Perry County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Abernathy School
Description:A rural school in the north-central part of Cinque Hommes Township, which was named for Drury Abernathy, a farmer, whose father Battee Abernathy came to Missouri in 1820. The region was known as the Abernathy settlement in 1873. (Goodspeed, Douglass I 445, Campbell 1873)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Abernathy Settlement
Description:See Abernathy School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen Landing Road
Description:A road in the eastern part of Bois Brule Township, so named because it led to Allen Landing, a Mississippi River ferry maintained by Thomas Allen. (Letter from Oscar J. Buerck, Goodwin, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen Lane School
Description:See Allen School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Bois Brule Township. The name is erroneously written Allen Lane School on some maps, doubtless because of Allen Landing Road. The school was established in 1855 and named for William Allen, a landowner. (Letter from Oscar J. Buerck, Highway Map, Rolla Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen's Landing
Description:A landing on the Mississippi River, in the eastern part of Bois Brule Township. Thomas Allen settled here in 1797. The landing is mentioned by Goodwin in 1867-1868. (Goodwin, Goodspeed, CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Altenburg
Description:A town of some 300 inhabitants in the center part of Brazeau Township. It is the largest of seven small communities settled by German Lutherans in the so-called "Saxon Migration" of 1839. Five of these were located on a tract of land in the southeast corner of Perry County, purchased by the Lutherans in common shortly after their arrival. Three of them still survive: Wittenberg on the Mississippi River, at the mouth of Brazeau Creek; Altenburg about five miles farther west along the Wittenberg Road (q.v.) to Perryville, on high ground about one mile south of Brazeau Creek; and Frohna (originally Nieder-Frohna), about two and a half miles farther west or northwest on the same road. The other two, Dresden and Seelitz, have disappeared from the map, and their exact location has not been ascertained, except that they were somewhere on the original tract. Dresden was close to Altenburg, probably south of it, and was probably later incorporated with it. Seelitz was near Frohna, on a rich but low-lying section to the north along Brazeau Creek. Two other settlements, Johannisberg and Paitzdorf, lay outside the original purchase and were founded a few months later. Both of them have since changed their names. Johannisberg, known at present as New Wells, is in Cape Girardeau County, about seven miles south of Altenburg and three miles south of Apple Creek. Paitzdorf, now Uniontown, is eight miles southwest of Altenburg in the adjoining Union Township. The present hamlet of Brazeau (q.v.), which is on the creek about two miles northwest of Frohna, and which was setled by the Saxons at about this time, may be the modern successor of Seelitz. A later settlement also probably connected with them is Frankenburg, now disappeared, in Central Township, fifteen miles northwest of Frohna on the Wittenberg Road and about two and a half miles east of Perryville. Two other nearby German named places, Friedenberg, twelve miles northwest in Central Township, and Millheim, fifteen miles west in Cinque Hommes Township, are perhaps the products of subsequent expansion of the Saxons, although their names show the influence of later immigration from other parts of Germany. All these places have so much in common in the circumstances of their origin that they are best treated together.

The dramatic story of the "Saxon Migration" has been told and retold in a flood of books and articles and controversial pamphlets, and only the bare outlines of this momentous chapter of Missouri HIST. can be here recounted. For a full and painstaking account and appraisal, and a complete biography, reference may be made to a recent Ph.D dissertation by Walter Otto Forster, compiled in 1942 for the Department of HIST. at Washington University, in St. Louis. Forster describes the "Saxon Migration" of 1839 as the "advance guard of German immigration to the West" (p. 4). As late as 1821 there were no Germans of European birth in Missouri. The German traveler Gottfried Duden came in 1824, and his immensely influential book about the attractions of Missouri was published in Germany in 1829. Ten years later the great German influx began in eanest, and the Saxon colonists were the first large organized group to arrive in a body.

The "Saxon Migration" was primarily a religious movement, although Forster shows that economic factors also played a part in it. It was the product of widespread religious unrest and dissatisfaction felt in Germany in the 1830s, especially in the Kingdom of Saxony. The conservative party in the Lutheran Church, embodying the reaction against 18th century Retionalism and the orthodox opposition to an enforced union with the Reformed or Calvinistic branches, felt that false doctrines and teachers were being forced upon them, that spiritual conditions in the homeland had become intolerable, and that freedom of worship was denied. With much the same motives as led the Pilgrims to Plymouth Rock, nearly a thousand of these intensely religious people, led by their pastors, decided to leave Germany and seek the new land of religious and personal freedom. It was the dominant emphasis on the religious motive that differentitates this initial German migration from the larger movements, inspired rather by social and political impulses, that came after the revolutions of 1848.

More than three-fourths of them came from Saxony, and mainly from three specific parts of Saxon Germany; the environs of Dresden, Leipsic and the adjoining valley of the Mulde River, and the Saxon Duchy of Saxe-Altenburg. Most of them came from small country parishes, now often difficult to locate on the German map, rather than from the large cities. Nearly seven hundred of them came over together in five ships, one of which was lost at sea, that left Bremerhaven late in 1838 and arrived in New Orleans in January, 1839; they then proceeded up the Mississippi by river steamer and reached St. Louis by the end of February. There they were joined in May by nearly a hundred who had come overland by way of New York, and finally in December by nearly 150 more who made their way to St. Louis by the New York route. The colony remained in St. Louis till May, when the purchase of the Perry County land had been consummated; a tract of nearly five thousand acres in Brazeau Bottom, about a hundred miles south of St. Louis, acquired at a cost of about ten thousand dollars. Between one and two hundred of the immigrants preferred to remain in St. Louis, where they were known at first as the "Saxon Congregation." Until 1842 they enjoyed the hospitality of the Episcopalians at Christ Church Cathedral; in that year their first church building was erected and took the name of Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church, known affectionately as "Old Trinity," the mother church of all Lutheran congregations in St. Louis and its vicinity. The remainder of the colony were in Perry County by the end of May, and were joined there by the later arrivals from New York.

The personality and past HIST. of the pastors who led the movement is essential to an understanding of later developments, and incidentally to the selection of most of the place names involved. The pastors were at all times in control of events, and were almost certainly responsible for the choice of names for the settlements. The tragedy which almost brought the entire mvement to shipwreck also arose at bottom from a clash of personalities. A brief sketch must therefore be supplied of the careers of the seven men who were chiefly involved.

Martin Stephan (1777-1846) was the acknoweldged inspirer and original leader of the whole movement. He was the son of a poor Bohemian weaver, born in Stramberg, Moravia, and his first pastorate was at Haber, Bohemia. In 1810 he became pastor of the Bohemian St. Johannis-Gemeinde at Dresden, an ancient church founded in 1850 for Bohemian protestants who took refuge in Saxony during the Thirty Years War. There for eighteen years his powerful sermons and magnetic personality attracted a wide following; he became the recognized leader of the conservative wing of the Lutheran Church in Saxony, and all the other pastors were either converted to the cause by him or profoundly influenced by his teaching. His church had inherited special priveleges that long protected him from attack by the church authorities; but the increasing hostility of his enemies, both theological and personal, at last brought about his suspension in 1838. The idea of wholesale emigration was admittedly his original conception, as was the choice of Missouri, partly inspired by a reading of Duden's book. His suspension from his Dresden pastorate brought the issue to a head. Immediately thereafter he issued a stirring call for departure to a land of religious freedom, and in a few months had secured the enrollment of over seven hundred persons from all parts of Saxony, of whom far the largest contingent came from Dresden or its vicinity. On the way across, he was elected bishop, and most of the immigrants and pastors even signed a pledge of complete submission in all things to the direction of Bishop Stephan. When on April 26, 1838, he left St. Louis to inspect the Perry County land which he had purchased for the colony, his position seemed supreme and unchallenged. The point of embarkation on the Mississippi later to be named Wittenberg was at first denominated Stephan's Landing; and according to an uncorroborated story later told by one of his enemies (Polack, p. 29), he had made elaborate plans for the founding of a city to be called Stephansburg and a university, Stephan's College, and the site of his episcopal palace was already staked off. But he was now sixty-one years old, and before the end of another month was destined to suffer downfall, deposition, and utter disgrace.

The six other Saxon pastors were much younger men than Stephan. The oldest among them, Gotthold Heinrich Loeber (1797- 1849), who was 42 in 1839, came from Eichenberg near Kahla in the Duchy of Saxe-Altenburg. From the Duchy came also Pastor Theodor Carl Friedrich Grueber, whose exact age is not recorded. He came from the parish of Paitzdorf, and was the last to arrive, bringing his contingent by way of New York in December. A total of 158 immigrants from Saxe-Altenburg were enrolled in the county.

The other four pastors came from the valley of the Mulde near Leipsic. Ernst Gerhard Wilhelm Keyl (1804-1872), born at Leipsic, had been pastor of the large parish of Niederfrohna since 1829, with the neighboring parish of Mittelfrohna as a second charge. His stirring sermons there are said to have caused an "awakening" in the entire neighborhood, and were the means of enlisting the other men from the University of Leipsic. Ernst Moritz Buerger (1806-1890) became, on his graduation from Leipsic in 1829, his father's assistant in the paish of Seelitz and in 1832 pastor of the parish of Lunzenau near Rochlitz. Youngest of all were the two Walther brothers, sons of a Lutheran pastor at Langenchursdorf near Waldenberg. Both attended the University of Leipsic. The elder, Otto Hermann Walther (1809-1841), succeeded his father for the last four years before the emigration. The younger, Carl Ferdinand Wilhelm Walther (1811-1887), after his graduation in 1833, served as private tutor at Kahla in the family of a brother of Pastor Loeber, and then in 1837 became pastor of the parish of Braunsdorf near Penig. Although the junior members of the pastoral group, only 29 and 27 on arrival in America, and although bringing with them the smallest contingents of all, the two Walthers were destined soon to take the leadership of the entire colony. O.H. Walther became pastor of the Saxon Congregation that remained in St. Louis, but kept in close touch with events in Perry County, where he had an important part in the founding of Concordia Seminary (q.v.). C.F.W. Walther was to succeed his brother after his premature death in 1841 in the pastorate at St. Louis, and later to become head of the Seminary and the "Grand Old Man" of Missouri Lutheranism. His success was largely due to the decisive part he took in the struggle over Stephan's deposition and the subsequent vicissitudes of the Perry County colony.

The dramatic story of Stephan's downfall, in spite of all that has been written about it, pro and con, still remains to a large extent an unsolved mystery. Internal dissension seems to have begun during the two months they all waited in St. Louis to fix the location of their settlement. There were charges against Stephan first of autocracy and dictatorship, then of mismanagement of the common fund and extravagance; but his position was still apparently secure when he left the city fo Perry County on April 26. The crisis came on Sunday, May 5, after a "searching sermon" delivered to the colonists by pastor Loeber, two women from the congregation made private confessions to him of having had immoral relations with the aged bishop. There followed an epidemic of "confessions": at least four women admitted adultery with Stephan, the most detailed and lurid narrative, secured later on in Perry County, being that of his housemaid Louise Guenther. The five pastors remaining in St. Louis were convinced of his guilt, and commissioned the youngest among them C.F.W. Walther to go to Perry County and share the shocking disclosures with the other colonists. All of them, without exception, seem to have accepted the evidence against him as overwhelming, although no regular trial was ever held. Sentence of deposition was pronounced on May 30, and the next day the erstwhile bishop, maintaining his innocence to the last, was expelled from the colony and set across the Mississippi, where he was left to his fate at the foot of a grotesque rock on the Illinois side with the highly appropriate name, as it seemed to the horrified Saxons, of the Devil's Bakeoven. It was later learned that Stephan, though sick and unable to speak a word of English, made his way to an adjoining American settlement, where he was kindly received. A few weeks later his too faithful handmaid Louise Guenther escaped from confinement in Perry County and joined him. Later he even became pastor again of a small Lutheran church at Red Bud, in Randolph County, Illinois, about fifty miles away. There he died in exile seven years later, without ever admitting his guilt or the justice of his deposition.

