. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 858; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 147)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Muddy Creek
Description:Known also as Muddy Creek (q.v.). Called Big Muddy to distinguish it from its smaller tributary the Little Muddy (q.v.). Rises in eastern Johnson County, flowing through the southern part of La Monte Township about two miles south of La Monte in a northeastern direction, through Dresden Township, then through Cedar and Bowling Green Townships, emptying into the Lamine River in Cooper County. (Miss Inez Terry)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Black School
Description:A school in the northern part of Houstonia Township; later taken into District #1 (Houstonia Cons. District). Named for a homesteader, Lynn Black. The building has been wrecked. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 176; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blackwater Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal church in the west-central part of Blackwater Township; organized by John Rice, one of the first white children born within the county, 1833. Named from the creek which flows nearby. (Chapman (1895) 288; Couny Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blackwater Creek
Description:Rises in Johnson County and flows across the northwest corner of Blackwater Township, into Saline County, thence northeast into Lamine River, which it joins near the point where the Lamine empties into the Missouri. The water is notably dark, because it is in prairie land and is often at flood stage. Called Blackwater River on the Highway Map. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 804; County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 137, 75; Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blackwater River
Description:See Blackwater Creek
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blackwater Township
Description:In the northwestern corner of Pettis County. Bounded on the north by Saline County, on the east by Houstonia and Hughesville Townships, on the south by La Monte Township, and on the west by Johnson and Lafayette Counties. The township was one of the first five laid out when Pettis County was organized in 1833. The township derives its name from the stream, which flows across its northwest corner. The area in 1833 included, not only its present territory, but all of Houstonia, and parts of Dresden and La Monte Townships. By subsequent changes including the formation of Houstonia, Dresden, and La Monte Township, Blackwater Township was reduced to its present size in 1873. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 137)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bleak Mound School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of Blackwater Township. So named becaue of its location on a high mound, where the wind strikes forcibly. Called by natives the Carpenter School, for James Carpenter, landowner. Also known, in 1882, as Hansbrough's School, probably from an early resident. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 310; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140; County Plat Book (1916); File Co. Schools (1938-39); G.L. Reynolds; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boomer
Description:See Lamb
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bothwell Lodge
Description:Six miles directly north of Sedalia in Cedar Township, built on the land of Stonyridge Farm. Built by John H. Bothwell in 1898, as a retreat from city life and business. Mr. Bothwell, a prominent lawyer and businessman in Sedalia, had much to do with the city's development. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 151)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bothwell School
Description:A school in the center part of Cedar Township. Named for John H. Bothwell (1818-1899), who was a distinguished lawyer and citizen, having been County Rep. during the session of 1889, 1895, 1901, and 1903, assistant prosecuting attorney of the county from 1873-1876, acting judge of the circuit court in 1890, chairman of the Rep. State Committee in 1892, 1893, and 1894, and in 1896 and 1908 he was a delegate at large from Missouri to the Republican National Convention. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 150; H: Mrs. Elliot; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bowling Green Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Heath's Creek Township, on the east by Cooper County, on the south by Smithton Township, and on the west by Sedalia and Cedar Townships. It is nearly in the center of the county from north to south, and lies on the eastern edge of the county. The Township was laid out when Pettis County was organized in the winter of 1833. It then occupied most of the northeast quarter of the county, and was not reduced to its present dimension till 1873. George W. Smiley came to this township in 1825, from Kentucky, and gave it the name "Bowling Green, because he loved his native state and its beautiful town of Bowling Green." Bowling Green, Kentucky, was so named because it was a level agricultural region similar to a smooth level lawn for playing bowls upon, which is termed a bowling-green. The name is found also in Florida, Indiana, Mississippi, Ohio, South Carolina, and Virginia. Gannett thinks it was originally borrowed from Bowling Green in Yorkshire, England. (Murray (1888) Vol. I, Part 2, 1035; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 142; Enc. Brit. (1937); Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Broadway Seminary
Description:A school in Sedalia on Broadway, between Kentucky and Moniteau Streets; established in 1867. Known as the Broadway High School at present. Named for the street on which it is located. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 574; HIST. PETTIS (1886) 10; Scruton's SEDALIA (1904); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 258)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brookside School
Description:A school in the eastern part of Blackwater Township. Named for the brook nearby. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brown School
Description:A school in the southern part of Dresden Township. Named for James Brown, a landowner in the district, who came to Dresden Township in 1865. (Chapman (1895) 651; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 155; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brown Spring
Description:A spring, five miles south of Sedalia. A family name. (Miss Inez Terry)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brown Springs
Description:A station on the S., W. and S. Railroad in Pettis County, five miles south of Sedalia. Named from a nearby spring, called Brown Spring. (H: Polk (1889-1890) 193; Miss Inez Terry)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brushy Creek
Description:A small stream in the southwest part of Cedar Township, which flows north into Muddy Creek. Takes its name from the abundance of brush along its course. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 147)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brushy School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of Smithton Township. Named for the brushy timber surrounding it. The building cannot be seen for the brush. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 201; File County Schools (L938-39); L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bryson
Description:A town in the extreme southwest part of Pettis County, in western Green Ridge Township. Probably a personal name. (H: Cram Atlas)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bryson School
Description:A school in the center part of Green Ridge Township. Named from the town. (Rep. Public Schools (1932) 1141; L.L. Ream; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buckeye School
Description:See Jackson School
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buffalo Creek
Description:A creek which rises in central Houstonia Township and flows north into Saline County. Named for the animal, which used to be common here. (County Plat Book (1916); Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buncombe
Description:A post office in 1870, in the southwetern part of Bowling Green Township. A humorous name, given because people thought the village would never really materialize. The familiar Americanism originated near the end of the debate on the Missouri "Question" in the 16th Congress, when a member from Buncombe County, North Carolina rose to speak. Several members begged him to desist, but he declared that the people of his district expected it, and that he was going to make a speech for Buncombe. Consequently, the word means "talk talk" or humbug. The North Carolina county, according to Gannett, was named for Colonel Edward Buncombe of the Continental Army. (Campbell (1873); H: Postal Guide; Murray (1888) Vol. I, Part II, B. 1177; John W. Menefee; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bunker Hill School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of Lake Creek Township. The name commemorates a familiar and famous event in American History, the famous battle of the Revolutionary War, fought June 17, 1775. It was chosen because the school is located on the top of a hill. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 183; File County Schools (1938-1939); C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Branch
Description:A post office from 1888-1904; in the southeastern part of Prairie Township on Camp Branch Creek, for which it is named. A station on the M.K. & T. Railroad (Postal Guide; County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 192)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Branch Creek
Description:A creek which rises in the eastern part of Elk Fork Township, flows across the southern part of Prairie Township, and empties into Flat Creek Township. Named Camp Branch because early settlers came and camped here during revival meetings. (County Plat Book (1916); Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Branch School
Description:A school four miles southwest of Sedalia. Named from the town. (Rep. Public Schools (1932) 1140; L.L. Ream; C.F Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Campbell College
Description:Incorporated at Georgetown in 1847. Probably named for its founder. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 257)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Carpenter School
Description:See Bleak Mound School
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Bluff
Description:A bluff near the junction of Cedar Creek and Muddy. Named for the cedar shrubs which grow on the bluff. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 925)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Creek
Description:See Big Cedar Creek
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Ridge School
Description:A private school in Blackwater Township. Named from its location. Unidentified at present. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 812; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Hughesville and Longwood Townships, on the east by Bowling Green Township, on the south by Sedalia Township, and on the west by Dresden Township. By an order of court at the February term, 1873, Cedar Township was created. Named Cedar in 1877, because of the cedar shrubs which grew abundantly on Cedar Bluff, near the junction of Cedar Creek and Muddy Creek. Prior to 1872, Cedar Township was included in Mt. Sterling Township. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 925; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 146)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Centerview School
Description:A school in the eastern part of Washington Township. Named becaue it gives a central view of the surrounding prairie. Created by G.L. Coleman, former County Superintendant. (H: Rep. Pub. Schools (1932) 1141; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chicago Rock Island Route Railroad
Description:See Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chicago, Rock Island and pacific Railroad
Description:A railroad that passes through the extreme southwest corner of Greenridge Township in Pettis County, running into Benton County through Brandon, Ionia, and east into Morgan County, passing through Stover, Versailles, and Pacific, leaving Morgan County through the south-central boundary, and crossing into Miller County. This railroad is also called the Chicago Rock Island Route Railroad and the Boonville-Versailles Railroad. It was authorized by a special act of the Illinois legislature in 1847 and was amended in 1851. Construction of the railroad began in Chicago in 1851, and reached the Mississippi River in 1854. Named for its termini. (Showalter (1929) 1; Highway Map; Enc. Brit.; E.J. Heerman)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Christian Church
Description:A church in Heath's Creek Township, organized by the Methodist Episcopal, Cumberland Presbyterian, Reformed, and M.P. denominations about 1852. Called originally, the old Union Church, for the united denominations which organized it. Later called Christian, with similar interdenominational significance. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 863; Hasting's Bible Dict. (1922); Mrs. R.E. Bealert)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Christian School
Description:Organized May 6, 1839, in Elk Fork Township. The reason for the name has not been discovered. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 245; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 257; C.F. Cotton; Miss Inez Terry)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clifton
Description:In Bowling Green Township. Clifton is a stock name for American towns, found more than thirty times in as many different states. It has sometimes been borrowed from Great Britain, which has three Cliftons, but oftener perhaps was conferred as suitable for a high place. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 300; Miss Inez Terry)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clifton City
Description:Probably another name for Clifton (q.v.). (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 961)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cold Neck Creek
Description:A creek in Heath's Creek Township. "Neck" in Missouri often means a more or less elongated district or strip of country, especially in the phrase "neck of the woods." This name is said to have been given to the creek on a cold winter's night by one William Bryant. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 858; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Coon Creek
Description:Crosses Prairie Township. Named because of the many raccoons found near it. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 985; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cottage School
Description:A school in the northeastern part of Washington Township. Named because it was first taught in the teacher's home. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 197; County Plat Book (1916); L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:County Line Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the southwestern part of Blackwater Township, established in 1844. The building is now closed. Named because of its location on the county line between Pettis and Johnson Counties. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 141)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crooked Creek
Description:A tributary to Muddy Creek. Named for the bends in the creek, which make it very crooked. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 964; G.L. Reynolds)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crown Hill Cemetery
