Pemiscot County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Acorn Corner School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Little Prairie Township, named from the oak trees, often called acorn trees from their fruit, and the location at the corner where two roads meet. (Miller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atlantic and Pacific Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Austinville
Description:A store and community in the northwestern part of Little Prairie Township at the crossroads of Highway 61 and the gravel road from Caruthersville to Braggadocio. It was named in 1933 for the Austin families who live in that community. (Chilton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bakersville
Description:A small town in the northern part of Braggadocio Township, established in 1930 when the land in this section passed into the hands of the Missouri State Life Insurance Company. The first name, Hillsman Taylor, was given in honor of the president of the company, Hillsman Taylor. The name was changed to Bakersville in 1935 when the Insurance Company, having become the General American Life Insurance Company, placed a Mr. Baker in charge of the farm interests there. (Chilton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Battleground
Description:A pioneer name applied to a wilderness region near Steele where a small battle or skirmish of the Civil War occurred. The name was common until about 1908. (Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beasley Grove
Description:See Beasley Grove School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beasley Grove School
Description:The negro school in the town of Steele, named for Beasley Grove, an addition of the town, which was named for Tom Beasley, an early settler. (Miller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Lake [1 of 2]
Description:One of the largest lakes of the county. There are two Big Lakes; the larger one was also called Pemiscot Lake (q.v.) and has now been drained. The other is between the levee and the Mississippi River in Gayoso Township and is the largest lake in the county at this time. (County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Lake [2 of 2]
Description:See Pemiscot Lake
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Island
Description:A community near Fourteen Bend (q.v.) which is one of the oldest farming sections in the county. It is designated Island because during floods the waters of Robinson's Lake and Bayou (q.v.) unite with the Mississippi River to surround it. The term "Black" is descriptive of the soil which is very fertile. (Chilton, McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Island Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in 1934 in the community known as Black Island (cf. above), for which it was named. (Minutes of the New Madrid Baptist Assn.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blazer
Description:A logging switch on the Deering Southwestern Railroad in the northwest part of Little Prairie Township. It was named for J.M. Blazer, manager of the lumber company operating in and around Deering. (Gotcher)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bracy
Description:See Wardell
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bragg City
Description:A small town in the western part of Pascola Township. The settlement was called Owl City when the Kennett to Caruthersville Railroad was built in 1894. The name is said to have been suggested by the workers on the railroad because of the hooting of the owls in this wooded section. The name was changed to Clayroot, from Clayroot Island (q.v.), when the post office was established in 1915. In 1916 the local name was changed to Melson, in honor of Edmund P. Melson, president of the Missouri State Life Insurance Company; but the post office continued under the name Clayroot until 1918 when the town became Bragg City. Bragg City was named for W.G. Bragg of Kennett in Dunklin County, Missouri, who owns large tracts of land in this region. (Gotcher, Warren, P.G. McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Braggadocio
Description:A small unincorporated village in the eastern part of Braggadocio Township. The first settlement is said to have been made in 1847. It was a flourishing village in 1865 and has had a post office since 1886. Three theories about the origin of the name are held in the vicinity. One is that the first settler was a man named Bragg who combined his name with that of his wife, Docio, and so named the settlement. The second theory is similar: a man of this settlement was continually bragging about his wife Docio--about her beauty, wit, and merit, so that people mockingly named the place for the man who was always "bragging on Docio." The third theory is that the early settlers were such boastful people that this name grew up as descriptive of the settlers. The first two of these theories are of the familiar type known as "aetiological" or "ex post facto" explanations and may be safely disregarded, though they are widely repeated. the third is more plausible. Mocking names of this type are fairly common in Missouri; Cf. Gasconade, said to have received its name for precisely the same reason. (Long, McFarland, Darnell, Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Braggadocio Township
Description:In the western part of the county; one of the original townships. It was reduced in size by the organization of Pascola Township in 1900. Named for the principal town within its limits. (Campbell, County Court Records)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brent
Description:A discontinued flagstop on the Frisco Railroad in the western part of Godair Township, which was named for an early settler who had a sawmill there. (Gotcher)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Butler Township
Description:In the northeastern part of the county; one of the original townships formed 1851-1873, and named for F.C. Butler, justice of the peace of New Madrid in 1851. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cagle Lake
Description:See Franklin Lake
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cain School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Cooter Township, organized in 1932 and named for the man who donated the land. (Miller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canady
Description:A community and flag station on the Frisco Railroad and Highway 61 in the western part of Little Prairie Township. The original name was Canady's Mill because John Canady established a sawmill there in 1899. The name soon became Canady Switch to the railroad officials when this was a log loading station, and finally the name was shortened to Canady when the post office was applied for in 1915. The post office was discontinued in 1928, the mail being since routed from Caruthersville. A humorous but mistaken local explanation derives the name from a mispronunciation of Canada. Both Canady and Canady Switch are commonly known and used to apply to this place. (Wilks, P.G.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canady Switch
Description:See Canady
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canady's Mill
Description:See Canady
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carleton
Description:See Schult
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caruthersville
Description:The largest town and the county seat, located on the Mississippi River in the northeastern part of Little Prairie Township. The first settlement was La Petite Prairie, named doubtless, from its size, by the French traders who came from New Madrid under the leadership of Francois and Joseph LeSieur in 1794 and who knew East Prairie, Long Prairie, and Big Prairie. The name was Americanized to Little Prairie some time between 1794 and 1811. The village was almost destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811- 1812 and the place came to be known as Lost Village. Caruthersville was laid out a few miles north of the old village of Little Prairie in 1857 by J.H. Walker and G.W. Bushley, and was named by Walker for Hon. Sam Caruthers (1850-1860) of Madison County, who was a lawyer in Fredericktown and Cape Girardeau and was elected to Congress in 1852. (Douglass 282, Goodspeed 477)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cassidy
Description:See Number Eight
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chapel School
Description:A rural school in the neighborhood of Marvin and Pierce's Chapel (q.v.) and named from them. (Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chute Eighteen
Description:A small community with a rural school in the western part of Pemiscot Township on the Mississippi River; named for the river formation as was Chute Sixteen. (q.v.) (Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chute Eighteen School
Description:See Chute Eighteen
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chute Sixteen
Description:A small community with a rural school in the southeastern part of Little Prairie Township on the edge of Chute Sixteen of the Mississippi River. Beginning at Number One at Cairo, Illinois, the chutes, islands, bends, and other river formations are numbered consecutively down the river. A community existed here in 1899. (Ross, Pemiscot Democrat 1899)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chute Sixteen School
Description:See Chute Sixteen
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clayroot
Description:See Bragg City
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clayroot Bayou
Description:A bayou in the western part of Pascola Township, which flows into Little River and drains Clayroot Island (q.v.), from which it is named. (Warren)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clayroot Island