The terrific scandal stunned and bewildered the colonists. Although none of them, apparently, believed in his innocence, they were at first thoroughly demoralized and assailed with doubts both of their faith and the wisdom of having come to America. Many returned to Germany, including some of the principal laymen. By 1844, according to Forster, 110 had severed relations with the colony. One pastor, Maxmilian Oertel (not one of the original seven, but a recruit picked up in New York), even deserted the church and embraced Roman Catholicism. Others offered to resign their charges; and Pastor Buerger actually did resign at Seelitz, leaving to accept a charge at Buffalo, New York.

There were some, however, whose courage never wavered. During the darkest months of 1839 the beginnings were made of the foundation of an institution of higher learning later to be known as Concordia Seminary (q.v.). In the time of greatest doubt and confusion, it was undoubtedly the younger Walther who rallied the weaker spirits and saved the day. At a historic debate in Altenburg, held in the log cabin college on April 15 and 16, 1841, he vindicated the rights of the exiles to form a new church in a new land. The famous "Altenburg Theses" were adopted, which upheld a more democratic form of church government than the rigidly episcopal system envisaged by Stephens, have ever since been regarded a a landmark in the HIST. of Missouri Lutheranism. From that day the disheartened and wellnigh shattered colony began to revive, and although with depleted resources and diminished numbers set its face steadfastly toward the future.

On June 1, 1839, the first rough division into separate settlements was begun, and calls were issued to the pastors, who then began serving their respective congregations. By November the allotment of land, previously held in common, to private owners was completed and confirmed by the Circuit Court at Perryville. Final boundaries of the five original settlements were not confirmed, however, till 1847, when Altenburg was awarded 1,559 acres, Dresden 1, 158.08 acres, Seelitz 758.80 acres, Nieder-Frohna 360 acres, and Wittenberg 640 acres, out of the original land purchase of 4,475.88 acres made in 1839. The exact size of the two outlying settlements of Johannisberg and Paitzdorf has not been recorded. Forster declares that the communities, with one exception, were nothing more than parishes composed of persons from a particular locality or attached to a particular pastor in Germany (p. 627).

The one exception was Wittenberg, the landing place on the Mississippi. Wittenberg, at first known as Stephan's Landing, was intended to be the city or commercial metropolis of the entire colony, their trade and population center. From the first, no pastor was placed here, but services were held each Sunday by one of the pastors or candidates in turn. Elaborate plans had been drawn up, perhaps by Stephan himself, for a municipal center in the angle formed by the Brazeau and the Mississippi, and several hundred building lots were to be laid out. These hopes failed to materialize when the numbers of the colonists were depleted and the site was found to be unhelpful; and the village was not even incorporated and provided with a post office till 1867. It has never reached a population as large as 300. But the high design with which it was founded is indicated by the choice for its name, to replace the invidious Stephan's Landing or Stephansburg, of Wittenberg, the historic birthplace of German Lutheranism, the town where Luther started the Reformation in 1517 when he nailed his ninety-five theses on the door of the Schlosskirche.

Altenburg, the largest settlement, was situated comparatively favorably at a sufficient elevation to assure resonably dry ground and a healthful, not too humid atmosphere. Its pastor, G.H. Loeber, and most of its people had come from the Duchy of Saxe-Altenburg, and it was doubtless named for the Duchy--not, as one authority declares, for the German city of Altenburg, which does not seem to have sent a single colonist. It grew slowly, but steadily, although it was not incorporated until 1870.

Dresden was obviously named for the Saxon city where Stephan's church was located and where the movement had originated. Most of its inhabitants came from Dresden. After Stephan's downfall, it was assigned for a time to the care of C.F.W. Walther, but most of the other pastors lived there, for at first it contained most of the habitable dwellings. It must have immediately adjoined Altenburg, probably on the south, for the "special partition" between them for a while was unfixed, and in 1841, when C.F.W. Walther left to take over his brother's church in St. Louis, it was made a subsidiary parish or branch of Altenburg. This probably marked its end as an independent settlement. The famous log cabin erected for the college in 1839 is originally said to have been located within the territory of Dresden (Forster, p. 648), but is subsequently always spoken of as Altenburg, where it is proudly exhibited today. The union of the two original settlements is demonstrated by this fact.

Frohna was known at first as Nieder-Frohna, a name which it still bore when the final allotment of territory was fixed by the Circuit Court on May 11, 1847 (Forster, p. 703). Its pastor was E.G.W. Keyl, and most of its people had been members of Keyl's old congregation at Niederfrohna in the Mulde valley, or of his adjoining parish of Mittelfrohna. The shorter name doubtless came into use to cover both of his original parishes.

Seelitz was settled by people from E.M. Buerger's congregation in Germany and from that of his father. Although only one of the colonists is recorded by Forster (p. 761), as coming from the small parish of Seelitz, which is near Niederfrohna in the Mulde valley, Buerger may have chosen it out of filial piety and the memory of his own first pastorate, rather than Lunzemau, from which he and most of his people had actually come. Seelitz must have been near Frohna, somewhere to the north of it in the Brazeau Creek bottom, for the "special partition" between them had not yet been agreed upon in November, 1839 (Forster, p. 647). It's low-lying situation made it unhealthful and subject to fevers of various descriptions. By 1841 Buerger's congregation had been reduced to five, and after much dissatisfaction he resigned, and the parish was made a branch of Altenburg. Thereafter the name disappears from the map. It has been impossible to ascertain whether its territory was united with that of Altenburg, or Frohna, or perchance changed its name to Brazeau, a little hamlet which still survives a short distance away on Brazeau Creek, and which is said in the county HIST. to have been originally settled by the Saxons in 1839.

Paitzdorf, the outlying settlement eight miles away in Union Township, is known to have changed its name at a later date by the latest group of Saxons to arrive, those led by Pastor T.C.F. Grueber, and named for his old parish of Paitzdorf, near Gera in Saxe-Altenburg. The Grueber group arrived on December 12, 1839, and could not be granted space within the original boundaries of the colony. The name Paitzdorf survived at least till 1866, when it is mentioned by Koestering (p. 34). Being so far away from the other Saxons, it was exposed to early amalgamation with native American settlers, and doubtless for this reason was one of the first to surrender its German name.

Johannisberg, another outlying settlement, presents the only unsolved problem of naming. It is said to have been an offshoot of the Dresden settlement. In May, 1840, the members of the New York group who had arrived in December, 1839, and who had been members of C.F.W. Walther's congregation at Dresden, branched off and founded a hamlet seven miles away in Cape Girardeau County. Forster (p. 630), thinks the split was caused by a quarrel over the sale of lots at Wittenberg to the general public. Members of the New York group violently opposed this move, which was proposed because of the failure of Wittenberg to grow as fast as had been hoped. They severed financial connections with the community, and withdrew into a separate settlement, although they continued other connections with the Saxons. C.F.W. Walther continued to serve both Dresden and Johannisberg until the end of 1841, but after his departure for St. Louis both were made branches of Altenburg. An account in the WESTERN DISTRICT LUTHERAN tells how in the late 1840s services were held on a hill near the town. In 1852 fresh settlers arrived from Austria, and these for a while continued to attend church at Altenburg in Perry County. At this time the place began to be known to the Altenburg people by the name of Oesterreich. But because Apple Creek often rose and prevented attendance at Altenburg, a separate church was organized in 1853. The present pastor, Reverend L.F. Dippold, writes that the Austrian settlers never called the place Oesterreich, but Neu Wels, after their home city of Wels in Upper Austria, and later the name was Americanized to New Wells (q.v.).

The origin of these later names is therefore clear enough, but the source of the original name Johannisberg remains something of a mystery. There are many German places so named, but none of them is listed by Forster as the original home of any of the Saxon colony. It is not likely to have been the well known Johannisberg on the Rhine, which is a Catholic stronghold, nor yet Johannisberg in East Prussia, neither of which could have any connection with the Saxons. There is a Johannisberg in Bohemia, near Reichenberg, about seventy miles southeast of Dresden across the Erzgebirge, and some connection is just possible between it and Martin Stephen's earlier Bohemian days. But the most probable conjecture is that the name was coined from the name of Stephan's church in Dresden, the "Johannis-Gemeinde," or else that it is a lost parish name from somewhere near Dresden, which is particularly rich in Johannis-names.

Frankenberg (q.v.) near Perryville, which is first mentioned as a Lutheran settlement in 1864, may well have some connection with the Saxons; for no fewer than thirty-two of them came from that Saxon town halfway between Dresden and Altenburg. But the two other German named villages nearby, Friedenberg (q.v.) and Millheim (q.v.), are probably the product of later German immigration; for Friedenberg, Germany is in East Prussia, and none of the many German Mulheims is located in Saxony.