Description:At Sedalia. Named for its location on the edge of a hill. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 715; J.W. Menefee)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crystal Spring
Description:A sulphatic mineral spring flowing from a sandstone member of the Coal Measures, about two miles south of La Monte near Muddy Creek. Named for the clear, transparent appearance of the water. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 84; G.L. Reynolds)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crystal Springs School
Description:A school on the southern border of La Monte Township. Named for springs nearby. When present County Superintendant Scotten attended, the only picture on the walls was a large white canvas painting of the springs. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 187; County Plat Book (1916); C.F. Scotten; G.L. Reynolds)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Darkeytown
Description:See Lincolnville
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dorsey
Description:A town about two and a half miles northeast of Sedalia. Probably a family name. (H: Cram Atlas)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dresden
Description:A post office since 1876; in the center part of Dresden Township, seven miles west of Sedalia. Laid out in the spring of 1863, by Agee and Thomas J. Lester. Mr. Agee came from Kentucky, and Mr. Lester from Virginia. Incorporated in 1866 (Campbell's Gaz. said 1860; Eaton said platted in 1870). Probably named from the beautiful city of Dresden, the capital of the Kingdom of Saxony, in the southern part of the German Empire, as it was the seat of German settlers. Dresden is a city where elaborately decorated and delicately colored porcelain figures are made. Hence, Dresden is used to designate anything of a delicate prettiness. Fifteen places in the United States bear the name of this German city. (Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 429; HIST. PETTIS (1882) 907; Enc. Hist. Mo. (1901) V. 11, p. 317; Eaton (1917) 340; Postal Guide; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 305-306, English Dictionary (1933) 307; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dresden Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Hughesville Township, on the east by Cedar Township and a part of Sedalia Township, on the south by Prairie Township, and on the west by La Monte Township. Organized in 1873; until 1844 it had been a part of Blackwater Township. When the lines were changed, the territory was divided between Elk Fork, and Mount Sterling Townships. Named for the town of Dresden. (Campbell (1873); HIST. PETTIS (1882) 907, 908; County Plat Book (1916)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dumpville
Description:A post office from 1886-1895, 1897-1904; in the southern part of Flat Creek Township. Named for Peter Dump, who lived here. (Postal Guide; County Plat Book (1896); Mrs. R.H. Wheeler)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dunkley's Store
Description:See Dunksburg
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dunkleysburg
Description:See Dunksburg
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dunksburg
Description:A village in northwestern Blackwater Township, twenty miles northwest of Sedalia. It stands on the borderline between Pettis and Johnson Counties, and has been claimed by both counties. Hence the history of the name has already been discussed in Miss Johnson's thesis. It's earliest name, according to Miss Johnson, was Dunkley's Store, given in 1859 when Dr. B. F. Dunkley opened a store there. Dr. Dunkley was born in 1809 in London, England, and came to Missouri from Ohio in 1848. Very soon the common suffix -burg was substituted for "Store," and the name became Dunkleysburg, later shortened to Dunksburg. In the high political excitement during and after the Civil War, the charge was made that Dr. Dunkley was a Confederate sympathizer, and a determined attempt was made to change the name to Sigel, the post office established here being actually named Sigel from 1876 to 1886. This was an attempt to honor General Frans Sigel (1824-1902), one of the best known Union officers in Missouri. Three other towns were named for him, in Illinois, Michigan, and Pennsylvania respectively. General Sigel, often known as "the Flying Dutchman," was born in Baden, Germany, and came to St. Louis in 1858, where he was a teacher in the German Institute. On the outbreak of the war, he organized a regiment of infantry and took a prominent part in the engagement at Dug Springs and the Battle of Wilson's Creek. Later he was credited with winning the Battle of Pea Ridge by a well timed assault, and was promoted to major general. After the war was over, he entered journalism and removed to New York City, playing an important political role as leader of German-Americans. His later activities brought him many enemies, and his popularity in Missouri declined. Probably for this reason the name Sigel fell into disfavor, and the original name Dunksburg was resumed. The name of the post office was changed back to Dunksburg in 1887, and so remained till 1897, when it was discontinued. The village is still known only as Dunksburg. (Postal Guide; Campbell (1873) 432; HIST. PETTIS (1874) 812; Conard (1901) 593; History of Johnson (1881) 620; Miss Johnson's thesis; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dunksburg School
Description:A school on the western border of Blackwater Township. Named from the town. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:East Prairie Grove School
Description:A school in the northwestern part of La Monte Township. The first Prairie Grove School was located on the wide prairie, and was given a descriptive name. Later the school district was divided. The eastern portion was called East Prairie Grove School, because of its geographical location. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 187; G.L. Reynolds; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eden Valley School
Description:A school in the west-central part of Blackwater Township. Named from the Garden of Eden, with reference to its low and fertile location. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elder Ridge School
Description:A school in the north-central part of Blackwater Township. Named for the elder trees growing on the ridge of land. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140; Mrs. Clarence Ray)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eldorado Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Episcopal church in the southwest corner of Elk Fork Township. Services are now held there. Named for the mythical country of the Golden Man sought by adventurers in South America. It is used figuratively to mean any country of wealth, or the land of desire. More than fifteen other places in the United States bear the name. (County Plat Book (1896); COL. ENC. (1935) 557; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eldorado Church [2 of 2]
Description:A community church in the southwest part of Elk Fork Township. This building was razed, and rivalry in the congregation caused the Methodists and Christians to try to surpass each other in erecting elaborate buildings. Now defunct. For the name cf. above. (COL. ENC. (1935); L.L. Ream; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elk Horn Creek
Description:A creek in Bowling Green Township, a tributary to Muddy Creek. Named for the deer which were attracted to this place, and shed their horns. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 947, 1004; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elkfork
Description:A post office in 1902, in Elkfork Township. Named from Elkfork Creek. (Postal Guide; Mrs. R.H. Wheeler)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elkfork Creek
Description:A creek which rises in the northern part of Green Ridge Township, and flows north into Muddy Creek in Elkfork Township. Named by the early trappers and hunters because of the abundance of elk, deer, and other game along its banks. (Campbell (1873); County Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 156)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elkfork Township
Description:Bounded on the north by La Mone Township, on the east by Prairie Township, on the south by Greenridge Township, and on the west by Johnson County. Organized in 1833, as one of the five original townships. It included most of the territory now comprised in Elkfork, Washington, and Green Ridge townships, and it was not until 1873 that it was finally reduced to its present boundaries. Named for the creek which flows through it. (Campbell (1873); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 156)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elm Branch Creek
Description:A branch in the southwestern part of Green Ridge Township. Named for the many elm trees that grow near its banks. (L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elm Branch School
Description:A school in the southwestern part of Green Ridge Township. Named for Elm Branch Creek. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 168; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Embree Branch
Description:A branch rising in eastern Bowling Green Township, running north into Heath's Creek. Named for Jas. C. Embree, who owned land on its banks. (Brown (1903)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eugene Field School
Description:A public school in Sedalia at Twenty-fourth and Ohio Avenue. Named for Eugene Field, a Missouri poet, born in St. Louis (1850-1895). He worked on newspapers in St. Joseph and Kansas City, and in 1883 joined THE CHICAGO NEWS staff. He wrote and printed collections of children's poems. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 262; Enc. Brit. (1938) )
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ewerton
Description:A little store near the west-central part of Green Ridge Township. A doubtful etymology derives the name from "ewer" which in the O.F. means water and "ton" meaning town, hence a watering place which developed into a town. It is more likely to have been a personal or family name. (Bradley (1897) Vol. 3, Pt. 2, 356; County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 308)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fairview
Description:A post office since 1860; in the northern part of Elkfork Township. A descriptive name, the setting being unusually beautiful. More than thirty other American places bear this popular name. (H: Missouri Gaz. (1860) 80; Campbell (1873); L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:A school, now discontinued, 1/2 mile off Camp Branch. Cf. above. (L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Farmer's City
Description:A town in the northwestern part of Smithton Township. Laid out in 1859, soon after purchasers of property in Priceville (q.v.) were swindled, but abandoned the same year, these settlers removing to Smithton, two miles east, when the Missouri Pacific Railroad reached that point. Named for the fact that it was laid out by the farmers in the township. (Campbell (1873); H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1011; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 306)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fauner City
Description:Probably a misprint for Farmer's City. (H: Parker (1867) 351)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fince
Description:See Finch
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Finch
Description:A post office from 1895-1902; in the southwestern part of Hughesville Township. Named for S.H. Finch, who ran a store in his yard and was postmaster. Spelled Fince in the county history, obviously a misprint. (Postal Guide; County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 307-308; Mrs. R.H. Wheeler)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:First Church of Pettis
Description:A Presbyterian church east of Hughesville, near the present Hughesville Cemetery. It was thought by the organizers to be the first church in Pettis County. Also known as "Old Brick Church." It was constructed of kiln- dried bricks. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 179; Mrs. R.E. Bealert)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Flat Creek
Description:This stream is said to rise variously in the northern part of Benton County, or in Elk Fork Township of Pettis County. The discrepancy seems to arise from its two branches. The one that bears the name Flat Creek on most maps rises in Elk Fork Township, but a more southern branch rises in northeastern White Township of Benton County, flows north across the county line just west of Ionia into Washington Township of Pettis County, and joins the other branch on the border between Sedalia and Flat Creek Townships. This southern branch is marked on some maps as South Flat Creek (q.v.), and the part of it in Benton County, on the Highway Map, is apparently named Elk Creek (q.v.). The united stream flows east across Pettis County, through the southern part of Smithton Township into Morgan County, where it joins the Lamine River in western Richland Township. The name has been explained as descriptive of the bottom of the creek bed, which is very flat and wide. It seems more likely that it is either a translation of an earlier French name Riviere Platte, or at least influenced by the sense of the French adjective plat, i.e. "shallow." Two large rivers and a multitude of smaller streams were so named by the French pioneers, and this considerable tributary of their Riviere a la Mine may have been one of the number. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1079; HIST. BENTON (1912) 69; Map of Morgan; Highway Map; Gannett; E.H. Preuitt; Lee T. Sims; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Flat Creek Church
Description:A Baptist church, five miles south of Smithton, organized September 23, 1846. Named from the creek, which is nearby. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 300; J.W. Menefee)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Flat Creek Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Flat Creek and Sedalia Township, on the east by Smithton and Lake Creek Townships, and on the south by Benton County, and on the west by Washington and Prairie Townships. It was one of the five original townships laid out when the county was organized in 1833, and then included most of the southeastern quarter of the county, as far north as Flat Creek, for which it was named. In 1872 it was reduced by the creation of Sedalia, Smithton, and Lake Creek Townships, and no longer touches the stream. (Campbell (1873); County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1079)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Forest Grove Seminary
Description:A seminary in Georgetown. Unidentified. (Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 429; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Forest Park
Description:A park near the southern side of Sedalia. Named for its abundance of trees and forest-like appearance. The name was probably suggested by the famous Forest Park of St. Louis. (Scruton (1904) 12; W.D. Agee)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Franklin School
Description:A school in Sedalia on the northwest corner of Moniteau and Cooper Streets; built in 1870. Named for Benjamin Franklin, an American philosopher, statesman, and man of letters (1706-1790). He was a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly from 1750- 1764. He was sent to France in 1776 to gain aid from Louis XVI, in which venture he was successful. He was made a member of the French Academy of Science in 1772. He was a minister to France. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 259; Encyclopedia Britanica (1938)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fristoe School