Description:An island in the western part of Pascola Township formed during flood seasons when the waters of Elk Chute and Little River surround this region. It was named Clayroot from the fact that the pioneers found large numbers of trees torn up by the roots in this region of black clay. The railroad stop which was known as Owl City was located on a point of this island and was renamed Clayroot when the post office was established in 1916. (Warren)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Community School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Virginia Township to which no name has been given and it is called simply the community school. (Miller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Concord Baptist Church
Description:A rural church in the eastern part of Concord Township, established in 1898 and given this ideal name which was common among the early churches. (Warren)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Concord School
Description:A school and community in the eastern part of Concord Township. Established in 1898 and named from Concord Church (q.v.). (Warren)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Concord Township
Description:In the northeastern part of the county; organized August 24, 1912 at the request of G.R. Henderson et al., including all of Gayoso Township and part of Hayti Township. It was named from the principal settlement within its limits. When Gayoso Township was reestablished in 1925, Concord was reduced to its present size. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coontown
Description:An early sawmill in operation in 1902. Located in the wilderness between Holland and Steele and named by the pioneers for the animal, the coon or raccoon. (Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cooper
Description:See Douglass
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cooper's Lake
Description:In Butler Township; one of the early lakes of the county, which appears on the map of 1873. It was one of the first lakes ordered drained in 1897. The name is from one of the early settlers of the county. (Campbell, County Court Record, Gotcher)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cooter
Description:A town in the west-central part of Cooter Township. The date of the first settlement is unknown, but evidence from a monument in Upper Cooter Cemetery (q.v.) shows that a settlement was made here before 1854. In 1856 this was a flourishing village. It was first settled as a hunting and fishing camp on Pemiscot or Cagle Lake. Among the game shipped were the coots, members of the duck family, and it is from them that the town is said to have received its name. H.E. Doerner, of Steele, disagrees with this theory on the ground that an old map of the county, drawn by George W. Carleton between 1883-1890 gives the spelling Couter. He maintains that the town was named from an old family of that name, or that the township received its name first from the French word "coutre" or "couter" which he says means to cut, indicating that this township was cut from others. The French word couter, however, does not mean to cut but to cost and the significance Mr. Doerner attached to the word is lost. It is true that the township was first spelled Coutre or Couter in the county court records from 1883-1890, and the name of the town was so spelled by Goodspeed in 1888. Portell Coutre, a Frenchman, was a resident of New Madrid in 1795, and it is possible that he moved to this vicinity and the settlement was named for him. In 1924 the post office department changed the name to Coutre to avoid confusion with Cooper in Gentry County, but after a year's trial the spelling Cooter was resumed. (Doerner, Gotcher, Ross, County Court Record, Carleton's Map, Campbell, Goodspeed, Houck II 157)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cooter Township
Description:In the southern part of the county, organized from Pemiscot and Virginia townships February 5, 1883. The original spelling Coutre, with occasional spellings of Couter, was kept until 1890 when it became Cooter. Named from the principal town within its boundaries. (cf. above)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cottonwood Point
Description:A small town in the eastern part of Pemiscot Township on the Mississippi River, which was established as early as 1830 as a ferry landing. A post office was established in 1867 when the town was a flourshing shipping point. It was named from the formation of the land which runs out into the river in a point and from the cottonwood trees growing there. (Gazetteer 1879, Postal Guide, E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coutre
Description:See Cooter
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Covington
Description:An early settlement in Virginia Township on old Pemiscot Bayou. It is sometimes referred to as Upper Cowskin, from its location north of Cowskin (q.v.). When a post office was established in 1886 the name of Covington, for the principal landowners, was given. The post office was discontinued between 1910 and 1915. (Postal Guide, Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cowskin
Description:See Samford
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Criddle's Bridge
Description:See Willowpole Bridge
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crockett School
Description:A school and community in the southwest part of Pemiscot Township, three miles from Tyler. A settlement existed here from early days; in fact, a school was maintained here before one was built at Tyler (q.v.). The school was named for Jim Crockett, a landowner, who donated the land. (Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Culbertson
Description:See Moseley
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cunningham
Description:A stop on the Frisco Railroad in the eastern part of Little River Township, named in 1902 for Frank Cunningham of Caruthersville, one of the original promoters of the railroad in this section. (Barrys)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cushion Lake
Description:A large lake in the northeastern part of Butler Township forming part of the county boundary line between New Madrid and Pemiscot Counties. It is one of the few lakes that remain. Douglass says it was so named because the grassy banks of the lake resembled a cushion, but the fact that it was spelled Cushing and Cushin in the New Madrid Couny Court Records indicates that it was probably named for a family of early settlers and the name changed by the process known as "folk etymology" to Cushion. (Switzler 77-78, Campbell, County Court Records, Douglass I 229)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cypress Lake
Description:In Holland Township; one of the lakes of 1873, supposed by Walker to have been drained from an artificial bayou which the Indians had cut to connect the waters of Big Lake and Cushion Lake. It was named from the cypress trees. (Campbell, Switzler 77-79, McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Darnell School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Godair Township, established in 1922 and named for T.J. Carnell, a landowner in the community. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis School
Description:A school and community in the southern part of Braggadocio Township. The name Shakerag was given by the early settlers of the logging camp, who, when they wanted to go to the corner dancing place, used the expression, "Let's go down to the corner and shake a rag." When the school district was organized in 1912, the name Davis was adopted because Harry Davis, a prominent farmer, donated the land. (Ross, Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deep Slough
Description:A slough in the eastern part of Pemiscot Township, named for its depths. (Gotcher, Houck I 54)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deering
Description:A small village in the central part of Braggadocio Township. It was established in 1902 as a center of the lumber industry of the International Harvesting Company (McCormick and Deering) of Indianapolis, Indiana, and named for Mr. Deering of the company. A post office was established in 1903, and soon afterward the settlement was passed into the hands of the Wisconsin Lumber Company (Doerner, Warren)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deering Southwestern Railroad
Description:A railroad from Deering to Caruthersville, built by the lumber company to ship lumber. It is now a part of the Cottonbelt System. (q.v.).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Delisle
Description:A discontinued flagstop on the Frisco Railroad, which was established as a log loading station for the mill of Alphonse Delisle of Marston, New Madrid County. (Gotcher)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Denton
Description:A settlement centered around a rural school in the southern part of Virginia Township, named for Neil V. Denton, who owns land there. (Ross, Kelly, Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Denton School
Description:See Denton
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dogskin
Description:See Vicksburg
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dogwood Ridge
Description:An old ridge or mound two miles south of Cooter in Cooter Township, about one-fourth mile in length. Originally this was the site of boarding houses for the Number Eight (q.v.) sawmills and was named for the dogwood trees which grew there. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dolphin