(Walter Otto Forster, SETTLEMENT OF THE SAXON LUTHERANS IN MISSOURI, 1839-1847: A STUDY IN THE ORIGINS OF THE MISSOURI SYNOD. Ph.D. dissertation, Department of HIST., Washington University, St. Louis; June, 1942. 854 pp. Other sources as listed in Forster's "Bibliography," especially J.F. Koestering, AUSWANDERUNG DER SACHSISCHEN LUTHERANER IM JAHRE 1838: IHRE NIEDERLASSUNG IN PERRY COUNTY, MISSOURI, 1866-1867; W.H.T. Dau, EBENEZER: REVIEW OF THE WORK OF THE MISSOURI SYNOD DURING THREE QUARTERS OF A CENTURY, 1922; W.G. Polack, FATHERS AND FOUNDERS, 1938; P.E. Kretzmann. "The Saxon Immigration to Missouri, 1838-1839," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW, XXXIII (January, 1939), 157-170; Atlases by Andree, Meyer, Stieler, etc.; Baedeker's Guidebook; Douglas HIST. OF PERRY, 1912; A MODERN EDEN. See also the WESTERN DISTRICT LUTHERAN, January, 1929, and a letter from the Reverend L.F. Dippold, pastor of Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church at New Wells) (R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Altenburg Seminary
Description:See Concordia Seminary
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Anchor Landing
Description:See Bois Brule
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Apple Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the southern part of Perry County and flows east to form the boundary line between Perry and Cape Girardeau counties, and empties into the Mississippi River. Also known as Riviere a la Pomme or Apple River, it marked the northern boundary of the Cape Girardeau District in 1793. Thomas Fenwick received a grant of land here in 1797. Since the Shawnee Indians cultivated farms and had a large village on this creek, it is probable that the early French travelers and hunters gave the name Riviere a la Pomme (later Americanized to Apple River or Apple Creek), from the apple trees which grew there. Major Stephen H. Long refers to the Shawnees of this region as the Apple Creek band, and Collot's DANS L'AMERIQUE contains a painting by Warin of an Apple Creek Shawnee. (Wetmore (1837), Campbell (1873) Spanish Regime II 88, 94, Houck I 214, 212, III 151, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Applecreek
Description:A small village in the southern part of Union Township, near Apple Creek (q.v.), from which it was named. A post office was maintained from 1902-1908. (County Map (1941), Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bailey's Landing
Description:A ferry landing on the Mississippi River, in the eastern part of Salem Township, maintained in 1873. Presumably named for its original owner. The landing was purchased by C.F. DeLassus, a well known farmer, before 1856. He was perhaps a member of the famous DeLassus family, best known of whom was Charles de Hault de Lassus de Luziere, last Spanish Lieutenant Governor of Upper Louisiana, for whom see the town of DeLassus in St. Francois County, in Miss Zimmer's thesis. (Campbell, Goodspeed, R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barks
Description:A post office maintained from 1899-1918 in the south-central part of Saint Mary's Township. Houck erroneously writes it Perks in 1909. The source of the name has not been ascertained. (Postal Guide, Houck I)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barren Church
Description:See Hepzibah Church
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barrens, The
Description:A region in what is now Central Township, settled in 1800 by Kentuckians who brought the name with them. They had called their home in Kentucky The Barrens, a term used extensively to designate a species of land which combines some of the features of timber land and prairie, the timber being scattering and possibly stunted. The term does not indicate poor soil. Finding the topographical conditions in Perry County to resemble that of their Kentucky home, the early settlers transferred the name to this region. The Kentucky Barrens lie east of Bowling Green; cf. Barren River, a tributary of Green River, and Barren County near the southern border of the state. The first settlers here were Tuckers, Moores, Haydens, and Laytons. The first Catholic Seminary west of the Mississippi River was founded here in 1818 by Bishop Du Bourg and called St. Mary's-of-the-Barrens. (Peck, Houck I 353, II 324, Douglas I 177, W.P.A. Guide 523)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baudendistel School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Saint Mary's Township. It was named for two men, Moritz and Nicholas Baudendistel, who were prominent in the community. William and Moritz Baudendistel live there now. (Letter from Cora Coffelt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Belgique
Description:A small village in the eastern part of Bois Brule Township. A post office was established in 1890 and named Belgique, the French word for Belgians, honoring immigrants from that country who had settled here among the original French settlers in Bois Brule Bottoms. (Eaton, Postal Guide, Letter from Oscar Buerck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bess School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Saint Mary's Township, named for John Bess who gave the land for the school. The school was established about 1858. (R.F. Edmond (letter ) )
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethlehem Court
Description:A convent for the Sisters of Loretto near St. Mary's-of-the-Barrnes Seminary in what is now the central part of Central Township. The convent was established in 1824 and named by Father Rosati for the city of the nativity of Christ. The order of the Sisters of Loretto was founded by Father Nerinckx in 1809 in Washington County, Kentucky. It was an educational institution or sisterhood, and from this original convent in Kentucky groups went out to assist many settlements in Missouri as well as Kentucky. (CATH. H. R. I 177)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Biehle
Description:A small village in the southern part of Cinque Hommes Township. A post office was established here in 1876 and named for the Biehle family. Joseph Biehle came from Baden, Germany, in 1839 with the original colony; his son Maurus Biehle came to the store of his uncle Moritz Biehle, and worked there until he purchased a large farm near the present location of Biehle. (Goodspeed, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Springs Cave
Description:A large cave in the central part of Central Township, so named because it is near two big springs. It is also known as Shelby Cave, because it is located on the Dr. R. Shelby farm. (A MODERN EDEN 7, PERRY COUNTY CENTENNIAL HIST., Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Birmingham
Description:A "Ghost town," which was projected but never quite materialized as a landing on the Mississippi River in the southeastern part of Brazeau Township. There must have been some place of that name even before the county was organized in 1821, for Birmingham Hills was then designated as the southern boundary of the county, and it is more likely that the hills were named for the settlement than vice versa. Cf. also Birmingham Road, which seems to have been in existence at a very early date. The county historian, in A MODERN EDEN, says "An old citizen informs us that in his early days all the county roads led to Birmingham." Little is known of it, however, except by tradition. In 1837 John Scudder is said to have laid off a town at the mouth of Apple Creek to be known as Birmingham; and the St. Louis MISSOURI ARGUS of April 21, 1837, carried this notice: "Extensive and unreserved sale of building lots in the town of Birmingham on Monday, July 10, 1837, on the premises." This was doubtless a last attempt to revive the old place; but the town was never actually settled. At least a dozen American towns have been named Birmingham, including one in Clay County, Missouri, platted in 1887. All of them go back ultimately, of course, to the great manufacturing city in England. (A MODERN EDEN, 1895, 5, MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW, XXXI 128, Conard, R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Birmingham Hills
Description:A range of hills in the southeastern part of Brazeau Township, designated as the southern boundary of the county when it was organized in 1821. Probably the name was transferred, as was that of Birmingham Road (q.v.) from the "ghost town" of Birmingham (q.v.). (Conard, County Court Records)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Birmingham Road
Description:A country road in the southeastern part of Brazeau Township, so named because it leads to the spot selected by John Scudder for his town Birmingham (q.v.). The town was never actually settled, but the road is still so designated. (A MODERN EDEN 5, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bishop Rosati's Sacistry
Description:A one-room log cabin preserved as Bishop Rosati's Sacistry on the campus of St. Mary's- of-the-Barrens. It is said to have been built for Father Rosati in 1818. Father Joseph Rosati (1789-1843), was the first bishop of the newly erected See of St. Louis, to which position he was raised in 1826 by Pope Leo XII. Born in Italy, he came to the United States in 1816, and in 1818 became the first president of St. Mary's Seminary. In 1823 he succeeded Father De Andreis as Superior of the entire Vincentian "Congregation of the Missions." (W.P.A. Guide 523, Houck I 326, PERRY COUNTY CENTENNIAL HIST. (1927) )
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bishop's Mill
Description:A mill in The Barrens on the southern fork of Saline Creek in the southeastern part of Saline Township. It was built in 1801 by Joseph Tucker, Sr., one of the first settlers who came from The Barrens in Kentucky in 1799. The mill was purchased in 1819 by Bishop Rosati (for whom see next slip) of St. Mary's-of-the-Barrens, and called the Bishop' Mill. (PERRY COUNTY CENTENNIAL HIST. (1927) )
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Springs Branch
Description:A small stream, a branch of Saline Creek in the eastern part of Saline Township. Doubtless a descriptive name for the water.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bois Brule [1 of 2]
Description:A large region eighteen miles long and 3-6 miles wide, covering the northern part of Perry County, also known as Bois Brule Bottoms. The first settler was John Baptiste Barsaloux, who lived here in 1787 and applied for a concession of land for himself and his father, Girard Barsaloux. In 1818 the chief settlements were here. The name means "Burnt Woods," and was frequently applied by the French to a burnt tract of forest. Cf. Bois Brule Creek in Cole County, locally known as "Bob Ruley." (McDermott, Douglass I 177, Houck I 381, Eaton, Long, Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bois Brule [2 of 2]
Description:A post office maintained from 1886-1902 in the eastern part of Bois Brule Township and given the name by which this entire region was known (cf. above). It was a landing on the Mississippi River and sometimes called Anchor Landing. (Postal Guide, Gazetteer 1898)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bois Brule Baptist Church
Description:A first Baptist church organized in what is now Perry County in 1807 by members of the Bethel Church (in Cape Girardeau County). It was named for its location in Bois Brule Bottom (q.v.). The church disbanded after the year 1815. (Douglas I 201)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bois Brule Bottoms
Description:See Bois Brule
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bois Brule Creek
Description:A branch of Cinque Hommes Creek running through Bois Brule Bottoms (q.v.), for which it is named.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bois Brule Township
Description:One of the three original townships organized in 1821 and named for the region or bottom known as Bois Brule (q.v.). (Douglas I 170, Conard)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boxdorfer
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Salem Township, named for Gottlieb Boxdorfer, who gave two acres of land for the school. The first meeting to organize the school was held April 20, 1878. (MODERN EDEN, 34; Leon H. Hoffman (letter) )
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Br. Water's Landing
Description:A ferry landing in the eastern part of Bois Brule Township, on the Mississippi River, maintained in 1873. Presumably named for its proprietor; the Br. may or may not stand for "Brother." (Campbell 1873)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brady's Mill
Description:See Burnt Mill
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brazeau
Description:A small hamlet in the northwestern part of Brazeau Township, on Brazeau Creek, for which it was doubtless named. According to the county HIST., the community here was first established in 1839 by a group of German colonists, who named it for a place called Brazeau in Germany. The derivation of the name is certainly erroneous, for there is no such place in Germany, and the name is far older that the earliest German immigration, as it demonstrated by the dates for Brazeau Creek, Bottom, Church, and Township, which go back to an early French name. The county HIST. may be correct, however, about the first settlement at the site of the village having been made by Germans in 1839, the date of the "Saxon Migration." For the possibility that it is to be identified with the settlement which the Saxons first called Seelitz, and which was certainly very close by on the banks of Brazeau Creek, see under Altenburg. A post office was established here in 1886. (PERRY COUNTY CENTENNIAL HIST. (1927) (R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brazeau Bottom
Description:The lowland surrounding Brazeau Creek (q.v.), from which it was named. The first settler here was George A. Hamilton, from Kentucky in 1797. (Houck I 385)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brazeau Church
Description:A Presbyterian church organized September 12, 1819, by Reverend David Tenny with twenty members. The church declined for several years and was reorganized in 1890 with sixty-two members. (Douglas I 484, CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brazeau Creek
Description:A small stream running through the northern part of Brazeau Township, which emptie into the Mississippi River near Wittenberg. Houck says it was also known as Obrazo Creek, and mentions the names of a number of Americans who settled on it and in Brazeau Bottom (q.v.) from 1797 to 1803. Doubtless the name was older, going back to the early French occupation, and taken from the well known French family of that name. In his SPANISH REGIME, Houck mentions a Joseph Brazeau of St. Louis, listed in the statistical census of 1791 as a well-to-do merchant, who made a large patriotic subscription to the Spanish Government on October 12, 1799; and also a Madame Brazeau, included in the same list of 1791, about whom Houck has the note: "This is probably Marie Therese Bienvenue dit De Lisle, widow of Joseph Brazear, Sr., who was killed on the Kaskaskia River in 1779. After his death she came to St. Louis and died there in 1787." Which member of this important family was responsible for the Perry County names has not been ascertained. The old form "Obrazo was long used by river boatmen; cf. Cramer's NAVIGATOR of 1824, Cumming's WESTERN PILOT of 1837, and U.P. James's RIVER GUIDE of 1871, all of which call the stream Obrazo River. It is doubtless and Americanized form of "Au Brazeau," i.e. "in the Brazeau territory;" cf. Aux Vasse, Auglaize, the Ozarks (for "Aux Arcs," i.e. "in the Arkansas country," and also the Omete River (q.v.), a nearby stream in Perry County. (Houck HIST. OF MISSOURI I 385, and SPAN. REG. II 299, 374, 376, 383; Zadok Cramer THE NAVIGATOR (1824); Samuel Cummings THE WESTERN PILOT (1837) 81; U.P. James RIVER Guide (1871) R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brazeau Township
