Oregon County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Alf Couch Mill
Description:A gristmill on Eleven Points River at the mouth of Little Hurricane Creek (q.v.). Named for Alfred Couch, son of Simpson Couch. The mill was not operated later than the middle 1880s, and only the old mill dam remains. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Alton
Description:The county seat, near the center part of Piney Township. On October 9, 1859, William Hodges deeded 50 and one quarter acres for the site, and the surveying of the town was completed the following month. It had been a post office since 1862. There seems to be no doubt that the name was borrowed from Alton in Madison County, Illinois, from which towns in at least a dozen other states have also taken their names. The Illinois city is said by Gannett to have been named by Rufus Easton, its founder, for his son Alton Easton. The fact that William C. Boyd, the first postmaster of Alton, Missouri, came from Alton, Illinois, doubtless accounted for its selection. Pioneer humor, however, has been at work in the invention of other explanations of the name. One story has it that the name was originally "All Town," chosen because the three leading citizens appointed to elect the name, Boyd, Woodside, and Simpson, could not agree and decided to name it for all of them. Another declares that "Uncle Billy" Boyd, as he was called, spelled the name "Awl Town," presumably associating it with the craft of shoemaking. There is, of course, no basis for these explanations except imagination. (Gannett; Eaton; Postal Guide 1862...1943; Mo. Hist. Rev. (Apr., 1917) 337; W.C. Harrod; J.L. Sipe; Chas. Braswell; Cleora B. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:American
Description:A discontinued station on the Frisco Railroad six miles northwest of Thayer in Big Apple Township; established as a shipping point and doubtless named for the American Orchard Company of Kansas City, which began the development of large fruit farms in the vicinity in 1893. (T.M. Culver; T.J. Richardson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Anderson Creek
Description:Heads in Ozark Township and flows into Eleven Points River in Cedar Bluff Township. Anderson Spring, with good living water, in the valley is on the Brock ranch (q.v.) and marks the home place of James Anderson, an early pioneer settler. (J. Hitt; W. Heiskell; A. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Anderson School
Description:The pioneer log schoolhouse with split log seats in what is now Ozark Township. James Anderson, who owned land here before the Civil War, came back to his war-ruined farm and was influential in the rebuilding of the community. During the early 1890s, the school was moved a mile northeast and the name was changed to Mitchell (q.v.). (Mrs. Jack Woodring; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Anderson Spring
Description:See Anderson Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Andrews Cemetery
Description:One of the oldest burial grounds in the county, one mile west of Alton on the farm now owned by Samuel M. Simpson, by whose name the cemetery is sometimes known. The land was entered by Alec Andrews before the Civil War. (Chas. Braswell; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Anthony Creek
Description:A small stream, in Big Apple Township, that flows into Warm Fork. An early family name. (R. Childers; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Perkins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Antioch Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church at Lula (q.v.), organized and named by Reverend William Logan Williams in 1901. For the name Cf. above. (H. Williams; G.C. Martin; M.B. G.A.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ary School
Description:See Pleasant Hill School, No. 52
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Attie
Description:A vanished small village and post office one and a half miles southwest of Rover (q.v.). The post office was established in K.H. Goodwin's store. The name was suggested by Jno. R. Woodside, for his niece Mrs. M.B. Clark of West Plains, nee Miss Attie Old, who was the daughter of James B. Old of Thomasville, a legislative representative who helped to get the post office established. This office was discontinued when a part of the village and school were burned. (Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Moore; William D. Willard; Mrs. Susie Huddleston; Postal Guide 1887-1902; W.E. Harrod; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Augusta
Description:The early name for Thayer (q.v.). The town was platted December 2, 1882, by George H. Nettleton of Kansas City, the first president of the Fort Scott, Kansas City, and Memphis Railroad (now Frisco), and named for his wife. When the post office was established the name was changed because there was another Augusta in the state--the one in St. Charles County, which has been a post office since 1853. (J.L. Sipe; N.B. Allen; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bailey Cemetery
Description:See Simpson Graveyard
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Baker School
Description:In Cedar Bluff Township, two and a half miles southeast of Calm. Named for James H. Baker, a landowner nearby. (Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bales School
Description:In Highland Township, three and a half miles southeast of Rover (q.v.). William M. Bales, a pioneer from Tennessee, was a landowner and farmer of the vicinity. (E. Williams; William Weaver; Jno. Old)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ballard Hole
Description:A famous eddy in Barren Ford in Moore Township, where horse swimming was great sport in the earlier days. Named for James Ballard, landowner and farmer living there. (Jno. Old)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bamby Ranch
Description:About one hundred acres of land in Johnson Township, on Eleven Points River, owned by Mack Weilputz of Cape Girardeau. Mr. Weilputz, who owns bakeries in southeast Missouri, named his ranch for the trade name of his bread. Weilputz Club House on the ranch is the best equipped on the river. (Chas. Braswell; W.E. Harrod; G.R. Owens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bandyville
Description:A discontinued post office ten miles north of Alton. Established soon after the Civil War through the efforts of J.R. Bandy, a physician of the community, who owned land and kept the office. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; W.E. Harrod; P. Williams; P.L. 1874, Gaz. of Mo., pp. 15, 408; Postal Guide 1893-1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bardley Camp
Description:A C.C.C. camp near Bardley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barren Fork
Description:A branch of Eleven Points River, heading in Highland Township. The name was suggested by the good grazing region so barren of timber, during the pioneer days. North Prong and South Prong converge two and a half miles south of Thomasville to make Barren Fork. (Geo. Moore; William Weaver; J. Old)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barren Hollow
Description:In Thayer Township, leading into Warm Fork just below Clifton (q.v.). No timber grew there during the pioneer days. Mr. Allen remarked, "Couldn't get enough timber for a riding switch." (N.B. Allen; E. Williams; R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barren Hollow School
Description:A pioneer school in the vicinity of Barren Hollow (q.v.) long before the Civil War. The original old log house one mile east of the present Clifton School, was also used for services by the Methodist and Baptist churches. When Clifton School (q.v.) was built, the old house was abandoned. During the 1890s, as population increased, the present Barren Hollow District was formed from parts of Clifton and other districts, and the building was erected about three miles east of Thayer. (R. Childers; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bat Cave
Description:See Bat Cave Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bat Cave Hollow
Description:The hollow, in Johnson Township, which drains into Eleven Points River three miles north of Riverton. It was named for the cave, which has been for years the habitat of bats. During the Civil War, saltpeter was made here from the "drippings" of the cave. (J. Johnson; E. Bailey; T. Hofstedler; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bates Spring
Description:A good, living spring in Tucker Branch Valley, about two miles southwest of Alton. James Bates entered the land long before the Civil War. (E. Bailey; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Batman School
Description:One of the older schools in Thayer Township, about six miles west of Thayer. It took the name of a landowner, Thomas Batman, a Condfederate soldier, who gave the site. (R. Childers; E. Williams; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bay Creek
Description:Heads in Gatewood Township and flows southwest across the corner of Oregon County into Eleven Points River in Arkansas. A family name. (W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bay Creek
Description:Another Bay Creek, a small stream in Thayer Township, flowing into Warm Fork. It took its name from the bay or pond formation at its mouth. (W. McLelland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bear Hollow
Description:In Thayer Township, leading into Two Mile Creek (q.v.). Habitat of bears in early days. (W. Highfill; R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bear Spring Hollow
Description:In Franks Township. It leads into Spring Creek. A name given by the early settlers near the valley because large numbers of bears made the spring their watering place. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Beaty Cemetery
Description:See Union Hill Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Becky Hollow
Description:Leads from the north into Eleven Points River about one mile east of the mouth of Spring Creek (q.v.). Duing the early pioneer days, Mrs. Rebecca Willoby, a beloved widow, known as "Aunt Becky," lived there. (W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bee Fork [1 of 2]
Description:Heads in Shannon County and leads into Spring Creek in Moore Township. Pioneer bee hunters found many bees here. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bee Fork [2 of 2]
Description:Another Bee Fork, a small branch of Mill Creek in Myrtle Township. The habitat and watering place of many wild bees during pioneer days. (Geo. Underwood; J. Birchert)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bellah Cemetery
Description:In Moore Township, one mile west of Thomasville, on the old farm entered by Walter Bellah, who came from Tennessee as early as the 1830s. (Mrs. A.O. Roberts; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bellah's Falls
Description:In Eleven Points River between the mouth of Greer Spring Branch (q.v.) and the bridge of Highway 19. The rapids cause a noise resembling that of old time bellows. Some of the persons interviewed insist on spelling the falls "Bellows," but others give the real origin, the same as that of the ford (q.v.). (N. Bell; W. Heiskell; C.S. Gohn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bellah's Ford
Description:The old crossing on Eleven Points River northeast of Greer Spring. An early family of the name lived near. The river is now spanned at this place by a bridge of Highway 19. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethany Baptist Church
Description:A defunct church organized about 1900 by Reverend Joe Glass of Kentucky. The building one quarter mile east of Greer post office was bought by the Greer School District and used for the public school for a number of years. A Bible name, meaning the house of dates. A village, the residence of Lazarus and his sisters, near Jerusalem. (John 11:1; E. Bailey; P. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church, organized about 1903 by Reverend M.S. Newberry, who suggested the Bible name; cf. above. The name was given by Jacob for Luz, where he had the dream of heaven. The building was known as Bildad (q.v.). (O. Young; Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills; Gen. 28:16-22)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
Description:In Black Pond Township, northwest of Thomasville. Organized about 1885 by Reverend Austin Hensley. When this church disbanded the house was taken by the Primitive Baptists, and the name changed to Mount Zion (q.v.) (cf. above). (Mr. and Mrs. W. Weaver; Matt. 2:1)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Betsy Hollow
Description:In northeast Moore Township. Heads southwest of Paty Pond (q.v.) and leads into Spring Creek. Mrs. Betsy Sipe lived there before the Civil War. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Biffle Branch
Description:See Carter's Branch
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Apple School
Description:North of Koshkonong in Big Apple Township. Situated in the fruit district where apples were grown abundantly during the early 1900s. Now consolidated with Koshkonong School. (E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Apple Township
Description:One of the western border divisions, formed from Lynn Township soon after the large fruit farms (especially apple), were established by the NcNair Orchard Company, the Midland Orchard Company, and others in the late 1890s and early 1900s. (W. Weaver; N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Barren Hollow
Description:In Goebel Township. It drains "The Barrens" (q.v.), into Eleven Points River. (W. Heskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Hurricane Creek
Description:Heads in Shannon County and flows through Falling Springs Township into Eleven Points River. A hurricane did pass through this region long before the Civil War, tearing down timber along this stream and leaving mounds, but Mr. Heiskell thinks it is more likely that the name originated from the noise made by the stream when heavy rains came. (P. Williams; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Ozark Spring
Description:Another name for Greer Spring (q.v.). Apparently the name was given by Louis Houck of Cape Girardeau. (Houck I.18)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring
Description:See Watered Rock Branch
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bildad Baptist Church
Description:The present building, near Cates Pond (q.v.) is now generally known as Cates Pond Church. Five or six years before the Civil War, the United Baptists built, near the present site of Greer (q.v.), a house of hewed logs to be used for church and school. The name, one of Job's three friends, was suggested by the informant's father, Gilbert Williams, who came from Tennessee in 1853. The church was organized by two ministers of the settlement--Thomas C. Simpson and Jeff Sisco. When this building burned in 1884, a house was erected about two miles south and used for church by the Baptists and Methodists and for school (see Bethel Church). The Methodists, disbanding during the early 1920s, sold their intersts to the Freewill Baptists who then built a church near Cates Pond but retained their old name. The name of Bildad is a strange selection among Bible characters to use for a church, for he was one of the three friends of whom Job declared, "Miserable comforters are ye all" (16:2), and he made a point of deriding Job's long speeches: "How long will it be ere ye make an end of words?" (18:2). That some at least of the congregation were aware of the incongruity of the name, which must have been conferred in a humorous spirit, is shown by the following anecdote. Because of the long sermons and additional talks at the old, early church, a local, derisive expression; "Well, they bildaded us through" developed and is still used when services are unusually long and tiresome. (Job 2:11: W.B. Simpson; P. Williams; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills; Mrs. Susie Huddleston; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bildad School
Description:In west Goebel Township. Erected in 1914, one mile west of the second site of the old church (q.v.) for which it was named. The present house of stone was built in 1934. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell; P. Williams; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Billmore
Description:A discontinued post office. See Billmore Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Billmore Hollow
Description:In Myrtle Township, leading into Frederick's Creek. Soon after the Civil War William Moore, known as Bill Moore or More, settled in the valley away off from other settlements. As settlers came a post office was established, and a small village grew up, but all is now lost except the school that is situated three and a half miles northeast of Myrtle (q.v.). (Postal Guide 1886-1902; N.B. Allen; W.J. Birchert)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Billmore School
Description:See Billmore Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Billmore Spring
Description:Another name for Blue Spring (q.v.) because of its location in Billmore Hollow (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Hollow
Description:Leads into Eleven Points River in Goebel Township. Jerry Black, a Civil War veteran, homesteaded there soon after the Civil War. (P. Williams; W. E. Harrod; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Jack School [1 of 2]
Description:One of the schools consolidated with the Thayer School, four miles west of Thayer. Named for a variety of small oak trees, common in the United States. (Webster's Dictionary; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Jack School [2 of 2]
Description:In Woodside Township six miles northeast of Alton. Established in 1887 or 1888 and named for a variety of small, rough oak trees growing in the vicinity. (P. Williams; E. Williams; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Pond
Description:A natural, small lake, very deep, covering about half an acre, in Pond Township on land now (1935), owned by Mr. Mace Lasley. As there is no outlet, the water has become discolored by the refuse from mills and pine timber in the region, thus suggesting the name. (W. Heiskell; W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Pond Mills
Description:In Black Pond Township. The unusually large sawmills there have been operated by various persons from 1895 to about 1915. The first mill was set up by Joe Howell at Black Pond. (q.v.) (W. Heiskell; W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Pond Township
Description:In the northwest corner of the county. Formed from Thomas Township during the 1880s and named for the small lake of this name. (W. Heiskell; W. Weaver; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bland School
Description:In Woodside Township. Established during William J. Bryan's first campaign for President, and named for Richard P. Bland, Congressman from Lebanon, Missouri, who sponsored the Bland Silver Act of 1878. (N. Bell; E. Williams; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blankenship Cemetery
Description:The burial ground near which Norman Church (q.v.) was erected. The name of a landowner and farmer nearby. (Mrs. Geo. Moore; M. Holman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Hole
Description:About 3/4 miles from its mouth there is a cave and a partition in Little Hurricane Creek (q.v.). The water rushes in under the bluff and makes various kinds of noises, quite musical. In the earlier days people believed the place was haunted. The depth and color suggest the name. (N. Bell; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Spring
Description:See Blue Springs
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Springs
Description:Two large springs of bluish water, in Myrtle Township, near "The Narrows" (q.v.). The scenery in its natural wildness is beautiful. The smaller one, generally known as Blue Spring, is on land now (1937), owned by Mrs. W.L. Caldwell near Billmore School. Its estimated daily flow is from 17,000,000 to 32,000,000 gallons. The larger one is also known as Thomason Mill Spring (q.v.). Its estimated flow is 43,000,000 gallons. (H. Taylor; McCanse; N. Bell; C.S. Gohn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bodenhamer School
Description:See Spring Creek School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boise City
Description:An early village just across the state line from Mammoth Springs, Arkansas. It was really that part of Mammoth Springs on the Missouri side. During the early 1880s, when the railroad was being built, it was quite a town, with a store and saloon. Its growth was favored by the Arkansas prohibition laws. Mr. Taylor explained that it was founded by a man who came over the state line and helped to get it incorporated, in order that he might sell liquor with impunity. The community has now almost entirely disappeared. When the post office was established, in 1883, the name Spring City (q.v.), for Mammoth Springs, was first suggested by Charles Trantham, a leading merchant and lifelong resident. Later this was changed to Boise City, which some informants think was an old family name in the vicinity. Mr. Bell believes it was named for a man who operated a small grist mill nearby. Mr. N.B. Allen suggests that it was named for Governor Horace Boies of Iowa, but both spelling and dates make this unlikely; Boies served two terms as the state governor, from 1889 to 1893, and became prominent outside of Iowa only in 1896, when he was one of the leading but unsuccessful candidates for the presidential nomination at the Democratic National Convention. The spelling, but not the pronunciation, would suggest that the name was borrowed from Boise City, the capital of Idaho (pronounced _____ or _____). According to Gannett, the Idaho city takes its name from the Boise River; it is a French word meaning "woody," given by the early French traders because of the trees upon the banks of the river. Nor has any reason been discovered that would explain a transference of the name from Idaho to Missouri. The precise origin must remain in doubt. (Gannett; P.L. 1883; Polk, 93; N. Bell; N.B. Allen; T.S. Taylor; R. Childers; W.J. Birchert)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bond Church