Description:A small setlement in the eastern part of Virginia Township made at some time between 1895 and 1900 as a logging camp by the Dolphin Land and Lumber Company of St. Louis on the now abandoned Wheeler-Tyler Railroad. A post office was maintained there in 1907-1908. The name came from the company which had obtained its name in this way: One of the stockholders of the company, a Mr. Lubben, was a steamboat owner whose boats were called Dolphins. He selected the name Dolphin for the company, perhaps because of a fancied resemblance to the fishes so named. (Doerner, Kelly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Douglas
Description:A small community in the western part of Cooter Township, called Oak Ridge, from its location, since 1895 and still so known locally. When a post office was applied for in 1905, the name Oak Ridge was preempted by a town in Cape Girardeau County. The name Cooper from Dr. T.S. Cooper, a prominent landowner, was suggested but rejected because of Cooper in Gentry County. Finally the name Douglas was adopted because of the prominence of another local family. The post office was discontinued in 1921 and the mail routed from Holland. (Mrs. E.E. Hamlett, P.G.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Bayou
Description:A small bayou in the western part of Gayoso Township, which was dry except during flood seasons. (Warren)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Bayou Baptist Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the community of Dry Bayou (cf. above), from which it was named. It was organized in 1887. (Warren, Minutes of New Madrid Baptist Assn.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Bayou Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the community known as Dry Bayou.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Bayou School
Description:A school and community in the western part of Gayoso Township, named from the bayou. (q.v.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Lake
Description:A small lake lying in the old townships of Gayoso and Little Prairie (now Concord and Hayti). It was named from the fact that, being small, it was dry during the summer months. (Campbell, Warren)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duland's Lake
Description:An old lake in the western part of Gayoso Township (now Concord) on the map of 1873; possibly named for an old settler. (Campbell, McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eastwood Lake
Description:An old lake in the eastern part of Gayoso Township (now Organ Township), which was drained after the court order in 1900. It was named for James Eastwood, the first presiding judge of the county, who helped mark the boundaries of Gayoso. (Campbell, Douglass I 313-314, County Court Record, McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eastwood Memorial Church
Description:The Methodist Church of Caruthersville, erected in 1925 and named as a memorial for James Eastwood, the first presiding judge of the county and one of the men who first organized the Methodist Church in the town. The graves of Mr. and Mrs. Eastwood and of Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Walker, prominent in the early history of the county and of Caruthersville (q.v.), are to be found in the churchyard. (Gother)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:El Camino Real
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elk Chute
Description:In the western part of the county. This body of water was a chute only in seasons of high water when the entire section of the county was cut off by this stream which joined the Mississippi River and thus formed an island. The name of elk was given because this was the feeding ground of the elk. (Gotcher)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Faris
Description:A signal stop on the Deering Southwestern Railroad, established as a log loading station for the mill of Judge Charles B. Faris of Caruthersville who lived there from 1867-1909, was representative in the state legislature in 1890, prosecuting attorney in 1892, curator of Missouri University in 1903-1909, and was elected to the state supreme court in 1910. (Gotcher, Douglass II 175)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Farrows
Description:A logging switch one mile north of Steele in the northern part of Cooter Township on the Frsco Railroad, which was established in 1901 at the sawmill camp of Clyde Farrows, and hence called by his name. (Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Faust
Description:A small village in the eastern part of Concord Township. A post office was maintained there from 1914 until 1921 when a route was established from Hayti. The post office name was Faust, the German form of the name of R.E. and J.M. Foust, landowners, for whom it was named. (Gotcher, Postal Guide, Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fisher
Description:See Hayward
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fisher School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Butler Township, established in 1930 and named for the Fisher families who have been landowners in that township since the organization of the county. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flag Lake
Description:A low swampy region in the southeastern part of Little River Township, which filled with water during flood seasons and so formed a lake. It does not appear on the map of 1873, but the meander line is shown on the map of 1922. It was named from the flags which grow in abundance in the swamps of the county. (Map of 1922, Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flag Lake School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Pemiscot Township, established about 1920 and named from Flag Lake. (cf. above). (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flagland School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Little River Township, named from Flag Lake (q.v.) on which it is located. There was already a Flag Lake School in the county, so the suffix land was substituted for lake. (Warren, Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fourteen Bend
Description:A community in the eastern part of Organ Township, located on the large bend of the Mississippi River near Island Fourteen. It was named in the same way as Chute Sixteen (q.v.). (Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Foust
Description:See Faust
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Franklin Lake
Description:A large lake in a group which was called Big or Pemiscot Lake (q.v.). It was known as Cagle Lake in 1883, for "old man Cagle," an early settler. It was one of the first lakes of the county to be drained. J.E. Franklin, who had bought a large tract of land which included this lake, began as a private enterprise a drainage project using pumps in 1898. The project was a failure, and Mr. Franklin finally resorted to the usual method of ditching. The lake became known as Franklin, for Mr. Franklin, and the community now has that name although the lake is no longer there. (Campbell, Douglass I 312-314, County Court Record, Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Franklin Lake School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Cooter Township, usually referred to as the Lake School, named from Franklin Lake (cf. above). (Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Friendship School
Description:A school and community in the northwestern part of Holland Township. When the few settlers in this unamed community met in 1918 to organize a school, they discussed the matter of a name. Several men present had come from Friendship, in Crockett County, Tennessee, so that name was suggested and adopted. (Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frisco Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Game
Description:See Stubtown
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gayoso
Description:A town in old Gayoso Township. It was the oldest town in the county, originally planned and named as the county seat by Albion Crow (Scott County), William Sayers (Mississippi County), and W.S. Moseley (New Madrid County). The land for the courthouse was purchased from J.A. McFarland and the town laid out by William Bigham in 1851. It was named for Don Miguel Gayoso de Lamos, a Spanish official, governor of Natchez, who established a small stockade near New Madrid in 1795. This town continued as a county seat until 1900 when the constant washing of the Mississippi River threatened it to such an extent that the county seat was changed to Caruthersville. The post office was discontinued at some time between 1904-1910, many business houses were moved to Hayti, and the whole town finally washed into the river. (Goodspeed 476, Douglass I 282, P.G.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gayoso City
Description:See Hayti
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gayoso Township
Description:One of the oldest townships organized in 1851 and named for the town Gayoso (q.v.). It was reduced in size by the organization of Organ Township in 1898, changed to Concord Township in 1912, and restored with its present boundaries by petition of the voters of Concord Township May 11, 1925. (County Court Record, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gibson Bayou
Description:In the northern part of Cooter Township. This is a part of the old Pemiscot Bayou which has been renamed locally, though not officially, for Newberry Gibson who owns a large tract of land at the southern end of the bayou. (Kelly, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gibson School
Description:A school and community in the northern part of Cooter Township, on Gibson Bayou (q.v.), from which the school is named. (Hamlett, Chilton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Godair
