New Madrid County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Airline
Description:A road running north from Dodd's Spur to Morehouse through the west part of Lewis and West Townships. It was completed in 1932 and so named because it runs in a straight line. (Stearns)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Arnold
Description:A flagstop, now abandoned, on the Frisco Railroad in the southern part of Lewis Township, established in 1915 and named for J.L. Arnold of Lilbourn, a landowner and merchant. (Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atlantic and Pacific Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barnes Ridge
Description:A small slightly elevated strip of land in the southern part of St. John's Township, on which the Barnes family settled about 1874. (Barnes, Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barnes School
Description:An old rural school in the southern part of St. John's Township, established in 1874 and named for the Barnes family, early settlers of that community. (Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baxter
Description:A sawmill camp in the southwest part of Como Township, established about 1916 and named for the owner, Mr. Baxter. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bayou Carondelet
Description:A small stream in the center part of the county where Jean Baptiste Peltier from Kaskaskia settled in 1790. He probably gave the stream its name in honor of Baron de Carondelet, Governor Intendant of the province of Louisiana and Florida, who established, or promoted the idea of establishing, two flour mills on the streams of New Madrid County for the purpose of manufacturing flour for the King's storehouses. The bayou was destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. (Barnes, Houck II 158, III 399.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bayou de Boeuf
Description:An old bayou in the northern part of New Madrid County, which was destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. It was probably named by early French settlers. The name translated means Buffalo Bayou. (Houck I. 164)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bayou de Cyprie
Description:See Decypri
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bayou Fourche
Description:A bayou two miles south of the present site of New Madrid, which flowed past Big Mound and divided into two branches or forks, one of which emptied into Lake St. Ann, and the other into Lake St. Mary. It was named by the early French settlers for its two branches or forks. (Douglass I 229, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bayou St. Henry
Description:A bayou in the eastern part of the county; Francois Derousser owned land on this bayou in 1800, and it is probable that he named the stream for the patron saint of some member of his family; possibly St. Henry (972-1024), a German king, emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, who was canonized in 1146. The bayou was among those destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. (Houck II 147, Barnes, Catholic Ency.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bayou St. Thomas
Description:A small stream in the center part of the county; it appears on a map of 1789 describing Colonel Morgan's plans for New Madrid, and was probably named by the early traders for St. Thomas, the apostle. The stream, which was sometimes called St. Thomas River, was destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. (Houck II 120-121, 158, Goodspeed 436, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bayouville
Description:A small town in the eastern part of St. John Township between the St. James Bayou, Dry Bayou and the Mississippi River. It was named by Mr. Fletcher of New Madrid, who sent mail by steamboat to this settlement in 1882. The name was suggested by the number of bayous. A post office was maintained there from 1901-1933. (Barnes, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beaver's Causeway
Description:A road or trail which appears in the plans for laying out the town of New Madrid in 1789. A causeway is a road, particularly one built through marshy ground or shallow water, and this was probably so named because the road was believed to have been built by beavers. (Houck I 120-121)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beech Grove Methodist Church
Description:An early rural Methodist Church in the southern part of Lafont Township, which was organized prior to 1888 and named, as was Beech Grove School (q.v.), for the natural surroundings. The Church was disbanded about 1900. (Croell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beech Grove School
Description:The oldest school in the Conran district, established about 1898 and named for the beech trees which grew there. The land was donated, and the school was organized and named by Judge Dockery, of the county court of New Madrid. (Croell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Lake Township
Description:In the southern part of the county; organized in 1842. It was changed in 1845 to LeSieur and Little Prairie Townships. The name is from Big Lake (cf. above), which is now in Pemiscot County. (Goodspeed 329, Douglass I 166, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Mound
Description:A large Indian mound in the western part of New Madrid Township, called La Grande Cote by the early French settler, and said to have been the site of DeSoto's camp. It was used by the Indians as a signal and look-out mound, but not as a burial place, prior to 1811-1812. (Douglass I 5, Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Prairie