Description:A school in the southern part of Longwood Township. Named for Chas. Fristoe of the district. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919); C.F. Scotten; Mrs. R.H. Wheeler)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gailey
Description:A post office from 1886-1892; on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, six miles south of Sedalia, in the northern part of Flat Creek Township. Sometimes known as White's, which was a post office from 1893-1896. (Postal Guide; H: Polk (1889-1890) 377; County Plat Book (1896)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:George R. Smith College
Description:A school for colored people, located in Sedalia; opened for students January 25, 1894. It was organized in 1872, and was a gift of Mrs. M.E. Smith and Mrs. S.E. Cotton, daughters of General George R. Smith, for whom see under Smithton, below. (Enc. History of Missouri (1901) 42; Scruton (1904) 5, 6; H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 264)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Georgetown
Description:A village near the center of Cedar Township, three miles north of Sedalia. It was the county seat from 1837 to 1865, and is listed as a post office from 1876 to 1918. When the original location of the county seat at St. Helena (now Helena, q.v.) proved inconvenient, as the settlement advanced, its removal to a point nearer the center of the county was decided upon. The new town was laid out in 1833 by General David Thomson, father-in-law of General George R. Smith (for whom see under Smithton), and he named it in honor of his old Kentucky home, Georgetown, in Scott County, Kentucky, where he had been born and from whence he and General Smith started with their families on the long journey out to Missouri. General Smith and Judge Ramey manufactured the brick for the new courthouse and erected the building, which was completed December 16, 1837. By 1856 Georgetown had become a flourishing little town of some 1500 inhabitants. Nevertheless, as work advanced on the new Pacific Railroad, and it had reached as far as Washington, Missouri it became apparent to General Smith that Georgetown was doomed. The line of the road passed three miles south of the town. It was for this reason that he removed to the present site of Sedalia (q.v.) and became the founder of that place in 1857. His foresight was ridiculed by most of the people at Georgetown, but it was justified by events; the old county seat steadily declined, and Sedalia took its place in 1865. Georgetown, Kentucky, was incorporated in 1790 and name for George Washington. There are twenty-five Georgetowns in the United States, about a third of them being named, according to Gannett, for King George of England, about a third for the father of our country, and the other third for various and sundry Georges of less renown. (Postal Guide: Eaton: Gannett: Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 429; HIST. PETTIS (1882) 932, and (1919) 300; Conard (1901) 42; Harding's LIFE OF GEORGE R. SMITH (1904) 27, 286; Scruton's SEDALIA (1904) 17; SEDALIA DEMOCRAT, October 1, 1930)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Georgetown Church
Description:A Disciple's Church at Georgetown, organized before 1859. The congregation moved to Sedalia in 1862, when the county seat was moved there. Named for the village. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 144; Enc. Hist. Mo. (1901) 42)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Georgetown College
Description:A college in Georgetown, founded in 1869, which had a high reputation. Cf. above. (Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 429)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Georgetown School
Description:A school in the center part of Cedar Township. Cf. above. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 150; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gilead Christian Church
Description:A church ten miles northeast of Hughesville and about six miles north of Beaman in Heath's Creek Township. A Bible name from Mt. Gilead, where Gideon won his famous victory (Judges 7:3), or from the familiar phrase "balm in Gilead" (Jer. 8:22). (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 173)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Glover School
Description:A school in the center part of Prairie Township. Named for a family in the district. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 194; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Green Lawn Seminary
Description:Located five miles south of Longwood in Longwood Township; organized by Reverend Gordon Turner as a Cumberland Presbyterian School, but since 1878 has been conducted as a private school. Also known as Sunnymede School. Both names are for location. "Mede" is another spelling of "mead," archaic for meadow. A meadow is a lowland, having grass and wild flowers, but without trees or shrubs. Thus the mede would be both "green" and "sunny." (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 839)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Green Ridge
Description:A post office since 1876; in the northeastern part of Green Ridge Township, twelve and a half miles southwest of Sedalia; a station on the M.K. & T. Railroad. Founded in 1870 and 1871, when the Missouri, Kansas, and Texas Railroad came through the county. Called Parkersburg in 1870, in honor of the founder, Albert Parker, but the name was changed to the name of the post office formerly about a mile distant. Green Ridge is probably a location name suggested by the ridge that is covered with beautiful green prairies. (Postal Guide; Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 429; H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1037; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 302; Eaton 340)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Green Ridge Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Elk Fork Township, on the west by Washington Township, on the south by Benton County, and on the west by Henry and Johnson Counties. It was at first a part of Elk Fork Township until 1873, when it took its present boundaries. Named for the watershed between the waters of the tributaries of the Missouri and the tributaries of the Osage River. It is a ridge covered with green prairies interspersed with timber along the few water courses. (Campbell (1873); HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1037; County Plat Book (1916) )
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Green's Branch
Description:Unidentified. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 847)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Greenwood Church
Description:A Congregational church, organized by Aaron Brown in 1867. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 547)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Guier School
Description:A school in Houstonia Township; later taken into District #1 (Houstonia Cons. District). Named for James Guier on whose land it was located. The building was wrecked in 1933. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 176; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hansbrough's School
Description:See Bleak Mound School
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hazel Hill School
Description:A school in the eastern part of Houstonia Township. It is in a thicket of hazel brush, on a slight elevation. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 176; Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Heath's Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A discontinued post office, thirteen miles north of Sedalia. Named for the creek. (Goodwin (1867) 19; H: Polk's Gaz. (1883-1884) 410; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Heath's Creek [2 of 2]
Description:Rises in Hughesville and Longwood Townships, flowing east across Heath's Creek Township, into Cooper County. Named for Robert and John Heath, who in 1809 erected salt works at the mouth of the creek, where it empties into La Mine River. (Campbell (1873); HIST. PETTIS (1882) 857; County Plat Book (1896)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Heath's Creek Cumberland Church
Description:A Presbyterian church in Heath's Creek Township, organized in 1831. Named for the stream, near which it is located. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 862; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Heath's Creek Township
Description:In the northeast corner of Pettis County, bounded on the north by Saline County, on the east by Cooper County, on the south by Bowling Green Township, and on the west by Longwood Township. It was created in 1844, out of part of the original Bowling Green Township. Until 1873 it included a considerable part of the present Longwood Township. Named for the stream which flows through the township. (Campbell (1873); HIST. PETTIS (1882) 857)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Helena
Description:A former village in the southwestern part of Longwood Township, on Muddy Creek not far from the present town of Newland. It was eight miles north and one mile east of Sedalia. It was originally known as Pin Hook, a name said to have been conferred by an early adventurer from Tennessee, who thought it resembled a "hard place" by that name in his native state. The name seems to have been popular in Tennessee: there are two small villages so called in that state, one in Union County in northeast Tennessee, the other in Marion County near Chattanooga, and there is also a Pinhook Landing on the upper Tennessee River in Meigs County. All are in the wild mountain region of eastern Tennessee. The word is used for a small fishing-hook made from a pin, and may have been deemed fitting to describe a place in a crooked valley or on the bend of a stream, such as Muddy Creek makes in the vicinity. In 1833, when Pettis County was organized, Pin Hook was chosen as temporary county seat, but its name was almost immediately changed to the more aristocratic one of St. Helena. The County history of 1919 quotes a court order of December 3, 1834, using the new name. It was borrowed from the British island of St. Helena in the south Atlantic discovered by the Portuguese in 1501 and originally named for one of the greatest of Christian saints, Helena, mother of the Emperor Constantine and discoverer of the true cross, who died about 328 A.D. The island is chiefly famous as the scene of Napoleon Bonaparte's exile. He was imprisoned here, at Longwood, from 1815 till his death in 1821. The adoption of this Napoleonic name is to be compared with that of Longwood (q.v.), about five miles away in the same township; also the towns of Napoleon and Wellington, founded in 1836 and 1837 respectively, with Waterloo just halfway between them, in the adjoining county of Lafayette. There are seven Napoleons, thirteen Wellingtons, twenty-four Waterloos, and six St. Helenas in the United States, furnishing ample evidence of the widespread American interest in the career of the great French commander. There was good reason why this interest should be especially active during the 1830s, for this was the decade which saw the rise and growth of what has been called the Napoleonic legend. After the Emperor's lonely death at Longwood in 1821, he was forgotten for a while, but about 1830 his fame began to grow miraculously, both in France, where it was fed by the poetry of Beranger and a flood of romantic fiction, and all over the world. In 1836 his nephew Louis Napoleon made his first unsuccessful attempt to organize a Napoleonic revolution among the French soldiers stationed at Strasburg. The reigning French monarch, Louis Phillippe (1830-1849), tried to capitalize on the growing popular enthusiasim for his memory by bringing Napoleon's body back from St. Helena in 1840 and burying it in a magnificient mausoleum at the Hotel des Invalides in Paris. Finally in 1852 Napoleon "the Little," as he has since been called, succeeded, largely by reason of his name, in driving Louis Philippe from the throne and making himself the Emperor Napoleon III. During all this time the Napoleonic legend was powerful in America as well as France, and one of its results is manifest in an amazing number of American place-names. St. Helean remained the county seat of Pettis County from 1833 till 1837, when it was displaced by Georgetown (q.v.). After this the village rapidly declined. By general usage, the name was shortened to Helena. Little now remains of the old place but a few ruined houses. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 108, 147, 189, 308; Enc. Brit. (1938); Harding's LIFE OF GEORGE R. SMITH (1904) 27; R.M. (1939); Gannett; Miss Johnson's thesis.; Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hermantown
Description:See Longwood
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Grove Church
Description:See Houstonia Baptist Church
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Point Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist church in the southwestern part of Elk Fork Township. Built by Baptist, Methodist, and Christian denominations about 1853; cemetery was attached. The church was used for union services until 1870. It is now being operated by the Baptist denomination. Named for its location on the point of a hill, which is also in a hickory grove. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 965; County Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 159; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Point School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of Elk Fork Township. Named from Hickory Point Church. (County Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 159; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Higgins School
Description:A school in the north-central part of Houstonia Township. Named for Colonel Higgins, on whose farm it was built. The old colonial residence of Colonel Higgins, built in 1866, stands 220 yds. northeast of the schoolhouse. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 176; Rep. Pub. Schools (1932) 1141; Mrs. Robert R. Higgins)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:High Point Church
Description:In central Hughesville Township. Cf. above. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 180)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:High Point School
Description:A school in the center part of Hughesville Township, now in Consolidated District No. 2 (Hughesville Consolidated District). Named from High Point Church located nearby. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 180; H: Ibid.; Mrs. R.E. Bealert)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hope Dale School
Description:A school in the northwestern part of Green Ridge Township. Named for its location in a valley, and because it was a place that gave promise of future benefits. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 168; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hopewell Church
Description:A Baptist church, twelve miles northeast of Sedalia in Heath's Creek Township, organized August 1, 1867. Cf. above. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 863; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hopewell School
Description:A school in the southwestern part of Heath's Creek Township. Named for the church, which is nearby. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 173; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Horace Mann School