Description:A logging switch on the Frisco Railroad in the southern part of Godair Township; named for the Godair families who have been landowners in that township since the organization of the county. Toussaint Goder or Godair, settled in New Madrid County in 1792. He was the first member of the family in America. (Warren, Goodspeed, Houck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Godair Township
Description:In the northeastern part of the county; one of the original townships established in 1851-1873. It was named for the Godair families. (cf. Godair). (Campbell, New Madrid Court R.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grassy Bayou
Description:A switch on the Frisco Railroad in the western part of Little Prairie Township; named for the unusually tall and abundant grass growing in a small bayou by the workmen, who built the switch, in 1901. (Wilks)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Half Moon Lake
Description:A small lake in the northeastern part of Pemiscot Township, which was named before 1873 probably because of its shape. It has been drained. (Campbell, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Halls
Description:A logging switch of the A.C. Hall camp two miles north of Steele, established in 1901. (Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hayti
Description:A town in the center of Hayti Township at the junction of the Frisco and Kennett to Caruthersville Railroad. The town was established in 1894 at the time of the building of the railroads, although a settlement had been made there earlier. The school district was established in 1875. When a post office was applied for in 1896, the name Gayoso City was suggested, but rejected because of the similarity to Gayoso, so the name was coined from the name of Dr. G. Hayes, who owned land there, and the syllable "ti." Louis Houck, who helped lay out the town says, "The name is from the family name of Dr. Hayes and the word "ti" or "tie" which refers to the high ridge which ties this place to Caruthersville, so it might have been called "Highti" but that remined us too much of the Negro Republic." (Douglass 381, Wilks, Houck Mss., G. Houck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hayti Township
Description:In the east-central part of the county; formed from Gayoso, Little Prairie, and Little River Townships May 3, 1898. It is named from Hayti (cf. above), the principal town within its boundaries. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hayward
Description:A small village in the northern part of Butler Township. The first name of this settlement was Needmore, a name typical of pioneer humor. A rural church was established there in 1880 and called Macedonia Church (q.v.). The name Fisher, from John J. Fisher, a prominent farmer, was given to the post office which was established in 1886. The name was changed to Hayward in 1888 for a man who took Mr. Fisher's place in prominence in the community. Warren, Postal Guide, Foster)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hermondale
Description:A railroad stop on the Frisco and a post office in the southern part of Holland Township on the Arkansas line. A post office was established there in 1920 by Hermon G. Reynolds, the chief landowner, who became the postmaster and gave the name Hermondale. (Doerner, P.G.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hildreth School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Little River Township, named for a prominent family of the community. (Warren)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hill School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Little River Township, named for Mrs. Dorothy Hill, who taught there a number of years. (Hamlett, Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hillsman Taylor
Description:See Bakersville
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holland
Description:A town in the eastern part of Holland Township on the Frisco Railroad. The first known settlement which was made in 1871 was known as Middleburg because it was midway between Upper Cowskin (later known as Covington), and Cooter. The town was laid out in 1902 by J.C. Winters and J.W. Holland and named for the latter. A post office was established in the same year. No proof exists for Eaton's statement that the town was so named because, like much of the country of Holland, it was built on reclaimed land formerly submerged; however, the selection of Mr. Holland's name rather than Mr. Winter's was doubtless influenced by the name of the country. (Douglass I 383, Eaton 338, Postal Guide, Doerner, McFarland, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holland Township
Description:In the southern part of the county; erected from Virginia Township at the request of C.H. Bryant et al. May 3, 1904, and named for the principal town within its limits. A change was made in the original boundaries February 6, 1906 for the convenience of the voters. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holly Grove Church
Description:The Baptist Church of Cooter, which was established in 1865, and named for H.A. Holly, an early settler, and a grove of trees in which it was located. (E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hunter School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Little River Township, which was named for the Hunter families who established the Hunter Land and Development Company, and who owns large tracts of land in the county. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Illinois, Missouri, and Texas Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ingram Ridge
Description:A community in the eastern part of Pascola Township, named for G.A. Ingram, landowner. (Chilton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jones' Opening
Description:A sparsely timbered place on Pemiscot Bayou in the southern part of Cooter Township, where a man named Jones settled in early days. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kennedy
Description:A small village on the Mississippi River in the eastern part of Organ Township. A post office was maintained there from 1893 until 1918. It was named from the Kennedy family who settled there about 1890. (Chilton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kennett to Caruthersville Railroad
Description:See St. Louis San Francisco Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kinfolks Ridge
Description:A community, centering about a rural school, in the eastern part of Little Prairie Township, so called because most of the people living there are related. (Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kinfolks Ridge School
Description:See Kinfolks Ridge
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Klump Cave
Description:A large cave in the center part of Central Township, on the farm of Andrew Klump, for whom it was named. (A MODERN EDEN 7, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Petite Prairie
Description:See Caruthersville
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake School, The
Description:See Franklin Lake School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lint Dale
Description:An old shipping point at the mouth of Pemiscot Bayou on the Mississippi River, founded in 1873 by Turner Chamberlain and George Coleman. It was abandoned when the current of the river changed and Tyler became a better boat landing. The first cotton gin in the county was established here and that gave the settlement its name; that is, the name was suggested by the cotton lint and the dale or open space in the woods on the bank of the river. (Davis and Durrie, Campbell, Doerner, E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Prairie
Description:See Caruthersville
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Prairie Township
Description:In the east-central part of the county; one of the townships which was a part of New Madrid County at the time of the organization of Pemiscot County in 1851, having been organized in 1834. It adopted the early name for Caruthersville (q.v.). (Campbell, Goodspeed 329)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little River
Description:A river flowing through New Madrid, Pemiscot, and Dunklin Counties. It rises in St. Francois County and flows south into Arkansas. Below the Cape Girardeau County line it is known as Little River; above as Whitewater. Whitewater is the name applied to the entire stream before the earthquakes of 1811-1812. The Indians called the river Ne ska or Unica. Schoolcraft says the Osage name for this river is Unica, meaning white, but he is said to have confused White River, largely in Arkansas and Whitewater, this stream. The Chippeway name for the river was Ne ska, meaning white water. It is often written Niska. The early Spanish explorers called the river Rio Blanch, and the French La Riviere Blanche or L'eau Blanche. In the English translation this became Whitewater, by which name the entire stream was known as late as 1817. The name "Little" seems to have been given between 1817-1822, in the French form La Petitie Riviere, and is a reference to the size of the river as compared with the Mississippi and St. Francois Rivers, between which it lies. (History of Dunklin 29, Campbell, Brown, Rand McNally, Schoolcraft 853, Douglass I 230, Houck I 17, 18)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little River Bottoms
Description:Low swampy land lying along Little River in the western and eastern parts of these counties. (E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little River Township