Description:A long narrow and slightly elevated ridge stretching north from New Madrid to the present town of Sikeston in Scott County. It was named by the early settlers for its size. (M.H.R. 5-6)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Prairie Township
Description:In the center part of the county. It was first organized in 1813 to include all the territory about Sikeston, now in Scott County. In 1822, at the organization of Scott County, the Township was reduced in size with boundaries described, "north of a line running in a westerly direction north of Rawl's old mill to the west boundary of the county." It was changed in size many times by the redistricting of New Madrid Township (q.v.), in 1845, and of East Township in 1874. It was named from Big Prairie. (q.v.) (County Court Record, Goodspeed 329, Douglass I 166)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Ridge
Description:A large ridge or elevation in the west part of the county, which was so named by the early settlers. (Taul)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Ridge School
Description:A rural negro school in the southern part of West Township. The first school established here in 1908 was for white people of Canalou and the surrounding community, and was given the name by which the entire region was known. (Cf. above) (Taul)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boadwater School
Description:See Broadwater
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boekerton
Description:A small village in the southern part of Portage Township on Portage Bayou. The first settlement was Weaversville, named from Weaver's mill located there by the Weaver family in 1861. Prior to this a settlement had been made there in 1789 by Jean Baptiste Olive, but no name had been given to the settlement. In 1910 when a post office was established, the name Boekerton was given, because the Boeker family had become prominent landowners. The post office was discontinued in 1921. (Barnes, Fiala 1881, Postal Guide, Mrs. E.E. Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bowman
Description:A flagstop on the Frisco Railroad in the north part of Big Prairie Township determined by the building of a warehouse by the Scott County Milling Company. It has been discontinued since 1928 when a storm destroyed the warehouse. The name was given in honor of W.C. Bowman , president of the company. (Bowman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Broadwater
Description:A stop on the Cottonbelt Railroad in the center part of Como Township. A post office was maintained from 1915-1918. Now the place is only a rural school and community. It was named from the fact that water from Buckhorn Slough (q.v.) spread over this entire territory, and later the name was appropriately retained for the broad floodway ditch which drained the old slough. (Hoehn, Phillips, Spitzler)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brooks Mill
Description:An old settlement in the northern part of what is now Como Township, established as a sawmill and log loading station on the Houck Railroad in 1879 and named by Houck for the man who operated the mill. (Barnes, Cram, Kochtitsky)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckhorn Slough
Description:A large slough or swamp in the west part of Como Township, which was given the name Buckhorn by the early hunters because the deer frequented this place until recently. (Spitzler)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cade School
Description:A rural school in the west part of East Township, which was named for the Cade family, landowners in the community. (Phillips) . ..
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canalou
Description:A small village in the western part of West Township, established in 1902 as a sawmill camp and called Stansfield Switch, for a Mr. Stansfield who built the switch from his mill to the Frisco Railroad. A post office was established in 1903. The origin of the name is unknown. Caverno says it is of Indian origin, but Hodge does not list it. The common story is that the word was coined from canal and the French word ou (where), to mean "Where goes the canal?" referring to the question as to where the ditch for draining the town was to be located. This is obviously an afterthought. (Taul, Caverno)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Ridge
Description:An old ridge in the southeastern part of Elk Township so designated in 1879 because of the cane which grew thickly on this slightly elevated ground which extended into New Madrid County. (Cram 1789, Kochtitsky 1879)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Capaha Village
Description:An old Indian village of the Capaha, ("downstream people") or Quappa or Quapaw tribe, as they are variously called, on Bayou St. John, the remains of which may still be seen. This is thought by many archeologists, including Professor Conant, and many historians, including Schoolcraft, to be the site of the famous Capaha Village described by Desoto. (Schoolcraft, Houck I 101-117, 172, Goodspeed 222-227)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor River