Description:One of the three original townships organized in 1821, and named for the creek. (Douglas I 170)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brewer
Description:A small town in the southeastern part of Saline Township. A post office was established in 1886 and named for John Brewer, who entered a Spanish land grant and whose home embraced the site of Brewerville, as it was unofficially known before the post office was christened Brewer in 1886. (MISSOURI 523, Eaton, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brewerville
Description:See Brewer
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brushy Creek
Description:A small stream in the western part of St. Marys Township, so named because of the brush or low shrubbery growing along the stream. (Hevenor Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burnt Mill
Description:Burnt Mill is three miles north of Cedar Fork in the western part of Saline Township. The mill was built in the 1850s by Rozier and Valle, prominent in Ste. Genevieve and Mine la Motte HIST.. It was operated by T.J. Brady and known as Brady's Mill for many years. Later the mill burned so that it was no longer used but the scorched walls remained and the mill is called Burnt Mill or Old Burnt Mill, from its appearance. (PERRY COUNTY CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Antoine
Description:A promontory in the Mississippi River in the eastern part of Salem Township, just above the present town of Wittenberg. Father St. Cosme, in the letter cited under Cape Cinque Holmes (q.v.), calls it Cape St. Antoine, but apparently is now known as Fountain Bluff, Illinois. As to this Houck says: "It may be that, at the time of this voyage in 1698 of St. Cosme, a channel of the Mississippi River ran along Fountain Bluff and around and east of the isolated high hills above Grand Tower; that the present channel was not as wide as it is now, and that as it widened the channel on the east side filled up, making the bottom through which the Illinois Central Railroad now runs, and on which the town of Grand Tower is built. Be that as it may, pines then grew on both sides of the rocky river hills." The name was doubtless derived from the famous Catholic saint Antoine or Anthony (251-356), founder of asceticism. (Houck HIST. OF MISSOURI I 242) (R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Cinque Hommes
Description:A promontory in the Mississippi River, in the eastern part of Salem Township, at the mouth of Cinque Hommes Creek. It is a few miles above the promontory now known as Cape Antoine (q.v.), just above the town of Wittenberg, and the Grand Tower (q.v.) rock, just below it. This old name is known on indisputable authority to have been a very clear corruption, or rather popular etymology, of the original name Cape St. Cosme, conferred for Father St. Cosme, a missionary priest from the Quebec Seminary of Foreign Missions, who visited the spot in 1698 and erected a cross on Grand Tower. The account of the event is given in Father St. Cosme's own words, in a letter to the bishop of Quebec dated in 1699. Part of his letter, which is transcribed in full in Shea's EARLY VOYAGES UP AND DOWN THE MISSISSIPPI, may be here quoted: "On the 10th (of December), saw a hill which is about three arpens distant from the Mississippi River, on the right going down. After being detained a part of the 11th by rain, we arrived early on the 12th at Cape St. Antoine...Some arpens below there is another rock on the right which advances into the river and forms an island, or rather a rock two hundred feet high, which, making the river turn back very rapidly and entering the channel, forms a kind of whirlpool there, where it is said a canoe was engulfed at the high waters. Fourteen Miamis were once lost there, which has rendered the spot fearful among the Indians, so that they are accustomed to make some sacrifices to this rock when they pass. We saw no figure there, as we had been told. You ascend this island and rock by a hill with considerable difficulty. On it we planted a beautiful cross, singing the VEXILLA REGIS, and our people fired three volleys of musketry. God grant that the cross, which has never been known in this region, may triumph there and our Lord put forth abundantly on them the merits of His holy passion, that the Indians may know and serve Him." (Translation by Houck, I.241) Jean Francois Buisson de Saint Cosme (1667-1702) was a Canadian, born in Quebec, son of Michael Buisson, a native of Cosme le Vert in the Diocese of Mans in France, and of Susanne Licheraffe. He was ordained a Seminarian priest at the age of twenty-three. The Seminarians derived their name from the "Seminaire des Missions Etrangeres" founded by Francois de Laval de Montmorency, first bishop of Quebec, in 1663, to educate the Canadian clergy. They were to some extent rivals of the Jesuits in the mission field, and carried on various missions among the Indian tribes of the lower Mississippi. Father St. Cosme was stationed first at Tamarois, or Tamaroa, in Illinois, and also labored in Acadia, Louisiana, and among the Natchez Indians in lower Louisiana. He was massacred by a party of the Sitimaches or Chetimacha Indians while descending the Mississippi in 1702. On the 1698 voyage he was accompanied by Fathers Francois Joliet de Montigny and Ambrose Davion, also Seminarians. How soon after the incident of the planting of the cross on Grand Tower the name of the missionary was attached to Cape St. Cosme and the creek whose mouth is at its foot, is unknown, but it must have been extremely early. Almost equally early, however, arose the misunderstanding that accounts for the later spelling of the name, as "Cinque Hommes." As William Clark Breckenridge stated the case clearly in a letter written to Ben Blewett of St. Louis, March 26, 1915 (quoted in his life by J.M. Breckenridge, 1932, p. 199): "The pronunciation of "St. Cosme" and "Cinque Hommes" is exactly the same in French, and the early Frenchmen who came after the priest, misunderstanding, called it by the latter name, which it was never given. There is absolutely no tradition connected with any five men, whether you call them in the French language or the English." It must be acknowledged, however, that there have been many attempts to supply the missing tradition, and that the spelling Cinque Hommes is actually recorded considerbly earlier than St. Cosme. In Houck's SPANISH REGIME (I.284), a letter is given from the Spanish minister Diego de Gardoqui dated October 4, 1788, about the grant made to Colonel George Morgan, which speaks of "a new settlement on our western bank of the Mississippi River south of Cape Cinque Hommes (i.e., Five Men);" for this cf. also Houck's HIST. of Missouri, II.154. Another letter dated April 14, 1787, spells it "Cinq Hommes;" and still another written by Lieutenant Governor Perez on March 27, 1789, mentions it with the spelling "Cape Cinque Home." Most striking of all is a mention of five men who were actually killed further down the river, in a letter from Thomas Partell, Commandant of New Madrid, written on September 6, 1793, to Louis Lorimier, in which he implores: "Speak to Chief le Point du Jour of the Loup village. Refresh his memory as to the promise which he gave to have brought and delivered to me the murderers of the five men killed below Les Ecores on the Mississippi." (Houck's SPAN. REG. I.275, 279, 310; II.54-55). After all, however, Les Ecores was on the other side of the Mississippi in Kentucky, nearly a hundred miles from Cape Cinque Hommes. No doubt many men did lose their lives at one time or another at or near this treacherous spot; indeed one of these fatalities, involving the drowning of fourteen Indians, is mentioned by Father St. Cosme in the original letter of 1699 cited above. The perils for unwary boatmen are thus described by Beck in 1823: "The creek makes a sudden turn to the east, and the water is thrown against it with great violence, and forms what is known as the Great Eddy." (EUROPEAN SETTLEMENTS ON THE MISSISSIPPI, 1770, ed. with facsimiles of maps by F.H. Hodder, 1906; THE JOURNAL OF CAPTAIN MERIWETHER LEWIS, 1803-1804, ed. Milo M. Quaife, Pubs. of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Collections vol. XXII; Zadok Cramer, THE NAVIGATOR, 1824; Samuel Cummings, THE WESTERN PILOT, 1837; U.P. James, RIVER GUIDE, 1871; THE LIFE OF WILLIAM CLARK BRECKENRIDGE, by James Malcolm Breckenridge, 1932, p. 199) (R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape St. Cosme
Description:See Cape Cinque Hommes
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cashion
Description:See Cashion School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cashion School
Description:A rural school in the north-central part of Cinque Hommes Township, one of the first rural schools in the county. A post office named Cashion was here in 1901-1904, but now only a rural school and community remains. It was named for A.H. Cashion, who came here from North Carolina in 1822. (Goodspeed, Postal Guide, Douglass II, PERRY COUNTY CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Fork
Description:A branch of Saline Creek in the western part of St. Mary's and Saline townships, so named from the cedar trees growing on the stream. The "fork" is that of this branch and Saline Creek. (PERRY COUNTY CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Fork Church
Description:A rural church in the northwestern part of St. Mary's Township, located near Cedar Fork (q.v.), from which it is named. (County Map 1941)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Fork School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of St. Mary's Township, named from Cedar Fork (q.v.) near which it is located. (County Map 1941)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Central Township
Description:In the central part of the county, and hence so named. It was organized between 1870-1890. (U.S. Census Reports, 1870- 1930)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chester Road
Description:The public road leading from Perryville through Sereno to Chester, Illinois, from which it was locally so called. (Huber)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chillicothe
Description:See Large Shawnee Village.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chilliticaux
Description:See Large Shawnee Village.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Christenson Branch
Description:A small branch of McClahanan Creek in the southern part of Bois Brule Township. The name is doubtless personal.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Church of Our Lady
Description:The Catholic Church of Claryville, named for the Virgin. (Douglas 451)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Church of the Nativity
Description:Cf. below
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Description:The Catholic Church of Bois Brule Bottom. The name is sometimes shortened to Church of the Nativity. It was organized in 1886 and blessed on May 10 by Reverend Henry Van der Sander, Chancellor of St. Louis, who called Reverend Father D.L. De Ceumynck, immigrant from Belgium in 1884 to take the parish. (Douglass I 451, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Church-of-the-Assumption
Description:The Roman Catholic Church on the campus of St. Mary's-of-the-Barrens Seminary. It was begun in 1827 under the Italian Angelo Olivia. It was planned as an exact reproduction of the Church of Monte Citorio in Rome, but plans were changed and a scale one-third of the original was adopted. The church was consecrated in 1837. Named for the Catholic doctrine. (W.P.A. GUIDE 523)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cinque Hommes Creek
Description:A large creek which rises in Cinque Hommes Township and takes a winding course through Central and Salem townships, to empty into the Mississippi River near Menfro at Cape Cinque Hommes (q.v.), from which it was doubtless named. For the probability that the original name of both creek and cape was St. Cosme, see the discussion there given. (R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cinque Hommes Township
Description:One of the three original townships organized in 1821 and named for Cinque Hommes Creek (q.v.). (Douglass I 170)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cissell School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Saline Township, named for the Cissell family. Vincent Cissell, whose father Joeph came to the county in 1803 from Kentucky, owned 900 acres of land and was one of the largest taxpayers in the county. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Claryville
Description:A small town in the northern part of Bois Brule Township. It was settled in 1860, laid out as a town by Captain C. Williams, and incorporated in 1871. The spelling of the name was first Clearyville, as it was named for John Cleary, a farmer nearby. The spelling was changed to correspond to the pronunciation. (Douglass I 382; A MODERN EDEN 5, EVAN L. CHURCH 14)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clearyville
Description:See Claryville
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coffman
Description:A settlement which had its origin in a grist mill erected on the property of Thomas Madden by Job Westover in 1800. The source of the name has not been ascertained. (Houck I 384)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Concordia Seminary