Description:In the northwestern part of the county; one of the original townships established in 1851. It was named from Little River (q.v.) and was reduced to its present size in 1900 when Pascola Township was organized. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lost Bayou
Description:A small stream which meandered through the community of Number 8 and flowed through Tyler. It was named by the early settlers because of its indefinitie direction and size. (Mrs. E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lost Village
Description:See Caruthersville
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Macedonia Church
Description:An old rural Baptist Church in the northern part of Butler Township where Hayward is now located. It was established in 1880 and named from the churches in Macedonia (Greece), the first country in Europe in which the gospel was preached by Paul (Acts 16:9-12. 18:5-6). (Minutes of New Madrid Association, Warren)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maple View School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Braggadocio Township in the Deering Consolidated School district, which was named for the maple trees growing on the site. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maplewood School
Description:A school and community in Little Prairie Township once called Pultite or Pull Tite. Two reasons are given for this mocking name. According to R.A. Moyers it indicated the difficulty of making a living in the community in the early days. According to C.E. Johnston and C.G. Ross it is a reference to the gumbo or sticky mud. The latter theory seems more probable, as the soil in the community is excellent farming land and it is no more difficult to make a living there than elsewhere; whereas, the roads were unusually bad in this section and it was a "tight pull" to get over them. The name Maplewood was given by Charles G. Ross, County Superintendent of Schools, when the district was organized in 1916. He says that he so named it because he liked the sound of the name and not because there are maple trees in the community. (Moyers, Johnson, Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marvin Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church located beside Pierce's Chapel (q.v.) and named for the Marvin family living in that neighborhood, who were members of the church. (Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCarty School
Description:A school and community in Pemiscot, named for Judge Sterling H. McCarty of Caruthersville, who was county commissioner of schools from 1900-1904 and judge of the probate court from 1904-1911. He had a part in the organization of the district. (Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Melson
Description:See Bragg City
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Michaels
Description:A logging switch on the Frisco Railroad of 1901 just south of Caruthersville. It was named for Mr. Michael, the mill owner. (Bloymeyer, Wilks)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Micola
Description:A small town in the western part of Little Prairie Township. A post office established in 1904 was discontinued in 1927. The original name Pokono was given at the time of the building of the Frisco Railroad (1901), when this was a pipe loading station. Its meaning and source are unknown. The name Micola was given in 1904, coined from the names of the principal landowners, Walter and Sid Michie and H.R. Coleman, to which the "a" was added. (Postal Guide, Johnston; Ham; Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mid City
Description:A community in Braggadocio Township halfway between Caruthersville and Kennett (in Dunklin County), centered about a rural Baptist Church which was established there in 1932. (Myra Gerrish, Minutes of N.M. Assn.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mid City Church
Description:Cf. above
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middleburg
Description:See Holland
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Midway
Description:An old landing place on the Mississippi River in Pemiscot Township three-fourths of a mile south of old Lint Dale. It was a point halfway between Cairo, Illinois and Memphis, Tennessee, where steamboats stopped for cord-wood. (Campbell's G. 1874)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Midway School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Braggadocio Township. It was named from its position halfway between Micola and Braggadocio. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mitchell Cemetery
Description:See Number Eight Cemetery.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mitchells
Description:A log loading station on the Frisco Railroad in 1901 just south of Caruthersville and the Mound. It was named for the owner of the mill, Mr. Mitchell. (Blomeyer, Wilks)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moseley School
Description:A school and community in Holland Township near the Arkansas line. It was named for Gus Moseley who moved to this community in 1898. He served as constable of Holland Township, was instrumental in getting a cotton gin for Holland and a road from Holland to Douglas, served on the board of education, and helped to form Consolidated District No. 1. The place was one called Walnut Grove, but the absence of walnut trees made the name unsuitable and it has been discarded. An attempt is now being made to change the name to Culbertson because the landowner, a Mr. Culbertson of St. Louis, has donated the land on which the now abandoned school building stands for a Community Center. Whether or not the name is adopted remains to be seen. (Hamlett, Mrs. Homer Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mound, The
Description:An old Indian mound lying between Caruthersville and Cottonwood Point in Little Prairie Township. The largest mound in the county, and said to be the largerst in southeast Missouri. A settlement was made by white men on this mound in 1898. The railroad station of the Frisco for this community is Dayton, named for the Dayton family living there. (Douglass I 3-12, Blomeyer)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Zion Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery located halfway between Cooter and Steele in Cooter Township. The oldest monument in the cemetery is dated 1854. The earliest name was Upper Cooter Cemetery, from its position north of Cooter. The name Mount Zion seems to have been applied since 1926 when the Mount Zion Methodist Church (q.v.) was torn down. Both names are in use now. (Kelly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Zion Church
Description:An early rural church located at Upper Cooter, probably erected in 1854 or soon afterward. The first building, of logs, was used as church and school. The later structure was torn down in 1926 and the church disbanded. The name is still used for the cemetery. Mount Zion is a common church name suggested by the Biblical Mount Zion in the city of Jerusalem. (Kelly, Doerner, Biblical map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Needmore
Description:See Hayward
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Needmore School
Description:A negro school in the Steele Consolidated District; organized in 1930 and given this mocking pioneer name, suggestive of the fact that the people were always needing more supplies. (Miller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Neska River
Description:See Little River
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Netherlands
Description:A small community in the northern part of Concord Township. A post office was established there in 1918, but was discontinued in 1925 and the mail routed from Hayti. The place was named for Wood Netherlands of the Netherlands Land Company and the Land Bank of St. Louis, Missouri, who was interested in land in this section. The name has no connection with the European country in spite of the fact that the land is low. (Chilton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Deal Country
Description:The territory around Bakersville and Mid City in the western part of Little River Township, which belongs to the General American Life Insurace Company. The company began the development of this land during the "depression," and it is so called because of President Roosevelt's policy of The New Deal. (Warren)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Survey
Description:A community in the western part of Virginia Township, established about 1915 and named from the fact that this community was affected by the new survey of the county made after the Civil War. (Kelly, Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Niggerwool Swamp
Description:An area of low, swampy land in the eastern part of Braggadocio Township in the overflow region of Little River. It was named from the colloquial expression, "The grass is as thick as nigger (Negro) wool." Louis Houck says that J.H. Morley, superintendent of the Iron Mountain Railroad in 1852, first used the derisive term when he had difficulty in securing the right-of-way for his road through the swamps. (Hamlett, Houck Mss.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Niska River
Description:See Little River
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Number 8 Cemetery
Description:An old rural cemetery in the community of Number 8 (cf. above), which was started about 1892. It was first known as the Mitchell Cemetery, named for the Mitchell families who, with their relatives, the Cassidy families, composed almost the entire settlement. After the establishment of the mill in 1898, the cemetery, like the community, became known as Number 8. (Mrs. E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Number 8 School