Description:See Bond School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bond School
Description:In Oak Grove Township. One of the older schools, on land given by Andrew Bond. Earlier one house was used for school and church. About 1917 a new schoolhouse was built at the old site and a church house was built by the Methodists and Baptists about one mile west. (N. Bell; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bond's Hollow
Description:In Oak Grove Township. Leads into Frederick's Creek. A pioneer settler of the name lived here before the Civil War. (R. Childers; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bone Hollow
Description:In Franks Township, leading into Eleven Points River, near Cave Bluff. Also known as Huddleston Hollow, Peggy Hollow, and Bozo Hollow. During the Civil War guerilla hands marauded this section and several persons were killed one evening when a dance at Aunt "Peggy" Huddleston's was disturbed. It is said that the people fled and some bodies were left unburied, their bones remaining in the valley. Richard ("Devil Dick") Boze, a guerilla leader, was killed. Superstitious persons always believed the place was haunted and no one would live in the Huddleston house for some years. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; W.E. Harrod; P. Williams; Mrs. J. Owens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boyd Ranch
Description:See Boyd Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boyd Spring
Description:A good living spring on a large ranch, about 2000 acres, in Cedar Bluff Township. Formerly owned by Everett Boyd, a former banker of Alton, but recently in charge of O.C. Lindley, sheriff of the county. (E. Bailey; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boze Hollow
Description:See Bone Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boze Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill on Eleven Points River, in Ozark Township, north of Riverton. It was built as early as 1850 by Richard Boze ("Devil Dick" Boze), and his brother. Mr. B.N. Jones of Riverton has the old corn burrs having the patent stamp of 1831, which Mr. Casey thinks are not the original burrs used there. The spellings "Bose" and "Bows" were found on some maps, but a grandaughter of Richard Boze gives the "z" spelling. Later the mill came into possesion of Marshall Boze. Then it was owned by James Conner (see Conner Hill), and others. During the middle 1880s, Clelland Mitchell of Bardley (q.v.) (formerly of St. Louis), bought the old wooden mill. In 1902 Morgan Woodring bought it from the Mitchell heirs, after which he put in a concrete dam
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boze Mill Crossing
Description:See Doniphan Hollow and Boze Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boze Mill Hollow
Description:Heads in Ripley County, and leads into Eleven Points River near the old Boze Mill. The early road led from Doniphan and vicinity through this hollow. (N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boze Mill Spring
Description:At the old Boze Mill. A private resort for camping and fishing. It flows 8,400,000 gallons per day. (McCanse, 22)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bradley Chapel
Description:See Mount Zion Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bradley Graveyard
Description:See Mount Zion Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brady
Description:A post office established in the store kept by John G. Jolliff at the present location of Willard (q.v.). Named for L. Brady Harris, a lawyer of the community, later of West Plains, who helped to get it established. (G.W. Jolliff; William D. Willard; Postal Guide 1901- 1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Braswell
Description:A discontinued post office, established in the home of Thomas Braswell in Goebel Township about 1897. Rural routes made it unecessary, Thomas Braswell, whose father John Lemuel Baswell came from Tennessee in 1856 and settled here, was a landowner and teacher in the county for several years, and served as state representative in the early 1890s for the Republicans. Braswell Tower is located here. (Chas. Braswell; W. Weaver; Postal Guide 1897-1915)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Braswell Tower
Description:Undoubtedly named for the post office Braswell (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brawley
Description:See Butts
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Broadfoot Spring
Description:A small spring in Woodside Township near Little Hurricane and the Alf Couch Mill site. Before the Civil War, Broadfoot, an early settler, said to be an Indian, built a hut there and lived a few years, leaving only his name for the spring. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; E. Bailey; P. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brock Ranch
Description:A large ranch of about 10,000 acres, owned by J.D. Brock, an eye specialist and aviator of Kansas City. It includes the Hitt and Boyd ranches and the old Sitton and Cal. Smith places on Eleven Points River. On the ranch he has a good club house and a small aviation field. (M. Roberts; T. Hofstedler; N. Be..; R.M. Hitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown Cemetery
Description:See Brown Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown Hollow
Description:Leads into Big Hurricane Creek (q.v.). James Brown was a pioneer settler here. The old cemetery of this name is near the old homestead where Walter Brown now lives. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brushy Pond
Description:Between Cook and Tram Hollows. Descriptive of conditions in various areas of the Ozarks. After the heavy pine timber was cut during the 1880s and following years, a dense growth of other timber, chiefly oak, soon covered this section. It is also known as Camp Five Pond, for which see Camp Five. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bryan School
Description:In Woodside Township. Established during one of the presidential campaigns, 1896 or 1900, of William J. Bryan, fo whom it was named. (N. Bell; W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buck Hollow
Description:Heads near new Liberty (q.v.) and leads into Spring Creek (q.v.). During pioneer days an unusually large buck was killed in the valley. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buck Horn Branch
Description:A small stream heading in Oak Grove Township and flowing into Frederick's Creek in Jobe Township. The name was acquired because during early days so many deer were butchered there and the horns left along the stream. Also known as Lick Branch because early hunters placed salt near the stream to attract deer. (W.J. Birchert; A.J. Robinson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buckhart Zinc Mine
Description:During the early 1920s two Buckhart brothers from Iowa opened a zinc mine about one mile northeast of Alton and worked it two or three years, but it did not prove profitable. (William Harrod; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Butler Hollow
Description:Heads in Carter County and leads into Big Hurricane Hollow in Falling Springs Township. Daniel Butler, one of the first settlers, lived in the hollow duing the 1870s. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Butts
Description:An early post office near the present site of New Liberty in Falling Springs Township. It took the name of an early settler, John Butts, who owned a store and operated an over-shot wheel grist mill during the late 1870s and early 1880s. For several years prior to his death in 1889, he served as justice of the peace and postmaster. At this time the office was discontinued until 1901, when James Brawley, a farmer and landowner, took charge of the mail in his home. The office bore his name until 1915, when he turned it over to his son-in-law, L. Allman, who changed the name to New Liberty for the school nearby. (Postal Guide 1901-1915; E. Bailey; P. Williams; W. Heiskell; Mrs. N., Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Butts Mill
Description:See Butts
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Butts School
Description:An early name for New Liberty School (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buzzards' Cave [1 of 2]
Description:In Woodside Township, near Cliff Spring (q.v.), is a small cave in which buzzards reared their young in the earlier days. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; Chas. Braswell; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buzzards' Cave [2 of 2]
Description:The dry cave at Cave Springs (q.v.) is sometimes known by this name because formerly buzzards were numerous there. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; Chas Braswell; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Byrd Cemetery
Description:Named for Jesse Byrd, an old settler, who gave the grounds in the northwest part of Myrtle Township. (E. Williams; J. Kester)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Byrd School
Description:In Myrtle Township, four miles west of Myrtle. Named for an old settler from Alabama, Jesse Byrd, who gave the land for a school. (J. Kester; E. Williams; W.J. Birchert)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Caldwell's Ferry
Description:On Eleven Points River, near Blue Spring (q.v.). George Caldwell owns a farm here and operated the ferry boat here until it was replaced by a bridge in 1936. (N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Calm
Description:A village and discontinued post office in Cedar Bluff Township. Only one store and the school remain. The local tradition of the origin of the name is as follows. Just when the citizens were casting about for a name and several names were suggested, John Miller's daughter, who had been to Salem, Massachusetts, came in on the mail hack. To her all was so quiet in this rural section, and the calmness suggested to her the name. (Postal Guide 1901-1916; W.R. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Eight
Description:See Camp Five
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Five
Description:One of the more important timber camps of the Ozark Land and Lumber Company that cut the pine and some oak timber during the 1890s and 1900s. Headquarters in Winona, Shannon County in King Township, halfway between Bardley (q.v.) and Wilderness (q.v.). It was the terminus of the tram road (now a highway), from Winona. Camp Five Pond, later known as Brushy Pond (q.v.) is a small natural pond. Camp Four (q.v.) is in Carter County. Camp Six is in King's Township, four miles northwest of Bardley; Camp Seven, in King Township, one and a half miles west of Bardley; Camp Eight, about three miles northeast of Wilderness (q.v.); Camp Nine, one and half miles east of Wilderness; Camp Ten, on White's Creek (q.v.), about four miles south of Camp Five. Nothing remains of the camps, and this region was later sold to the Moss Tie Company of St. Louis and is now a part of the Fristoe Unit of the U.S. Forest. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills; T. King; W. Heiskell; C.E. Drain)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Five Pond
Description:See Camp Five and Brushy Pond
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Nine
Description:See Camp Five
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Seven
Description:See Camp Five
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Six
Description:See Camp Five
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Ten
Description:See Camp Five
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Bluff
Description:A perpendicular bluff, about 600 ft. high, on Eleven Points River in Woodside Township. It is covered with a dense growth of the cane plants. Nearby is the Cane Bluff Ford, the river crossing of the old pioneer Pocahontas and Thomasville road. Thomas Bowles of Alton built a club house there about 1923. It burned a few years later, but the place remains a good fishing resort. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; E. Bailey; McCanse, 44)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Bluff Ford
Description:See Cane Bluff
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Bluff Hollow
Description:The hollow in Woodside Township leading into Eleven Points River near Cane Bluff (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Hill School
Description:Five miles east of Thayer, near a little stream where the wild cane plant grows. (E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carter's Branch
Description:A small tributary of Frederick's Creek in Piney and Oak Grove Townships. It is named for Ned Carter, a farmer landowner. Now generally known as Biffle Branch for Joseph Biffle who owns land and lives near the mouth of the stream. Also known as Haw Branch for the black and red haw bushes that grow profusely in that region. (Chas. Braswell; Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; H. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cates Pond
Description:In the western part of Goebel Township, a small natural, drainage-fed lake of about two and a half acres on the farm settled by Ephraim Cates, a farmer from Tennessee. (W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cates Pond Baptist Church
Description:See Bildad Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cave Hollow
Description:In Thayer Township. Runs from northeast into Warm Fork (q.v.) near Clifton School (q.v.). There is a small cave in the hollow. (R. Childers; Mrs. W. Fraley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cave Springs
Description:About four miles southeast of Alton are two small caves; one is dry and from the other flow small springs. During the Civil War Major Geo. Norman and William Johnson, two older men, took Joseph Johnson, then a youth, with them when they took the County Records to the cave for concealment during the danger. Near the springs was built the old log house for school and church, the Cave Springs Missionary Baptist Church, having been organized in 1856. Later a church house was erected and the old house was used for school several years. Cave Springs School is now consolidated with Couch. (Halford Taylor; Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson; E. Williams; Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; Chas. Braswell; M.B.G.A. 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cave Springs Missionary Baptist Church
Description:See Cave Springs
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cave Springs School
Description:See Cave Springs
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Bluff Hollow
Description:Leads from the northeastern part of Oregon County into Kelley Township, a southern tributary of Big Barren Creek. There are cedar covered bluffs along the headwaters. (J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Bluff Township
Description:The southeast corner division, east of Eleven Points River. Formed from Jobe Township, the petition having been granted August 3, 1886. Named from the cedar covered bluffs near Stubblefield Ford (q.v.). (County Court Records, Bk. 6, 82; Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Creek
Description:A small stream of Thayer Township, flowing into Warm Fork (q.v.). Many cedar trees grow along the stream. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Perkins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Hole
Description:A larger eddy, about 200 yds. long and 100 yds. wide, in Barren Fork in Moore Township, where horse swimming was a favorite sport in the early days. The growth of cedar trees near suggested the name. (J. Old; W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Charter Oak School
Description:In King Township. Originally the name was White's School (q.v.). Also later known as Roberts School for the settlement of this name. William Roberts, who had come from Indiana during the timber days, was a farmer and landowner. When Mr. Gohn taught there in 1896, he and the pupils changed the name for the famous old Charter Oak of Connecticutt. This tree, celebrated in legendary American history, formerly stood in Hartford, Connecticutt. The tradition is that when Governor Andrus in 1687 demanded from the Assembly the return of the colonial charter, a patriot Captain Wadsworth, escaped in the darkness with the charter and hid it in a hollow oak. There is no contemporary record of this event. (C.S. Gohn; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chasteen School
Description:In Big Apple Township, west of Koshkonong. Named for John Chasteen, on whose land it was built. (R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Childers Spring
Description:A good spring at the old log Stony Point School, on land belonging to Frank Childers, who settled there long before the Civil War. Now (1937), owned by Nelse Vinson. (R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chimney Cave
Description:In Woodside Township. In early days they would make fires in the cave allowing the smoke to leave through the opening near the summit of the hill. Also called "Nigger Cave" (q.v.). (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clark Mill
Description:See Mill Stone Branch
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cliff Cemetery
Description:An early burial ground northeast of Thayer, named from two early settlers, Gnorma Wilma and William J. Cliff, who were landowners and prominent business men. (N.B. Allen; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cliff Spring
Description:In Woodside Township near Little Hurricane Creek. An ordinary spring near a high steep bluff. (E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clifton
Description:A post office and village, about two miles northeast of Thayer, on the old Thomasville and Salem, Arkansas road. Established before 1874, it became quite a little village with a population of 300, having a large building, erected in 1880, for church, school, and the Masonic lodge. Its name, the "town of Cliffs," originated from two prominent landowners and merchants, George and William J. Cliff, who settled here soon after the Civil War. When the railroad was built, this village was gradually moved to Thayer. (N.B. Atlen; W. Weaver; J. Old; Campbell, Gaz. of Mo. (1874) 15; R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clifton School
Description:About two miles northeast of Thayer; all that remains of an early village, Clifton (q.v.). (E. Bailey; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Climax School
Description:Now consolidated with Alton School, but it was originally formed from Alton District about 1902. As a climax to a school fight and a struggle to get their district formed, the community was successful. (N. Bell; C.S. Gohn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Coin
Description:A post office and small village, now gone, in the northeastern part of Johnson Township. Named for Coin Jones, who with his father, George Jones, came from Kansas about 1894. A saw mill, a grist mill, and a store were set up on the settlement and soon a post office was established and kept by the son. Rural mail routes caused its discontinuance. (Postal Guide 1897-1916; P. Williams; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cold Rock Spring
Description:About eight miles northwest of Thayer, near Anthony Creek. A descriptive name. The water is very cold. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Perkins; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Collins Mill
Description:See Graham Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Colvin Creek
Description:In Cedar Bluff Township, flowing into Eleven Points River near Stubblefield Ford. A pioneer family name. The stream is crooked and, being in a very hilly section, its water comes with a great rush; hence the old name is being replaced by Rush Creek. (W. Heiskell; Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Conner Hill
Description:One of the largest and steepest elevations in Ozark Township, north of Mitchell School (q.v.). Soon after the Civil War George Conner, his widowed mother, and his half brother James came fom Indiana and settled here. Later James had a partnership in the old Boze Mill (q.v.). (Mrs. Jack Woodring)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cook Hollow
Description:Heads in Falling Springs Township and flows southeast into Big Hurricane. The name, which was given long before the timber days, is evidently a family name. (N. Bell; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Corona
Description:A post office for Eldorado Springs (q.v.). The name was suggested by Porter Arnold, probably because of the coppery or golden color of the spring water. (J.H. Taylor; Postal Guide 1901-1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cotton Creek
Description:A small stream in Jobe Township, flowing into Frederick's Creek. This valley was the first place in the county where cotton was grown. (E. Bailey; W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cotton Creek Cemetery
Description:See Cotton Creek School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cotton Creek School
Description:In Jobe Township, 3/4 mile west of Jobe (q.v.), near the stream from which its name was derived. The Freewill Baptists use the house for worship. The cemetery near the school also took the name of the creek. (E. Bailey; W. Weaver; Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Robinson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cotton Rock School
Description:See Knob Hill School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Couch