Description:A public school in Sedalia at Sixteenth Street and Park Avenue. Named for Horace Mann, the American educator and statesman (1796-1859). He was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1827- 1833; here he was responsible for the act creating a state board of education. He was secretary of the board from 1836-1848. He accepted a seat in Congress from 1848-1852. He was president of Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, from 1853-1859. Here he established his ideals of co-education and non-sectarianism in higher education. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 262; Enc. Brit. (1938)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Houstonia
Description:A post office since 1876; in the northwestern part of Houstonia Township, sixteen miles northwest of Sedalia; laid out in 1871. Named in honor of Colonel Thomas F. Houston, who was a Colonel in the Confederate army. He was a lawyer but did not practice. He was a planter near Houstonia. Gannett says it was named for General Samuel Houston (1793-1863), of Texas, president of the Texas Republic and later U.S. Senator from Texas, as are more than twenty other American towns; but a different origin for the Missouri Houstonia is well attested by local tradition. (Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 430; Scruton (1904) 18; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 304; J.D. Eckles; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Houstonia Baptist Church
Description:One of the old churches of the county, having been organized in 1866 under the name of Hickory Grove. Later the organization was called Wake Forest, and in 1867, the organization was moved to Houstonia, where the present church is located. The original location was three miles west of Houstonia. Named Hickory Grove Church from its location in a grove of hickory trees. The later name Wake Forest has been fancifully explained as derived from its location in a grove, and because the congregation often kept vigils or all-night services of prayer and meditation in the church. It is much more likely to have been borrowed from Wake Forest, North Carolina, for some reason. Many of the Pettis County settlers were North Carolinians. When the church was moved to Houstonia, it took its name from the town. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 811; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140-141, 176; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Houstonia Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Saline County, on the east by Longwood Township, on the south by Hughesville Township, and on the west by Blackwater Township. It was organized in 1873, out of parts of the original Blackwater, Elk Fork, and Mt. Sterling townships. Named for the town of Houstonia. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 757, 764; County Plat Book (1916)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hughesville
Description:A post office since 1876; in the south-central part of Hughesville Township, eleven miles northwest of Sedalia. A town before the organization of the township in 1872; laid out by Reece Hughes, for whom it was named, in 1871. (Campbell (1873); Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 430; Postal Guide; County Plat Book (1919); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 114)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hughesville Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Houstonia and Longwood Townships, on the east by Longwood Township, on the south by Cedar and Dresden Townships, and on the west by Blackwater Township. On petition of citizens to the county court, that body on August 14, 1878 created Hughesville Township as it now stands, out of Longwood and Houstonia Townships. It takes its name from the principal town in its borders. (County Plat Book (1916); H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 177)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ionia
Description:A village on the borderline between Washington Township in Pettis County and White Township in Benton County, which has been placed in both counties at different times. It belonged of course to Pettis County from 1833, when Pettis was organized, till 1835, when Benton was cut off from it. From 1835 till 1845 there was no doubt about its being included in Benton County; but on February 26, 1845, 24 sq. mi. in the northwest corner of Benton were cut off, between Ionia City and Windsor, in Henry County, and reassigned to Pettis, thus leaving the place on or close to the county line. Its post office is listed in Pettis, under the name of Ionia City, from 1876-1895, and as Ionia from 1896-1904; but since 1910 it appears as Ionia, in the list for Benton. The name Old Ionia is used in Pettis County histories, apparently with reference to the former post office north of the line. The earliest name of the place was Peel Tree, probably for a tree that was "peeled," or stripped of its bark, which served as a sort of landmark. In 1866 it was laid out as a town by Henry Pollard, still living in Clinton, Henry County, in 1882. He named it Ionia City, later shortened to Ionia. Eaton says it was named for the ancient country in Asia Minor, which is the name taken by many Masonic lodges. The reference is doubtless to the five Masonic "orders in architecture," which are listed in THE FREEMASON'S MONITOR, by Z.A. Davis, ed. of 1860 (p. 99), as the Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, and Composite. Davis declares that "the Ionic bears a kind of mean proportion between the more solid and delicate orders...There is both delicacy and ingenuity displayed in this pillar; the invention of which is attributed to the Ionians, as the famous temple of Diana of Ephesus was of this order." The special veneration of the Masons for the name may account for the fact that, as Gannett notes, there is an Ionia County in Michigan, and twelve other places so named in the United States; it may also account for at least some of the thirteen Corinths, from the Corinthian, which Davis describes as "the richest of the five orders," and perhaps likewise for the two Tuscans. (Postal Guide; HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1066; R.M. (1939); Eaton (1917); Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ionia City
Description:See Ionia
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jackson School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of La Monte Township. Named for a family in the district. First named Buckeye School for the numerous buckeye trees in the vicinity. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 155; G.L. Reynolds)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jefferson School
Description:A public school in Sedalia at New York and Chestnut Avenue. Named for Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States and a great apostle of democracy (1743-1826). He was governor of Virginia from 1779-1881, minister to France from 1784-1789, Secretary of State from 1789-1793, President of the United States from 1801-1809. He spent his last years establishing the University of Virginia. More than thirty towns and twenty counties have been named for Thomas Jefferson. (HIST. PETTIS (1914) 262; Enc. Brit. (1938)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jenkins Quarry
Description:At the corner of 22nd and Engineer Streets, near the southeast limits of the town of Houstonia. Named for early owner. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 82; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Johnson Quarry
Description:Four miles west of Sedalia. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 82)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jones Creek
Description:(H: Colton's Map (1857)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Keightly
Description:A village in the southeastern part of Prairie Township, six and a half miles southwest of Sedalia; a station on the M.K. & T. Railroad. (Campbell (1873); Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 430)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kemp
Description:A post office from 1887-1899; in the southwestern part of Heath's Creek Township. Named for a pioneer, Thomas A. Kemp, who settled in Heath's Creek Township. (Postal Guide; Campbell (1873); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 530, 531)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kendrick School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of Elk Fork Township. Named for Edwin R. Kendrick, who came to Pettis County in 1884. Discontinued since 1935. (Chapman (1895) 536; County Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 159; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Knapp School
Description:A school in the central part of Green Ridge Township, belonging to the Green Ridge Cons. District. Named for a family of the district. The building is no longer used. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 168; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kraft
Description:A town about six miles north of Sedalia. (H: Commercial Atlas 57)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:La Monte
Description:A post office since 1870; in the northeastern part of La Monte Township, laid out in 1866 (Campbell's Gaz. said 1867) by Colonel Frank Hickox and J.R. McConnell. It was at first known as Boomer, in honor of Mr. George Boomer, a bridge contractor and railroad construction foreman who was very popular with his workmen. After the Missouri Pacific Railroad was completed in 1870, the post office of La Monte, previously located one mile south of Boomer, on the Georgetown and Lexington stage road, was removed to Boomer and its name replaced the earlier one. Postmaster Mason named the post office La Monte, for a friend by that name. The name is written also as LaMonte and Lamonte. (Missouri Gaz. (1860) 156; Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 430; Enc. History of Missouri (1901); Miss Inez Terry)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:La Monte Township
Description:Bounded on the north by BlackwaterTownship, on the east by Dresden Township, on the south by Elk Fork Township, and on the west by Johnson County. It was created in 1873, out of part of the original Elk Fork Township. Took its name from the post office. (Campbell (1873); HIST. PETTIS (1882) 881; Miss Inez Terry)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Creek
Description:Rises in northern Williams Township in Benton County and runs north through Lake Creek Township, Pettis County; makes a turn to the east through Richland Township in Morgan County; reenters Pettis, and empties into Flat Creek in southeast Smithton Township. Named for the reason that it winds a sluggish course through the heavy soil, and forms numerous small lakes. When a flood comes down from its source, it overflows its banks and spreads far out, covering thousands of acres of the bottom lands, and even weeks at a time presents the appearance of a lake, filled with growing trees and underbrush. (Campbell 1873, 62; H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 218; HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1098; HIST. BENTON (1889) 69; Williams (1904) 331; Eaton (1917) 210; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 181; Hammond, 312)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Creek Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Smithton Township, on the east by Morgan County, on the south by Benton County, and the west by Flat Creek County. Organized November 5, 1872, out of part of the original Flat Creek Township. Named for the creek which flows through the southeastern part of the township. (Campbell (1873); HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1098, 1099)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lamaine River
Description:See Lamine River
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lamb
Description:A post office from 1889-1902; in the eastern part of Lake Creek Township. Cf. above. (Postal Guide; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 298)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lamb
Description:A former post office, in 1887, 1888. Probably a family name. There are towns so named in Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan, and a county in Texas, all named for different men who bore this common surname. (Postal Guide; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lamine River
Description:This stream rises near the northern boundary of Richland Township in Morgan County, and flows north through Cooper County, emptying into the Missouri River about seven miles above Boonville. The original form of the name was Riviere a la Mine, conferred by the French near the beginning of the Eighteenth Century. The earliest known occurrence of the name is in a grant dated June 14, 1723, to Philip Francois Renault, which speaks of the "cabanage de Renaudiere" at the first fork of the "Marameig." It is clear that the Sieur de Renaudiere had worked mines along the Missouri before that date, and he may have named the stream some time before. We know little of Renaudiere except that he was an "ingenieur pour les mines," i.e. a mining engineer, and was with Bourgmont's expedition up the river in 1724. The name means, of course, "Mine River." Variant forms are La Mine, LeMine, and Lamaine. (Eaton; EWT, ed. Thwaites, XIV. 162; Houck, History of Missouri, I. 281; M. and C. Map Morgan County; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lexington Branch
Description:A branch of the Missouri Pacific Railroad from Lexington to Sedalia. Named from its terminus. (Scruton's SEDALIA (1904) 6)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Liberty Church
Description:A remnant of a Christian church, about six miles south of Sedalia. Cf. above. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 317)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Liberty Park
Description:A resort park, west of Sedalia, maintained by the city of Sedalia. Cf. above. (Scruton's SEDALIA (1904)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:A school in the north-central part of Flat Creek Township. Named for Liberty Church. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 163; County Plat Book (1916)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lincoln School
Description:A colored school in Sedalia; instituted in 1868. Named for Abraham Lincoln, the emancipator of the slaves. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 259)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lincolnville
Description:A suburb, adjacent to Sedalia, which has a negro population. It was a part of Sedalia until 1872, and is still in the Sedalia school district and police limits. It is popularly known as "Darkeytown," the meaning of which is obvious. It was also formerly known at times as St. Eyre, a name which has a curious history. According to Campbell, the name St. Eyre was derived from the British colonial governor Edward John Eyre (1815-1901), who while Governor of Jamaica in 1865 supressed a negro insurrection with terrible severity. It is said that 608 persons were executed or killed by his orders. On his return to England in 1866, Eyre became the principal figure in a prolonged judicial and parliamentary struggle that aroused worlwide interest. He and his associates were prosecuted for murder by the so-called "Jamaica Committee," which included John Stuart Mill, Herbert Spencer, Thomas Henry Huxley, and other distinguished liberals. He was defended, however, by a committee including equally famous names: Carlyle, chairman, Ruskin, Tennyson, and others, and was finally acquitted. It was felt that the insurrection was directly inspired by the emancipation of the American negroes during the Civil War that had just ended, and naturally the celebrated case aroused deep interest in the United States. It was probably in a spirit of bitter mockery that the name of a man supposed to be an inveterate enemy of the negro race was applied, especially with the sardonic prefix "Saint," to the colored quarter of Sedalia; and its replacement by the name of the great emancipator is easily intelligible. There are five Lincolnvilles and over fifty Lincolns, used both for towns and counties, in the United States. A minority, like Lincoln County in Missouri, were named for General Benjamin Lincoln of Revolutionary fame, but most of them pay tribute to President Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865). His name is naturally an especial favorite for negro communities and schools. (Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 430; Enc. Brit. (1938); Dict. Nat. Biog.)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Cedar Creek