Description:A school and community in the southern part of Cooter Township, established as a sawmill camp in 1898. This was one of a series of three mills (Number 9 and 10 being in northeast Arkansas), owned and operated by H.W. Tyler and connected by the Wheeler- Tyler Railroad. It was so named because Tyler moved the mill from Number 8 Island, Kentucky. A settlement had already been made here, but no name had been given to it. All signs of the sawmill have disappeared, but the name is applied to the community as well as to the new settlement which has developed on Dogwood Ridge (q.v.). Effort was once made to call the community Cassidy, but although the members of the Cassidy family were very prominent, the name did not survive, because the family were unpopular locally. (Mrs. E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove
Description:See Wardell
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Ridge
Description:See Douglass
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ogden
Description:A flagstop on the Cottonbelt Railroad in the western part of Pascola Township, maintained in 1913 and named for Sam Ogden of the community. (Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Long Field
Description:A long farm of the Fourteen Bend neighborhood, which, according to Mr. McFarland "was worn out sixty-four years ago." This statement indicates why the place is called "old," and the fact that it is lying along the bend in the river; that is, is longer than it is wide, shows the reason for the second adjective in the name. (McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Open Bay
Description:A small bay, forming with Portage Bayou and Portage Bay the boundary line between Pemiscot and New Madrid Counties. It was called Collins Lake or the Open Bay by Colonel J.H. Walker. Collins Lake was named for an early settler, A.J. Collins, and the name Open Bay, which has survived, was given because of the open appearance of the bay as contrasted with the thickly forested regions nearby. (Penman, Barns 78, Croell, Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Organ Township
Description:In the eastern part of the county, formed in 1898 from Gayoso Township and named for B. Organ who owned most of the land in this region at that time. (Huffman, County Court Records)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Owl City
Description:See Bragg City
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pascola
Description:A small town in the eastern part of Pascola Township. It was established in 1894 at the time of the building of the Kennett to Caruthersville Railroad and named by Louis Houck, who built the railroad and helped lay out the town. Pascola, Mr. Houck says, is a "fancy" name, that is, it was coined, but he does not say from what it was made. A post office was established in 1896 and the village incorporated in 1901. (Douglass I 381, Warren, Houck Mss., G. Houck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pascola Township
Description:In the western part of the county; organized from Little River and Braggadocio Townships in 1900 and named from Pascola (cf. above), the principal town within its limits. (County Court Records)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peach Orchard
Description:A school and community in the northern part of Little River Township. In the early days of the county's history an old settler, whose name has been forgotten, cleared land in this section and set out a number of peach trees. Floods drove him out, and it was not until after the drainage of this land in 1901 that a settlement was made. Traces of the old peach orchard were found and this gave the community its name. (Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pemiscot Bayou
Description:A large bayou which once extended almost the entire length of the county; now changed by drainage until little remains of the original stream. The name is still used in court records, on maps, and in referring to drainage districts, but is not in common use. Gibson Bayou (q.v.) is a common name for a part of the old bayou. Pemiscot is an Indian word meaning liquid mud. (Douglass I 313, Goodspeed 369, Campbell, Kelly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pemiscot County
Description:Established by act of legislature on February 19, 1851, and erected from territory cut off from New Madrid County. The boundaries are: On the north Portage Bayou to Little River, thence due west to Dunklin County line which forms the western boundary, on the south the parallel of 36 30' (Arkansas State Line), and on the east the Mississippi River. Pemiscot is one of the six counties of the state which bears an Indian name, the others being Moniteau, Nodaway, Oregon, Mississippi, and Osage. The name was given for the principal stream of the county (cf. above). The older pronunciation was "pemisco," and that is still heard occasionally especially when referring to the name of the bayou; the general tendency, however, is to pronounce it "pemiscott." (Douglass I 313, Goodspeed 369, Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pemiscot Lake
Description:A large lake in Pemiscot Township, also called Big Lake, which once covered 18,000 acres. It has been drained since 1900. (Houck I 369, Campbell, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pemiscot Township
Description:A township in the southeastern part of the county; one of the original divisions which was a part of New Madrid County until 1851, having been organized in 1839 from the southern part of Little Prairie Township. It was named from Pemiscot Bayou (q.v.). (Campbell, County Court Record, Goodspeed 329)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Persimmon Grove School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Holland Township, named from a grove of persimmon trees. (Miller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pierce's Chapel
Description:A rural Baptist Church which was located beside Marvin Chapel, a Methodist Church, in the eastern part of Little Prairie Township; named for the family of Charley Pierce. A Baptist Church is no longer maintained there, but the name is sometimes applied to the locality or to the Methodist Church, Marvin Chapel, which still exists. The school built on the former site of Pierce's Chapel is called the Chapel School. (Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plummer's Lake
Description:A low swampy region in the eastern part of Little Prairie Township which filled with water during a rainy season and so was termed a lake. It was named for the landowners, George W. and Mordecai Plummer, who purchased land there in 1907. The name is no longer used since drainage prevents the formation of the lake. (Pemiscot Democrat 1899, County Court Record, Gotcher)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pokono
Description:See Micola
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Portage Bay
Description:A small bay near the place where Portage Bayou enters Little River. It was named from Portage Bayou (q.v.). (Douglass 26, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Portage Bayou
Description:A bayou forming part of the boundary line between Pemiscot and New Madrid Counties. So named because it was a part of the early portage line from St. Francois River to the Mississippi River. (Douglass 266, Campbell, Penman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Possum Trot
Description:An old name applied to a region near Steele in the northern part of Cooter Township. It is an example of pioneer humor and refers to the fact that the place was a small opening in the forest the roads to which were so narrow they suggested a path which opppssums made by "trottin" between the trees. (Doerner, Long)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pultite
Description:See Maplewood
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pumping Station
Description:The abandoned site of a pump which was used in an effort to drain Franklin Lake (q.v.) by this mechanical means. The attempt was a failure. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rayburn
Description:A flagstop on the Frisco Railroad in the southern part of Holland Township. A station was established here in 1901 by a Mr. Rayburn of Caruthersville who maintained a sawmill and shipped logs to Indiana to be made into matches. (Ham, Pemiscot Democrat 1901)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Red Town
Description:A section of Tyler (q.v.) in Cooter Township so called because originally all of the buildings were painted red. The buildings are now green, but the old name is sometimes heard. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:River Gayoso
Description:A bayou which empties into the Mississippi River near the town of Gayoso (q.v.) from which it was named. It was destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. (Houck II 148. Gotcher)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riverview School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Litle River Township, named from its location on Little River. (Warren)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Robertstown
Description:See Robinson's lake
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Robinson's Bayou
Description:A small bayou in the western part of Organ Township, which flows from Robinson's Lake (q.v.) into the Mississippi River. (County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Robinson's Lake