Description:A small town in Oak Grove Township laid out by George W. Couch on the old Simpson Couch homestead. He was an influential citizen and landowner. He owned and operated a cotton gin, store, and corn mill here. (W. Heiskell; Rem. Hist. of Ozark Region, 484; Postal Guide 1888-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Couch Hollow
Description:In Johnson Township, leading into Eleven Points River about one-quarter mile west of the mouth of Big Hurricane Creek. It was built by Simpson Couch, a large landowner near Couch (q.v.) as early as 1853. It is said to have been the first mill on Eleven Points River. Only the few old ruins remain, and although it was owned by others (see Williams Mill), it was generally known as the old Couch Mill. (C. Braswell; W.E. Harrod; P. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:County Line Branch
Description:A small stream in Big Apple Township near the line between Oregon and Howell counties. It flows into Bussell Branch (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:County Line Garage
Description:In 1933, Mr. Joseph W. Spake of Hardy, Arkansas, built his farm home at the county line of Howell and Oregon counties on Highway 80. Here he operates a filling station, a garage, and a small store. He insists that it be called Spakeville, but the place is generally called County Line Garage. (J.W. Spake)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cow Hollow
Description:The upper part of Frederick's Creek valley. Probably named by the highway department, as the older inhabitants know nothing of it. As this section has free range, many cattle do graze here. (N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cox Town
Description:See Cox's Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cox's Creek
Description:In Thayer Township flowing into Warm Fork. An old family name. The settlement between Couch and Thayer was known as Cox Town because there were so many of this family name living in the vicinity. (W. Highfill; E. Bailey; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crane Ranch
Description:Albert Crane from Chicago entered and bought about 25,000 acres in 1875 in regions southeast of West Plains. Some of it was in Oregon County. He put in the first Herford cattle in that vicinity. Parts of it later composed Davis, Klice, and Tory ranches (q.v.). (E.M. Nale; H. Chapin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crews Cemetery
Description:See Shiloh
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crews Store
Description:See Royal Oak School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crooked Hollow
Description:In northeastern Franks Township; heads into Current River, drainage in Shannon County. Some called it South Crooked Hollow. Descriptive of the topography and position. (W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Culp Branch
Description:A small steam in Piney Township, flowing into Piney Creek. Named by the highway department for Caleb Culp, through whose farm it flows. (W. Weaver; W.B. Simpson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cupola Pond
Description:A natural, deep pond covering five or six acres, in Franks Township. Very old trees, known locally as "cupola gum," growing around the pond suggested the name to early settlers. The correct name of the species is tupelo gum (Nyssa aquatica). The cupola is commonly pronouned as if spelled "cupelo," thus facillitating the confusion. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dalton Chapel School
Description:In the northwestern part of Black Pond Township. About 1900 the house was erected for both church and school purposes. Luther Dalton, a farmer and landowner, was the leader in getting the district established. The Methodists were most numerous. (E. Williams; Mr. and Mrs. W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:De Priest Hollow
Description:In Black Pond Township. Leads into Eleven Points River. There were early settlers of this name in Oregon and Shannon counties. Isaac De Priest was the first assessor of Oregon County. (N. Bell; Geo. Moore; N.B. Allen)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Deckard
Description:In Woodside Township north of Alton. Kellis Deckard, farmer and landowner, owns a blacksmith shop. His grandfather, James Deckard, had a blacksmith shop here fifty years ago. Possibly a post office was there but no records, suggested one informant. (Mrs. N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Del Haf
Description:A vanished tie and timber village and post office, established about 1919, on the old Myrtle road halfway between Myrtle (q.v.) and Jeff (q.v.). In existence for only a few years, it was built up by Jasper L. Morris, who had a saw mill and a store. He coined the word from his daughter's name Della, and the "half way" location of the place. (J. Kester; A.E. Hackworth; Mrs. R. Dalton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Denman Ranch
Description:See Posey Ranch
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Denney Hollow
Description:Heads about six miles west of Greer (q.v.), and leads into Eleven Points River. John Denney was an early settler and landowner. He operated the Simpsons Mill (q.v.) before the Civil War. (W. Heiskell; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Denning Club House
Description:In Woodside Township, on Eleven Points River, near the mouth of Greer Spring Branch. Owned by Louis E. Denning, a prominent businessman of St. Louis now connected with the brewery industry; formerly with the Independent Packing House of St. Louis. He owns Greer Spring and 6000 acres, purchased from the Louis Houck estate of Cape Girardeau, part of which was fomerly owned by Samuel Greer (see Greer Spring). (W.E. Harrod; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Devil Shoot Hollow
Description:The depression about Thomason Mill (q.v.) is so steep and narrow that during heavy rains, the water rushes down the valley and into Eleven Points River with such force as to be dangerous. (Mr. and Mrs. T. Hofstedler)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Devil's Backbone
Description:A very steep ridge about one quarter mile long and about 40 to 50 feet high along East Prong of Mill Creek and Lowassie Creek. There are dangerous looking gorges on either side of the ridge, which is about 40 feet wide. (Jno. Old; Mrs. N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Diles Creek
Description:A small stream heading in Myrtle Township and flowing into Spring River near Imboden, Arkansas. Early pioneer settlers of this name lived in this vicinity. (N. Bell; J.H. Taylor; G. Underwood)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doniphan Hollow
Description:In Ozark Township leading into Eleven Points River. The old pioneer road from Doniphan (q.v.) to Thomasville (q.v.) followed this hollow to the old Boze Mill Crossing (see Couch Hollow). (Geo. Moore; C.S. Gohn; J.H. Johnson; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Creek
Description:A small, generally dry, stream in Jobe Township flowing into Frederick's Creek. (A.J. Robinson; N. Bell; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Creek School
Description:In Jobe Township. Named for the stream nearby. (E. Williams; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Fork
Description:In Moore Township. It flow from southwest into Watered Fork (q.v.). It has water only during the rainy seasons. (G. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Duncan Hollow
Description:In southwestern Falling Springs Township. The valley is said to have been an old Indian campground. A very early settler of the name lived there. He and his wife were buried there but the graves are lost. (E. Bailey; P. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:East Prong of Mill Creek
Description:See Mill Creek in Moore Township
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:East Prong of Piney Creek
Description:See Piney Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:East Prong of Spring Creek
Description:Rises in the northern part of Franks Township. Flows south into the main stream, Spring Creek, near its mouth. (W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:East Tennessee
Description:See Hollis Settlement
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elberta
Description:A local name given by some of the workers in the fruit orchards. Really St. Elmo (q.v.) on the railroad records. The name of a kind of peach grown abundantly in that section. (N. Bell; T.J. Richardson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eldorado Springs
Description:A pretty spring that seldom goes dry. About four and a half miles east of Thayer, in a little swampy hollow. Elm tree roots and other vegetation gave the water a coppery color. Some people earlier thought it was mineral water and an attempt was made, duing the 1880s, to establish a health resort; for a few years summer campers were attracted, but there was no real value. Doubtless it was the golden hue of the water that suggested the name of the mythical golden city so long sought by the Spaniads in South America. (J. Kester; N.B. Allen; J.H. Taylor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eleven Points
Description:The 1850 map shows this to be a settlement or village on Eleven Points River at the crossing of the old roads extending north, northeast, south, southeast, and southwest. It was later known as Thomasville (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eleven Points River
Description:This is the most important stream in the county. It rises in Howell County, where it is called Eleven Points Creek (q.v.), crosses Oregon County from northwest to southeast, and flows into Arkansas, where it unites with Spring River, and finally empties into Black River. The name is an old one. It is mentioned in the account of the Stephen H. Long Expedition, of the years 1819 and 1820 (EWT, XVII.34f.). Schoolcraft crossed it on January 24, 1819, and describes it as follows: "At twelve o'clock I reached the banks of Elevenpoints, and was ferried over in a canoe. This stream is nearly as large as Spring River, with which it unites three miles above its junction with Big Black River. Its waters are beautifully clear," probably it is much older, and goes back at least to the French voyageurs, if not to the Indians. The likelihood that it was translated from the French lies in the special meaning of the word "Point," here evidently taken over from the French word Pointe. The meaning of the French term is clearly explained in the recent and most helpful study entitled A GLOSSARY OF MISSISSIPPI VALLEY FRENCH, 1673-1850, by John Francis McDermott (Washington University Studies, 1941). Professor McDermott says (p. 123): "Pointe, n.f. A wooded point of land. This curious word is obviously a contribution of the voyageur who measured distance on the river by the bends of the stream as indicated by the points or arms protruding, but it was used apparently for wooded points only. Tixier, for instance, wrote in Louisiana "de ja les bois prenaient la disposition qu'ils ont sur toute la rive du fleuve, formant ce qu'on nomme des pointes (timbers), c'est-a-dire une bordure qui longe le Mississippi" (Voyage, 20). Jean Baptiste Truedeau nearly fifty years earlier used the word in much the same way: "on trouve Sur les Bord du Missouri de distence en distence quelque pointe de Bois etroite et peu longue fourni seulement en petit liard, saules, et aussi menu bois" (Abel, ed., "Trudeau's Description of the Upper Missouri," 1580159). In her note Dr. Abel added that the trader Chardon used the word in the same way in his "Fort Clark Journal" and that Audubon in his "Missouri River Journal" wrote "We saw a patch of wood called in these regions a 'point'." The voyageurs who named the stream evidently must have counted just eleven of the bends or reaches marked by wooded projections as they worked their way up from its mouth. Present inhabitants, who have naturally no knowledge of the special French use of the word, offer the usual guesses. One of them surmised that in early days there were eleven distinct branches that made up the main stream, though admittedly these eleven branches cannot now be pointed out with any certainty. Another had heard that early hunters, probably Indians, had once killed a deer near the stream with the unusual number of eleven points on its horns. A third, Mr. N.B. Allen, said his father James Allen had worked with the surveyors when the government survey of this region was made in 1821, and told him the surveyors found the stream so crooked that within a short distance (between townships 22 and 23), they had to change the points of their compass eleven times. This last explanation perhaps retains a distorted memory of the true origin, which was of course far older. (Schoolcraft, JOURNAL OF A TOUR INTO MISSOURI AND ARKANSAS IN THE YEARS 1818 AND 1819, 83; S.H. Long Exp., EWT, XVII.34f; McDermott, 123; all maps available; N.B. Allen; Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; J.H. Taylor; J. Old; Miss Cl Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elk Creek
Description:It heads in eastern Howell Township and flows into Warm Fork Creek in Big Apple Township. It is said that elk were uncommon in this section, but that a few were found in this vicinity during the early pioneer days. (C. Vaughn; Mrs. Anna Lassater)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elm Hollow
Description:It leads into Dry Creek two miles south of Many Springs in Johnson Township. The name was given by cattle men because of the great number of elm trees growing there. (Mrs. W. Johnson; N. Bell; Mr. and Mrs. Hofstedler)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elm Pond
Description:A small natural pond covering about one quarter acre in the generally dry part of Woodside Township. The large elm trees growing in the vicinity suggested the name. (W. Heiskell; Mrs. Susie Huddleston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elm Pond Church
Description:See Macedonia Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Engleside
Description:A discontinued post office in the southeastern part of the county on the east side of Eleven Points River, shown on 1865 map. Apparently in the same location as English (q.v.), shown on an 1884 map. It is probably an error of the map-maker for English. No one interviewed was able to give any definite information. (Goodwin and West (1867) 14; Sutherland (1860) 739-743; Map 1865)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:English
Description:A settlement on the eastern side of Eleven Points River near Stubblefield Ford, as shown by an 1880 map. English is an old family name in N. Arkansas and S. Missouri. (P. Williams; G. Underwood)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:English Creek
Description:Drains the western part of Thayer Township. Flows into Spring River in Arkansas. An old pioneer family name. (W. Heiskell; N. Bell; G. Underwood)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:English School
Description:In Highland Township two miles southeast of Rover. Theodore English, living near, gave land for the school. (Jno. Old; W. Weaver; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fagan Cemetery
Description:In Cedar Bluff Township. W.W. Fagan from Alabama, who was a Civil War soldier lived there and deeded the land. (Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:In Myrtle Township. The house was erected in 1880 on a high, rather level ridge, making possible a good clear view of the surroundings. The Baptists also used the house for worship. (E. Williams; W.J. Birchert; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Falling Springs
Description:In the southern part of Falling Springs Township near Big Hurricane Creek, on land now owned by Mr. Walter Brown. The water comes from a bluff, falling about 35 feet, thus making water power for running a feed mill and furnishing lights for the home. Later known as Turner Springs (q.v.). (W. Heiskell; E. Bailey; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Falling Springs Township
Description:A northeastern division. Named for the springs (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Farewell
Description:A small timber village and discontinued post office in southeastern Oak Grove Township. The office was first kept by J.W. Linebarger in his home. It was moved from Jeff (q.v.) to this place in 1913. Refusing the name "Fairview" as sent in, the postal department gave the name. Perhaps the name was suggested to the authorities because Mr. James H. Taylor had been the only postmaster at Jeff (q.v.)--a farewell to him. (J.H. Taylor; J. Kester; O. Young; Postal Guide 1913-1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Father Hogan's Settlement
Description:See Irish Settlement
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ferguson Mill
Description:See Thomason Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fox Hollow
Description:Leads into Bee Fork (q.v.) in Black Pond Township. Many foxes were in that vicinity. (J. Old)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Franks Township
Description:The north-central border division, formed from Woodside Township in 1894, and named for John M. Franks, a landowner and timber man, who was judge of the county at the time. (W. E. Harrod; N.B. Allen; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Frederick's Fork
Description:Heads in Piney Township; flows through Oak Grove and Jobe Townships into Eleven Points River in Myrtle Township. A family name. It is the name of one of the early pioneer landowners. (J.L. Sipe; J. Old)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Freeman Hollow
Description:In King Township, leading into Eleven Points River. Peter Freeman settled there long before the Civil War. (W. Heiskell; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fristoe Unit of the U.S. Forest
Description:It includes northeastern Oregon, southeastern Shannon, southwestern Carter, and northwestern Ripley counties. Mr., Bailey thinks that a Mr. Fristoe was a commissioned officer in the Civil War, and the name probably came from him. Mr. Sollars, who had much experience during the timber days in this section says that J.W. Fristoe was a partner of the Moss Tie Company that worked off the inferior oak timber in this section of the Ozarks. By his marriage to the widow of the former company president, Thomas J. Moss, Mr. Fristoe became the president of the company. He died in 1933. It seems most probable, as Mr. Sollars thinks, that the name was given for this company executive. (E. Bailey; W. Heiskell; J.A. Sollars)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Garfield
Description:A little village and post office in Oak Grove Township. The village was earlier known as Sittonville for a captain of the Confederate Army, John J. Sitton, who kept a store on his farm. When the post office was established in his store, Thomas Hays, an old army chum of his, suggested the name for President James A. Garfield (1831-1881), who had been assassinated a few years before. All has disappeared but the school and church. (W.E. Harrod; A.J. Robinson; E. Williams; Postal Guide 1886-1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Garfield Church
Description:A community building for all denominations near the site of the old post office of Garfield (q.v.). Originally it was a Methodist Church supported chiefly by John L. Sitton, whose wife "Aunt Nannie," was very religious. It was a small building, but neat and painted white. As it was unusual for rural schools and churches to be painted, it was generally known as White Church. (Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Robinson; Chas Braswell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Garfield School
Description:See Garfield. Now consolidated with Couch School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Goat Hollow
Description:A small eastern branch of Warm Fork, in Thayer Township. It acquired this name because George Hopper lived there for years and raised many goats. (Mrs. W. Fraley; R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Goebel Township
Description:Formed between 1915 and 1919 from that part of King River west of Eleven Points River. Mr. Weaver, then county judge, aked that it be named for the recently assassinated Governor William Goebel (1856-1900), of Kentucky, who was a strong Democrat. (W. Weaver; H. Heiskell; N.B. Allen)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grab
Description:See Haywood's
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Graham Club House
Description:"Doc" Graham, a druggist of Poplar Bluff, Missouri, owns a small club house near Eleven Points River about one and a half miles south from Greer Mill (q.v.). (W.E. Harrold; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Graham Mill
Description:See Graham Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Graham Spring
Description:Near the mouth of Dry Fork, eight miles northwest of Alton. A good stream strong enough to give power for a small grist mill. Soon after the Civil War, a bachelor Union soldier of this name built a small corn grist mill there and operated it until his death, after which the mill was fast going to ruin, when in 1880, A Mr. Collins repaired the mill and operated it for a few years until it burned. (E. Williams; E. Bailey; Geo. Moore; N. Bell; Mrs. Susie Huddleston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grand Gulf
Description:A natural topographical curiosity in Big Apple Township, four miles west of Koshkonong. A marvelous example of nature's handiwork in the Ozarks is this gulf or enormous depression covering possibly 50 acres. There are two crater-like gulfs variously estimated about 3/4 mile long, 50-100 ft. wide, and 150-200 ft. deep, so deep that large sycamore trees at the bottom are dwarfed in comparison with the great walls of limestone. The cavern may be traversed when dry, and from it roaring waters may be heard. Some doubt that this rushing water is the underground stream that forms Mammoth Spring in Arkansas, but the story that bundles of straw thrown into the cave do come out into the spring is told and believed by many of the natives. The natural bridge, the spring, the valley, the cavern, and the great horseshoe shaped depression make it a grand gulf in a generally level country. (WHERE TO GO IN THE OZARKS; COMMONWEALTH OF MISSOURI, 55; R.T. Boles; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grand Hollow