Description:A large river flowing through the central part of Stoddard County and south into New Madrid County, where it flows into Little River. It was called Crooked Creek, probably because of its winding or crooked appearance, by the early settlers. It is so called by Schoolcraft in 1818; and in 1823 is designated Castor or Crooked Creek by Beck. In 1837 Wetmore refers to it as Castor River, but it continued to be known as Crooked Creek until 1873. Castor is a French word meaning beaver, and the name was doubtless given by the early French settlers in St. Francois County where the river rises. (Thwaites 17:38, Wetmore, Beck Schoolcraft, Long's Voyage, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor River
Description:Castor River rises in St. Francois County, flows south through Madison County near the eastern boundary, then for a short distance along the boundary line between Wayne and Bollinger. It enters Bollinger in Fillmore Township and flows southeast through Wayne Township into Stoddard County, and thence into New Madrid County, where it empties into Little River. Prior to the white man's coming the region in what is now the southern part of Madison and the western part of Bollinger counties was a mass of canebrakes where pools of water collected in rainy seasons. Here beavers built dams and held back the water coming down from the St. Francois hills to the north. When heavy rains came, the beaver dams were broken and the water formed a channel. After many repetitions of this process a river was formed, and it was called Castor, a word meaning beaver, by the French who came to the Mine LaMotte district (in Madison County) near the source of this stream in 1725. Schoolcraft in 1818 refers to this branch as Crooked Creek. (Present Crooked Creek is a few miles east and joins Castor River in New Madrid County). Beck calls the river Castor or Crooked Creek in 1823; Wetmore calls it Castor in 1837, but the name Crooked Creek is not entirely separated from this branch until 1873. (Conard, Douglass I: XII, XIV, Schoolcraft, Beck, Wetmore, Long's Voyage, Campbell, Hopkins, Miss Hamlett's thesis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Catron
Description:A school and community in the eastern part of Como Township, just west of Little River where a post office was maintained in 1895-1896, discontinued between 1904-1914, and finally reestablished in 1915. The first name of this settlement was May's Switch, named for a man of the Southwest Land and Lumber Company, who established a mill there and arranged for the loading switch on the Cottonbelt Railroad. The settlement was known as Little River Station in 1879, but the post office was named for W.C. Catron, an early settler. (Postal Guide, County Court Record, Kochtitsky, Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cattle Ridge
Description:An old settlement in what is now Como Township, which appears on the map of 1879 on the Cottonbelt Railroad. It was probably named by the railroad workers because of the cattle which ranged the slight elevation. (Kochitsky, Cram, Barnes, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caverno School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of West Township; established in 1914 and named for Xenophon Caverno, a prominent landowner. (Taul, Caverno)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chapoosa Creek
Description:See St. John Bayou.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chepoosa River
Description:See St. John's Bayou.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Claud Spur
Description:A piling camp from which a spur was built to the Cottonbelt Railroad about 1912 by the owners, Marlow, Wheeler, and Arnold, and named by them for a friend. (Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cline School
Description:A rural school in the center part of West Township. It was first called Eberett School in honor of an early settler, but later renamed for Henry Cline, a landowner and a man of local prominence. (Taul)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Como
Description:A small village and station on the Cottonbelt Railroad in the northern part of Como Township on old Lake Como which was drained about 1901. A post office was established in 1886, discontinued in 1890, and reestablished in 1899. A settlement was made prior to 1879 when the railroad was built, The name, which was given by Louis Houck, was suggested to him by Como, an Italian town in the northern part of Lombardy on Lake Como, which he had visited. (M.H.R. 11:335, and McNally, Kochtitsky, Cram, P.G., Houck Mss., Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Como Township
Description:In the west part of the county, organized May 8, 1888, at the request of T.J. Morrison et al. and named from its oldest settlement, Como (cf. above). (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cottonbelt Railroad
Description:A railroad which enters new Madrid County from Dunklin County on the west and branches at Lilbourn, formerly Pawpaw Junction, one tract going to New Madrid and the other to Bird's Point in Mississippi County. This branch of the Cottonbelt system was first incorporated as the Little River Valley and Arkansas Railroad in 1876 with the purpose of building a railroad from New Madrid through Malden and Kennett (in Dunklin County); that is, through the Little River Valley, to the Arkansas state line. The road was finished from New Madrid to Malden in 1878 by Otto Kochtitsky and George B. Clark. In 1881 it was extended to the state line of Arkansas and consolidated with the Texas and St. Louis Railroad Company of Missouri and Arkansas. In 1882 the branch was built from Lilbourn to Bird's Point. The line went into the hands of the receiver, Mr. Fordyce, in 1886 and was reorganized as the St. Louis, Arkansas and Texas Railroad in order to extend the road to Texarkana, Texas. In 1890 the railroad was again sold and reorganized