Description:A small lake in the western part of Organ Township. The name is Robertstown on the map of 1873. This difference in spelling is probably caused by a map maker's error, or the fact that the county records were destroyed by fire in 1882, and, when restored, this change occurred. It was named for an early settler, several members of the Robinson family having played an important part in the settlement of New Madrid County of which this was a part until 1851. (Campbell, Map of County, E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sacred Heart Church
Description:The Catholic Church in Caruthersville established through the efforts of Father Furlong in 1902 and given this common Catholic Church name. (Catholic Historical Review 4: 206-218)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sacred Heart School
Description:Cf. above
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Samford School
Description:A school and community in the southern part of Virginia Township. The early settlement was called Cowskin. There are two theories regarding the origin of this name. Max L. Kelly of Steele argues that the name is deived from the fact that each year J.H. Walker went into the heart of the wilderness and slaughtered hundreds of heads of cattle which he skinned, and dried the skins along the banks of Pemiscot Bayou before shipping them to New Orleans. J.H. McFarland says that the settlers who were in this vicinity before the earthquakes of 1811-1812 quitted the place and left their stock to go wild, so that afterward, when people began to settle the county, those who wanted fresh meat went into the wilderness and killed the cows, skinned them, and left their skins hanging in the trees to dry so that it was a common experience to see cow skins in that region. When the post office was applied for in 1899, the name was changed to Samford, quite often pronounced Sanford, for Robert Samford, who was an early settler and a prominent landowner. (Kelly, M.H.R. 14:384, Postal Guide, McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sanford
Description:See Samford
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schafer School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Cooter Township, named for the man who donated the land for the school. (Miller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schult
Description:In the eastern part of Hayti Township on the Kennett to Caruthersville Railroad. The first name was given to the Carleton post office established in 1896 in honor of Major George W. Carleton, an early resident of Gayoso and Caruthersville, who was editor of the GAYOSO DEMOCRAT, and who secured the enactment of a law providing for the organization of drainage districts. The post office was discontinued in 1903, and some time later the name was changed to Schult for Heine G. Schult, who was a prominent citizen of that community. (Gotcher)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seidemseen
Description:See Seldom Seen
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seldom Seen
Description:A small, out of the way community in Braggadocio Township also called Seldemseen. This is a specimen of pioneer humor. (PEMISCOT DEMOCRAT 1899)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seven Mile Bend
Description:A large bend in Pemiscot Bayou in the eastern part of Cooter and the western part of Holland Township. It was named for the length of the curve or bend in the bayou. (E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shade
Description:A flagstop, also called Shade Switch, on the Frisco Railroad in the western part of Little Prairie Township, which was named for E.W. Shade of Caruthersville, who is manager of the Pemiscot Land and Cooperage Company farms in that section. (Chilton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shade Switch
Description:Cf. above
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shakerag
Description:See Davis
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shiloh Church
Description:A rural church in the northern part of Godair Township, which was established in 1857 and given this Biblical name which suggests a sanctuary of the ark was located (I Sam. 3:3, 17). (Goodspeed 556, Foster)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Solitude
Description:This name appears on a map of 1867 at the northern end of Big Lake in Butler Township. A post office was established in 1868 and discontinued between 1876 and 1886. None of the oldest men of the county remember this place, but Mr. McFarland said it is probable that a few settlers lived there and were driven away by floods so that none of their descendants remain in the county. The name is descriptive of the loneliness of the place. (Campbell, Goodwin, Postal Guide, McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Pacific Railroad
Description:See below
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Speer School
Description:A school in the eastern part of Braggadocio Township. The district was never formally named when the school was organized in 1915, but the name Speer "just grew up" because of the prominence of the family of Everton Speer, a landowner, and his sister Mrs. Minnie Speer Boone, who donated the land for the school. (Ross)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Description:This railroad was first organized as the Southwest branch of the Pacific Railroad in 1849, along a surveyed route from St. Louis west to the Pacific Ocean. In 1851 it became the South Pacific Railroad and was completed to Rolla in 1861. In 1866 it was created the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad by an act of Congress, and authorized to build to the Pacific Coast. It was finished to Vinita in Indian territory in 1871. In these counties the road is the result of the consolidation of a number of short lines which were connected to form the present system. It had its beginning in the Cape Girardeau and State Line Railroad Company, which proposed to build a line from Cape Girardeau to the Arkansas line in 1869. No work was done on this road, and in 1871 Governor Fletcher of Missouri reorganized the company as the Illinois, Missouri and Texas Railroad Company with the idea of connecting those three states by rail. This charter was purchased in 1880 by Louis Houck and organized as the Cape Girardeau Railroad Company because the businessmen of that city were to furnish the capital. In 1881 the branch was built to Lakeville in Stoddard County, and the name changed to Cape Girardeau and Southwestern Railroad Company, indicating the direction of the road from Cape Girardeau. In 1891 the name was again changed to the St. Louis, Cape Girardeau, and Fort Smith Raiload, named to indicate the intention of extending the road north to St. Louis and south to Fort Smith, Arkansas. The railroad also includes the line of the Missouri and Arkansas Railroad organized in 1891 by Mr. Houck to build a road from Morley to Cape Girardeau, and the St. Louis, Kennett and Southern Railroad, which was built in 1890 from Campbell to Kennett, and the Kennett to Caruthersville Railroad, which was built in 1894. In 1902 all these roads were consolidated under the name St. Louis and Gulf Railroad with the intention of extending the road from St. Louis to the Gulf of Mexico, and shortly afterward the property was transferred to the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad. The latter company extended the line from St. Louis to Memphis, Tennessee, thence to Pensacola, and west from Memphis to Oklahoma, but it has not yet reached its intended destination - San Francisco. In Pemiscot County the company purchased a right-of-way extending from Caruthersville to the Arkansas line and thence to Blytheville, Arkansas from Cunningham Brothers of Caruthersville, who had been interested in building a railroad and had begun private operations. This road is commonly called Frisco, a shortened from of San Francisco. (Willis, Douglass 502-504, Wollman 16, Ham, Wilson, Barns 615, 673)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Matthews Church
Description:A rural negro Baptist Church in the southeastern part of Cooter Township, named for the Apostle. (U.S. Grant, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Matthews School
Description:A rural negro school in the southeast part of Cooter Township, named from St. Matthews Church (cf. above). (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Paul Church
Description:A rural negro church organized about 1920 and named for the Apostle. (Miller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Paul School
Description:A rural negro school in the northern part of Cooter Township, named from St. Paul Church (q.v.). (Miller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stancil
Description:An old settlement in the northern part of what is now Butler Township. A post office was maintained there one year - 1890. It was named for John P. Stancil who was state representative from 1870-1874 and who figured prominently in the early settlement of the county. (Postal Guide, Goodspeed 1888)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stancil Bayou
Description:A bayou in the eastern part of Butler Township, which flows from Big Lake to the Mississippi River. The lower part is called Wolf Bayou (q.v.). It was named fom the old settlement of Stancil (cf. above). (Map of County, Gotcher)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stanley School
Description:A school and communiy in the western part of Godair Township. A post office was maintained there from 1899 until 1915. It was named for several prominent families of the community. (Ross, P.G.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Steele
Description:A town in the western part of Cooter Township. A post office was established in 1897 and named for L.L. Steele, who came to Pemiscot County in 1885 and started in the farming and mercantile business. (Douglass I 382, PEMISCOT DEMOCRAT 1898)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stewart