Description:A more recent name given by fishermen and hunters for Cane Bluff Hollow (q.v.) because of the splendid hunting and fishing region there.(N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Greenbriar Hollow
Description:In King Township, leading into Eleven Points River. Rather notorious for the moonshine whiskey made there. The greenbriar, also known as saw briar, vines grow there abundantly. (C.S. Gohn; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Greer
Description:A small village and discontinued post office in Woodside Township. When the post office was established Janurary 10, 1890, the first postmaster, Mr. Peter Williams, who is still serving (1937), suggested the name for Captain Samuel Greer of the Confederate army, who had entered the land before the Civil War. The office was discontinued between 1939-1941. (P. Williams; W. Heiskell; Postal Guide 1891-1939)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Greer Mill
Description:A large three-story flour mill, built in 1888 upon the hill about one quarter mile from Greer Spring. It was run by a cable from the large water well at the spring. Because of competition it has not been in operation since 1916. The original small grist mill set at the spring in 1855 was known as the Simpson Mill for its owner Thomas C. Simpson, a pioneer Baptist minister from Tennessee, who sold it to Captain Samuel Greer during the Civil War. (P. Williams; W. Heiskell; W.E. Harrod; W.B. Simpson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Greer Spring
Description:One of the largest springs in the United States, twelve miles northeast of Alton. Its average flow of 209,000,000 gallons (maximum 539,000,000) rushes from under a precipitous bluff, a most picturesque surrounding, and flows with a fall of 46 ft. through a narrow, rocky gorge with heavily wooded slopes to Eleven Points River, one and a half miles away. One of the scenic gems of the Ozarks, it is a place of unusual beauty and grandeur. Named for a former owner, Samuel Greer, a pioneer from Tennessee, who later was a captain in the Civil War. The spring and a large tract of surrounding land are now owned by Mr. L.E. Denning of St. Louis. (P. Williams; W. Heiskell; WHERE TO GO IN THE OZARKS, 22)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Greer Spring Branch
Description:A picturesque stream, about one and a half miles long, carrying the water for Greer Spring to Eleven Points River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grisham Mill
Description:See Mill Stone Branch
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grisham Spring
Description:See Mill Stone Branch
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Griswold
Description:A small village and post office in Cedar Bluff Township. There were a store, a cotton gin, and a grist mill, but all were gone before 1910. James Griswold had a store and kept the post office for a time. It is said that a drunken man killed a member of a wedding party one evening, and this incident caused the death of the village, because people began moving one by one. (Postal Guide 1888- 1901; J.H. Taylor; Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton; W.J. Birchert)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Guiteau
Description:Soon after the assasination of President Garfield in 1881, Robert Hall set up a store about three miles southeast of Garfield (q.v.) saying that he would kill that village. Since the Sitton store was spoken of as Garfield, this store was known as Guiteau, for Charles J. Guiteau, the assassin of President Garfield. Still with some feeling of political enmity in the community when the Garfield District was divided, the new school, Guiteau, took the name of the Hall Store. The store failed to develop into a village and soon the proprietor moved to Oklahoma. (O. Young; Chas. Braswell; E. Williams; A.J. Robinson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Guiteau School
Description:See Guiteau
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gum School
Description:See Smyrna Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gum Spring
Description:On a farm now owned by Emil Oesh, in King Township. Mr. John Mills, who formerly lived there, dug out the spring to a depth of eight feet and put in a large black gum casing, the origin of the name. Gum Spring School, one and one quarter miles from the spring, took the name of the spring. It is now discontinued and consolidated with Freemont. (N. Bell; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gum Spring School
Description:See Gum Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hackberry Sink
Description:A large depression with an average depth of about fifteen feet, covering about fifteen acres, in Big Apple Township. Originally there was a large spring there known as Hackberry Spring. A dense growth of hackberry trees suggested the name. (R.T. Boles)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hall Cemetery
Description:In Woodside Township, one and a half miles west of Gree. On land entered by Irs G. Hall, who came from Kentucky about 1854. The first person buried there was a northern soldier during the Civil War. (P. Williams; E. Bailey; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harris Ranch
Description:In King Township, 11,000 acres of land formerly owned by the Ozark Land and Lumber Company. William T. Harris, now of Indianapolis, Indiana, bought the land about 1916, stocked it with cattle and sheep, and lived there a few years until the financial slump immediately following the World War. (G.C. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hart Spring
Description:A good spring, one mile west of Couch, on the Sam Rhodes farm. Named for Thomas Hart who came from California soon after the "gold rush" of 1849 and lived there several years on land he entered. (Chas. Braswell; W. Highfill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hatcher Hollow
Description:A northern tributary, leading into Eleven Points River one half mile below Thomasville. Robert Hatcher, one of the very early pioneers settled here about 1814 according to some informants. Campbell says Samuel Hatcher settled on Eleven Points River in 1816. Parker says the first settlement was made in 1803 by Charles Hatcher. Now known also as Mill Hollow because Oliver Longgreer operated a lumber and planing mill here about 1884-1892. Hatcher Spring, now Posey Spring (q.v.), is one mile up the hollow. (Geo. Moore; J. Griffith; Mrs. A.O. Roberts; MISSOURI AS IT WAS IN 1867, 344; Campbell, Gaz. of Mo., 405)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hatcher Spring
Description:See Hatcher Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Haw Branch
Description:See Carter's Branch
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Haxckberry Spring
Description:See Hackberry Sink
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Haywood's
Description:This store was set up as early as 1896. It was given the nickname of Grab. Mr. Haywood was a very fine, generous man, but kept only a very limited stock of groceries. An example of good-natured joking. (Geo. Moore; William D. Willard)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hesley
Description:About one and a half miles southeast of Couch (q.v.). An early settler, named Hesley, lived here before the Civil War. (Chas. Braswell; A. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hi Wassie
Description:See Low Wassie Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hi Wassie Hollow
Description:See Low Wassie Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hickory Grove Cemetery
Description:See Hickory Grove Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hickory Grove Church [1 of 2]
Description:About six miles northeast of Alton, near a grove of black hickory trees, are two churches of this name, both used occasionally. The Cumberland Presbyterian was organized as early as 1880. The Church of Christ, organized about 1893, is about 200 yds. from the Presbyterian Church. Hickory Grove Cemetery, an older burial ground is near the Presbyterian Church. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; P. Williams; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hickory Grove Church [1 of 2]
Description:See Hickory Grove Church above.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hide Out School
Description:A name by which Norman School (q.v.) was often known because it was so far out in the forest region between Alton and Thayer. (Mrs. Geo. Moore; Mrs. W. Fraley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Highland Township
Description:One of the west-central divisions, formed as early as 1873. Of topographical significance. (Campbell, Atlas 1873; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hitt Ranch
Description:A large ranch in Ozark Township along Eleven Points River. R.M. Hitt, a fruit agent of Koshkonong, and his brother John Hitt of Chicago bought the Boyd Ranch and other land at the close of the World War. The Boyd Ranch had been started about 1910. In 1933 it was sold to Dr. J.D. Brock of Kansas City. See Brock Ranch. (W. Heiskell; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hog Hollow
Description:A small branch of Pine Hollow (q.v.) in Black Pond Hollow. One of the camps of the Ozark Land and Lumber Company was located here. The name was acquired because so many hogs were raised around the camp. (N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hogan Club House
Description:In southern Franks Township near eleven Points River. Built in 1928 by Dr. Edward Hogan of West Plains. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; P. Williams; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hog's Backbone
Description:A ridge, so known because of its shape, said to be 400 ft. high, between East and West Prongs of Mill Creek (q.v.). (J. Old)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hollis School
Description:In the northeastern part of Woodside Township. Named for the donor of the site, Jesse Hollis, a pioneer from Tennessee. (N. Bell; W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hollis Settlement
Description:In Goebel Township. A Tennessee family of that name were pioneer settlers here. The settlement was also known as "East Tennessee because it was the most eastern settlement of Tennessee at that time." The Livingston family and others had come from the same state. (Clipping from THE SOUTH MISSOURIAN recent issue. Article by Lewis Simpson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hood Pond
Description:In Penwood School district. A later settler of this name made a small pond out in the forest to furnish water for the range cattle. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hooper Hollow
Description:Leads into Little Hurricane Creek (q.v.). Joseph Hooper lived there and after the death of Simpson Couch, operated the Couch Mill (q.v.). (Mr. and Mrs. J. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Horner's Branch
Description:In western King Township, a branch of White's Creek. James Horner of Tennessee came to Missouri soon after the Civil War, bought land and lived there. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Howell Township
Description:Originally the northwestern part of the county and one of the four original divisions. The name of a very early pioneer family. Four sons of Thomas Jefferson Howell (see Howell Valley in Howell County), settled in various localities: Joseph, on Bay Creek (q.v.); Jasper, on Anthony Creek (q.v.); William Benton, on Warm Fork (q.v.); Eason, on Middle Fork (q.v.). See Howell Township of Howell County. (Geo. Moore; R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Huddleston Branch
Description:In eastern Moore Township, leading into Eleven Points River. John Huddleston settled here before the Civil War. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Huddleston Ferry
Description:See Stubblefield Ford
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Huddleston Graveyard [1 of 2]
Description:In Moore Township, six miles northwest of Alton. It was begun in 1887 on land belonging to John Huddleston, when his daughter Mishie (Mrs. Thomas Braswell), was buried there. This is now a public burial ground still used; but in Franks Township is a very old cemetery, no longer used, which was started as a family burial ground long before the Civil War, on the pioneer farm belonging to Nathaniel Huddleston, who came from Tennessee. (Mrs. Susie Huddleston; Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Huddleston Graveyard [2 of 2]
Description:In Franks Township. See Huddleston Graveyard above.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Huddleston Hollow
Description:See Bone Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Huddleston's
Description:Also Huddleston. A settlement and post office about five miles northwest of Alton. Benjamin Huddleston was a pioneer settler here before the Civil War. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell; P.L. 1860 Sutherland, 740)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Huff Mill
Description:An early grist mill on Warm Fork, down the creek from the present site of King's Point School (q.v.), built by Walton Huff, from North Carolina, before 1852. Burned during the Civil War. The Huff homestead is now owned by Albert Wiggs, Jr. (R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hurricane Creek
Description:Heads in Ripley County, and leads through Ozark and Cedar Bluff townships, into Eleven Points River. A storm uprooted trees along the stream years ago, but the name more probably originated because of the topographical condition, causing the water to flow with great force during heavy rains. (Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hy
Description:A post office kept by a pioneer school teacher, John Dillard in his home on the old Myrtle Road. Its location on the divide between Warm Fork and Frederick's Creek suggested the name, a whimsical spelling of "high." (Postal Guide 1886-1887; E. Williams; J.H. Taylor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Irish Settlement
Description:An early settlement, chiefly in Ripley County, a few miles north of the present site of Bardley (q.v.), sponsored by Reverend John Hogan, priest of St. Michael's Parish of St. Louis. Father Hogan and others, imbued with the Missionary spirit, soon after the panic of 1857, set about to aid the poor Irish, good home and peace-loving Catholics, many of whom were distressed railroad laborers. Some had fled from persecution in Ireland. Reverend James Fox, of Old Mines, Missouri, bought a tract of land for the settlement. A one-story long house, 40 ft. square, was erected, and partitioned; one, for chapel; the other for the private residence. Land clearing, house building and well digging were begun, and by the spring of 1859, about forty families had settled on land entered at twelve and a half cents an acre, or on improved farms nearby. Father Hogan had settled there in November, 1858. Old Priest Field, now owned by William Hatfield, about two miles southeast of Wilderness (q.v.), is now grown up in timber; the ruins of the well, a pile of stones that made the foundation, and some excellent citizens--descendants of these early settlers-- remain to mark the missionary efforts. During the Civil War, marauding bands devastated the settlement. Some were killed; all who could fled to other states or sections. The region, in ruins and covered with much timber, was later known as the Irish Wilderness. Some land was sold for taxes. The timber was worked off by the Ozark, Land and Lumber Company and the Moss Tie Company. (Geo. Dale; C. Franken; Mrs. E. O'Neill; MISSION IN MISSOURI, 35-36, 59-60, 95)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Irish Wilderness
Description:See Irish Settlement
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:James Branch
Description:In Big Apple Township. Flows into Warm Fork (q.v.). Early settlers of this name lived there. (R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:James Creek
Description:A tributary of Strawberry River in Arkansas, heading in Oak Grove Township. The name of very early pioneers, in Arkansas, near the stream. (Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson; J.H. Taylor; O. Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jeff
Description:A discontinued village and post office in Oak Grove Township. In 1883 Mr. James H. Taylor, former postmaster and present merchant, applied for the establishment of an office on the old star route from Gatewood to Mammoth Springs. He offered "Jeffers" for Joseph Jeffers, a Cherokee Indian who owned land and operated the grist mill nearby, but the postal authorities, afraid of confusion, gave the first part of the name only. Only the store remains of the little village. (J.H. Taylor; W.J. Birchert; Postal Guide 1886- 1913)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jeff School
Description:In Oak Grove Township. Named for the village and post office.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Job
Description:See Jobe
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jobe
Description:Also spelled Job. A decadent village and post office; discontinued in 1907 when a mail route was established from Couch, near the center of Jobe Township. Campbell describes it as a "thriving little village twenty-one miles southeast of Alton." There is only one store now. Later maps and postal guides give the spelling "Job" which Mr. Heiskell explains is the true spelling for the family. Jacob Job was a landowner and influential citizen there. See Jobe Township. Mr. William L. Gum now owns the Job land and operates a large stock farm there. Doubtless named for the Jobe family. (W. Heiskell; W.L. Gum; Campbell, Gaz. (1874) 408; P.L. 1853, Hayward, 824; Postal Guide 1886-1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jobe Cemetery
Description:The old burial ground near Jobe (q.v.). Named for the early pioneers. See Jobe Township. (W.L. Gum)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jobe Township
Description:A small division in the southeastern part of the county. One of the original townships, it included also what is now Myrtle and Cedar Bluff townships. Named for a pioneer family. In 1830, Eli Job came from Tennessee with his family when his son Jacob was five years of age. He entered land where the village and post office Jobe (q.v.) was later established. (Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Robinson; W.L. Gum)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson Ferry
Description:About half a mile south of the present highway No. 42 crossing of Eleven Points River. Lum Johnson built in the ferry about 1880 and operated it until 1914, when the bridge was built. (T. Hofstedler; Mr. and Mrs. J. Johnson; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson Hollow
Description:Leads into Spring Creek in Moore Township. Gilbert Johnson homesteaded land there about 1900. (G. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson Pond
Description:A deep natural pond on Harry Johnson's farm in Thayer Township, formerly owned by his father who came from Chicago in the 1880s. Earlier it was the only watering place for the stock of the community. (Mrs. W. Fraley; R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson Township
Description:A small southeastern division of the county west of Eleven Points River. Originally it included Ozark Towship and parts of other townships. In 1844, James Johnson, of Tennessee, came with his family and settled near the mouth of Dry Creek (q.v.). He entered land on both sides of the river. His sons, Tom Lum, Robert, and James, became leading men of the county. The larger Johnson Township later was divided into Johnson Township No. One, west of the river; and Johnson Township No. Two, east of the river. (E. Williams; N. Bell; J. Johnson; Mr. and Mrs. J. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson Township No. One
Description:See Johnson Township
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson Township, No. Two
Description:See Johnson Township and Ozark Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jolliff Church
Description:See Jolliff Graveyard
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jolliff Graveyard
Description:In Highland Township about two miles northeast of Rover (q.v.). During the Civil War, there was a little skirmish near the Jolliff home, and Captain Maples, sent to suppress the bushwhackers, was killed and buried there. After the war Randall C. Jolliff, who had come from Illinois during the 1850s, deeded the land for a church and cemetery. The Shiloh Hardshell Baptist Church, generally known as Jolliff Church for the donor, a Baptist minister, was in existence only a short time. The old log house was also used for school, but later torn down and used in building the new school, which took the name of the church and leader Jolliff. (G.W. Jolliff; Mrs. Mary Cowen; Mrs. Alice Humphrey; J. Old; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jolliff School
Description:See Jolliff Graveyard
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jolliff Spring
Description:In Highland Township, the head of Barren Fork (q.v.). Randall C. Jolliff settled here before the Civil War. See Jolliff Graveyard.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Joshua Myres Spring
Description:Good living water on South Prong of Barren Fork (q.v.), six miles south of Thomasville. Joshua Myres of North Carolina entered the land and lived there during the Civil War and to an advanced age for some years afterward. Now on Davidson Ranch. (J. Old; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kansas City, Fort Scott and Memphis Railroad