Description:The oldest Lutheran institution of Higher learning in Missouri, and mother college to all the junior colleges and seminaries of the Missouri Synod of the Lutheran Evangelical Church. Now located at St. Louis, it was first founded in Perry County in 1839, the year of the original settlement there of the Saxon immigrants. The historic log cabin which was its earliest home is still preserved as a museum. For the probablity that the cabin was originally erected in the territory of the settlement known as Dresden, and afterwards annexed to Altenburg, see under Altenburg, above. It is not unlikely that the original plans for the seminary were drawn by Pastor Martin Stephan, perhaps even before leaving Germany. One of the most hostile accounts of Stephan, that of Polack, makes indeed the uncorroborated allegation that he planned to call it Stephan's College. Be that as it may, in the darkest days after his downfall, the sumer of 1839, a group of three of the candidates for the ministry, Brohm, Furbringer, and Buenger, with the active support of the pastors, especially C.F.W. Walther, then pastor at Dresden, succeeded in acquiring four or six acres of land in this settlement, and joined their effort to provide a place of instruction for a course similar to that of a German "Gymnasium." The three candidates did most of the work of erecting the log cabin which was to serve as the home of the future college. On August 13, 1839, the following announcement was inserted in the ANZEIGER DES WESTENS, the principal German language newspaper of St. Louis: "We, the undersigned, intend to establish an institution of instruction and education which distinguishes itself from the ordinary elementary school especially by including, beside the usual elementary studies, all branches of a "Gymnasium" which are requisite for a genuinely Christian and scientific education, such as: Religion, the Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, German, French, and English languages, HIST., Geography, Mathematics, Physics, Natural HIST., fundamentals of Philosophy, Music, Drawing. In the branches named the pupils at our institution will be sufficiently advanced so that after completion of a full course they will be prepared for university studies...In the settlement of the German Lutherans in Perry County, near the Obrazo, August 13, 1839. (Signed by) C. Ferd, W. Walther, Ottomar Fuerbringer, Th. Jul. Brohm, John. Fr. Buenger." The log cabin was dedicated in October, Pastor O.H. Walther writing a special poem for the occasion which is still preserved. On November 19, Buenger wrote to St. Louis from "the Luther-College near Wittenberg," saying that classes would begin no later than December 1. A letter is preserved from Fuerbringer to the famous German scholar Franz Delitsch in Leipsic, telling him of the plans for starting a "Gymnasium," but eventually broadening its scope to make of it a full university and theological seminary, and inviting him to accept a professorship in the proposed institution, although he could offer him no salary. The school opened December 9, 1839, with seven boys; three girls also attended during the first few years. The school was the sole property of the Perry County colonists, who barely succeeded in maintaining it as a college until 1843, when the St. Louis group assumed the venture of sufficient support to guarantee its continuance, not as a "Gymnasium," but rather as a theological seminary. In 1849 it was decided to remove it to St. Louis and transfer its control to the Missouri Synod. C.F.W. Walther, who had succeeded his brother as pastor of the St. Louis church from 1841 to 1849, was called to the Seminary as professor and later served as its head until his death in 1887. There is some uncertainty about the name of the institution during its years at Altenburg. As has been noted above, it was allegedly planned as Stephan's College by Martin Stephan, was at least once referred to by Buenger as "Luther College," and was occasionally denominated the "Altenburg Seminary." There is no sufficient evidence that it was ever known as Concordia Seminary before the transfer to St. Louis. Yet that may have been the original name intended for it by Martin Stephan. An interesting piece of information given by Forster in his recent dissertation (p. 93) is that Stephan in his Dresden days used to send out candidates into the homes of his followers to conduct "Concordia-hours," so called because the Lutheran Formula of Concord was the chief subject of discussion. The reference is to the Confession of Faith of the Evangelical Lutheran Church adopted in 1850, which is commonly known as the "Formula" or "Book of Concord," or in short as the "Concordia." The name has at any rate always been especially beloved by Lutherans, and Lutheran churches have been so entitled at Kirkwood, Maplewood, and many other places, as has also been the town of Concordia in Lafayette County. It has sometimes been explained as inspired by Schiller's use of the term in his "Lied von der Glocke," in the line, "Concordia soll ihr Name sein;" but the reason for its distinctively Lutheran association is undoubtedly far older and goes back to the foundation of the denomination. (Forster, SETTLEMENT OF THE SAXON LUTHERANS, 93, 648, 715f.; Polack, FATHERS AND FOUNDERS, 29; GESCHICHTE DES CONCORDIA COLLEGIUM (1889) 25; Fuerbringer's CONCORDIA CYCLOPEDIA (1927) under "Concordia;" Douglas I 480; LIFE OF BRECKENRIDGE 206; theses by Miss Welty and Miss Atchison) (R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Corners
Description:A settlement in the southwestern corner of St. Mary's Township. Presumably a name of location, like Crossroads.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crosstown
Description:A small village in the north-central part of Salem Township. A post office was established in 1886, and so named because it was at the crossing of two county roads. (Postal Guide, Lawes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis Landing
Description:In Perry County 1832 Father Ennemond Dupuy landed there when traveling from Kentucky to the Barrens. Presumably a personal name. (Cath. H.R. I 177)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dayton
Description:See The Mound
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dresden
Description:A short- lived settlement, or parish, in southeasten Brazeau Township, near Altenburg, with which it was probably later consolidated. For the circumstances of its founding by the Saxon colonists, who doubtless named it fo their German home Dresden, the capital of Saxony, see above under Altenburg. More than fifteen other American towns have been named for the old German city. (Douglass I 479, A MODERN EDEN, 5, EV. LUTHERAN CHURCH, 12)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Creek
Description:See Dry Fork
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Fork [1 of 2]
Description:A stream once called Dry Creek in te western part of St. Mary' Township. Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Fork [2 of 2]
Description:A small stream, tributary to Cinque Hommes Creek in the eastern part of Salem Township, so named because it is dry except in rainy seasons. (Lotte)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duggins' Mill
Description:A mill on Cinque Hommes Creek, in the south-central part of Salem Township. It was named for the owner, James Duggins. (Centennial HIST., Goodspeed 429)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duggins School
Description:A rural school in the south-central part of Salem Township named for Oliver H. Duggins whose parents, James and Columbia Duggins were pioneers of Perry County. Oliver H. was a minister of the Methodist Church and was later made presiding Elder of the Poplar Bluff District in 1905 by Bishop Hendrix. (Goodspeed 429)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dy Creek Church
Description:A rural Baptist church in the western part of St. Mary's Township, constituted in 1830, and named for the creek now Dry Fork (q.v.) on which it is located. (Centennial HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Emanuel Church
Description:One of the two Lutheran Churches of Altenburg (q.v.). Named for Christ (cf. Matthew L;23). A favorite name for Lutheran churches, especially with this spelling with a single "m," which was used in Luther's translation of the Bible. Other denominations prefer Emmanuel or Immanuel. (W.P.A. 524)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eureka
Description:A small community in northeastern Cinque Hommes Township, named for the school. (Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eureka School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Cinque Hommes Township. A favorite motto name for schools. The Greek word translated means "I have found (it)."
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Falts Branch
Description:A small stream in the central part of Saline Township. No explanation of the name is available.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Farrar
Description:A small village in the southern part of Salem Township. A post office was established in 1893 and named for R.B. Farrar, who was a farmer and merchant, and who established the post office. He came to Perry County in 1837 and entered 900 acres of land. The boat landing for his farm on the Mississippi River, several miles from the post office, was known as Farrar's Landing. (Eaton, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Farrar's Landing
Description:See Farrar
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fenwick Settlement
Description:A settlement in the southern part of Brazeau Township on Prairie Spring Creek, a tributary of Apple Creek, where Thomas Fenwick received a grant of several thousand acres of land in 1797. A settlement sprang up here known as Fenwick's Settlement from the original settler. Thomas Fenwich was related to a Maryland family of that name and to the distinguished prelate of the Catholic Church, Edwad Fenwick, the first bishop of Cincinnati. Father Nerinckx says in 1809 this settlement consisted of twenty families. (Houck I 387, Douglass I 66, CATH. H.R. 159)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fiehler School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Cinque Hommes Township. Presumably a personal name. It is included several times among landowners in various parts of the county. Chas. B. and John Fiehler are listed as farmers near Frohna, both born in Perry County. (County Atlas 1915)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Five Spring Farm
Description:A well-known farm owned by W. Gatts, so named because there are five large springs on the farm. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frankenberg
Description:A former settlement about two and a half miles east of Perryville. During the years from 1864-1867, seven members of the Lutheran congregation located here organized the Evangelical Lutheran Emanuel Congregation of Perryville. The date of the first settlement at Frankenberg, and of its disappearance, have not been ascertained. Doubtless it was a later offspring of the "Saxon Migration," for which see under Altenburg, and named for the German town in Saxony. (A MODERN EDEN 23 ) (Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:French Lane
Description:A road in the northern part of Bois Brule and Saline townships, known as French Lane because here were the chief French settlers who came from Ste. Genevieve and from Illinois: the Valles, the Roziers, Govereaus, Dunns, Rutgers, and Berrys.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Friedenburg
Description:A small settlement in the southern part of Central Township. A post office was maintained here from 1900-1904. A Lutheran church was constituted in 1844. Presumably named for the German town of Friedenburg in East Prussia, about thirty miles southeast of Konigsberg. It is sometimes spelled Freidenburg, but appears correctly on the Highway Map. Cf. Altenburg, above. (Houck I, Postal Guide, Centennial HIST. of Perry)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Friendlytown
Description:A small settlement in the southeastern part of Saline Township, existing in 1873. An ideal name. (Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frisco Railroad
Description:See St. Louis San Francisco Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frohna
Description:A small village in the west-central part of Brazeau Township. It was originally known as Nieder-Frohna. For its founding by the Saxon Lutherans in 1839 and the source of it successive names, see under Altenburg. It was provided with a post office in 1886. (Postal Guide, Douglass I 479, A MODERN EDEN, 5) (Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Geile School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Saint Marys Township, named for the Geile family. Joseph H. Geile came from Prussia to this county in 1855. His sons, Frank and Henry M., became prominent citizens. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Creek
Description:A small stream in the western part of St. Mary's Township, a tributary of Saline Creek, so named because the pioneer hunters found geese in abundance here. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gorman Cave
Description:A cave in the central part of Central Township on the farm of Andrew Gorman. (CENTENNIAL HIST., Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grand Eddy
Description:Here at the mouth of Cinque Hommes Creek, the Misissippi River makes a sudden turn to the east; hence the water is thrown against the bank with great violence, and forms what is known as the Grand or Great Eddy. The place was a dangerous spot for boatmen, and many casualties resulted from the earliest days of river travel. Cf. under Cape Cinque Hommes, above. (Beck (1823)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grand Eddy
Description:A post office in the eastern part of Salem Township, maintained from 1888 to 1889. It was so named from the nearby Grand Eddy (q.v.) in the Mississippi River off the mouth of Cinque Hommes Creek. (Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grand Tower
Description:A large tower-like rock in the Mississippi River, near Wittenberg in Brazeau Township. Here in 1698 St. Cosme erected a cross. The place was dreaded by the Indians as a Manitou, fourteen Miamis having once been lost there. The rock is mentioned by Marquette. So named from its size and appearance. (Houck I 241-242, Douglass I 24)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Great Eddy
Description:See Grand Eddy
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Guethle School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Saline Township. Presumably a personal name. (Guth (letter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hager Spring
Description:A spring on the farm which was first settled in 1822 by the Hager family who came from North Carolina. The school and church built on land donated by the family took their name from the spring. It is in the southern part of Salem Township. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hager Spring Church
Description:A rural church in the southern part of Salem Township, named from Hager Spring. Cf. above. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hager Spring School
Description:See Hager Spring School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hall's Mill
Description:See Neeslein's Mill
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hepzibah Church
Description:A rural Baptist church which was first organized as the Saline Creek Baptist Church in 1813 by a group from the Bethel Church (in Cape Girardeau County). It was so named from its location on Saline Creek in the northern part of the county. In 1816 the church was moved south several miles into the community of The Barrens and the church was known as the Barrens Church. Soon afterward the church name was changed to Hepzibah, a misspelling of Hephzibah. Hephzibah, a Hebrew word meaning "my delight is in her," was the name of the queen of Hezekiah, mother of Manasseh (2 Kings 21.1) and has come to symbolize restored Jerusalem, on account of its use in Isaiah 62:4: "Thou shalt be called Hephzibah...for the Lord delighteth in thee." Cf. the similar origin proposed for the puzzling name of Hepsaida Church in Dent County. (Miss O'Brien's thesis) and Hepsidam School in Johnson County (Miss Johnson's thesis, 284). (Douglass I 201)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Herrington Cave