under the title St. Louis Southwestern Railroad Company, and in 1893 it became known as the Cottonbelt Route, because it has its terminal in Texas, in the cottonbelt of the United States. (Willis, M.H.R. 21:322, Douglass I 507, Goodspeed 385, Cox, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cottrell School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Anderson Township, organized in 1910 as a ward school of the Gideon district, and named for Dr. Thomas Cottrell, who came to Gideon in 1903 and was a member of the first board of education. The school was abandoned in 1937. (Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cox School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Lewis Township, named for J.F. Cox of Sikeston, Missouri, a landowner in this region. It is mockingly referred to as "Gumbo College" because of the gumbo (stocky mud) in the community. (Parrett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crossroads School
Description:See Pleasant Valley School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crumpecker
Description:A flagstop on the Cottonbelt Railroad in the northeast part of Como Township, established about 1915 on the farm of C.H. Crumpecker, for whom it is named. (Taul, County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cushion Lake
Description:A large lake in the southeast part of LeSieur Township forming a part of the boundary line. Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cyprie Church
Description:See Mound Church
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dawson School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of New Madrid Township just north of the town of New Madrid. It was named for Thomas A. Dawson, an early settler, who gave the land for the school. (Allen, Phillips, Dawson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Decypri
Description:A large deep pond in the center part of New Madrid Township, which, formed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812, was first called Earthquake Lake until 1823. About that time the name Bayou de Cyprie or Bayou de Cypriere ( a rare word meaning cypress grove or swamp) was used. The correct French word would be Bayou des Cypress. The name suggests the swamps of cypress trees in the region. Locally it is now known as the Washout, because the original stream had almost disappeared before 1912 and in that year, duing a flood from the Mississippi River, a deep hole fomed or washed out quite suddenly. (Douglass I 107, Goodspeed 290, Schoolcraft, Beck, Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deshler
Description:See Tram Switch
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Diamond School
Description:Two rural schools, white and colored, bear this name which was given in honor of George Diamond, an early settler who donated the land. (Croell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dodd's Spur
Description:A flagstop on the Cottonbelt Railroad in the western part of Lewis Township. The first name of this place was Warrington, named for R.T. Warring of Lilbourn, a landowner. It was established for the purpose of shipping ducks and other wild game. Railroad officials objected to this long name and substituted Sky. This name was the last syllable of the name of the chief engineer of the railroad, Mr. Otto Kochtitsky. The name was changed to Dodd's Spur in 1910, for E.M. Dodd, Superintendent of the Cottonbelt Railroad. In 1918 a post office was maintained under the name Spurdod, which was Dodd's Spur reversed, at the request of postal authorities for a one word name. (Barnes, Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Donaldson's Landing
Description:A boat landing on the Mississippi River in the eastern part of St. John's Township, which was established prior to 1872 by Mr. Donaldson, who bought land there, and maintained until 1890. It was named because of the boat landing which Mr. Donaldson established on a small point of land extending out into the river. (Phillips, Kochtitsky, McAnaly 35)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Donaldson's Point
Description:Another name for Donaldson's Landing. (Cf. above).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Donaldson's Point Methodist Church
Description:A rural church located at Donaldson's Landing (q.v.) prior to 1872 and disorganized about 1890. (McAnaly 35)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Earthquake Lake
Description:See Decypri
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:East Township
Description:In the northeast part of the county; organized September 14, 1874 and named from its position. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eastlake
Description:An old settlement in what is now East Township. A post office was established in 1893 and discontinued between 1904 and 1910. It was named from its location on a lake and in the east part of the county. (Phillips, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eberett School
Description:See Cline School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:El Camino Real
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Emory School
Description:See Pleasant Valley School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Evergreen Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church established in 1883 at the place where Marston now stands. It was named for the evergreen trees which marked its location. (Minutes of New M. Assn., Foster)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:An old rural school in the northern part of Big Prairie Township, which was given this descriptive name by the early settlers.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Farrenberg