Description:Rises near the northern limits of Sedalia, in Cedar Township and flows north, uniting with Big Cedar just north of Georgetown. Named for Big Cedar Creek, of which it is a small branch. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 147)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Muddy Creek
Description:A creek which rises in the northwestern part of Dresden Township, and joins Muddy Creek in the northeastern part of the same township. Takes its name from the larger stream. (Campbell (1873); County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 153; H: Ibid.)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lone Elm School
Description:A school in the northeastern part of Elk Fork Township. Named for a beautiful elm tree, still standing. (County Plat Book (1896); C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lone Star School
Description:A schoolhouse in the northeastern part of Lake Creek Township. Named for the Lone Star State of Texas, because it was the largest school district in the county in early days. It was out on the "lone prairie" which was covered with prairie hay and inhabited by prairie chickens, coyotes and wolves. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1102; County Plat Book (1916); C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Long Branch
Description:Unidentified (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 964)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Longwood
Description:A village in the northeastern part of Longwood Township, about fifteen miles northeast of Sedalia. It was founded in 1852, and has been a post office since 1860. The place was at first called Hermantown. The source of this name has not been ascertained; it was probably personal in origin. There was a post office called Oak Grove, doubtless a topographical name, about one mile north of the present site. A petition to remove it was granted on condition that another name be chosen, since there was already an Oak Grove post office in the state, the one in Jackson County, established at least as early as 1855. The name Longwood was selected, for Napoleon's home in exile on the island of St. Helena, doubtless inspried by the example of the earlier village of St. Helena (q.v.). See above, under Helena, for the influence of the "Napoleonic legend" on American place names. (Postal Guide; HIST. PETTIS (1852) 836 and (1919) 303; Missouri Gaz. (1879-1880) 406; Miss Atchison's thesis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Longwood Township
Description:A township in the northeastern part of the county, bounded on the north by Saline County, on the east by Heath's Creek Township, on the south by Cedar Township, and on the west by Houstonia and Hughesville Townships. Named for the village of Longwood. It was originally a part of Bowling Green, and then part of Heath's Creek and Mt. Sterling Townships. It was given its present boundaries in 1873. (Campbell (1873); HIST. PETTIS (1882) 836; County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 188)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lookout
Description:A post office from 1886-1904; a little south of the center of Heath Creek Township. Only a store is there at present. Named for its fine scenic viewpoint. (Postal Guide; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 307; C.F. Scotten; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lookout School
Description:A school in the southern part of Heath's Creek Township. Named for the early post office. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 173; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lovelace School
Description:A school in the northeastern part of Bowling Green Township. A family name. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 144; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lutman
Description:A post office from 1893-1904; in the northeastern part of Lake Creek Township. The town was laid out on the land belonging to George W. Lutman; hence the name. (Postal Guide; County Plat Book (1896); Brown Atlas (1903)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:M. K. and T. Hospital
Description:On East Broadway in Sedalia. Named for the railroad, the Missouri, Kansas, and Texas, which supports it. (Scruton's SEDALIA (1904)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Manila
Description:A post office from 1899-1904; in the southern part of Washington Township. Sometimes spelled Manilla. Named for Manila, the capital of the Philippine Islands, because the post office was created soon after the Spanish-American War (1898). The capital of the Philippine Islands was probably so called from the Tagalog word "Minalad," which means a place where there are many nilads--a flowering shrub with white blossoms, Ixora Manila. (Postal Guide; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 308; Enc. Brit. (1938); Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Manila School
Description:A public school in Washington Township. Named from the town. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 197; Rep. Pub. Schools (1932) 1140; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maple Grove School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of Green Ridge Township. Named for its early location in a grove of maple trees. There are still some maple trees around the building. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 168; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maplewood School
Description:A school in the northwestern part of Smithton Township. Named for its location in a sparsely wooded area of maple trees. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 201; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marlin
Description:See Beaman
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Marlin Branch
Description:A tributary of Heath's Creek. Derived its name from Thomas Marlin, one of the pioneers, who came from Tennessee. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 874)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McAllister
Description:A post office on the boundary line between Saline and Pettis Counties, sixteen miles south of Marshall and sixteen miles northwest of Sedalia; mentioned in Polk's Gaz. (1883-1884) but not listed in Postal Guide. A family name. (H: Polk's Gaz. (1883-1884) 616; Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McCubbin School
Description:A school in the southern part of Hughesville Township, now in Consolidated District No. 2 (Hughesville Consolidated District). Named for Ed McCubbin on whose farm the school was built. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 180; H: Ibid.; Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McEnroe Quarry
Description:About three and a half miles north of Sedalia, operated in 1919 by Charles Myers. Named for a former owner. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 82; John W. Menefee)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McKee Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal church in Prairie Township; seven miles southwest of Sedalia; organized by Reverend George McKee in 1866, the society using a schoolhouse until 1876, when funds were secured to erect a building. There was a cemetery connected with the church property. The church was apparently named for its organizer. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 194; H: Ibid. 193)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McVey School
Description:A school southeast of Sedalia. Named for Absalom McVey, on whose land the school was erected. (Scruton's SEDALIA (1904); H: Rep. Pub. Schools (1932) 1140; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Memorial Baptist Church
Description:Near the center of Heath's Creek Township. (H: Pettis (1919) 173)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Miller's Chapel
Description:In Heath's Creek Township; one of the oldest churches in Pettis County, being organized in 1852. It was a camp meeting place many years before a church was organized there. No services are being held at Miller's Chapel at the present time. A Mr. Miller owned the land on which the church was located. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 172; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Hospital
Description:A railroad hospital in Sedalia created and supported by the Missouri Pacific Railroad. (HIST. PETTIS (1886) 11)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Railroad
Description:A railroad that enters Morgan County through the extreme northwest corner, passing through the east-central boundary of Pettis County, running west through Smithton, Sedalia, Dresden, and La Monte, leaving Pettis County on the west side of La Monte Township, entering again through the northeast corner, and passing through Syracuse. A branch line of the Missouri Pacific enters the northern Pettis County line and passes through Houstonia, Hughesville, Sedalia, and south into Benton County through Mora, Cole Camp, Lincoln, Schuyler, and Warsaw. This railroad was incorporated on March 12, 1849, and construction was started in St. Louis in 1851. In 1853 it reached Franklin, Missouri, in 1855 it reached Jefferson City, and Sedalia in 1861. The Warsaw branch was incorporated February 24, 1853. (Laws Missouri (1848-49) 222, (1852-53) 373, 375; County Plat Book (1929) 1; Enc. Brit.; E.J. Heerman)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri, Kansas, and Texas Railroad
Description:A railroad that enters the county through the southwest corner of Green Ridge Township, running northeast through Bryson, Green Ridge, Sedalia, and Beaman; and northeast across the Pettis-Cooper County line. A branch line runs west from Bryson into Johnson County. This railroad was begun at St. Louis in 1851 and was called the Pacific Railroad, an ambitious name, for the owners hoped to reach the Pacific Ocean. By 1865 the track was completed to Kansas City. It was incorporated as the Missouri Pacific in 1876. Named for the territory it serves. (County Plat Book (1929) 1; Highway Map; Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mitchell School
Description:A school in Hughesville Township. Unidentified. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 180; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mosby School
Description:A school in the north-central part of Flat Creek Township. Named for a family in the district. First called Pleasant Valley School, for its location in a small pleasant valley. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 163; H: Rep. Pub. Schools (1932) 1140; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mosby's Branch
Description:A branch, which rises near the center of Lake Creek Township, and flows north and west into Flat Creek. A Mr. Mosby formerly owned land nearby. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 181; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mountain View School
Description:A school in the western part of Washington Township. Located on a high point which looks like a little mountain. The school has been discontinued. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 197; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mt. Harrison Church
Description:A Union Church five miles north of Sedalia, in Cedar Township. A cemetery is in connection with the church. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 149-150)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mt. Sterling Township
Description:One of the five original townships laid out when the county was organized in 1833. It was reduced by successive changes in township boundaries until in 1873 it disappeared entirely, being replaced mainly by Cedar and Sedalia Townships. The source of the name has not been ascertained. It may have been borrowed from Mount Sterling in Montgomery County, Kentucky, which in its turn was named from the city of Stirling in Scotland. There are seven other places named Mount Sterling in the United States. Cf. the Kentucky origin of the names of Bowling Green Township and of Georgetown. Like those, the name Mt. Sterling may have been inspired by General George R. Smith or some of his relatives, although there is no direct evidence to that effect. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 907; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Muddy Creek
Description:Rises in the southwestern part of Cedar Township, and flows northeast into Cooper County, where it joins the Lamine River. Also known as Muddy Fork. An old legend says that the stream was named, for the fact that Hiram Jenkins and John Heath, while on a hunting expedition, camped on an island, which after a rain was submerged in water; but no special incident seems needed to account for this descriptive name, which is justified by the usual condition of the water. (Campbell (1873); Magruder (1919) 75, 147; HIST. PETTIS (1882) 299, 858)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Muddy Fork
Description:See Muddy Creek
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Muddy Fork Church
Description:A Baptist church, three or four miles northeast of Georgetown, organized before 1834. Named for the branch of the same name near which it is located. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 299; Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Bethel Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal church, South, in Flat Creek Township, six and a half miles south of Sedalia. A Bible name, for which cf. Bethel Church, above. Named New Bethel to distinguish it from Bethel Church (q.v.) in Elk Fork Township. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 163)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Hickory Point Church
Description:A Baptist church in the southeastern part of Elk Fork Township. Named for its location. "New" was added to distinguish it from Old Hickory Point Church (q.v.) nearby. (County Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 157)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Newell School
Description:A private school in Blackwater Township. Newell was a family name in this county. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 812; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Newland
Description:A post office from 1893-1902; in the southeastern part of Longwood Township. Named in honor of Judge William Henry Newland, who settled on a farm, later called Newland Farm, near this village. (Postal Guide; County Plat Book (1896); H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 522; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 307)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Newport Mine
Description:A mine about midway between Dresden and La Monte. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 81; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove
Description:See Longwood
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of Dresden Township. Cf. above. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 155; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove School [1 of 2]
Description:A school in the northwestern part of Blackwater Township. Cf. above. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove School [2 of 2]
Description:A school in the western part of Longwood Township. Cf. above. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 191; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Point School
Description:A school in the western part of Hughesville Township. Named for oaks around it. There are at present oak trees east of the building. Some of the natives humorously called it Barefoot School, because the children wore no shoes, but went "barefoot." (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 180; G.L. Reynolds)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Brick Church
Description:See "First Church of Pettis"
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Hickory Point Church
Description:A church house in the southeastern part of Elk Fork Township, built by the Baptist, Methodist, and Christian denominations about 1853. Named for its location; cf. New Hickory Point Church, above. (County Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 157)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Ionia
Description:See Ionia
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Ionia School
Description:Public school in Washington Township. Named for the town. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 196)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Olive Branch Church
Description:A Baptist church in the north-central part of Bowling Green Township, organized in 1872. Cf. above. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 145)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Olive Branch School
Description:A school in the northwestern part of Bowling Green Township. Named for the church. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 144; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Orator School
Description:A public school in Bowling Green Township. It seems likely that its original name was Arator School, from the old community of Arator (q.v.), now vanished, that was laid out in June, 1858. The village, which is said to have been in the southeastern corner of Bowling Green Township, about two miles from Georgetown, must have been at or near the present site of the school. Cf. also the two Arator schools in the county that still bear the old name unchanged, although both of them are some distance away: the one for white children in northern Smithton Township, and the one for colored pupils in Sedalia. The change from Arator to Orator would seem to be a clear case of popular etymology. The Latin word for "plowman, tiller of the soil," probably conferred on the old village by some classicly minded settler as a suitable equivalent for such a name as Farmer's City found in an adjoining township, was doubtless misunderstood by later inhabitants, especially after the village itself had disappeared. In any case Orator would seem a more befitting name for a school. There is, however, a noteworthy difference in pronunciation between Orator School, the name of which is always pronounced _____with the accent on the first syllable, and the two surviving Arator Schools, pronounced _____ , with the accent on the middle syllable. We do not know how the name of the old village was pronounced, but the Latinist who conferred it may well have insisted on the correct Latin accent, which of course would fall on the penult. The two modern schools which have preserved the correct spelling would then have preserved also the original accent; and the one that changed must first have shifted its accent, or rather adopted a "spelling pronunication" with the accent on the first syllable, which would have made the name sound almost exactly like the familiar English word "orator." (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 144; Rep. Pub. Schools (1932) 1140; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pacific School
Description:A school in the southwestern part of Lake Creek Township. An ideal name; cf. Harmony, Concord, etc. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 183; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Panther Creek
Description:In Heath's Creek Township. Named thus, it is said, because the first panther or wildcat killed in this region was taken on that branch. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 858; H: Ibid.)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Parkersburg
Description:See Green Ridge
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pauline
Description:A post office from 1887-1902; in Prairie Township, ten miles west of Sedalia. A feminine Christian name; why adopted is unknown. (H: Polk's Gaz. (1889-1890) 927; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pearl River
Description:A small run or rivulet running through Sedalia between Second and Third Streets. Named for the mussel shells found in sandy places along the small stream. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 462; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pearson
Description:A discontinued post office and station on the M.K. & T. Railroad nine miles southwest of Sedalia. Named for the owner of the land on which the town was laid out. (H: Polk's Gaz. (1883-1884) 752; Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peel Tree
Description:See Ionia
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Persimmon Creek
Description:Mentioned in the county histories as a fork of Flat Creek, rising in Benton County and flowing northeast into Pettis County. It does not appear on recent maps, unless it is to be identified with Lake Creek (q.v.). Named for the familiar tree. (HIST. BENTON (1886) 456; Conard (1901) 206; HIST. BENTON (1912) 69; E.H. Preuitt; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pettis County
Description:In the west-central part of the state; bounded on the north by Saline County, and on the west by Henry, Johnson, and Lafayette Counties. It was organized January 26, 1833, by severance effected from Cooper and Saline Counties, and until Benton County was organized January 3, 1835, included all the present territory of Benton and parts of the present Hickory and Camden Counties. On February 26, 1845, it was increased by twenty-five sq. mi. cut off from Benton County in its northwest corner, between Ionia City and Windsor. Since then its boundaries have remained unchanged. The name of Pettis County commemorates a remarkable individual and a sensational event in Missouri history. Spencer Darwin Pettis (1802-1831) was born in Culpeper, Virginia. He came to Missouri as a very young man, and practiced law at Fayette in Howard County. At the age of twenty-four he was appointed Secretary of State for Missouri, serving from 1826 to 1828. In 1829 he was elected as sole representative sent from the State to the lower house, preceded only by John Scott (1820-1826) and Edward Bates (1826-1828). During his first term in Congress, as a Democrat, he made himself extremely popular with his constituents, and was a warm friend of Senator Benton. In a heated campaign in 1830, he was reelected for a second term, but precipitated a quarrel that led to his death. As a supporter of President Andrew Jackson, he had been especially caustic and severe in his opposition to the National Bank, and in consequence was challenged to a duel by Major Thomas Biddle, brother of Nicholas Biddle, then president of the United States Bank. The duel was fought August 27, 1831, on the sand-bar opposite St. Louis, and it is said that the river was lined on both sides to witness it. Both combatants fell mortally wounded, and Pettis died the next day. Intense feeling was aroused throughout the State, and when the new county, which contained many of his ardent supporters, was created two years later, it was named in memory of the eloquent young martyr, as he was considered, to the Democratic cause. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 208, & (1919) 74, 100; Campbell (1873); Conard (1901) 5, 96; Eaton; Gannett; Biog. Dir. Am. Congress)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pin Hook Mill
Description:A grist mill on Muddy Creek, set up by James Wasson. Commonly called Wasson's Mill. The name Pin Hook Mill was borrowed from the early name of Helena (q.v.), near which it is located. (Enc. History of Missouri (1901) V. v, p. 98; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 104; Harding's LIFE OF GEORGE R. SMITH, 27)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pin Oak School
Description:A school in the southwestern part of Smithton Township. Named perhaps for the low-growing pin oak trees, which are very plentiful in the western United States. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 201)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pinhook
Description:See Helena
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Green School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of La Monte Township. Cf. above. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 187; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church
Description:A Southern Methodist church in Flat Creek Township, six miles southeast of Sedalia. Named from its location. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 163; Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:See Mosby School
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant View School
Description:A school in the southwestern part of Washington Township. Named for the location. The school has been discontinued. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 197; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Plymouth Church
Description:A Baptist church in the northwest corner of Elk Fork Township. Doubtless from Plymouth, Massachusetts, where the Pilgrim Fathers landed in 1620. They named it Plymouth from the English port whence they had sailed. American Baptists trace their beginnings back to the Pilgrims, and Plymouth is a stock name for Baptist as well as Congregational churches. (County Plat Book (1896)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Point Pleasant Cemetery
Description:A cemetery north of Point Pleasant church building. Named for the church nearby. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919), 163; Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Point Pleasant Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal church in Flat Creek Township, two miles west and eight miles south of Sedalia. Named from its location. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 163; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Postal
Description:A post office from 1892-1904; in the northeastern part of Heath's Creek Township. The name signified that it pertained to the post office or mail service. (County Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 307; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Postal School
Description:A public school in Heath's Creek Township. Named for the town. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 173; Rep. Pub. Schools (1932) 1140; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Powell
Description:A town about five miles southwest of Sedalia. Named for Williams H. Powell, who owned land at this location from 1843-1882. He later moved to Sedalia. (H: Hammond, 312; Chapman (1895) 554)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Chapel Church
Description:A Presbyterian church, four miles northwest of Dresden, organized in 1876. Named from its location and because it was a place of worship. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 913; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Grove Church
Description:A Baptist church in the northeastern part of Longwood Township; organized in February, 1880, by Reverend S.W. Whipple. Named from the grove of trees here and its location on the prairie. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 838; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 190; G.L. Reynolds)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Grove School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of Flat Creek Township. Cf. above. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 163; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Hill School
Description:A school in the north-central part of Dresden Township. Located on a prairie, but not upon a hill. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 155; G.L. Reynolds)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Ridge School
Description:A school in the western part of Longwood Township. Named for its location on a ridge which crossed the prairie. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 191; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Dresden Township, on the east by Sedalia Township, and Flat Creek Township, on the south by Washington Township, and on the west by Elk Fork Township. Created in 1873, out of parts of the older Elk Fork and Washington Townships. Named for its broad expanse of prairieland. (Campbell (1873); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 192)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Valley School
Description:A school in Hughesville Township. Cf. above. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 180; Mrs. R.E. Bealert)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie View Church
Description:A Southern Methodist Episcopal church in the eastern part of Elk Fork Township, twelve miles west of Sedalia. Named for its location in the midst of an expansive prairie. In operation. (County Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 158; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie View School
Description:A school in the eastern part of Elk Fork Township. Named for Prairie View Church. (County Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 159; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Priceville
Description:The earliest settlement in what is now Smithton Township. It was laid out by David Kernudle in the 1850s. Chargers were made, however, that purchasers of property there had been swindled, and the village was abandoned. In 1859 an unsuccessful attempt was made to establish a new settlement to replace it at Farmers' City (q.v.) nearby. In 1860 all the houses at Priceville, about fifteen in number, were removed on wheels to the present site of Smithton, about two miles away. (Polk's Gaz. (1860) 224; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 306)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Priest's Chapel
Description:The first Methodist Episcopal church house erected in the present limits of Pettis County; twelve miles north of Georgetown. Probably a personal name. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 312, 313)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prigmore School
Description:A public school in Houstonia Township; later taken into District No. 1 (Houstonia Consolidated District). Named for a prominent family in the settlement. The school has been discontinued. The building was wrecked in 1933. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 176; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prospect School
Description:A public school in Sedalia at Second Street and Prospect Avenue. Named for the street which it adjoins. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 261)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Providence Church