Description:A small settlement in Butler Township formerly called Stewart's Landing. A post office was established in 1886 and discontinued in 1915. It was named for Robert Stewart, the first sheriff of the county (1851-1855). (Goodspeed, Gotcher)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stewart
Description:A town in the western part of Cooter Township. A post office was established in 1897.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stewart's Landing
Description:Cf. above
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stubtown
Description:A community in Little Prairie Township. The name Game, suggested by the abundance of game there during the early days, was given when a post office was established in 1899. The post office was discontinued in 1915; the place became nothing more than a crossroads store and blacksmith shop, and the name became Stubtown because of the Stubbs families living there. (Moyers, Chilton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Swift
Description:A small community and station on the Frisco Railroad in the southern part of Godair Township, where a post office was established in 1915 and named Swifton. The name was given for the cotton plantation owner, Mr. Swift, who had purchased a large tract of land there in 1914-1915, to whose name was added the common suffix for town. In 1927 the post office was reestablished under the name Swift. Both names are still in use, although the latter is more generally used throughout the county. (Postal Guide; Ham; Wilks; McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Swifton
Description:Cf. above
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tally
Description:A sawmill camp post office in the northern part of Little River Township, established in 1895 and discontinued in 1897. The name is a shortened form of Tallapoosa (cf. above). (Penman, P.G.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tanner's Bayou
Description:A bayou mentioned in the county court records from 1883-1900 as flowing near the town of Cooter. It is an outlet of Tanner's Lake (q.v.). (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tanner's Lake [1 of 2]
Description:A small lake in the western part of Cooter Township which was named for an early settler. It was drained before 1902. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tanner's Lake [2 of 2]
Description:A small lake in the western part of Gayoso Township (now Concord Township), appearing on the map of 1873. It was drained after the court order in 1900. The name is that of a prominent early settler. (Campbell, McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Terre Rouge
Description:A tributary of Pemiscot Bayou, which was destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. A man named Culberson, who gave one of the most vivid accounts of the earthquakes, lived there. It was probably named by the early French settlers. The name translated means red earth, but if there was any red clay in this county it disappeared with the stream. (Douglass I 227; McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Terry
Description:A flagstop on the Frisco Railroad in Hayti Township three miles north of Hayti. Bill Terrett was the only resident of the community when a station was established for the purpose of loading logs from the mills of this section. Railroad officials asked his name, but understood it as Terry, and so named the station. (Wilks)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tindle
Description:A flagstop on the Deering Southwestern Railroad in Little Prairie Township. It was named for Robert Tindle who was born in Caruthersville in 1878 and worked for the Pemiscot County Bank of that city. (Gotcher; Douglass II 1037)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tyler
Description:A small town on the Mississippi River in the eastern part of Cooter Township. This one time flourishing sawmill town and shipping point is now almost abandoned because of the completion of the timber cutting and the fact that an island has formed in the river opposite the town. A post office was established there in 1892. The town was named for H.A. Tyler of the Tyler Land and Timber Company, who purchased vast tracts of land in this region and operated sawmills at Tyler, at Number 8 (q.v.), and at Number 9 in Arkansas. (Postal Guide, E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upper Cooter Cemetery
Description:See Mount Zion Cemetery
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upper Cowskin
Description:See Covington
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Van Hoy
Description:A small settlement and logging station on the Frisco Railroad north of Steele. This name was spelled Vannoys by railroad officials in 1901. Van Hoy is a part of Steele now and was named for Jesse Van Hoy, who was one of the early settlers of this community. (Doerner, Kelly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Van New
Description:A flagstop on the Deering Southwestern Railroad, in the northern part of Little Prairie Township, so named because of the landowner, S. Van New. (Map of County, Doerner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vannoys
Description:See Van Hoy
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vicksburg
Description:A community in the northeastern part of Virginia Township, which was originally called Dogskin by the residents of Braggadocio who knew an old hunter who frequented this region, whose dogs were said to be "skin and bones." Dr. J.P. Vickery, now of Steele, taught school there in 1914 and was so much respected that when a name was sought for the post office which was established in 1915, he was honored by having his name used. The form of the name was no doubt influenced by that of the well known town in Mississippi. The post office was maintained only one or two years, but the name is still in common use. (Ross; Long; Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Virginia Township
Description:In the southwestern part of the county; one of the original townships organized in 1851-1873. It was reduced to its present size by the organization of Holland Township in 1904. Mr. McFarland says the name was probably selected by chance because someone in the county court liked the name, and does not necessarily indicate that the early settlers were from Virginia. (Campbell, County Court Record; McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walnut Grove
Description:See Moseley
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wardell
Description:A village in the eastern part of Little River Township on Little River. An early settlement known as Bracy, named for J.W. Bracy, a landowner, had a post office in the year 1895. After the Bracy post office was abandoned, this settlement was known as Oak Grove, from the oak trees, until 1902 when a sawmill was established there. In 1903 when a post office was applied for, R.L.Warren gave the name Wardell, using the first three letters of his name and adding the syllable "dell," signifying an opening in the forest. (Warren, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Westbrook
Description:A small settlement in the southern part of Holland Township, which was named from the farm and mill of John Westbrook. (Kelly)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wheeler-Tyler Railroad
Description:An old logging road built by Wheeler and Tyler to connect various logging camps which they owned in the southeastern part of Pemiscot County and the northeastern part of Arkansas. It was abandoned when the mills ceased to operate, and the rails were removed about 1915. (E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Who'd-a-thought-it
Description:A pioneer name in use about 1904. Knowledge of the exact location of this place is vague, although a number of old settlers are familiar with the name. It is an expression of surprise, either individual such as "Who would have thought that I'd come to this?", or referring to the location of the settlement as "Who would have thought anyone would settle here," (Doerner; O'Keane; Mrs. E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilks
Description:A small town on the Mississippi River in the eastern part of Little Prairie Township; named for Judge Henry J. Wilks, who was the probate court judge and prosecuting attorney in the county. A post office was maintained there in 1907-1908. (County Court Record, Postal Guide, Wilks)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Willowpole Bridge
Description:An old bridge made of willow poles on Pemiscot Bayou. The same name was applied to the succeeding steel structure over the ditch. It is now abandoned because of a change in roads. It is also called Criddle's Bridge for the family of E.T. Criddle living nearby. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wolf Bayou
Description:A bayou, the upper end of which is called Stancil, flowing through the townships of Gayoso and Organ and emptying into the Mississippi River. The name is suggested by the swamp and wilderness, which is a suitable place for wolves and was once the habitat for these animals. The term "wolf" is so used in these counties even though wolves are no longer found there. (Gotcher; Foster)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Yamma
Description:A flagstop on the Frisco Railroad three miles west of Bragg City on the Dunklin County line. It is usually pronounced, "Yamie," and frequently so spelled. Its origin could not be learned. (Warren; Rand McNally)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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