Description:This road, named for the former terminal points, was constructed through this section during the very early 1880s. It is now a part of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelley Cave
Description:See Kelley Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelley Hollow
Description:In Falling Springs Township, leading into Big Hurricane (q.v.). Camp Four (q.v.) was located on the ridge near. In the hollow is Kelley Cave, with several rooms, one of the largest in the county. Some slight improvements have been made at the cave, and the vicinity has become a great hunting region. The name of very early pioneers. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills; P. Williams; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kimes Hollow
Description:Leads into Dry Creek in Jobe Township. A family of this name settled there soon after the Civil War, but none of the family are now in the county. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:King Township
Description:In the northeastern part of the county. Robert A. King, a Presbyterian minister, father of informant, originally from Tennessee, was one of the earliest settlers in this section soon after the Civil War. Since he was influential in getting the township established, the court named it for him. (T. King; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:King's Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church, a box house one mile northwest of Rover used as early as 1887 for school purposes also. It took the name of a family, farmers who settled there a few years after the Civil War. The church organization was disbanded, and the house, long since gone to ruins, was sold to James Willard for a barn. (William D. Willard; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:King's Point School
Description:About six miles north of Thayer. About 1900, John King gave the site for the present school which was named for him. The school is situated in Warm Fork Valley, a nearly level ground where the King farm came to a point with adjoining lands. A nice level point, the term "point" being used for location. The earlier school, one and a quarter miles north was known as the Perkins School, an old log house, built soon after the Civil War, on land belonging to James Perkins, a pioneer settler. (R. Childers; N. Bell; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Knob Hill School
Description:In Black Pond Township. A topographical name for the low, rounded hills of the vicinity. Also called Cotton Rock, a derisive name given because very small patches of cotton were cultivated among the stony fields. (E. Williams; W. Weaver; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Koshkonong
Description:A small town in Big Apple Township, on the Frisco Railroad. It was established in 1882 by real estate men, one of whom was Colonel Dobizie, who served on the Northern side in the Civil War. The name was suggested by Mr. Diggings, a railroad superintendent, for Lake Koshkonong in southern Wisconsin, where he had enjoyed duck hunting. A creek and town in Rock County, Wisconsin, also bear this name. Koshkonong is an Indian word of doubtful meaning, possibly, according to Gannett, referring to koshkosh, a hog. Others have suggested such meanings as "wild rice," which grew around the Wisconsin lake, or "cross," referring to an Indian village where old trails crossed, or "big water," referring to the lake. It is probably connected with the name Kaskaskia, explained by Gannett as an Indian word of unknown meaning, the designation of a tribe of Illinois Indians. Of course the original signification of the name of the Wisconsin lake has no necessary connection with that of the Missouri village, which merely borrowed it. (Gannett; Postal Guide 1897-1941; J. Hitt; R.T. Boles; Mrs. A.O. Roberts; T.J. Richardson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lance Cemetery
Description:A public cemetery two and a half miles south of Many Springs (q.v.), on land settled in 1854 by Daniel J. Lance, who started it as a family burial ground during the Civil War. (J.R. Trimble)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lawrence
Description:A post office listed by Sutherland , but none of the informants had ever heard of it. (P.L. 1860 Sutherland, 741)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Liberty Church [1 of 2]
Description:About 3/4 mile northeast of Calm (q.v.), a log house was built as early as 1884 for church and school. Later a house, which burned in 1936, was erected on the old grounds for the Missionary Baptists. This denomination dwindled and the Freewill Baptists became the leaders. The old log house was open for all denominations. Liberty School, 1/2 mile east of Calm, took the old church name. It is a favorite ideal name. (Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton; W.R. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Liberty Church [2 of 2]
Description:An old United Baptist Church in Falling Springs Township. It is now a Missionary Baptist organization and the name is changed to New Liberty Church. The school took the name of the church nearby. (W.D. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:See Liberty Church near Calm
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lick Branch
Description:See Buck Horn Branch
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Limestone Hollow
Description:Into Dry Creek in Johnson Township. There is some limestone in the small valley, but not of commercial value. (Mrs. Walker Johnson; T. Hofstedler)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lindley Club House
Description:Kept by Ollie C. Lindley, now (1934) sheriff of Oregon County. In Ozark Township on the Brock Ranch (q.v.). Mrs. Ollie C. Lindley, Supt. of the County Schools, thinking of the wildness of the region and of Hawthorne's TANGLEWOOD TALES has christened it Tanglewood. (W.E. Harrod; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Hurricane Creek
Description:Heads in Piney Township and flows into Eleven Points River in Goebel Township. A storm in 1880 blew away some timber and homes along the stream. It is much smaller than Big Hurricane (q.v.), the mouth of which is up the river a few miles. (E. Bailey; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Mill
Description:The Ozark Land and Lumber Company had a sawmill on Eleven Points River near the mouth of Big Hurricane, the capacity of which reached forty thousand feet a day. It was known by this diminutive name to distinguish it from th main mill at Winona. (Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Piney Creek
Description:In Cedar Bluff Township, flowing into Eleven Points River. Scattered pine trees grow along the stream. The dimunitive term distinguishes it from Piney Creek (q.v.) of Frederick's Fork. (Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Springs Church
Description:The Presbyterian Church in Wilderness (q.v.), organized in 1881 by Reverend Robert A. King. Named for the small springs nearby. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Mills; T. King)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lizard Camp School
Description:See Pleasant Hill School No. 52
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Long Hollow Creek
Description:The longest stream in Woodside Township, flowing through a comparatively deep valley, into Eleven Points River. (Mrs. J. Owens; P. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Longgreer Mill
Description:See Hatcher Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Pond
Description:In Ozark Township about three-quarters of a mile from Charter Oak School (q.v.). It is never dry and the depth has not been found. (C.S. Gohn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Pond School
Description:In Highland Township. A large natural but shallow pond nearby gave the name. The pond, receiving the drainage of a large section, covers ten acres during heavy rains, but soon the water is gone and the basin is dry most of the time. (W. Heiskell; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Louse Creek
Description:A smaller stream in Oak Grove Township flowing into Frederick's Fork. A mocking name, for some untidy, careless families who lived there in the early pioneer days. (Chas. Braswell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Low Wassie
Description:See Low Wassie Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Low Wassie Creek
Description:A small eastern branch of Spring Creek in Franks Township. The lower part of the valley was formerly known as Low Wassie Hollow, and the upper part as Hi Wassie Hollow. Through the valley ran the old road from Thomasville to Piedmont in Wayne County. Presumably located in the two parts of the valley respectively are the post offices listed by Campbell in 1874: "Hiwassie, a post office ten miles north of Alton. Low Wassie, a post office thirteen miles northeast of Alton" (p. 408). Low Wassie appears also on the postal lists of 1862 and 1867, but neither of them appears among Oregon County post offices in later postal guides, or on later maps of the county. One of the two places must be identical with the "Yowassie" placed in the northeast corner of the county on Colton's Sectional Map of Missouri of 1867. There is a town called Low Wassie in Shannon County, located on Pike Creek, but it cannot possibly be the same as the place in Oregon County: in the first place because it is at least thirty miles from Alton and in a different county, and secondly because the Shannon County town has borne the name of Low Wassie only since 1892, being formerly named Pomeroy (see Miss O'Brien's thesis). Presumably it borrowed the old name only after the Oregon County village had passed out of existence. Today the two hollows also have lost their old names. Hi Wassie Hollow is now known generally as Three Mile Spring Hollow, for its spring on the old Thomasville-Piedmont road, a famous place for early travelers and teamsters to make camp. Low Wassie Hollow, and likewise Low Wassie Creek, are now called Two Mile Spring Hollow, for the approximate length of the lower part of the valley. The origin of the old names is a matter of peculiar interest, for if they are Indian in origin, as seems probably, they are the oldest names in the county. Hiwassie, or its variant Yowassia on the 1867 map, is presumably closest to the original form. The name Hiwassee is used for Hiwassee River in Tennessee; there is also the settlement formerly known as Great Hiwassee, now called Savannah Ford, on its northern bank just above Columbus in Polk County, Tennessee, and another at its junction with Peachtree Creek, above Murphy, in Cherokee County, North Carolina. All of them, as pointed out by Hodge in his HANDBOOK OF AMERICAN INDIANS (under "Hiwassee"), were former settlements of the Cherokee tribe of Indians. Hodge interprets the word as originally Ayuhwasi, meaning "savannh" or "meadow;" other forms cited by him are Euforse, Highwassee, Hiwasse (in Bartram's Travels), and Owassa. The presence of Cherokees in what is now Oregon County in the early part of the 19th century is entirely plausible. Shortly after 1800, according to Hodge, numbers of the more conservative Cherokees, wearied by the encroachments of the whites, had left their homes in North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee, and had crossed the Mississippi and made new homes in the wilderness, in what is now Arkansas. The most famous member of the tribe, Sequoya (1760-1843), the inventor of the Cherokee alphabet, came out to Arkansas in 1822 to introduce writing to the Western division of the nation, and took up his permanent residence among them after 1823. There is also evidence that there were Cherokees in Missouri, at least in the southern part of the state, although this was properly speaking Osage country. In Schoolcraft's JOIURNAL OF A TOUR INTO MISSOURI AND ARKANSASA IN THE YEARS 1818 AND 1819, there is an interesting passage bearing this point. It is part of a coversation which Schoolcraft had with a white settler named M'Gary, who was living on the White River in Arkansas: "He informed us that a deadly and deep-rooted hostility existed between Cherokees, who had lately exchanged their lands in Tennessee for the county lying between the Arkansas and Red River, and the Osages, and that they were daily committing depredations upon the territory and properties of each other. Having but a short time before witnessed the conclusion of a treaty of peace between these two tribes, made at St. Louis under the auspices of Governor Clark, I was surprised to hear of the continuance of hostilities. To prove what reliance is to be placed on the faith of such treaties, he mentioned that when the Cherokees returned from ths council which concluded that treaty, they pursued a party of Osages near the banks of White River, and stole, unperceived, twenty horses, and carried them safely off" (p. 37). A Cherokee settlement within the bounds of Oregon County is therefore a distinct possibility, and the name Hiwassie or Yowassia would be derived naturally from the original Indian form. The change from Hiwassie to Low Wassie is apparently an instance of popular etymology. Here the explanation given by Miss O'Brien says it was so "named because of a sink hole close to the village. A "wassie" is a dialect term for a rain wash or a swamp." On p. 239, in her "Appendix of Americanisma," she further expands this explanation: "The word "wassie" or "wossie" is used locally in the sense of swamp or rainwash. It seems likely that we have here an interesting survival in Missouri dialect of a word or form that has become obsolete in Standard English. Cf. OED Wase: obs. form of Ooze; 1463, only ex. OED Ooze, sb., with the forms was, 11th c.; wose 14-15th c.; wose, woes, 16th c. Ooze is defined 1. Wet mud or slime, esp. that in the bed of a river or estuary. c.725...1582, sp.wase or wose; 1547...1859, sp.ooze. lb. A stretch or extent of mud; a mud-bank; a marsh or fen, a piece of soft boggy ground. c. 1500, sp. wose; 1568...1865, sp.ooze. so Webster, Century, and Standard. The adjective oozy is also cited with the earlier form woosy, which is closest of all to the Missouri form of the word. The Shannon County "wassie" or "wossie" is probably to be taken as a derivative sb., with the suffix -ie, of the obs. English sb. Wase, Wose, Ooze in the sense of mud-bank, marsh, boggy ground." This derivation from a local dialect term would not in any way be contradicted by the ultimate Indian origin, if that can be established, of the earlier forms Hiwassie or Yowassia. The pioneers were merely following the ordinary processes of popular etymology, by replacing an Indian term that was of course unintelligible to them by a familiar dialect word. Out of Hiwassie, interpreted as "High Wassie," they first created "Low Wassie," and then understood "Wassie" as a common noun. The fact that the whole region is amply supplied with small spring, marshy spots, and sink-holes would have given frequent occasion for the use of such a topographical term as "wassie." (Schoolcraft; Hodge; Campbell; Goodwin; Postal Guide 1862; Map of 1867; Miss O'Brien's thesis; Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Low Wassie Hollow
Description:See Low Wassie Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Loyd Millsap Store
Description:A crossroads store about five miles northwest of Alton, established in 1925 by Loyd Millsap by whom it is operated. (O. Young; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lula
Description:A discontinued post office in Johnson Township; kept in his store, by William J. Stairs, a landowner and former judge of the county. The Christian name of Mrs. William J. Stairs was suggested by a Baptist minister, William L. Williams. (Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson; E. Bailey; Postal Guide 1909-1911)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lynn Township
Description:The original southwest division, including about one quarter mile of the county as shown by an 1878 map. Linn or Lynn is a common American synonym for the linden or line tree (Tilia americana). From it are derived the names of Linn County and Linville in northern Missouri, LinnTownship in Shannon County, and other place names. The linden is a common tree in all parts of the state. Some informants say it is here a family name found in old land records; but no one so named appears to live in the county now. (N. Bell; N.B. Allen; A. Williams; R. Childers; G. Moore; Mrs. T. Hofstedler; see Miss Adams' and Miss O'Brien's theses)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Macedonia Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church five miles north of Alton. Also known locally as Elm Pond Church for Elm Pond (q.v.) nearby. The report of the General Association of 1934 gives the organization date as 1902, but elderly residents say it is much older. For the name, cf. above. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell; Mrs. W.N. Huddleston; Acts 16:17)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Macedonia School
Description:One of the early schools, established soon after the Civil War, near the church for which it was named. The schoolhouse was built about 1890. Later as the Grandin Mills caused the increase in population, a new school, New Hope was formed fom Macedonia in Jordan Township. (J. Lewis; Mrs. M. Nunnellee; N. Sullivan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mammoth Springs Cemetery
Description:Near Mammoth Springs, Arkansas, but just over the state line. (W.J. Birchert)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Many Springs
Description:A village and post office about nine miles southeast of Alton on Highway 42. In the early days, the mail was brought by horseback from Doniphan (q.v.). Now it comes on a rural route from Alton. The name was suggested by the great number of small springs in the valley. Only one store and filling station, the church, school, and three or four small springs remain. (P.L. Polk (1876) 17; P.L. Polk (1883) 90; Postal Guide 1886-1911; N. Bell; J.R. Trimble)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Maple Sink
Description:One of the larger depressions in Big Apple Township, two and a half miles west of Koshkonong. It covers about ten acres, averages about fifteen feet in depth and is covered with maple trees. (R.T. Boles)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McCormick Hollow
Description:In Franks Township, leading into Eleven Points River. Old settlers of the name lived there long before the Civil War. (P. Williams; James Johnson; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McDaniel Branch
Description:In Moore Township, flowing into South Prong of Barren Fork. Early settlers of the name lived there before the Civil War. (Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McFry Crossing
Description:A fishing resort on Eleven Points River, ten miles northeast of Alton, where the river can be forded in low water time. During the early 1900s, W.J. McFry owned a farm near; now his son Ab McFry, who owns the farm, keeps rooms and board for tourists. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; McCanse, 46)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McFry Ford
Description:McFry Crossing (q.v.) is generally known by this name by the older residents. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McKelvey School
Description:See Mint Spring School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Metcalf Mill
Description:A man of this name operated a small sawmill in Panther Hollow (q.v.) as early as 1880. (P. Williams; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Middle Fork
Description:One branch of Eleven Points River, flowing through Thomasville. It is fed by springs. See Gunter's Creek in Howell County.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midway
Description:On Highway 19, halfway between Alton and Thayer, there are a store, filling station, and blacksmith shop. In 1907 Geo. W. Moore, from Indiana, built a neighborhood blacksmith shop, known as Moore's Shop. The store was added in 1914. All are operated by Mr. Moore and his family. (Mrs. Geo. W. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek [1 of 2]
Description:In the eastern part of Moore Township flowing north into Barren Fork. Also known as South Prong of Barren Fork. Josiah Howell had a sawmill in that vicinity in the early 1880s. West Prong and East Prong converge to form Mill Creek. Ruins of an old grist mill remain. (J. Old; R. Childers; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek [2 of 2]
Description:Another Mill Creek, which heads in Oak Grove Township and flows through Myrtle Township into Eleven Points River. A number of grist mills have been operated along the stream at various times. Some owners and operators at various times were James Young, Joe Stubblefield, John Taylor, and Hiram Kirk. (J. Old; G. Underwood; W.J. Birchert)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church, organized by Reverend R.O. Tribble before the Civil War, situated in Myrtle Township near the stream whose name it acquired. In 1893, Mill Creek and Fairview churches united to form the Myrtle Church which was erected one mile east of Myrtle (q.v.). See Fairview School. (W.J. Birchert; M.B.G.A. 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Hollow
Description:See Hatcher Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Spring
Description:See Thomason Mill Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Stone Branch
Description:A western tributary of Warm Fork (q.v.) in Big Apple Township. Near Warm Fork Creek above the mouth of Mill Stone Branch is a spring, large enough to supply water for an early grist mill, which was operated during the Civil War by a Mr. Clark. Mart Grisham operated the mill for a number of years after the war. Native stones for building the mill were taken from along Mill Stone Branch. (R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mint Spring