Description:A Baptist church eight miles northeast of Sedalia, in Blackwater Township; oldest church in the county, organized in 1842. Called Provident Baptist Church in early days. A cemetery adjoins the church. An ideal name. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 144)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Quisenberry School
Description:A school in the northeastern part of Prairie Township. Named for Everett B. Quisenberry, prominent landowner. The district is nationally known today for its community activities. (Chapman (1895) 455; County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 194; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Reed's Branch
Description:Rises near the eastern part of Cedar Township and flows northwest to unite with the Muddy in the southern part of section 4. Named for a Mr. Reed who owned land along its banks. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 147; John W. Menefee)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ringen School
Description:A school in the northeastern part of Lake Creek Township. Named for a family in the district. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 183; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere a la Mine
Description:See La Mine River
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Robbins' Business College
Description:In Sedalia. (HIST. PETTIS (1886) 11)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rodelia
Description:A discontinued post office 1897-1910; in Green Ridge Township. It may have been a feminine Christian name. (Postal Guide)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rodelia School
Description:A school in Green Ridge Township. Named from the early post office. It is not used today. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 168; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rowletta
Description:A post office from 1876-1902; near the center part of Blackwater Township, six miles north of La Monte. Possibly a feminine Christian name. (Postal Guide; Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 430; County Plat Book (1896)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sacred Heart Church
Description:A Catholic church in Sedalia; dedicated on Sunday, October 1, 1882. Named for the Feast of the Sacred Heart, which is on Friday after the Octave of Corpus Christi. (Bryan Missouri History (1876) 437; H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 260; Enc. Brit. (1938)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sacred Heart School
Description:A Catholic school in Sedalia. It was blessed on Sunday, October 1, 1882 and opened October 2, 1882. Named from the church nearby. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 260)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Salem Church [1 of 2]
Description:An Methodist Episcopal Church South, in Bowling Green Township, six and a half miles northeast of Sedalia. The old church was built in 1858, rebuilt in 1880. Cf. above. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 145; Bible Dict. (1922)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Salem Church [2 of 2]
Description:A Presbyterian church in Blackwater Township, five miles northwest of La Monte; organized in October, 1880. Cf. above. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 811; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Salem School
Description:A school in the southwestern part of Bowling Green Township. Named from the church. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 144)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:School No. 1
Description:A rural school near Blackwater Chapel; first school taught in the township, hence called No. 1. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 811)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Science Hill School
Description:A school in Heath's Creek Township. Unidentified. The name is a common one for ambitious early institutions of learning. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 173; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Scott School
Description:A school in the east-central part of Heath's Creek Township. The name may have been transferred from Scott's Ford in Cooper County, just across the border. Scott's Ford, according to Miss Pace's thesis, was named for Ezekiel Scott, one of the early settlers, who came here about 1818. Here, in the Lamine River Bottom, the party of General George R. Smith encamped on November 12, 1833, upon their first arrival from Kentucky; see under Smithton. (Harding's LIFE OF GEORGE R. SMITH (1904) 18; County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 173; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Section School
Description:A public school in Houstonia Township; later taken into District No. 1 (Houstonia Consolidated District). Probably named for the railroad section house, which was first built there. Later the section house was moved to Houstonia. The school building was wrecked in 1933. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 176; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sedalia
Description:The sixth largest town in Missouri; an important railroad center on the Missouri Pacific and Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroads; since 1865 the county seat of Pettis County, replacing Georgetown (q.v.). It was founded by General George R. Smith (for whom see under Smithton). Foreseeing that Georgetown was doomed because the approaching Pacific Railroad would pass three miles south of it, General Smith determined, since he could not bring the road to the town, that he would take the town to the road. In 1856 he purchased a tract of land of some 500 acres, at a cost of between six and seven thousand dollars, secured a guarantee of the location of a depot on the tract, and filed the first plat for the new town on November 30, 1857. A revised plat was filed by General Smith and Colonel David W. Bouldin on October 16, 1860. Sedalia was incorporated in 1864, and General Smith was named in its charter as the first mayor. He died at Sedalia on July 11, 1879. The town was named by General Smith for his younger daughter, Sarah Elvira Smith, later Mrs. Henry S. Cotton, who was born October 1, 1831. The family were in the habit of calling her by the pet name "Sed." Her older sister Margaret Elizabeth Smith, writes as follows about the circumstances of its naming: "The name of the new town was quite a puzzle, and gave our family great pleasure in its selection. Our father and mother decided to name it for my sister, laughingly saying to me, "Bet, we once named a flatboat for you, and we will name the town for your sister." Her pet name was "Sed," so they called the town Sedville. Often my sister and I would accompany our father on his business trips to St. Louis in the interests of the Pacific Railroad. There our father had delightful friends, and among them was Mr. Josiah Dent. He became very much interested in the new town and in its name. The "-ville" was decidedly objectionable, he thought, as it did not comport with the large and flourishing city of his dreams. Mr. Dent suggested the termination "-alia" in its place, and this so delighted my father that it was at once accepted. Since then the town has been called Sedalia." "Sed" as a diminutive for Sarah is uncommon today, but "sadie" is still used; and Gannett affirms, though without giving his authority, that the original name was Sadieville. The fact that Miss Sarah was actually called "Sed" is confirmed by several letters given verbatim in her father's biography (pp. 146, 208). The change in the suffix is explained by the county history of 1882 as made "because the original "Sed" could be united to the more euphonious termination "-alia," like Vandalia, Centralia, etc." The town name thus coined in 1860 has proved singularly appealing to many other Americans besides its founder and inventor General Smith. It has been later adopted for places in fifteen other states, ranging all the way from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Nine of them lie east of Missouri, and six in states to the west. It is decidedly unusual for American place-names to spread eastward; and when the names of the other fifteen states have been studied it may be discovered that at least some of the Sedalias have originated independently. The Missouri Sedalia, however, seems to have a clear priority over all the rest. In Goodwin's Gazetteer of 1867, and in the postal guides of 1868 and 1870, it was the only Sedalia listed in the country. By 1876, however, post offices named Sedalia had been established in Colorado, Indiana, and South Carolina; by 1886, in Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia (discontinued after (1904), and Washington (discontinued 1893); by 1889 in West Virginia (discontinued 1908); by 1890 in Texas (discontinued 1904); by 1900 in Tennessee (discontinued 1927); by 1902 in North Carolina; by 1904 in Oklahoma (discontinued 1908); and by 1910 in Arkansas (discontinued 1930) and Florida (discontinued 1915). There was also a hamlet named Sedalia in North Dakota listed in the 1900 census, which seems never to have had a post office, and which as since disappeared. All the Sedalias have been small, none having as many as 300 inhabitants, except the one in Missouri, which numbered over twenty thousand in the last census; four have disappeared entirely, and five others have had their post offices discontinued, leaving only seven Sedalias in the postal list. The pattern of radiation for the name seems a fairly concentric one; and whether or not all of them go back to Missouri for their original source, it is safe to say that few American young women have had their names spread so widely through the land as Miss Sarah Smith. (Postal Guide; Eaton; Gannett; Bryan's History of Missouri (1876) xv; HIST. PETTIS (1882) 404; S.B. Harding's Life of George R. Smith, Founder of Sedalia (1904) 11, 291, 377, 380; Century Atlas (1901); R.M. (1943); Professor R.M.S. Heffner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sedalia Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Cedar Township, on the east by Bowling Green and Smithton Townships, on the south by Flat Creek and Flat Creek Township, and on the west by Prairie and Dresden Townships. It was created in 1873, out of part of the original Mt. Sterling Township. Named for Sedalia, the largest settlement within its boundaries when the Township was formed. (Campbell (1873); W.D. Agee)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sedalia University
Description:Established by Reverend G.A. Beattie and Professor G.W. Ready under the auspices of the Presbyterian Church. Named from its location in Sedalia. (HIST. PETTIS (1886) 11 and (1882) 586, 587)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sedalia, Warsaw and Southern Railroad
Description:A railroad from Sedalia in Pettis County to Warsaw in Benton County, commenced in 1869 and completed. It runs generally south, except to swerve to the east to pass through Cole Camp, in Benton County. Named for its termini. It is called the Sedalia-Warsaw Railroad in the Pettis County Plat Book in 1929. (Campbell (1873) 23; HIST. BENTON (1889) 520; COUNTY PLAT BOOK (1929) 1; Williams (1940) 331)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sedalia-Warsaw Railroad
Description:See Sedalia, Warsaw and Southern Railroad. (County Plat Book (1929) 1)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sedville
Description:See Sedalia
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shaver Creek
Description:Rises in the northern part of Smithton Township, flowing north through Bowling Green Township, into Big Muddy Creek. A family name. (County Plat Book (1916); J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shavetail Creek
Description:A tributary to Muddy Creek which rises in the southwestern part of Bowling Green Township, flows east across the Township into the Lamine River in Cooper County. There is a tradition that sometime during the year 1840 a marriage occurred near this little stream and while the guests enjoyed the festivities of the evening, Richard Johnson assembled a few of his youthful companions, proceeded to the place where the horses were hitched and closely shaved their tails. The creek on whose banks this amusing incident occurred was ever afterward called "Shave-Tail" creek. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 947; County Plat Book (1896)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sigel
Description:See Dunksburg
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smelser Creek
Description:Rises in the northwestern part of Cedar Township, and unites with Muddy Creek in the northern part of section 4. Named for a pioneer settler. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 147)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smelser School
Description:A school in the northwestern part of Cedar Township. Named for a pioneer family there. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smith City
Description:See Smithton
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smithton
Description:A village in northeastern Smithton Township, eight miles east of Sedalia, and a station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. It was laid out in 1859 or 1860, most of the first inhabitants coming from Farmer's City (q.v.). Its original name was Smith City, so listed in the postal guides from 1870 to 1876; since 1876 the post office has been called Smithton. The place was named for the man who has been called the "father of Pettis County," certainly her most distinguished citizen, General George R. Smith, although apparently General Smith took on direct part in its founding, his chief interests lying in Sedalia (q.v.). Since General Smith was the name father of so many places in Pettis County, either for himself or his relatives (see under Bowling Green Township, George R. Smith College, Georgetown, Sedalia, and Smithton Township, possibly also Mt. Sterling Township and Majorville in Benton County), it seems in place here to give a condensed outline of his career, taken mainly from the biography by S.D. Harding. George Rapeen Smith (1804-1879), was born in Powhatan County, Virginia. Within a few weeks of his birth, his father, the Reverend George Smith, removed with his family to Georgetown, in Scott County, Kentucky. Here the boy grew up. In 1827 he married Melita Ann Thomson, daughter of General David Thomson. Another daughter of General Thomson had married Lewis Redd Major. In October, 1833, General Thomson left the gome in Kentucky, with his two sons-in-law and their entire families, for the seven-hundred mile journey to Pettis County, Missouri. They went in a caravan of covered ox-wagons, and arrived November 12, 1833. The caravan first encamped in the Lamine River bottom near Scott's Ford in Cooper County, not far from the present Scott School (q.v.). Pettis County had been organized only a year when General Thomson and his sons-in-law took up their residence within its borders. They settled first at a little hamlet on Muddy Creek known as Pinhook or Pinhook Mills, which had been chosen as the temporary county seat. The same year it changed its name to St. Helena, the present Helena (q.v.). When the county seat was removed in 1837 to Georgetown (q.v.), the entire clan followed it there. General Thomson and George R. Smith had much to do with the founding and naming of Georgetown, and the erection of the new courthouse. In 1838, when the so-called Mormon War broke out, Smith joined a company of cavalry that was raised in Pettis County. It was not engaged in action, for the Mormons surrendered the very day the Pettis County troop marched into camp. When the trouble was over, however, Governor Boggs reorganized the State militia so as to be