Description:A small village on the Cottonbelt Railroad in the northeast part of New Madrid Township. Established in 1882 when the railroad was built and named for W.A. Farrenberg, landowner. A post office was maintained from 1899-1918. (Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Five Points
Description:A small switch just outside Malden (in Dunklin County) in the extreme northeast part of Como Township, so named in 1924 because the railroads (Frisco and Cottonbelt), branched from this point in such a way as to give access to five points, northeast, southeast, northwest, southwest, and south. (Cam, Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flater School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Lewis Township, which was named for Mr. Flater, a landowner in the community. The school was abandoned in 1935. (Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fletcher School [1 of 2]
Description:A rural school in the southern part of St. John's Township, which was named for the prominent landowner in this community. A second school was established in 1910 a short distance south of this school and also named Fletcher. For a while the two schools were called Fletcher Numbr One and Fletcher Number Two. Later Number Two was changed to Higgerson. (O'Bannon, Robbins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fletcher School [2 of 2]
Description:See Higgerson
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Floodway
Description:A large drainage ditch running through the western part of the county, which is so called because it receives the waters from the drainage ditches to the north; that is, it receives the flood waters. (Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Floodway Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church organized in 1937 and named for the Floodway. (q.v.) (New Madrid B. Assn. Minutes, Gooch)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Floodway School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Anderson Township, which was organized in 1920 and named for the Floodway (q.v.). (Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fort Celeste
Description:An old fort destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812; built by Pierre Fourcher, who came, under the orders of Governor Miro, to New Madrid territory in 1789 to take over Colonel Morgan's work in building New Madrid (q.v.). The fort was located some distance north of the present site of New Madrid and was named for the wife of Governor Miro. (Douglass I 89, Goodspeed 436)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frailie
Description:See Frailie School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frailie School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Anderson Township, which was named from the old station on the Houck Railroad. The station was named by Mr. Houck for a Mr. Frailie who owned land in the community and who established a sawmill from which he shipped logs and lumber by rail. (Penman, Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frisco Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gerkin
Description:A log camp, now abandoned, in the east part of Como Township. A post office was established in 1918 and discontinued in 1921, the mail being routed from Tallapoosa. It was named for the mill owner. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gideon
Description:A small town in the southwest part of Anderson Township, established in 1900 when the Gideon Anderson Lumber Company of Indiana set up a sawmill and built a railroad there. In 1903 a post office was established, the town was platted, and named for Mr. Frank Gideon of the Lumber Company. The name Anderson was first suggested but was preempted by a town in McDonald County. (Douglass I 379, II 1127, Anderson, Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grape Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the west part of Lafont Township, which was named for the wild grapes growing on a slight elevation. (Croell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gumbo
Description:A country store in the eastern part of Anderson Township, named by the proprietor in reference to the gumbo or sticky mud in the neighborhood. (Croell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gumbo College
Description:See Cox School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hartzell
Description:A small village in the northeast part of Anderson Township. A post office was established in 1921 and named for the Hartzell family. The land was cleared and the first settlement made by Mr. Max Sarff. (Sharp, Anderson, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Headlight Plantation
Description:A large plantation in the southern part of West Township, which belongs to Mr. Xenophon Caverno. He purchased the land in 1907, and named the plantation in 1912 for a horse which he had bought in Kentucky. An old negro recognized the horse as "Old Headlight;" told Mr. Caverno his history, and how he happed to come to southeast Missouri; and Mr. Caverno adopted the name for the horse. He says, "Headlight was a horse that always did what the owner expected; he never did what he shouldn't. When the day the Model T arrived, Headlight was put on a pension. I thought a great deal about a fitting monument for him, and finally hit on the naming of the plantation for him. So Headlight Plantation it became--a well-earned memorial."