Description:One of several large caves in Perry County, in the center part of Central Township. Presumably a personal name. (A MODERN EDEN, 7, CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Highland
Description:See Highland School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Highland Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in Cinque Hommes Township, near Highland, and flows north into Central Township, to join Cinque Hommes Creek southeast of Perryville. Its name, like that of Highland, is topographical.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Highland School
Description:A rural school in the north-central part of Cinque Hommes Township. A post office was maintained here from 1891-1904, but now there is only the school and the church to mark the center of the community, although the place still appears on the Highway Map. The name is descriptive. (Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hoff School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Bois Brule Township, named for John Hof (or Hoff), who was born in Hesse Dormstadt, Germany in 1837. He served with the English army in the Crimean War, came to the United States and served in the Black Hawk War, in 1859 came to Perry County, engaged in the Civil War, was made a second lieutenant, and finally settled on a farm in Perry County in 1866. He was a school director. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hoffman School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Cinque Hommes Township, named for Peter Hoffman, who farmed the old homestead purchased by his father John in 1844 when he came here from Baden, Germany. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holschen Landing
Description:A ferry landing on the Mississippi River in the eastern part of Brazeau Township. A post office was maintained from 1892-1899 and named for Frederick Holschen, postmaster and general store owner. The landing was maintained as late as 1912. (Missouri Gazetteer (1892), Postal Guide, Parker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holy Innocent's Church
Description:See St. Rosa's Church
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holy Rosary Church
Description:The Catholic church of Claryville constituted in 1873, and dedicated by Reverend M. Rubi. The first pastor was Reverend D. Downing. Named by the founders of the rosary. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hooss Cave
Description:A large cave in the center part of Central Township, so named because it is on the farm of Thomas, John, and Louis Hooss, prominent pioneer landowners. (A MODERN EDEN 7, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Horse Island
Description:A small island in the Mississippi River, northwest of Claryville in the northern part of Bois Brule Township. The source of the name has not been ascertained.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Huber Island
Description:A small island in the Mississippi River near Belgique in Bois Brule Township. Presumably a personal name. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hunt School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Central Township, named for Honorable Anton Hunt, once county judge, whose parents came from Baden, Germany, in 1839 and settled on a farm in Perry County. Judge Hunt inherited the farm, and later gave land for the school. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:A small stream, tributary of Apple Creek, in the southern part of Union and Brazeau townships. Named from the Indian village (Shawnee- Deaware) which existed on the site of Uniontown (q.v.). (County Map (1941), Campbell (1873), Conard, Douglass I 481, 520)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Island School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Bois Brule Township; the name doubtless refers to the location of the school on a piece of land which becomes an island during flood seasons. Cf. former study, Hamlett. (Rolla Map (1941)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jordan Branch
Description:A small stream in the western part of St. Mary's Township, doubtless named for the landowner.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Killian School
Description:A rural school in the center part of Central Township, named for John Killian whose father George came to Perry County in 1822 from North Carolina and died during the Civil War. John bought a farm in this community in 1851. Killiam Switch is the community's name on the Frisco Railroad. (Goodspeed, CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Killian Switch
Description:See Killian School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kimmel's Mill
Description:See Duggin's Mill
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:King's Highway
Description:A puiblic road established in 1789 following an old Indian trail through New Madrid County northward through Cape Girardeau and Perry Counties and on to St. Louis. It was designated as the public road and named El Camino Real, the King's Highway, by Colonel George Morgan, who planned New Madrid (for which see former study by this writer), in honor of King Charles IV, King of Spain 1788-1808. The French called the road Le Chemin du Roi. U.S. Highway 61 follows the general course of the old highway and the D.A.R. have erected suitable markers along the trail. (Houck II 150-154)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knob School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Saline Township. Presumably a topographical name.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Koch Cave
Description:A large cave in the center part of Central Township, so named because it is located on the farm of George Koch. (A MODERN EDEN 7)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lady of Victory Church
Description:The Catholic church of Sereno, in the western part of Bois Brule Township. Sereno was served as a mission from Lithium from 1900 until 1915 when a separate church was organized with Reverend William Roche as pastor. The church was named Lady of Victory, honoring the Virgin Mary. (Perry CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Landing Seventy-six
Description:See Seventysix
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Layton School
Description:A rural school in the center part of Saint Mary's Township, named for the Layton family. John B. Layton and four brothers came to Perry County from England in 1808. One descendant, Major Felix Layton (1831- ), served in the Civil War and then returned to his farm. By 1888 there were 200 Layton descendsnts in the county. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Le Chemin du Roi
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Le Grand Village Sauvage
Description:A large Indian village of the Shawnee and Delaware tribes who came from their homes on the Ohio in 1793. In this village once lived the sister of Tecumseh, who became the wife of Francois Maisonville, an early settler of New Madrid. Uniontown (q.v.) is now located on the site of this village. (Conard V 92, CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:L'hote Mill
Description:A mill near Schindler's Spring on Cinque Hommes Crreek, in the southern part of Central Township. This is a personal name. There was a L'hote & Muench dry goods store in Perryville in 1895, and Leon L'hote was clerk of the circuit court in 1909-1910. (CENTENNIAL HIST., A MODERN EDEN opposite p. 33, Missouri Blue Book)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Linhoff's Landing
Description:A ferry landing on the Misissippi River, in the eastern part of Salem Township, maintained in 1873. It was named for F.W. Linhuff, a farmer, merchant, and ferryman who settled here in 1854. The spelling Linhoff is douibtless a map maker's error. (Campbell (1854)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lithium
Description:A small town in the eastern part of Saline Township. It was surveyed and laid out as a town in 1822 by C.F. Laurence. The first settlers were Dr. Henry Clay Tish, R.P. Dobbs, and James G. Christian, who came from Illinois and settled at this place where they found two springs of mineral water known as lithium, because containing one of the lithium salts. The town grew rapidly because of the springs and was incorporated in 1883. (Douglass I 383, A MODERN EDEN)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lithium Springs
Description:Two large springs located in the northern part of the county in the present town of Lithium (q.v.). One of the springs is owned by the town; the other by Mrs. Richard P. Dobbs, wife of one of the first settlers. (Douglass I 520)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Longtown
Description:A village in the north-central part of Cinque Hommes Township, laid out in 1860 and incorporated in 1874. The first residents who came in 1821 were John Long, Emil Urban, Herman Funke, Valentine Bergmann, Frederick Schade, and Oliver Abernathy. It was named for John Long. (Douglass I 383, 271, Eaton, A MODERN EDEN, CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lost Mine, The
Description:According to tradition the Indians had located a silver mine, possibly in the southern part of Bois Brule Township, near the Allen's Landing Road. James McCauley found a cave which he believed to be the lost mine, but no silver was ever discovered, and the tradition of the lost mine continues. (A MODERN EDEN 34)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lukefahr School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Cinque Hommes Township. Presumably a personal name. It is a common surname in the county. T.J. Lukefahr was a farmer near Millheim in 1889. (County Atlas (1915)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Luther College
Description:See Concordia Seminary
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Madansburgh
Description:A town fifteen miles south of Ste. Genevieve near Saline Creek where extensive salt works provided salt for the interior, particularly St. Michaels in Madison County. The exact location of the place is not known. Wetmore (1837) and Beck (1823) are the only authorities who mention the place, and they spell the name as Madansburgh or Madensburgh. This settlement is probably connected with Thomas Maddin, of whom we are informed in the HIST. OF SOUTHEAST MISSOURI (p. 254): "A settlement was made in what is now Saline Township... Among the first settlers were...Thomas Maddin, an early resident of Ste. Genevieve, and a man of great wealth...He was deputy surveyor under Soulard; and owned a mill on the River Aux Vases." (Wetmore, Beck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Manning Cave
Description:A well-known cave in Perry County, on the farm of Leo Manning for whom it was named. (CENTENNIAL HIST., Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mattingly School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Saline Township, named for the Mattingly family. Matt Mattingly is a member of the board of education now; William Mattingly was one of the founders of Sereno, and Mueller and Mattingly were proprietors of a general store in Wittenberg in 1895; Phillips and Mattingly were merchants of the county in 1854-1855. (A MODERN EDEN, adv. between pp. 32-33, County School Supt. (1854-1855), Letter from G.B. Huber)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:May School
Description:A rural school in the western part of St. Mary's Township; the name is doubtless that of a prominent landowner.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McBride
Description:A post office and station on the Frisco Railroad, in the center part of Bois Brule Township, and named for the McBride family, prominent landowners. Stephen McBride (1802-1847), came to the county in 1837. His son, John C. had twelve children, all of whom were prominent in the community. (Goodspeed, Oscar J. Buerck (letter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McClannahan Creek
Description:A tributary of Cinque Hommes Creek in the northern part of Central Township. So named because in 1796 John W. McClannahan, a native of Virginia, established a claim near this creek, and in 1797 built a mill there. The stream was first called Mill Creek, from the famous mill, but later took the name of the man who operated the mill and owned the land. (CENTENNIAL HIST., Houck I 381)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McClannahan Mill
Description:A well-known mill built in 1797 in what is now the northern part of Central Township, and named for its owner John W. McClannahan, a native of Virginia. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mecker Cave
Description:A large cave in the center part of Central Township. Presumably a personal name.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Menfro
Description:A village in the northern part of Salem Township. A post office was established in 1908. It is said to have been named by St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad officials in 1904 "for the three dead men who were killed on the river, who were bringing in supplies for the railroad." (Douglass I 303, letter from Oscar J. Buerck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mertz Cave
Description:A large cave in the center part of Central Township. Presumably a personal name. (A MODERN EDEN 7, CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miles School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Central Township, doubtless named for a prominent landowner. (County Superintendent of Schools, School Report)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Creek
Description:See McClannahan Creek
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Millheim
Description:A small village in the southern part of Cinque Hommes Township, on Apple Creek. There was a well-known mill here, built as early as 1856 by Rudolph Conrad and Mike Eddleman; a post office was established in 1891. According to the Perry County HIST., the name was conferred for the mill, with the significance of "mill home." More likely the name was borrowed from one of the numerous Mulheims in Germany--either the city on the Rhine opposite Cologne, or the one in the Ruhr--and may have been one of the German names brought by the "Saxon Migration," for which see under Altenburg. The Americanized spelling and the popular etymology was doubtless an afterthought. (CENTENNIAL HIST. PERRY (1927)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moore Springs Cave
Description:A cave in the center part of Central Township, so named because it is on the farm of Thomas F. Moore. (A MODERN EDEN 7, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moranville School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Central Township. Named for Jerome Moranville, who was a prominent farmer in this community. Jerome's father John B. (1790-1852), came to America from France in 1804. He settled first in Maryland, and came to Perry County about 1820. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morey School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Bois Brule Township, named for Anson H. Morey whose father Anson came to Missouri from Ohio in 1839. Anson H. was a farmer and the principal mover in organizing the school district where he served as director and clerk. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Muddy Branch