better prepared, for future emergencies, and among other measures promoted George R. Smith from private to Brigadier-General in command of the troops of Cooper, Benton, Pettis and Saline Counties. From this commission came the title of General by which, in accordance with Southern custom, he was universally addressed for the rest of his life. Although Pettis County was overwhelmingly Democratic at this time, General Smith was an ardent Whig, and had already begun to form the strong anti-slavery convictions for which he was later distinguished. In the remarkable campaign of 1840 (for which see under Camden County), he took an active part. This was the election in which President Martin Van Buren, leader of the Democratic Party, ran for reelection, but was defeated by the Whig William Henry Harrison. General Smith ran for representative in the State Legislature in the same election, on the Whig ticket. The Democrats outnumbered the Whigs in Pettis County by two to one, and Smith was defeated, although he made a spirited and creditable contest, and ran well ahead of the ticket. As a party reward, he was appointed Receiver of Public Moneys at Springfield, Missouri. When the Democrats came back in 1844, however, under Polk he was promptly ousted from his federal job. In 1856 came the most important event in General Smith's life, his founding of the city of Sedalia (q.v.), which he named for his daughter Sarah. When the Civil War came, he came out strongly for the Union side and had much to do with holding Missouri against secession. At the darkest hour for the Union cause, just after the crushing defeat at Wilson's Creek in 1862, he accepted the post of Adjutant-General for the State under the Union administration. In 1864, when his town of Sedalia was incorporated, he was named in the charter as its first mayor. He died in Sedalia on July 11, 1879. Both Smithton and Smithton Township were probably named directly for General Smith. The change from its first hopeful name of Smith City to the more modest Smithton perhaps marked the decline in its hopes to rival Sedalia. Curiously enough, Sedalia changed its name in the opposite direction, from Sedville, which, as his daughter wrote, "did not comport with the large and flourishing city of his dreams," to the more magniloquent title it now enjoys. (Postal Guide; Eaton; Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 432: Polk's Gaz. (1879-1880) 802; Harding's LIFE OF GEORGE R. SMITH (1904) entire volume; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 306; Williams (1930) 278)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smithton Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Bowling Green Township, on the east by Morgan and Cooper Counties, on the south by Lake Creek Township, and on the west by Flat Creek and Sedalia Townships. Organized in 1864. It was originally a part of Bowling Green Township, from which it was separated in 1864, but records show that the township was not organized until May 13, 1873. Named for the town of Smithton. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1003; County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 306)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Flat Creek
Description:See Flat Creek
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Fork Baptist Church
Description:A small log house of worship with hewed benches built on South Fork. Three miles south of Sweet Springs, in Blackwater Township. It was the first church organized in the county. It was organized at James Roberts' and was of the Old Iron Side Baptist. Organized by Martellus Embry in September, 1855, and a church built the following year, 1856. (Magruder, HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Fork Creek
Description:Rises in the southeastern part of Blackwater Township, and flows in a northerly direction across the Township, joining Bear Creek near the center of the Township, continues north and joins Blackwater River in the southern part of Saline County. The name is descriptive of its location. (County Plat Book (1916); H: Ibid; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Side School
Description:A school in the southwestern part of Flat Creek Township. Named for its location on the south county line. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 163; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Fork
Description:A post office since 1910; in the north-central part of Flat Creek Township. Named for the creek nearby. (Campbell (1873); J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Fork Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the southern part of Flat Creek Township and flows north into Flat Creek. A descriptive name for the fact that it rises near a spring. (Campbell (1873); County Plat Book (1896); J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Garden
Description:A post office in 1867. A descriptive name. (Goodwin (1867-1868) 39; Miss Enez Petty)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Eyre
Description:See Lincolnville
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Helena
Description:See Helena
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. John's Church
Description:A Catholic church in the southeastern corner of Lake Creek Township, organized in 1838. The building was erected in 1848. The full name, St. John Evangelist Catholic Church, shows that it was named, not for John the Baptist, but for the "beloved disciple and writer of the Fourth Gospel." (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1102)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Patrick's Cemetery
Description:Cemetery adjoining St. Patrick's church. Named for the church nearby. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 162)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Patrick's Church
Description:A Catholic church at Spring Fork in Flat Creek Township. Named for St. Patrick (389-461), the apostle of Ireland. He was successful in making Ireland Christian. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 162; Col. Enc. (1935)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Paul Church
Description:An Evangelical Lutheran church in Lake Creek Township, organized in 1869. The congregation was first organized in Benton County, and moved to Pettis County in 1879. Named for the Apostle. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1102; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 182)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stokeley
Description:A post office from 1887-1902; in the southwestern part of Blackwater Township. Probably a family name. Spelled Stokley in Postal Guide and County Plat Book (1916). (Postal Guide; County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 307)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stokeley School
Description:A school in the southwestern part of Blackwater Township. Named from the early post office. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stony Point Church
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian church near Smithton. A descriptive name. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 319; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Striped College School
Description:A rural school in the center part of Flat Creek Township. Doubtfully explained as so named because the pupils occasionally received stripes from the rod of the schoolmaster. More probably it was an allusion to the way the school was painted. (C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Summit School
Description:A school in Sedalia at Sixth Street and Summit Avenue. Named from the avenue which it adjoins. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 261)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sunny Dell School
Description:A school in the northwestern part of Blackwater Township, five miles northwest of La Monte. Named for its location in a small sheltered valley. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 140; G.L. Reynolds)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sunnymede School
Description:See Green Lawn School
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sunnyside School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of Cedar Township. Cf. above. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 150; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Swisher School
Description:A school in the western part of Green Ridge Township. Named for J. Charles Swisher, who came to the county in 1865. (Chapman (1895) 604; County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 168; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tangle Nook School
Description:A school in the northeastern part of Cedar Township. Named for its location in a corner abounding in vines and brambles. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 150; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tedieville
Description:A village in northwestern Longwood Township. A post office was established there, in a farmhouse, in 1889, but was discontinued in 1902. The source of the name has not been ascertained. (Postal Guide; H: Polk's Gaz. (1889-1890) 1458; County Plat Book (1896)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Telegraph Institute
Description:In Sedalia. Named from the subject matter which was taught, telegraphy. (HIST. PETTIS (1886) 11; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:The Botts Cemetery
Description:A cemetery, one mile northeast of Walnut Branch Baptist Church. It is located at the old site of the church. Probably a family name. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 158)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Thornleigh
Description:A post office from 1886-1901; in the southern part of Longwood Township, eight miles north of Sedalia. (Postal Guide; County Plat Book (1896); HIST. PETTIS (1901) 689; County Plat Book (1916); Campbell's Gaz. (1874) 432)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union Church
Description:A Disciple's church in the northern part of Bowling Green Township; organized prior to 1859; used by both Baptist and Methodist denominations; hence the name. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 144; H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 173)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Valda
Description:A post office from 1902-1904; in the south-central part of the county. (Postal Guide)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:VanNatta School
Description:A school in the northwestern part of Prairie Township. Named for John VanNatta, who came to Pettis County in 1884. He gave the land for the school. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 194; L.L.Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wadleigh School
Description:A school in Green Ridge Township. Named for Charles E. Wadleigh, who came to Pettis County in 1871. He owned the land on which the school was built. (Chapman (1895) 607; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 168; L.L. Ream)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wake Forest Church
Description:See Houstonia Baptist Church
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Walnut Branch
Description:A stream which rises in the southeastern part of Flat Creek Township and flows across the southwestern part of Smithton Township into Flat Creek. Named for the numerous walnut trees which grew along its banks. (County Plat Book (1896) (1916); Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Walnut Church
Description:A Baptist church in Elkfork Township about ten miles west of Sedalia, organized in 1837 or 1838. Named for its location in a walnut grove. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 158, 299; George H. Scruton)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:A school in the eastern part of Dresden Township. Cf. above. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 155; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Walnut School
Description:A school in the northeastern part of Flat Creek Township. Cf. above. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 163; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Warsaw Branch Railroad
Description:A branch of the Missouri Pacific Railroad running south for forty miles. Named for its terminal. (Scruton's SEDALIA (1904)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Washington Prairie
Description:A post office of Pettis County; not listed in Postal Guide. Unidentified. (H: Polk's Gaz. (1860) 478)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Washington School [1 of 2]
Description:First organized school district of Pettis County; organized November 6, 1838. It was the first school district in the county. Named for the father of our country, George Washington. Now discontinued. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 324; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Washington School [2 of 2]
Description:A public school in Sedalia at Fifth and Wagoner Streets. Cf. above. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 262; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Washington Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Prairie Township; on the east by Flat Creek Township, on the south by Benton County, and on the west by Greenridge Township. Was a part of Elk Fork and Flat Creek Townships until 1844, when it was made to include what is now Green Ridge and Washington Townships. In 1873 it was organized with its present boundaries. Named for George Washington. (Campbell (1873); HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1064)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wasson's Mill
Description:See Pin Hook Mill
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:West Liberty Church
Description:A free denominational church in Cedar Township. So named to distinguish it from Liberty Church, south of Sedalia. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 149; Mrs. Kate Neal)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:West Prairie Grove School
Description:A school in the northwestern part of La Monte Township, four and a half miles northwest of La Monte. Named for its location in a grove of trees on a wide prairie. When the Prairie Grove School District was divided the west part was called West Prairie Grove School. (HIST. PETTIS (1919) 187; G.L. Reynolds)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wharton Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in Heath's Creek Township. The date of its organization is uncertain. A family name. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 862, 863; J.D. Eckles)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:White School
Description:A school in the center part of Smithton Township. Named for a family of the district. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 201; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Whites
Description:See Gailey
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Whittier School
Description:A public school in Sedalia at Sixteenth Street and Montgomery Avenue. Named for America's Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892). He was a constant worker for the cause of abolition. (H: HIST. PETTIS (1919) 262; Enc. Brit. (1938)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wolf Creek
Description:(H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 806)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Woodland School
Description:A school in the southwestern part of Heath's Creek Township. Named for its location in a wooded area of land. (County Plat Book (1916); HIST. PETTIS (1919) 173; C.F. Scotten)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

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