Description:See Mint Spring School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mint Spring School
Description:In Moore Township, three miles southwest of Thomasville, near a good spring where the mint plant grows abundantly. The original school, a log house, known as McKelvey School was on land belonging to William McKelvey, three miles north of the present site. When the school was moved, in the early 1890s, for a good water supply, the name was changed. Discontinued and consolidated with Thomasville. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Griffith; Geo. Moore; Mrs. A.O. Roberts)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mitch
Description:A discontinued post office one and a half miles northeast of Riverton. It was kept by a farmer, Geo. Kellums, in his home. A shortened form for Norman A. Mitchell, who was a leading farmer and landowner of the community. (C. Franken; O. Young; Mrs. T. Hofstedler; N. Bell; Postal Guide 1897-1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mitchell School
Description:One of the older schools in Ozark Township. It was named for Norman A. Mitchell, who was an influential farmer and landowner of the community. Later, as the result of a local squabble, the district was divided into Districts No. 37 and No. 38. District No. 37 was still known as Mitchell School, but was given the name Seed Tick, for the insects so common on the hills, as a term of derision. The south part, No. 38 was named Pleasant Hill. (Mrs. O. Lindley; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mooney Branch
Description:A small stream flowing into Frederick's Fork near Couch (q.v.). Named for Joseph P. Mooney, a farmer, minister, and landowner living near. (Mrs. Irma Pinkley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Moore Township
Description:One of the reorganized divisions of the county, including the northwest part. Named for a pioneer family from Tennessee. John Moore, grandfather of the informant, who settled on Barren Creek before 1846, had three sons: Robert, Doc, and John who became heads of prominent families in the vicinity. (W.E. Harrod; William Weaver; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Moore's Shop
Description:See Midway
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Morgan School
Description:In Piney Township, southeast of Alton. Formed about 1915 from a part of Whitten School and named for Hugh Morgan, a farmer, who gave the site. (N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mosby Hill
Description:An elevation near the mouth of Little Hurricane Creek, across the Eleven Points River from Couch Mill. A Mr. Mosby kept a store here before the Civil War. (E. Bailey; P. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Carmel Church
Description:A United Baptist Church about two miles south of Calm. Organized by Reverend D.L. Poynor with eleven members and admitted to the association in October, 1877. After a few years the church disbanded and the house was sold. Later a school was built and named for the old church. For the name cf. above. The burial ground nearby is known as Mount Carmel Graveyard; also as Stubblefield Graveyard (q.v.). (Hist. of Lib. Bap. 240; Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton; L. Pulliam; I Kings 18)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Carmel Graveyard
Description:See Mount Carmel Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Carmel School
Description:See Mount Carmel Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Nebo Church
Description:About five miles southeast of Alton a log house was erected for church and school. The Missionary Baptist Church was organized in 1867 by Reverend R.O. Tribble but later disbanded. The log house upon the hill was replaced by a school building at the foot of the hill, and named Nebo for the old church. Mount Nebo is in the land of Moab is the mountain peak from which Moses was permitted to view Canaan, the promised land. (Mr. and Mrs. J. Johnson; E. Williams; Deut. 32:49)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Pisgah Church
Description:The Rover (q.v.) Missionary Baptist Church. It was organized in King's Chapel (q.v.) several years before 1889, the first Baptist Church in Highland Township. Soon a house was erected two miles south of the present site. The present building was completed in 1927. For the name cf. above. (C. Moore; William D. Willard; Deut. 34:1)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Pleasant School
Description:Situated on a small elevation in Myrtle Township. A topographical and complimentary name. (E. Bailey; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Prairie Branch
Description:Heads in northwestern Highland Township and flows into Middle Fork (q.v.) in Moore Township. It drains the high plateau region in Highland Township, said to have almost been a prairie in the earlier days. (W. Heiskell; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Zion Cemetery
Description:See Mount Zion Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Zion Church
Description:A Primitive Baptist Church in Black Pond Township; formerly Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church (q.v.). Organized on the fourth Sunday in August, 1897, by Reverend Thomas J. Jenkins who suggested the name. Mount Zion is literally the southwest and highest hill of Jerusalem where David's palace was located, but the name is used for the city as a whole. Figuratively it represents the City of God, the Spiritual city. The church was sometimes known earlier as Bradley Chapel for an influential member W.C. Bradley. Mount Zion Cemetery was also known as Bradley Graveyard for W.C. Bradley. (Mr. and Mrs. W. Weaver; N. Bell; II Sam. 5:7; Isa. 51:16; 24:23; Rev. 14:1)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mule Camp
Description:See Paty Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Murray Spring
Description:A good spring one and a half miles northeast of Jeff. A pioneer, Nicholas Murray, lived there before the Civil War. (J. H. Taylor; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Myrtle
Description:A village and post office in Myrtle Township. The village was started about 1878 by Scott Moore, who set up a store, and named the place for his daughter. (Geo. Underwood; W.J. Birchert; Postal Guide 1887-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Myrtle Church
Description:See Mill Creek Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Myrtle Township
Description:One of the southeast division, formed from Jobe Township and named for the village. (Geo. Underwood; W.J. Birchert; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nebo School
Description:See Mount Nebo
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Negro Hill School
Description:See "Nigger" Hill Ford
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Attie School
Description:Formerly the community of Attie post office had used King's Chapel (q.v.) for school, and when a good two-story building was erected one quarter mile from the post office, it was named New Attie. When this building was burned in the late 1890s the district was divided into Lost Pond and New Attie, but New Attie, the smaller house, built one mile northeast, acquired the name Sailor School for Sailor Gentry, a feeblemined and troublesome lad who lived near. (Geo. Moore; William D. Willard; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Home Cemetery
Description:Sometimes known as Perkins Cemetery. See New Home Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Home Church
Description:A General Baptist Church, now (1937) defunct for about five years, in eastern Big Apple Township. Organized by Reverend Allen Barnett under a brush arbor, during the 1880s. Now used as a dwelling by Mr. John Perkins, a charter member, who had deeded the site for church and cemetery under the stipulation that, when no longer used for church, the land should revert to the heirs. The name was suggested by Jasper Howell, then not a member, because this house should be a church home, new and different from Pleasant Ridge School (q.v.) and arbors that were formerly used. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Perkins; R. Childers; Mrs. W. Fraley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Liberty
Description:A post office in Falling Springs Township. See Butts. Named for the school.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Liberty Church
Description:See Liberty Church in Falling Springs Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Liberty School
Description:In Falling Springs Township. Named for the Baptist Church, New Liberty.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Salem Cemetery
Description:See New Salem Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Salem Church
Description:A Union Church, one quarter mile east of Couch (q.v.), at the site of Webster post office. The present house was erected in 1913. The old church known as Salem was erected by the Baptists before the Civil War. Mrs. Martha Couch, who died in 1933 at the age of 93 was a charter member. Some of the graves there are over 100 years old. For the name cf. above. (J.R. Trimble; Mrs. Erma Pinkley; N. Bell; M.B.G.A., 1934; C. Braswell; Gen. 14:18; Heb. 7:1.2)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nigger Cave
Description:A small cave with the entrance near the summit of the hill, in Woodside Township. So named because during the Civil War the negroes would descend the cave on an Indian ladder to hide there to avoid going to the army. (E. Bailey; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nigger Hill
Description:See "Nigger" Hill Ford
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nigger Hill Ford
Description:The old crossing at the place where Johnson Ferry (q.v.) was later put in. The exact origin seems indefinite. One tradition is that a negro family lived there before the Civil War. Another story is told of a negro going to the old Boze Mill (q.v.) after the Civil War. His team balked and he was frozen to death. Some report that a negro who died nearby was buried there. The school, erected in 1893 on the hill 1/2 mile south of Riverton (q.v.), is known as Negro Hill School. (Mrs. T. Hofstedler; J. Johnson; E. Williams; William Weaver; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Norman Church
Description:See Norman School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Norman School
Description:About eight miles southwest of Alton, in the pioneer Norman Settlement. Thomas Norman, a pioneer from Tennessee, entered land here before the Civil War. George Norman, a son, gave the site. The church, built by Methodists and Baptists in 1918, is one mile southwest of the school that gave the name. (E. Williams; J. Old; N. Bell; William Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Fork of Buffalo Creek
Description:Rises in King Township of Oregon County and flows across Pine Township into Kelley Township where it joins South Fork to form the main stream. Locally known as North Prong.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Prong of Barren Fork
Description:See Barren Fork
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nubbin Ridge School
Description:See Pleasant Ridge School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Forest Church
Description:About 1915 some of the members of Hickory Grove Presbyterian Church (q.v.) withdrew and built a church for the United Presbyterian membership two and a half miles southeast of the old church. Mrs. Maggie Parsons, who was an influential member, gave the name for the forest near. The house was painted yellow. The rigidness of one of the ministers and the color suggested to the boys the nickname "Yellow Jacket," by which it was generally known for some time. Later, when the house was painted white, they gave the nickname "White Mule;" but this name was not generally accepted. Both churches are still used. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; P. Williams; O. Young; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:In Big Apple Township; northwest of Koshkonong (q.v.). Originally there was an oak forest near. (E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove Township
Description:A southern border division formed as early as 1873. Doubtless named for the trees. (Campbell, Atlas 1873)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Hill School
Description:In Johnson Township. Topography and timber suggest the name. (E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Ridge Cemetery
Description:In Koshkonong Township. It is a topographical name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oaks Hollow
Description:In Ozark Township, leading into Eleven Points River south of Greenbriar Hollow. Noah Oaks operated a sawmill and kept a commissary there during the early 1890s. (Mrs. Jack Woodring)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old Field Hollow
Description:Leads from the northwest into Eleven Points River about one mile from Thomasville. About three miles northwest of Thomasville is a spring, now known as Trough Spring for the large trough put in to carry the water. Originally it was Thomas Spring for George Thomas an early settler of this name. Years ago the old fields near the spring were abandoned for some years, thus giving the name to the hollow. Now (1937) owned by the Federal Land Bank of St. Louis. (Mrs. A.O. Roberts; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old Priest Field
Description:See Irish Settlement
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old's Cemetery
Description:See Old's Mill
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old's Mill
Description:A water grist mill, one mile south of Thomasville on Eleven Points River, was established during the 1850s by Thomas Old, an early settler and landowner, who came from Virginia to Oregon County in 1841 and settled at Thomasville. It was burned during the Civil War. The early burial gound, Old's Cemetery, one quarter mile south of Thomasville, has not been used for at least fifty years. (E. Bailey; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Orchard Branch
Description:A tributary of Warm Fork in Bug Apple Township near Koshkonong in the big orchard section.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oregon County
Description:Organized from Ripley County February 14, 1845, with a population of 750; and named for Oregon Territory. The controversy between Britain and the United States over the possession of this territory, which gave rise to the slogan "Fifty-four forty or fight," was a live issue at the time, finally settled in favor of the United States in 1846. Oregon Territory was organized in 1848, and became a state in 1859. It was named for the Oregon River, now the Columbia. The name is of Indian origin, but its precise meaning is uncertain. (Campbell, Gaz. of Mo. (1874) 407; Mo. Hist. Rev. (April, 1917) 337; Goodspeed, 181; W.E. Harrod; Clippings from THE SOUTH MISSOURIAN)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ox Hollow
Description:Heads in northeastern Falling Springs Township and leads through Shannon County into Current River. During the timber days of the Ozark Land and Lumber Company oxen were used in this section to haul logs to the mill. (W. Keiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ozark Township
Description:One of the eastern border divisions. Earlier known as Johnson No. 2 Township (q.v.). It was named for the Ozark Land and Lumber Company of Winona, that operated mills and helped to establish schools during the 1890s and early 1900s. (E. Bailey; William Weaver; Geo. Dale; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Palmer Graveyard
Description:A very old burial ground one and a half miles north of Clifton (q.v.). An early pioneer of the name lived there. (Mrs. W. Fraley; R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Panther Hollow [1 of 2]
Description:A spring and hollow, in Goebel and Johnson townships, flowing into Eleven Points River. It is said that there were panthers in the wilds during the early days, and that one was killed near this small spring. Another hollow and spring of this name, northwest of Thomasville, leads into Eleven Points River. It is also known as Sam Smith Spring and Hollow (q.v.). (E. Williams; N. Bell; Geo. Moore; Mr. and Mrs. T. Hofstedler)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Panther Hollow [2 of 2]
Description:See above
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Panther Spring [1 of 2]
Description:See Panther Hollow and Sam Smith Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Panther Spring [2 of 2]
Description:See Panther Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Park Chapel
Description:The first Methodist Episcopal Church in the community, one half mile north of Rover (q.v.). Organized in 1886, under a brush arbor, by Reverend L.L. Whitehead of Alton. Soon the house was erected by John G. Jolliff, William Park, and E.M. Thomas, three leaders of the community. It was named for William Park, a carpenter and oldest member. The older organization dwindled and the building was bought by the Congregationalist Methodists. There is no organization there now, but the house is used for any denomination, chiefly the Pentecostals. (G.W. Jolliff; T. Proffitt; E. Williams; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Patterson
Description:An early post office on South Prong of Fourche Creek (q.v.). William Patterson was an older settler on this stream, near the county line, in what is now Ozark Township. Patterson is an old family name in the southeastern part of the county. (C. Franken; Mrs. Jack Woodring; P.L. Goodwin and West (1867) 34)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Paty Hollow
Description:In eastern Moore Township leading into Spring Creek. There is a natural pond, Paty Pond, in the lower part of the valley, covering about four acres. A good hunting section for turkeys and ducks. Buck Paty homesteaded there soon after the Civil War. During the 1890s the Cordz Fisher Lumber Company of Birchtree ran a tram into this section, and Mule Camp (q.v.) was located there. Many mules were used in the logging industry. (W.E. Harrod; P. Williams; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Paty Pond
Description:See Paty Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Payne Spring
Description:A good-sized spring about three miles south of Couch (q.v.) near Town Fork Creek (q.v.). Josiah Payne, a landowner, had a grist mill there soon after the Civil War. (P. Williams; W. Heiskell; A. Williams; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Peace Valley School
Description:In Myrtle Township, formed from Fairview School District about 1894. After considerable disagreement and trouble the new district house was built in the valley with great hopes that all might be peaceful. (E. Williams; W.J. Birchert; Mrs. R. Dalton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Peggy Hollow
Description:See Bone Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pen Wood School
Description:Now consolidated with Alton (q.v.) six miles east. Formed from Union Hill and Royal Oak chiefly. Named for Pen Andrews, who gave the site in the forest. (N. Bell; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Moore; J. Old; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Perkins School
Description:See King's Point School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Piedmont Hollow
Description:In eastern Moore Township leading into Spring Creek. The old pioneer road from Thomasville to Piedmont in Wayne County, which was on the nearest railroad before 1870, led from Thomasville down this hollow. (N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pigeon Roost
Description:Near Wilderness in King Township. Originally a great pine forest where the wild pigeons would gather by the thousands to roost on the trees. Older citizens point out various regions where pigeons gathered at night, but this seems to be the favorite resting place for the greatest numbers. When in the early 1880s they began the shipping of pigeons to St. Louis, they were soon killed and frightened away. Stories ae told of the pigeons flying over in such numbers that it appeared a great cloud hiding the sun. At night they would so weight the timber that trees were bent and branches were broken loose. (Mrs. E. O'Neill; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Hill School
Description:A descriptive name for the school three miles north of Thomasville, now consolidated with Thomasville. (Mrs. A.O. Roberts)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Hollow
Description:In Black Pond Township. Leads into Spring Creek. Much large pine timber grew in this region. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Piney Cave
Description:On Piney Creek near Piney School (q.v.). During the Civil War the county records are said to have been hidden in this cave by Major Geo. Norman, John C. Johnson, father of informant, William C. Livingston, Andrew J. Livingston, and others.(N. Bell; J.H. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Piney Creek
Description:Formed by the junction of East Prong and West Prong in Piney Township. Empties into Frederick's Creek in Jobe Township. In the early days a small grove of pine trees grew near the junction of the two streams, thus giving the name. (E. Bailey; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Piney School
Description:In Jobe Township. Named for the stream nearby. (N. Bell; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Piney Township
Description:The central township, formed before 1873. The name of its main stream. (Campbell, Atlas 1873)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pinkleyville