Description:A small branch of Saline Creek in the western part of Central Township, so named because of the muddiness of the water. (CENTENNIAL HIST., Lowe)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nations Creek
Description:A small stream rising in the southern part of St. Mary's Township, flowing north and emptying into the South Fork of Saline Creek near Selver Lake in St. Mary's Township. It was named for Gilbert Nations, who was born in Perry County in 1866. His father, James W. was a Civil War veteran. (Douglass I 571-572)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nations School
Description:A rural school in the western part of St. Mary's Township, on Nations Creek (q.v.) from which it is named. (County Map (1941)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nesslein's Mill
Description:A mill on Cinque Hommes Creek, the exact location of which has not been ascertained. It was first known as Hall's Mill. Both names are presumably those of its proprietors. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Frame School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Biehle Township. A descriptive name.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nieder-Frohna
Description:See Frohna; also Altenburg
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of St. Mary's Township, named from its location in a grove of oak trees. (County Map (1941)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Obrazo River
Description:See Brazeau Creek
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Burnt Mill
Description:See Burnt Mill
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Omete Creek
Description:A small stream in the eastern part of Salem Township, which empties into the Mississippi River near Red Rock Landing. The Perry County HIST. writes the name "O'Mete River," probably under the impression that it is an Irish name; but it is Omete Creek on the Highway Map. Doubtless, like "Obrazo" for Brazeau Creek (q.v.), it is an Ameicanized form of "Au Mette," taken from an old French family name. A Joseph Mette (or Mettes) is mentioned in a 1791 list as an inhabitant of New Madrid. Houck says he came there from Vincennes. (Highway Map, CENTENNIAL HIST. OF PERRY COUNY, Houck SPANISH REGIME, I 328, 330)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Owl Creek
Description:A small stream in the northeastern part of Brazeau Township, named by the pioneer hunters for the owls who inhabited the trees along the creek. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Paitzdorf
Description:See Uniontown; also Altenburg
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Patton Creek
Description:A small creek in the southeastern part of Brazeau Township, which empties into the Mississippi River about two miles south of Wittenberg. The source of the name has not been ascertained. Doubtless named for a landowner.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perks
Description:See Barks
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perry
Description:Listed in Wetmore in 1837 as one of the only two post offices in the county, the other being Perryville. It may be the same as Port Perry (q.v.). Doubtless named for the county. (Wetmore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perry County
Description:Created by a law passed on November 16, 1820, the last county constituted before the admission of Missouri to the Union. The territory was originally a part of the Ste. Genevieve district. Boundaries were designated thus: on the southeast by the Birmingham Hills, on the south by the brakes of Apple Creek, on the southwest by Whitewater River and Saline Creek, on the west by the Saline Hills. The Mississippi River forms the east and northern boundaries, with Ste. Genevieve and St. Francois on the northwest, Madison County on the west, Bollinger and Cape Girardeau counties on the south. The County court was organized May 21, 1821 in the home of Bede Moore by Lewis Cissell, D.L. Caldwell, and Samuel Anderson. The county was divided into three townships: Brazeau, the southern part between Apple Creek and Cinque Hommes Creek; Bois Brule, the northeastern part; and Cinque Hommes, the rest of the territory. Commissioners were appointed to locate a seat of justice, but no move was made toward the erection of a courthouse until 1825. For the "Saxon Migration" of 1839, which was largely responsible for the settlement of the county, see under Altenburg. The county was named for Captain Oliver Hazard Perry (1785-1819), a great naval hero of the War of 1812. Perry took charge of the construction of a fleet with which the Americans hoped to wrest from the British the control of Lake Erie. By 1813 a squadron of nine vessels had been built and manned. Perry won the battle of Lake Erie September 19, 1813, and sent to Gen Harrison the famous laconic message: "We have met the enemy and they are ours..." "So," says a Perry county historian "when the founders of our county looked for a name, they unanimously chose that of the great naval hero," who had just passed away. Nine counties in other states bear the name Perry, and there are twenty towns so named, including one in Ralls County, Missouri. (Conard, Douglass I 169, 170, CENTENNIAL HIST. OF PERRY COUNTY MISSOURI, Houck III 268)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perryville
Description:The county seat, located in the center part of Central Township. The first settlement was made here between the forks of the Saline and Cinque Hommes creeks in 1801 by Isadore Moore. The town site was selected in 1822 by Robert T. Brown, Joseph Tucker, and Thomas Riney, who had been appointed to select the seat of justice for Perry County. The land was surveyed and the town platted by William McLane in 1822 on land belonging to Bernard Layton. The first incorporation, made in 1831, lapsed and was not renewed until 1856. The Lutheran Church was organized in 1867 by Reverend Mr. Besel. The name was obviously borrowed from that of the county (q.v.). There are seven other Perryvilles and five Perrysvilles in other states. (A MODERN EDEN 14, Houck I 383, Douglass I 481, R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perryville Junction
Description:The railroad station on the Frisco Railroad in the northern part of Saline Township, serving the inland Perryville (q.v.) in Central Township.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Grove Church
Description:A Baptist church organized in 1839-1840. A descriptive name. (Douglass I 468, HIST. OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS 86, CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pointrest
Description:A post office and small village n the Mississippi River in the eastern part of Bois Brule Township. A post office was established in 1892. The name was written Point Rest until 1895. Obviously an ideal name. The "point" is a rocky ledge or point sticking out ino the Mississippi River. (Postal Guide, Oscar J. Buerck (letter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Port Perry
Description:A ferry landing on the Mississippi River in the eastern part of Bois Brule Township. A post office was maintained here from 1854 to 1867, and Joseph T. Clark was postmaster. It may have been the same as the earlier post office Perry (q.v.), listed by Wetmore in 1837. The name was doubtless given by the river boatmen to designate the one boat landing in the county at that time. (Wetmore, Goodwin)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie Spring Creek
Description:A tributary of Apple Creek. Thomas Fenwick received a grant of land here in 1797. Doubtless the stream was named from the natural surroundings. (Houck I 387)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pratte's
Description:A ferry landing in the northern part of Saline Township, named for Joseph Pratte, who kept the ferry from 1826-1847. Later the son, Bernard Pratte, operated the ferry. Known also as Pratte's Landing, but the shorter form is used as early as 1837 by Wetmore. This was an important landing used for the lead mined at Mine La Motte in Madison County. The road leading from Pratte's to Mine La Motte was well marked. (Schoaf, Wetmore, Featherstonbaugh 47)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pratte's Landing
Description:See Pratte's
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Putzdorf
Description:See Uniontown
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Raizon
Description:A post office maintained from 1899-1904, in the western part of Bois Brule Township. Nothing could be ascertained about the source of the name, which is possibly personal. (Postal Guide, Parker (1912)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Red Rock Landing
Description:A landing on the Mississippi River, in the northern part of Salem Township. A descriptive name. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ridge
Description:See Ridge School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Brazeau Township. A post office named Ridge was maintained here from 1898-1902, but now there is only the school and community. The name is descriptive of the topography. (Postal Guide, County Map (1941)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Springs School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Salem Township. Doubtless descriptive of the topography.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Valley School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Central Township. Doubtless descriptive of the topography.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rozier's Landing
Description:A landing on the Mississippi River in the northern part of Saline Township, probably named for Ferdinand Rozier, a merchant of St. Marys in Ste. Genevieve County, in 1854-1855. (1854) (Campbell (1873)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Saint Mary's Township
Description:In the southwestern part of the county, organized between 1850 and 1860 and doubtless given this name by the Catholic members of the community who worshipped at St. Mary's-of-the-Barrens Church. (U.S. Census Reports (1850-1930)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem Township
Description:In the eastern part of the county, organized between 1870-1890. Salem is a common name for churches and towns. Cf. Salem, Missouri, in Dent County. (U.S. Census Reports (1850-1930)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Saline Creek Baptist Church
Description:See Hepzibah Church
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Saline Township
Description:A township in the northwestern part of the county, organized between 1850-1860 and named for Saline Creek (q.v.), which flows through the township. (U.S. Census Report 1850, 1860-1930)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sandy Island
Description:A small island in the Mississippi River, off Brazeau Township, doubtless named from the sandy soil. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schalls
Description:See Schalls School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schalls School
Description:A rural school in the north-central part of Union Township. A post office was maintained from 1886-1910, but now nothing remains but the school and community. Named for Maritz Schall, a pioneer stock dealer and farmer. (Postal Guide, Eaton, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schindler's Spring
Description:A spring near Cinque Hommes Creek in the southern part of Central Township. A large number of Schindlers including Raymond, Joseph, Clement, and Anthony Schindler are landowners in this county. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schnurbusch
Description:A small community in Union Township, near the southern border of the county, about two miles west of Old Appleton. It appears on the Highway Map. Named for Joseph W. Schnurbusch, for whom see Schnurbusch School. (Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schumer Springs
Description:A village in the southern part of Cinque Hommes Township. It centers about a mineral spring or springs, and has become a health resort. A post office was established there in 1908. Presumably named for the proprietor of the spring. Henry J. Schumer, a farmer, lived at the nearby Biehle, and Frank P. Schuemer, a miller, was a resident of te adjoining town of Millheim in 1873. (Douglass I 520, County Atlas (1915)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scnurbusch School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Union Township, named for Joseph W. Schnurbusch, public spirited man who erected the nearby building for St. Joseph's Church (q.v.) at his own expense in 1828. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seelitz
Description:A short-lived settlement near Altenburg (q.v.), one of the seven established in 1839 in the "Saxon Migration." For the circumstances of its founding and the source of the name, see the discussion under Altenburg. It is spelled Selitz by Polack. (Douglass I 479, W.G. Polack FATHERS AND FOUNDERS (1938) 28) (Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sereno
Description:A small village in the western part of Bois Brule Township. A post office was maintained from 1889-1904. of the building and naming of the village Mr. G.B. Huber, now clerk of the Sereno School district writes: "About 1884 Thomas Moore owned a large tract of land about five miles north of Perryville, on what was then known as the Chester road, leading from Perryville to Chester, Illinois. Mr. Moore gave a small tract of his land to William Mattingly for the purpose of building a general store...which was followed immediately by a grist mill built by a man named Gregory Kline. They proceeded to name the village and decided it shoud be Serena, meaning a clean, respectable place. However, they found there was a place by that name in the state, so they changed the name to Sereno...The store stood until two years ago (letter in 1944), and the mill was razed in 1910...John Zoeller had the first blacksmith shop...about 1908 the community which was predominately Catholic decided to build a church which is now the pride of the community." By the explanation "Serena, meaning a clean, respectable place" we infer that Mr. Huber means this is a laudatory name indicating serenity, possibly influenced by the familiar Catholic epithet applied to the Virgin, like La Serena, capital of the province of Coquimbo, Chile. The church to which Mr. Huber refers was named Lady of Victory Curch (q.v.). (Postal Guide, Huber, R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seventysix
Description:A village and river landing in the northeastern part of Brazeau Township on the banks of the Mississippi River. A post office was established here in 1886. Three stories are told concerning the naming of the landing, which was known as Landing Seventy-six. According to one version: "In 1844 there was a great flood. The steamboat captain who had been sent to rescue the people reported that he made seventy-six landings. They also said prior to 1879 various men tried to keep the ferry landing and no one stayed long enough to give it a name, so the old steamboat captain's report was retained in "Landing Seventy-six." Another theory also concerns a steamboat captain (whether the same one or not legend does not reveal), "who had quit swearing and had acquired the habit of exclaiming, 'That beats all 76,' when he was vexed. He used the expression so often at that landing the steamboat men had got in the habit of calling it Seventy-six." Still another theory persists, and it is the most logical one, that the Government River Commision numbered the river landings and this was No. 76 from the head of the navigable waters. (E.M. Lottes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shawnee Hills