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Headlight School
Description:A rural negro school in the south part of West Township, established in 1926 and named for Headlight Plantation. (Cf. above), (Taul, Caverno)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Henderson Mound
Description:See Hough
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Higgerson
Description:A rural school in the southern part of St. John Township. The school was first known as Fletcher (q.v.) or Fletcher Number Two, but the name was changed to Higgerson about 1904 for A.J. Higgerson, an early settler. (O'Bannon)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hondin
Description:A sawmill and flagstop on the Cottonbelt Railroad established by the Gideon Anderson Lumber Company and named by Mr. Sherman of the Company for Mr. Hondin who operated the mill. (Andersons)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Honey Island
Description:An island in the southwest part of West Township made by the waters of Little River in flood seasons. It was named for an early settler, Mr. Johnson, who, because of his hobby of collecting wild honey, became known as "Honey" Johnson. (Ingram, Taul)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hough
Description:A small village in the western part of East Township. A post office established there in 1910 was discontinued and the mail routed fom Matthews in 1928. The railroad name for Hough is Henderson Mound, named for an old Indian mound about 1891. Hough is named for Bottoly Hough, superintendent of the cooperage company in charge of the land. (Charley Barnes, Phillips, Rand McNally 1891)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hough Township
Description:In the northeast part of the county, organized in 1903 and named from the principal settlement in the township. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hubbard Lake
Description:A small lake in the eastern part of St. John Township. It was named for W.H. Hubbard who settled there in the early days. The lake is now quite small because of the drainage. (Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hunter's Bottoms
Description:Low swampy land lying in the center part of the county and named for Joseph Hunter in 1805. His grandson, A.B. Hunter, still owns the land which has been drained and partially cleared. (Goodspeed 302, Croell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hurricane Ridge
Description:A community in the west part of Lewis Township. The name grew up in the community because of a terrific storm or hurricane which occurred about 1900. (Mrs. R. Tope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hurricane Ridge Church
Description:A General Baptist Church which was established in 1906 and named for the community. (Mr. Tope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hyman
Description:See Lorwood
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Illinois Road
Description:See King's Highway
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Illinois, Missouri, and Texas Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Immaculate Conception Church
Description:The Catholic Church in New Madrid was begun in 1789 when Father Gibault went to that place. A building was erected in 1799 and dedicated to St. Isidore, the canonized Isidore of Seville, Spain. This church was neglected after Gibault's death in 1804, and the building washed into the Mississippi River in 1816. In 1832 Bishop Rosati gave the Sisters of Loretto permission to build a monastery and school at New Madrid, and Father Victor Paillasson was placed in charge of the work. Paillasson began the erection of the building, but before it was completed a fire destroyed it. Father Ambrose Heim succeeded Paillasson in 1841 and built a wooden structure which he dedicated to St. John Baptist. This building was destroyed by fire in the period 1859-67. In 1867-1869 under the direction of Father Francis McKenna the Church of the Immaculate Conception was built.The name is a common one for Catholic Churches who hold this doctrine of the immaculate conception; that is, that the Virgin Mary was entirely free from sin from the moment of her conception by Ste. Ann. This building had to be moved to keep it from being washed into the Mississippi River in 1875. The present building was erected in 1911. (Catholic Hist. Review 4:113-124, 206-218)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Immaculate Conception School
Description:The present parochial school in the town of new Madrid, which is named from the Church (q.v.). It was first organized January 9, 1881 by Reverend Father J.A. Connolly. (Catholic H. Rev.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jerico Church
Description:A rural church of the General Baptist denomination in the southern part of Anderson Township, organized about 1910 and named for the city of Jericho, near Jerusalem in Palestine. Whether the spelling was changed becaue of ignorance of the correct spelling, carelessness, or a deliberate attempt to spell the word as it sounds is unknown. (Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jerico School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Anderson Township, established in 1913 and named for Jerico Church (cf. above). (Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jones School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Anderson Township, which was built about 1910 and named for the family who gave the land for the school. (Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Juanita
Description:A flagstop on the Frisco Railroad in the northern part of Big Prairie Township determined by the building of a warehouse of the Scott County Milling Company about 1902. It was named for a brand of flour made by the company. This name had been given in honor of Juanita Greer, daughter of a man of the company. Juanita is now Mrs. Frank Van Horn of Sikeston. (Bowman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kendall School
Description:A rural school in the western part of new Madrid Township, named for the man who gave the land, Dr. Kendall (O.E.), now of Kewanee. (O'Bannon, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kewanee