Description:An old village, now completely disappeared, and post office two miles south of Garfield (q.v.) on the old Alton to Pocahontas road. Emanuel Pinkley had a blacksmith shop there on his farm. Later a store and post office were established. His sons, Jeff and Ed, owned land near. The place was also known locally as Scott Town for Green Scott who had a store and post office. (E. Williams; Mrs. Erma Pinkley; Geo. Underwood; Postal Guide; Gaz. of Mo. (1874) 15; P.L. Polk (1876) 19)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Grove School
Description:In Myrtle Township. A descriptive and complimentary name. Also known as Trimble School for George Trimble who donated the site. (E. Williams; W.J. Birchert)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Cemetery
Description:Near Pleasant Hill School in Cedar Bluff Township. Named from the school. (Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School [1 of 3]
Description:No. 13, in Cedar Bluff Township. An ideal and topographical name. Also called Seed Tick School because there were so many of the insects in the region. One of the oldest schools. (E. Williams; Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School [2 of 3]
Description:No. 38, in Ozark Township. See Mitchell School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School [3 of 3]
Description:No. 52, in Oak Grove Township, situated on a small elevation, north of Jeff (q.v.). Also called Lizard Camp School because there were so many of those reptiles in the vicinity. Earlier known as Ary School for a pioneer from Tennessee. (E. Williams; O. Young; J. Kester; Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Ridge School
Description:In Thayer Township. An ideal and topographical name. Nicknamed Nubbin Ridge because the corn in that community was so small. (E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Posey Ranch
Description:Posey Woodside, Captain in the Confderate Army, a famer and treasurer of the county at his death in 1912, owned a large ranch (about 2,000 acres), east of Thomasville on Eleven Points River. Posey Spring is a good strong stream on the home place. In 1928 the Eleven Points River Cattle Association of St. Louis was incorporated with C.B. Derman as the president; it included Posey Ranch and other tracts of land, a total of about 8,000 acres north and south of the river. (Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Moore; Mrs. H.B. Pitts; C.S. Gohn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Posey Spring
Description:See Posey Ranch and Hatcher Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Powder Mill Bottom
Description:In King's Township leading into Eleven Points River about six miles north of Riverton. Powder was made there during the Civil War. (Mr. and Mrs. T. Hofstedler)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rain Out Hill
Description:A hill in Franks Township near the site of the Old Union Church (q.v.). The origin of the name seems extant only in legend. One old story related is that some people were camped on the hill, probably there for one of the protracted religious meetings. Such a heavy rain came that they were alsmost drowned and had to leave. Another story tells about a forest fire having been started by some soldiers in camp there during the Civil War, when a heavy cloud came bringing a rain that extinguished the fire. This latter story was related to Mr. Harrod by Reverend Charley Bolten. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; P. Williams; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rainey Hollow
Description:A very short hollow, between Old Field and Hatcher hollows, leading into Eleven Points River two miles from Thomasville. Dr. George Rainey lived there. (W. Heiskell; Mrs. Jack Woodring)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Red Brush Valley
Description:An extensive valley, good hunting grounds in earlier days, in King Township, leading into Eleven Points River. It was covered with large pine timber and tall grass which prevented much underbrush, but occasionally oak began making its appearance. An unusual growth of oak shrubs, showing the rich color in autumn, suggested this name to the early pioneers and hunters. (Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Dale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Redburn Church
Description:Originally a Methodist Church southeast of Rover, built during the 1890s, on land given by Jace S. Redburn, for church and cemetery. The northern and southern Methodist of the community, attempting to unite in erecting the house, later divided and sold the house to the community. It is now used by all, but the Pentecostal people are the leaders. (C. Moore; William D. Willard; J. Old)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Reedville
Description:In northeastern Myrtle Township. About 1923 George A. Reed established a store near The Narrows (q.v.). It was operated only a few years. (N. Bell; H. Taylor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rich Hill
Description:The name given to the Hatcher homestead. See Hatcher Hollow and Rich Woods.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rich Woods
Description:The name given by the early settlers to what is now Thomasville vicinity. The country was rich in land, timber, and wild animals. Rich Hill was the name given to his home, three miles north of Thomasville, Charles Hatcher, a Revolutionary soldier, who settled there in 1809. The Thomases came in 1817; in 1818 the Bellah, Huddleston, and Howell families came. Campbell says Samuel Hatcher settled near the present site of Thomasville in 1816. Parker says the first settlement was made here by Charles Hatcher in 1803. (R. Childers; N.B. Allen; Clippings from the SOUTH MISSOURIAN; Mrs. H.B. Pitts; Campbell (1874) 405; MISSOURI AS IT WAS IN 1867, 344)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Richland Church
Description:The Missionary Baptist Church in Thomasville. The General Assocation report of 1934 gives the organization date as 1894, which is about the time the present house was erected; but the church is much older, for the local association minutes report its meeting there as early as 1868, when Reverend R.O. Tribble was moderator. Because land in that vicinity is very fertile the name Rich Woods was given by the early settlers to their community. Hence the name of the church. (R. Childers; D.W. Epley; N.B. Allen)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Riverton
Description:A village in Ozark Township at the Highway 42 crossing of Eleven Points River, a good crossing for hunting and fishing. Charles R. Jones, from Stoddard County, put in the first store in 1923. He gave the name for Riverton, Wyoming, where he had operated a store for a short time. The name, meaning a town on the river, is quite appropriate. (B.N. Jones; Mr. and Mrs. T. Hofstedler; C. Franken)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Roaring Spring
Description:Near Eleven Points River above Graham Spring and Mill (q.v.) about one quarter mile. It flows from the hillside, making a roaring sound. (Geo. Moore; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Roberts School
Description:See Charter Oak School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rock Chapel Church
Description:A Pentecost Church in the Knob Hill School community. Built of cobblestones about 1926. (Geo. Moore; J. Old; William Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rose Hill Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church organized in 1886. The present building was erected about 1919. It took the name of the school nearby. (Joe Kester; J.H. Taylor; M.B.G.A. 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rose Hill School
Description:In Oak Grove Township. Named for D.D. Rose, a Christian minister and landowner who lived near. (J. Kester; J.H. Taylor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ross
Description:A post office established in 1914, kept by Samuel Ross in his home in Falling Springs Township. It was discontinued after two or three months and the mail handled at Greer. (P. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ross Cemetery
Description:See Ross Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ross Ford
Description:See Ross Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ross School
Description:See Ross Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ross Spring
Description:A large spring in southern Falling Springs Township marking the homeplace of Samuel Ross who came from Tennessee in 1866. The school, near Big Hurricane, was named for him. The cemetery of the same name, on the Ross farm, now a public burial ground, was begun as a family graveyard. The Ross Ford of Eleven Points River is the crossing of the old Alton-Van Buren road. (P. Williams; Geo. Moore; E. Williams; W.E. Harrod; W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rough Hollow
Description:A northern branch of Eleven Points River in western Black Pond Township. The small canyon or gorge and the steep, rough hills suggested the name. (Geo. Moore; W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rover
Description:A small village and post office in northwestern Highland Township. Nathaniel Haywood established the first store, set up a blacksmith shop, and was the first postmaster, caring for the mail in his store. Rab Jolliff suggested the name for Mr. Haywood's dog Rover. (Mrs. Mary Cowen; William D. Willard; Postal Guide 1901-1939)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rover Branch
Description:A more recent name by which Elk Creek is sometimes known because it is the main stream near Rover (q.v.). (William D. Willard)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Royal Oak School
Description:An old school seven miles northwest of Alton, built in a grove of oak trees. The oak is considered the king of trees; hence the adjective "Royal." The store on Highway 19, one and a half miles southeast took the name of the school. The store was established by Emory Uzzle in the early 1890s, but operated by some other persons at various times. It was later known as Crews Store also, for W.E. Crews who made considerable improvements and owned it for about ten years. He sold to E.N. Wallace in 1937. The old blacksmith shop and shack for the early store have been replaced by a more modern building for a filling station, store, and bus station for the Golden Arrow Bus Line from Thayer to St. Louis. The place is still known as Royal Oak Store. (Mrs. W.E. Crews; J. Old; Mrs. Alice Humphrey; Mrs. Belle Peace; Mrs. Susie Huddleston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Royal Oak Store
Description:See Royal Oak School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rush Creek
Description:See Colvin Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sailor School
Description:See New Attie School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Salem Church
Description:See New Salem Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sam Smith Hollow
Description:See Sam Smith Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sam Smith Spring
Description:The spring, about two miles northwest of Thomasville, and the hollow took the name of a pioneer settler, from Tennessee, Samuel Smith, who was the first owner. The story is told that, while this older man (who wore a buckskin coat), sat on a log near the spring waiting for his cow to come, he was attacked by a panther; thus the alternative name Panther Spring and Hollow. Mr. Weaver says a panther was killed here by a Mr. Haden. (Geo. Moore; Mrs. A.O. Roberts; W.D. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sand Springs
Description:In Pine Hollow (q.v.). A shallow basin where the water bubbles up from the sand. It covers about one quarter acre, and is a good watering place for range cattle. (Mrs. S.P. Kesner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Scott Town
Description:See Pinkleyville
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Seed Tick School
Description:See Pleasant Hill No. 13 and Mitchell School No. 37
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Seven Points Hills
Description:Near Thomasville are seven low hills, the points of which converge four miles southeast of the town, thus making the head of a small hollow near Eleven Points River. The old Alton Pocahontas Road followed this hollow. (J. Old; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh Cemetery
Description:See Shiloh
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh Church [1 of 2]
Description:An old church, log house originally, four miles southwest of Alton, built according to some informants as early as 1867--possibly ealier. Used by all, but most of the earlier community were Baptists and Methodists. Also used for school. The present house, erected in 1921, is a Missionary Baptist, but it is open to other denominations. The minutes give the organization date as 1888. Shiloh School, one quarter mile away, took the name of the old church. Shiloh Cemetery was ealier known as Crews Cemetery for John Crews who owned the land. For the name see above. (Mrs. William Clark; J. Old; E. Bailey; Mrs. Susie Huddleston; E. Williams; M.B.G.A.1934; Jos. 18:1)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh Church [2 of 2]
Description:A defunct Hard Shell Baptist Church. See Jolliff Graveyard.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sibtka Spring
Description:In Jobe Township on the Brock Ranch. Being near Eleven Points River, it is a good camping and fishing place. A man of this name lived there during the timber days. (E. Williams; Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Siding
Description:A railroad station or switch near Thayer. The railroad put in a side track in the early 1880s out to a packing plant. (William Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Simpson Cemetery
Description:See Andrews Cemetery
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Simpson Graveyard
Description:An old and large burial ground two and a half miles south of Greer (q.v.). Started on land owned by Thomas C. Simpson, a Baptist minister and pioneer, who came from Tennessee in 1853. He represented the county in the Legislature in 1858 and during the 1880s served as judge of the county. Now known as Bailey Cemetery for later land owners. Daniel Bailey, who came from Tennessee in 1858, entered land near. His son, Harvey Bailey, father of the informant, deeded more land for the cemetery. (E. Bailey; W.B. Simpson; P. Williams; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Simpson's Mill
Description:See Greer Mill and Simpson Graveyard
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sitton Knob
Description:A considerable elevation in Oak Grove Township near the home of John J. Sitton, captain in the Confederate Army, who owned a large farm here. (Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Robinson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sitton Spring
Description:See Sitton Valley
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sitton Valley
Description:In King Township, leading into White's Creek. Warren Sitton owned land here and ran a blacksmith shop at his farm home during the timber days of the 1880s and 1890s. Sitton Spring is on the farm. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sittonville
Description:See Garfield
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Smith Cemetery
Description:A public burial ground one half mile north of Alton. Named for Jacob Smith, who gave the land. (W. Heiskell; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Smyrna Cemetery
Description:See Smyrna Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Smyrna Church
Description:A Freewill Baptist Church, six miles northwest of Alton, built during the very early 1880s. Used for school purposes, too, until the Smyrna School, one quarter mile away, was erected a few years later. The school was also known as Gum School for Benjamin Gum, an influential farmer and landowner. The large burial ground at the church is known by the church name. Smyna was a commercial city of Ionia on the Aegean Sea. Here was one of the seven churches of Asia to which John wrote special messages in the Book of Revelation. (N. Bell; William Perigo; Mrs. Susie Huddleston; J. Old; Rev. 1:11; 2:8)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Smyrna School
Description:See Smyrna Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Crooked Hollow
Description:See Crooked Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Prong of Barren Fork
Description:Same as Mill Creek (q.v.). See Barren Fork.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Prong of Fourche Creek
Description:See Fourche Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spakeville
Description:See County Line Garage
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring Branch
Description:Leads into Warm Fork below Huff Mill place (q.v.). Two good springs near Kings Point School (q.v.) feed the stream. (R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring City
Description:Quite a little village grew up just over the state line from Mammoth Springs, Arkansas, but now practically all gone but a store and the spring. See Boise City and Tunsel Spring. Arkansas's passing the prohibition law prior to Missouri's action made the liquor business very thriving at this place, and at Boise (q.v.). It was the post office for both places. (P.L. Polk (1883) 93; E. Bailey; William Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring Creek
Description:Rises in Shannon County and flows southeast through Black Pond Township into Eleven Points River in southern Franks Township. The stream is fed by springs along its course. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring Creek Cemetery
Description:In Franks Township near the stream of this name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring Creek School
Description:In Franks Township near the stream of this name. One of the oldest schools, it was at first called Bodenhammer School for John C. Bodenhammer who came from North Carolina in 1855 and entered the land on which the school was built. (Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring Valley Creek
Description:Heads in northwest Myrtle Township and leads into Eleven Points River. Many small springs in the valley feed the stream. (W.J. Birchert; Geo. Underwood)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Elmo
Description:A discontinued railroad station, one and a half miles south of Koshkonong, the shipping point for the St. Elmo Peach and Apple Orchards, a 400-acre peach orchard set in 1898. The orchard was pobably named, Mr. Richardson thinks, by Mrs. McNair (wife of Orthwein McNair, one of the promoters) who was a great literary reader. St. Elmo, written in 1866, by Jane Evans Wilson, was widely read. Since a railroad accident is one of the central incidents of the story, it would seem appropriate for a railroad town. Cf. Elmo in Modaway County (Mr.s Ewing's thesis). John G. McNair, a grandson of the former Missouri governor, and brother of Orthwein, was the president of the McNair Orchard Company of Kansas City. Their developments in the vicinity of Koshkonong and Thayer began in 1893 with 160 acres, chiefly for apples and peaches. By 1898 there were 3,500 acres. After a few years of flourishing business the orchards gradually went to ruins until now only a few scattered small ones remain. See American and Elberta. (E. Williams; Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; William Weaver; T.J. Richardson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Elmo Orchard
Description:See St. Elmo
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railway
Description:The St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company now owns all the roads in these five counties except the "Cairo Branch" and the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Hence the present name, locally known as "The Frisco." It was taken, of course, from the terminal cities.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stillhouse Hollow
Description:In King Township. Leads into Eleven Points River six and a half miles north of Riverton (q.v.). Before the Civil War a twelve foot still was built here where they continued making whiskey during the war. After prohibition was established much moonshine whiskey was made in this thinly settled region. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills; Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Hofstedler)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stillhouse Spring
Description:A good spring in Black Pond Township. It received its name from the large still, operated there before the Civil War by a landowner, Solomon Depriest, who came from Illinois. (W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stinking Pond
Description:See Stinking Pond Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stinking Pond Hollow
Description:Heads near Wilderness (q.v.) and leads into Eleven Points River in Kings Township. The pond, filled by backwater, sometime reaches one quarter mile in length, and is about 30 yds. wide. Continuous decaying vegetation give an offensive odor. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stony Point School
Description:An old school, originally log, near Bay Creek. Used also for church services. A descriptive name. Although the school was moved, its old name was retained. Now consolidated with Koshkonong. (R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stubblefield Branch
Description:A small stream in Myrtle Township, flowing into Mill Creek (q.v.). Joseph Stubblefield settled there before the Civil War. (E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stubblefield Cemetery
Description:See Stubblefield Ford and Walnut Grove Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stubblefield Creek
Description:See Stubblefield Ford
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stubblefield Ford