Description:A ridge broken by the Mississippi River at Grand Tower; it extends through Illinois, crosses the Ohio River into Kentucky, and gradually fades away. It received its name from the early explorers of Illinois and Missouri, who found the Shawnee Indians living among the hills. (Douglass I, IX)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelby Cave
Description:See Big Springs Cave
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Silver Lake
Description:A small lake in the western part of the county. It is so named from its crystal clear water, although there is a legend that an attempt was made to locate a silver mine near the lake. Cf. the Lost Mine, above. Lead was mined here in 1883 and some silver was found, though not in paying quantities. (Douglass I 520, A MODERN EDEN 40, Perry Centennial Pamphlet)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Silver Lake
Description:A village in the eastern part of St. Mary's Township, near Silver Lake (q.v.) from which it is named. A post office was established in 1876. The post office name was written Silver Lake (1876-1895; Silverlake 1896-1910; and Silver Lake since 1910). The change was doubtless suggested by postal authorities, who prefer single names, but custom triumphed over law and the two words are used. (Postal Guide, A MODERN EDEN, CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sim Layton School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of St. Mary's Township, named for Sim Layton, landowner and member of the prominent pioneer family for whom the Layton School (q.v.) was named. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Fork of Apple Creek
Description:The southern branch or fork of Apple Creek in the southern part of St. Mary's Township, so named because it is a fork of Apple Creek south of the main stream.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Fork of Saline Creek
Description:A branch of Saline Creek (q.v.) which rises in St. Mary's Township, flows northeast through Central Township and joins Saline Creek near Brewer; named from its location south of the creek. (County Map 1941)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Boniface Church
Description:A German Catholic church established in Perryville in 1868 by Reverend Henry Grall. St. Boniface, known as the "Apostle of Germany," was a celebrated English missionary whose original name was Winfrid or Winfrith. He died in 755 after laboring for forty years in the conversion of the Frisian and German tribes. (Douglass I 451, Perry CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Cosme Creek
Description:See Cinque Hommes Creek
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Cosme Hill
Description:A large hill at the mouth of Cinque Hommes Creek (q.v.) in the eastern part of Salem Township. The hill has retained the original name St. Cosme, but the creek's name has been corrupted to Cinque Hommes. Cf. Cape Cinque Hommes. (Cath H. R. III 300- 308)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph's Church
Description:The Catholic church of Uniontown. Cf. above. (Douglass I 451)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph's Church
Description:The Catholic church established at Apple Creek in the southern part of Union Township by Joseph W. Schnurbusch in 1828 and named for his patron saint, husband of the Virgin Mary. The building was erected at Mrs. Schnurbusch's expense. Father Idiu was the first pastor. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Laurents Creek
Description:A small creek in the northwest part of Saline Township, forming part of the northern boundary of Perry County, which empties into the Mississippi River, in the extreme northern part of the county. St. Laurent had a tanyard on the Saline nearby. Cf. Miss Zimmer's thesis for the name in Ste. Genevieve County. (Houck I 38)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Lora River
Description:A small stream flowing into the Mississippi River at the head of Bois Brule Bottoms in what is now Bois Brule Township, mentioned by Beck in 1823 and Wetmore in 1837. For the source of the name cf. Miss Zimmer's thesis.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis San Francisco Railroad
Description:Thomas Hart Benton proposed a railroad from St. Louis to San Francisco in the second St. Louis Railroad Convention in 1849. The early history of the road is the same as that of the Missouri Pacific (q.v.). In 1856 the Southwest Branch was chartered, and in 1860 the line extended from Pacific to Rolla. In 1876 the St. Louis San Francisco Railroad Company was organized and took over the property of the Atlantic and Pacific Company. The name indicated the proposed destination, which has never been reached. In 1901 the company purchased the Kansas City, Fort Scott and Memphis line. In 1902 the line was finished from St. Louis to Memphis, Tennessee, through this section of the state. In these two counties the property and part of the constructed road was purchased from Louis Houck. (MISSOURI & MISSOURIAN I 756-66, Barns 616, 673)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Marys Seminary
Description:See St. Mary's-of-the-Barrens in Perryville. (Douglass I 270)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Mary's-of-the-Barrens
Description:The oldest college in Missouri was established in 1818, Bishop Du Bourg went to Rome in 1815 to seek help for his diocese (the La. territory). A group of priests under Fathers Felix de Andreis and Rosati arrived in St. Louis in 1817 as part of Du Bourg's "help." While there they received a delegation representing thirty-five families in what is now The Barrens in Perry County, who begged Bishop Du Bourg to choose their parish as the location for a seminary. They offered 640 acres of land. An investigation was made and in 1818 work was begun on the buildings for the institution which came to be known as St. Mary's-of-the-Barrens. (W.P.A. GUIDE 523, Houck II 320-325, Douglass I 412, 488)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Rosa's Church
Description:The Catholic church of Silver Lake. Just after the Civil War a church was started here under the direction of Fr. W.V. Moore. The church was completed in 1878. Originally it was designed as Holy Innocents' Church, honoring the martyrdom of the children who were slain at the dictates of Herod, but later the church was placed under the patronage of St. Rosa of Lima, Peru (1586-1617) whose feast-day is August 30. (PERRY CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Theresa's Church
Description:The Catholic church of Lithium in the eastern part of Saline Township, founded and organized by Reverend P. Lyons in 1904 and placed under the patronage of St. Theresa (1515-1582), the famous Spanish saint and mystic. Father George J. Hildner was the first pastor. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Starland
Description:A community in the northern part of Brazeau Township, on the Mississippi River. No explanation for the name can be learned. (Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stephan's College
Description:The name which, by an ill-supported charge, Pastor Martin Stephan is alleged to have planned to call his university. The projected school finally materialized as Concordia Seminary (q.v.).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stephan's Landing
Description:The name attached for a few brief weeks to the landing place on the Mississippi River used by the Saxon colony led there by Pastor Martin Stephan. After his downfall it became known as Wittenberg (q.v.). See under Altenburg.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stephansburg
Description:The city which Pastor Martin Stephan is said to have planned before his downfall. It may have been the same as the settlement later called Dresden. See under Altenburg.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Streile Branch
Description:A branch of McClannahan Creek in the southern part of Bois Brule Township. No explanation of the name can be offered.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stutterer Island
Description:A small island in the Mississippi River, off Bois Brule Township. Frank X. Sutterer is named as proprietor in the County Atlas of 1915. (CENTENNIAL HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Swan School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Salem Township, named for Richard Swann whose father came from North Carolina. Mr. Swann owned a large farm here and was the father of seventeen children. The name was originally spelled Swann. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Swann School
Description:See Swan School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thompson School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Saline Township. Presumably a personal name.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trickey School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Union Township. The source of the name has not been ascertained.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trinity Lutheran Church
Description:One of the two Lutheran churches of Altenburg built in 1867, replacing an older building now used as a school. This is a common church name honoring The Trinity. (W.P.A. Guide 524)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tucker School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Saline Township. Cf. below.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tucker's Mill
Description:See Bishop's Mill
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tucker's Settlement
Description:One of the original settlements of the county in the eastern part of Saline Township, named for a prominent pioneer family. Two Tucker families arrived in Perry County at the same time. Joseph T. and his nine sons, James, Nicholas, William, Francis, John, Peter, Thomas, Joseph, and Michael settled in the western part of the county and were known as the "Long Tuckers." The other family, much shorter in stature, settled in the southern part of the county and were known as the "Short Tuckers." This settlement mentioned by Father Nerinckx of St. Louis in 1809 was that of the "Long Tuckers," who were devout Catholics. In 1809 it consisted of about sixty families. Now only a rural school remains to remind us of the famous pioneers. (Conard, Douglass, CENTENNIAL HIST., Cath. H.R. 159)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Twin Springs
Description:Nine miles west of Perryville on the Perryville and Cedar Fork road. A descriptive name.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tyler Branch
Description:A small branch of Highland Creek in the center part of Cinque Hommes Township. Presumably a personal name.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:U.S. Highway 61
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Brazeau Township. An ideal name.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Township
Description:In the southern part of the county; organized between 1870-1890. The name was doubtless influenced by Uniontown (q.v.). (U.S. Census Reports 1870-1930)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Uniontown
Description:A small village in the south-central part of Union Township, on the site of the old Indian settlement known as "Le Grand Village Sauvage" (q.v.) by the French. The Shawnees were removed from the county shortly after the defeat and death of their chieftain Tecumseh in 1813. The first white settlement here was made in 1839 by a group of German Lutherans who were a part of the "Saxon Migration," for which see under Altenburg. This group, the last to arrive of the Saxons in Perry County, were led by Pastor Theodor Carl Friedrich Grueber, from the parish of Paitzdorf in Saxe-Altenburg; and they named their new settlement Paitzdorf after their German home. Since the tract of land bought in Brazeau Township by the Saxons was already occupied, the late-comers had to settle eight miles west of Altenburg.The original name Paitzdorf was retained at least till 1866, when it is mentioned as still in existence by Koestering. Being so distant from the other Saxon settlements, however, it was exposed to early amalgamation with the native Americans; and this gradual process of fusion was doubtless symbolized by the change to the ideal name of Uniontown, which probably took place at about the same time as the formation of the new Union Township (q.v.) in or shortly after 1870. (Douglass I 479, A MODERN EDEN 39, J.F. Koetering, AUSWANDERUNG DER ACHSISCHEN LUTHERANER IM JAHRE 1838, 34)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wagner's Landing
Description:A ferry landing on the Misissippi River in the eastern part of Bois Brule Township in 1912. Presumably named for a proprietor. (Parker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilhelm School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Cinque Hommes Township, named for a prominent man in the community who gave the land for the school. (Letter from Mrs. W. Rickardet)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilkinson's Mill
Description:A mill on Apple Creek in the southern part of Union Township, built by John Logan, and named for John Wilkinson who purchased the mill from Logan before 1854. (Hope (1854-1855)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wittenberg
Description:A small river port in the southern part of Brazeau Township, at the mouth of Brazeau Creek on the Missisippi River, just opposite Grand Tower and a little above the rock formation known a the "Devil's Bakeoven" on the Illinois side. The village was not incorporated and provided with a post office till 1867. For the circumstances of its founding in 1839 by the Saxon immigrants, and the origin of its name, see under Altenburg. (Douglass I 520, A MODERN EDEN 5, LIFE OF BRECKENRIDGE X 206)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wittenberg Road
Description:An old road which runs for about twenty-five miles from Wittenberg, for which it is named, over high ground about one mile south of Brazeau Creek to Perryville. See under Altenburg.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Yorke Chapel
Description:A Methodist church about five miles from Perryville in the southern part of Central Township. It was established in 1826 in the Abernathy Settlement (q.v.). It is the oldest church of the denomination in the county. The source of the name has not been ascertained. (CENTENNIAL HIST., Douglass I 452, "Evangelical Lutheran Church")
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Yount
Description:A post office and community in the southern part of Saint Mary's Township, established in 1866 as Yount's Store, and named for Henry Yount, merchant and storekeeper, also postmaster and county judge. The name was shortened to Yount in 1888. (Eaton, Postal Guide, A MODERN EDEN 37)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Yount's Store
Description:See Yount
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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