Description:The old crossing of Eleven Points River about two miles north of the state line. Clinton and William Stubblefield of Tennessee settled in the vicinity before the Civil War. Stubblefield Graveyard, on Mr. Rufus Dalton's land in Cedar Bluff Township, is no longer used. Stubblefield Creek, another name for Colvin Creek (q.v.) enters Eleven Points River near the Ford and took the name of the pioneer settlers. By 1916 the river had become deeper at the ford and a ferry was put in, known as Huddleston Ferry because it was first operated by Lon Huddleston. A bridge now spans the river. (W. Heiskell; N. Bell; Mr. and Mrs. R. Dalton; O. Young; J. Brewer; Mr. and Mrs. T. Hofstedler; W.J. Birchert)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stubblefield Graveyard
Description:See Stubblefield Ford and Mount Carmel Graveyard
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Surprise
Description:A post office, discontinued about 1922, when rural route No. 2 from Alton was established. See Turner Springs.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Surprise School
Description:Near Turner Spring. Named for the post office. (N. Bell; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Swamp Branch
Description:A small tributary of Frederick's Creek, in Myrtle Township. The section drained is rather low and wet. (W.J. Birchert)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tanglewood
Description:See Lindley Club House
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thayer
Description:A small city in Thayer Township on the Frisco Railroad and on highways 63 and 19. Platted as Augusta (q.v.). When the post office was established, there was considerable confusion about a name. Upon a petition of the majority of the citizens of the town, the circuit court, on August 24, 1886, gave the name for Nathaniel Thayer of Boston, Massachusetts, a very wealthy stockholder of the railroad company. (N. B. Allen; W. Highfill; N. Bell; Court Record Book 5, 201; Postal Guide 1887-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thayer Township
Description:The southwest border division, formed from Lynn Township. It was named for its chief town, Thayer. (N. Bell; N.B. Allen)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Barrens
Description:A large region in Goebel Township, excellent for grazing during the earlier days because of the heavy growth of grass and very little timber. Such regions are found in various sections of the Ozark Region.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Frisco
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railway.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Narrows
Description:One of the beauty spots of unusual scenery near Eleven Points River in Myrtle Township. The natural, narrow valley, east of Billmore (q.v.), barely wide enough for cars to pass, is hedged in on both sides by bluffs of 100 to 200 feet. Beauty is added by the variety of timber, much of which is cedar. (W. Heiskell; H. Taylor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thomas Cemetery
Description:An old burial ground, not used for twenty-five years, or longer, one and a half miles northwest of Thomasville (q.v.) on the old George Thomas homestead. The land was deeded by Mrs. Lydia Hoover, whose maiden name was Thomas. The name of early settlers. (Geo. Moore; Mrs. A.O. Roberts)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thomas Spring
Description:See Old Field Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thomas Township
Description:Original division in the northwest part of the county. It took the name of early settlers; cf. Thomasville. Moore Township was formed from it. (N.B. Allen)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thomason Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill set up before the Civil War by a Mr. Ferguson, and known by his name as Ferguson Mill. Soon after the war Jack Thomason from Tennessee bought the farm and mill. Now owned (1937), by William Sheers, a merchant of St. Louis, and operated by S.S. Williams. Besides meal, flour, and stock feed grinding, cotton is ginned. (H. Taylor; W.E. Harrod; J. Johnson; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thomason Mill Spring
Description:Another name for the larger Blue Spring, for the pioneer mill of that name (q.v.). also known locally as Mill Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thomasville
Description:A small village and post office in Moore Township, originally known as Rich Woods (q.v.) the oldest settlement in the county and adjacent region. The original county seat of Oregon County, it was laid out in 1846, incorporated in 1873, and name by the County Court for George Thomas who settled one mile north of Thomasville on land now owned by Charles Gum. The Thomases came in 1817. George Thomas had four sons: Lee, Julian, Marshall, and Stonewall Jackson; and two daughters: Lydia and Jane. They became heads of prominent families. (Jno. Old; N. Bell; Geo. Moore; Gaz. of Mo., 409; Good. and West, 26; Hayward (1853), 824 ff.; Postal Guide 1887-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thrasher Ford
Description:An old crossing place of Eleven Points River two and a half miles west of the mouth of Greer Spring Branch (q.v.). William Thrasher, who died before 1920, owned land and lived there for many years. (Geo. Moore; P. Williams; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Three Mile Spring Hollow
Description:See Low Wassie Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Town Fork
Description:A small stream in Oak Grove Township, flowing into Frederick's Fork two and a half miles south of Couch (q.v.). Some think the name is derived from an old Indian village, as the remains of the old burial ground may be seen. Many Indian relics have been found along the stream. Local records reveal that Lindley Couch came with his family from Fulton County Arkansas (originally from Virginia), in 1830 and located on a fork of Frederick River and put up a little store that gave the creek the name of Town Fork. He was the father of Simpson Couch and grandfather of Alfred and George Couch. See Couch and Alf Couch Mill. He moved to Dade County, Missouri, and died soon after the Civil War. (Chas. Braswell; Mrs. Irma Pinkley; J.H. Taylor; Rem. Hist. of Ozarks, 767- )
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Trace Creek
Description:Heads in Arkansas and flows through Thayer and Oak Grove townships into Spring River. No reason could be found for the name; but it is very crooked and Mr. Childers answered, "I guess it was hard to keep the trace of it," which statement seems a very plausible origin. (R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tram Hollow
Description:In Falling Spring Township. Heads near Brushy Pond (q.v.) and leads into Cook Hollow (q.v.). The tram road of the Ozark Timber Company of Winona extended into the vicinity. (N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Trantham Cave
Description:See Trantham Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Trantham Hollow
Description:Leads into Warm Fork (q.v.). Eli Trantham from Tennessee settled there during the 1850s. Trantham Cave in the hollow is about four miles southeast of Rover (q.v.). (Jno. Perkins; J. Old)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Trantham Mill
Description:A small grist mill on Warm Fork above Clifton (q.v.) operated by John Trantham for a few years soon after the Civil War. (Mrs. W. Fraley; R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Trimble School
Description:See Pleasant Grove School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Trough Spring
Description:See Old Field Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tucker Branch
Description:A small stream in Piney Township, flowing into Frederick's Creek. John Tucker, an old resident, lived near the stream. (N. Bell; W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tunsel Spring
Description:A well- kept spring at Spring City (q.v.). Harry Tunsel, landowner, had a store and small lot with spring for a number of years during the 1880s or earlier. This spring was the origin of the name Spring City, according to some informants. Cf. Spring City. (R. Childers; Jno. Perkins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turkey Creek
Description:Leads into Elk Creek (q.v.). There were many wild turkeys in the early days. (Lewis Simpson; Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turner Springs
Description:A later name for Falling Springs (q.v.). During the late 1880s or early 1890s Jesse L. Clay Turner, from Tennessee, homesteaded 160 acres on Eleven Points River, thus securing ownership of the spring, the daily flow of which is estimated at 1,600,000 gallons. About 1895 he bought from the Hardin brothers the ruins of the old Williams Mill (q.v.) and put it in repair here. Later he put in a sawmill and operated a store. For a time he operated a toll bridge; and when the post office was established, he gave the name Surprise, saying people would be surprised at what a well-improved, good place he was developing. His mill, too, went into ruins after his death and the post office was discontinued, but the spring remains strong and beautiful. (McCanse, 26; W.E. Harrod; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills; P. Williams; W. Weaver; W. Heiskell; Postal Guide 1897-1922)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turner's Mill
Description:See Turner Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turtle Island
Description:See Turtle Island Hollow
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turtle Island Hollow
Description:In Johnson Township. Leads into Eleven Points River two and a half miles north of Riverton. A rather picturesque place. Rugged hillsides and one boulder after another with the spring branch and main stream make a good sized island in the stream. It is a habitat of fresh-water turtles. (Mrs. W. Johnson; T. Hofstedler)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Two Mile Creek
Description:A small stream of Big Apple Township flowing into Warm Fork. A descriptive name. (E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Two Mile Spring Hollow
Description:See Low Wassie Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Church
Description:An old log church erected about 1853 for all denominations and for the early schools near the mouth of Spring Creek (q.v.). After the Civil War the old church activities declined rapidly, and by 1884 the house was in ruins. Spring Creek School, also used for church services, had been built farther up the creek as more settlers came. The old church was the scene of many pioneer camp meetings. Hogan Club House (q.v.) is near the old church house site. (P. Williams; Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Ford
Description:The crossing place of Eleven Points River near the old Union Church (q.v.). (P. Williams; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Hill Cemetery
Description:See Union Hill Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Hill Church
Description:About three miles south of Thomasville. John Manny and William Old deeded one acre for school and church purposes. The house, used by any denomination and for school, stands upon a high level elevation. The school is consolidated with Thomasville. The old burial ground, now generally called Union Cemetery, was started before the Civil War, and known as Beaty Cemetery for Daniel Beaty, a landowner there. (Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Moore; Mrs. Susie Huddleston; Jno. Old)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Hill School
Description:See Union Hill Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Point School
Description:Now a neat rock house seven miles northwest of Thayer. The house is used for school and services by any denomination. (W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vienna School
Description:In northern Spring Creek Township. The old school which had two rooms and was graded, burned about 1906 after which a smaller school was built. Probably named for Vienna, Austria, but why is not remembered. The house was earlier used for church by the Methodists and Baptists. (William Fox; S.T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walker Cemetery
Description:In Big Apple Township, southeast of Koshkonong. A very old burial ground on land formerly owned by John Walker. (R. Childers; Jno. Perkins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wallace Store
Description:On Highway 14 about five miles east of Alton, a service station with groceries, now (1937) owned and operated by Ernest Wallace. (Mrs. Earnest Wallace)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walnut Bottom
Description:A large lowland section in Warm Fork Basin, formerly well timbered with black walnut. (N.B. Allen)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walnut Branch
Description:A small branch of Barren Fork in Moore Township. Much walnut timber grows in the valley. (Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walnut Grove Cemetery
Description:It acquired the name of Walnut Grove Church (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walnut Grove Church
Description:A United Baptist Church in southeastern Myrtle Township. A descriptive name. The cemetery is also known as Stubblefield Cemetery for Joseph Stubblefield who lived there when the first person was buried before the Civil War. (E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walnut Spring
Description:See Williams Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Warm Fork
Description:A small town and post office, two miles north of Clifton (q.v.), laid out in 1873 on Wam Fork Creek for which it was named. It was the business point for the southwest part of the county. It is shown on an 1855 map and listed as a post office as early as 1862. Nothing now remains of the place. (P.L. Goodwin and West (1867); Polk (1876) 21; Gaz. of Mo. (1874) 409; N.B. Allen)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Warm Fork Creek
Description:It heads east of West Plains (q.v.), flows across Thayer Township (q.v.), and into Spring River in Arkansas. The name came from its water's being of a higher temperature than Spring River. Its average is about 60 to 65 degrees, while that of Mammoth Spring is about 58 degrees. (N.B. Allen)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wason
Description:A post office kept by Alec Wasson five miles east of Thayer, Mr. Heiskell thinks. A family name in that part of the county. Doubtless the postal authorities shortened the name. (W. Heiskell; R. Dalton; Mrs. N. Bell; R. Childers; Mrs. W. Fraley; Postal Guide 1901- 1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Water
Description:A post office between Gatewood (q.v.) and Calm (q.v.). Springs in that vicinity keep small streams of water running at all seasons. (Postal Guide 1901-1902; Mrs. R. Dalton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Watered Fork
Description:A small southwestern branch of Middle Fork on Eleven Points River. Fed by small springs, it always has plenty of water. (Geo. Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Watered Hollow
Description:Leads into Frederick's Fork south of Couch. Small springs furnish water for stock. A descriptive name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Watered Rock Branch
Description:A branch of Warm Fork in Big Apple Township. Big Spring also known as Cold Rock Spring (q.v.) feeds the stream with living water. On the old county road from Alton to Koshkonong. (W. Heiskell; Mrs. W. Fraley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Watson Spring
Description:Marks the old settlement five miles east of Rover, where Samuel Watson from Tennessee settled before the Civil War. (Jno. Old; Geo. Moore; R. Childers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Webster
Description:An old post office and trading post of some importance six miles south of Alton. Lemuel Braswell, who came from Tennessee in 1856, got the office established and kept it in a store. Mr. Braswell thinks it was established in 1869, but Goodwin lists it a post office in 1862. He named it for Noah Webster (1758-1843), the famous lexicographer. (Chas. Braswell; J.H. Taylor; Gaz. of Mo. (1874) 15 ff.; P.L. Polk (1876) 21; Goodwin 1862)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Weilputz Club House
Description:See Bamby Ranch
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West Prong of Mill Creek
Description:See Mill Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West Prong of Piney Creek
Description:See Piney Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wet Hollow
Description:Leads into Orchard Hollow (q.v.). Very soppy ground. (R. Childers; E. Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White Church
Description:See Garfield Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White Mule Church
Description:See Oak Forest Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White Oak Bottom
Description:Also known as White Oak Hollow. Leads into Eleven Points River west of Big Hurricane (q.v.). Noted for the fine white oak timber, highly prized by railsplitters, before the timber companies came with mills. The McFry Crossing (q.v.) is near. (Geo. Moore; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White Oak Hollow
Description:See White Oak Bottom
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White's Cave
Description:See White's Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White's Creek
Description:In King's Township. Flows into Eleven Points River. A pioneer family of the name "White" lived there before the Civil War. White's Cave in the valley is the largest in Oregon County. The old school took the family name. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills; W. Heiskell; N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White's School
Description:See Charter Oak School and White's Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Whitten School
Description:East of Alton twelve miles. The Ozark Land and Lumber Company gave the site. It was named for Drew Whitten, who owned land and lived near, when the school was established in the early 1900s. (E. Williams; William Weaver; Mr. and Mrs. N. Bell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wild Cat Hill
Description:A very steep hill east of Alton. Doubtless named for the animal; cf. Panther Spring and Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wilderness
Description:A village and post office in King's Township. The name is a survival of the old Irish Wilderness Settlement (q.v.). Robert A. King, a Presbyterian minister, was the first postmaster about 1881. (T. King; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Mills; P.L. Polk (1883) 93; Postal Guide 1886-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Willard
Description:A store, trade center, and filling station at the junction of highways 80 and 14 in northwest Highland Township established by William D. Willard in 1932. (William D. Willard; G.W. Jolliff)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Williams Mill
Description:Earlier Couch Mill (q.v.). William Williams, born in Scotland, bought the mill in 1867 or somewhat earlier. The dam washed out, and he sold it in the early 1870s to the Hardin Brothers, who tried to keep the dam repaired, but soon gave up and the old mill went to ruins. Some of the old mill stones may still be seen. (P. Williams; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Williams Spring
Description:In the eastern part of Piney Township. It is the head of Williams Spring Branch which flows into Piney Creek, and is sometimes called Walnut Spring because of the black walnut trees growing there. S.D. Williams, a Baptist minister and native of Georgia owned the land. (H. Williams; W.E. Harrod)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Williams Spring Branch
Description:See Williams Spring
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Willow Springs Hollow
Description:Heads near Paty Pond (q.v.) and leads into Two Mile Spring Hollow (q.v.). There are small springs and a good sized cave in the hollow where much willow timber gows. (N. Bell; W. Heiskell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wiser Chapel
Description:A Pentecost Church built in 1917 in the Mount Nebo (q.v.) community. James Wiser gave the site. (Mrs. Earnest Wallace; E. Bailey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wolf Pen Hollow
Description:Near Spring Creek in Franks Township. During the early hunting days, pens were common in this community for trapping wolves. (W. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Woodring Graveyard
Description:A small burial ground three miles south of Bardley (q.v.) on land now (1937) owned by Ollie Lindley; formerly owned by W. Morgan Woodring. (Mrs. B. Hayes; Mrs. Jack Woodring)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Woodside
Description:A little settlement and post office, six miles north of Alton. Nothing remains now but the ruins of an old mill. It was named for the large landowner Jno. R. Woodside, a native of Franklin County, Kentucky, who was a prominent citizen and circuit judge for several years; he moved to Oregon County about 1844 near Thomasville. (Campbell, Gaz. of Mo., 409; P.L. Goodwin and West (1862) 45; Postal Guide 1889-1915; W.E. Harrod; Mrs. H.B. Pitts)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Woodside Township
Description:A small division of the county in the north-central part. Originally it included all the northeastern quarter of the county. Named for Judge Jno. R. Woodside, a pioneer fom Tennessee, who was a prominent landowner and the first attorney in the county. (Campbell, Atlas, 1873; W. Weaver; Jno. Chilton; Jno. Old)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Yellow Jacket Church
Description:See Oak Forest Church
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Yowassia
Description:See Low Wassie Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

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