Description:A small town in the northern part of new Madrid Township established in 1910 as a sawmill camp by McGee and Hetledge, from Kewanee, Illinois, who gave the town its name. (Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:King's Highway
Description:A public road established in 1789 following an old Indian trail through New Madrid County, and named El Camino Real, The King's Highway, by Colonel Morgan, who planned New Madrid (q.v.), in honor of Charles IV, King of Spain 1788-1808. The French called the road Le Chemin du Roi. The entire road stretched from New Madrid to St. Louis, passing through Big Prairie and Rich Woods in Scott County, thence across the hills to Cape Girardeau, to St. Genevieve, and from there to St. Louis. To the south it extended through Pemiscot County towards Memphis, Tennessee. It was known to the early American settlers as the Illinois Road, because it led to the Illinois country. (Houck II 150- 154)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knott's Bridge
Description:A bridge over St. John's Bayou in the eastern part of new Madrid Township, named for W.D. Knott, an early settler who operated a sawmill and owned a farm in this region. (Croell, Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knott's Sawmill
Description:See Knott's Bridge
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Grande Cote
Description:See Big Mound
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Riviere Blanche
Description:See Whitewater River
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lafont School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of LeSieur Township, organized about 1900 and named for Judge Robert Lafont (cf. above). (O'Bannon)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lafont Township
Description:In the southern part of the county; established June 26, 1899 by order of the court "in honor of Judge Robert Lafont, deceased," who was judge of the county court three terms; 1872-1880, 1882-1886, 1891-1895. (County Court R.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Laforge
Description:A small village in the eastern part of New Madrid Township. A post office was establihed there in 1886, but was discontinued in 1928, and the mail routed from New Madrid. It was named by A.B. Hunter, a prominent landowner, for his wife's family, the family of Pierre Laforge who came to New Madrid in 1794, having been driven from France by the Revolution. (Houck III 139-140, Southwestern Imm. Soc., P.G., Peck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake Como
Description:An old lake in the northern part of Como Township, which was drained about 1910. It was named, as was the town (q.v.), by Louis Houck for the Italian lake. (M.H.R. 11:335, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake Eulalia
Description:A lake in the southern part of the county; originally by a large lake of clear water, three hundred by one hundred yards in size, but elevated by the earthquakes of 1811-1812 and never again filled with water. On this lake in 1792 John Gaston lived, and it is probable that he named the lake for some feminine friend or relative. (M.H.R. 7:189, Houck II 158-161, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake LeSieur
Description:A small lake in the southern part of the county where a settlement was made in 1792. It was probably named for the famous Joseph and Francois LeSieur, who made the first settlement in this county. The lake was totally destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. (Houck II 158-161, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake Ricardo
Description:A small lake in the southern part of the county. John Wall was the first settler on this lake in 1793. The name is a Spanish name, but whether it was named by Wall or some earlier settler, and for whom it was named is unknown. (Houck II 161, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake St. Ann
Description:An old lake which was located where the town of New Madrid now stands. The name first appears on a map of 1789 in Colonel Morgan's plans for the city of New Madrid (q.v.), and it was probably named by Francois and Joseph LeSieur, who came to this place in 1780 and established the trading post of L'Anse a la Graisse. They were devout Catholics and named many streams for the saints of their church. This one was named for the mother of the Virgin Mary, the patron saint of married women. (Douglass I 107, Houck II 114, Father Eggeman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake St. Charles
Description:An old lake in the southeastern part of New Madrid Township, near the site of Big Mound (q.v.), The Indians are said to have tied up their boats on this lake when they camped at Big Mound. It was destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. The name was given by an early settler whose patron saint was St. Charles. St. Charles or Carlo Borromeo (1538-1584), a famous Italian cardinal of the sixteenth century, who was canonized after his death was especially venerated by the Spanish and was one of the best known saints of that name. (Douglass I 107, Baker, Ency. Brit.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake St. George
Description:An old lake in the northeast part of Lewis Township, which was destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. It was named by the early settlers for St. George, the patron saint of England. (Douglass I 107, Baker, Ency. Brit.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake St. Isidore
Description:A small stream in the eastern part of the county where Francois Racine settled in 1800. Racine probably named the stream for St. Isidore, the canonized Isidore of Seville, Spain (570-636). The bed of the stream was elevated by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. (Houck II 148, Ency. Brit., Catholic Ency.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lake St. Mary
Description:An old lake in the center part of New Madrid Township, which was destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. One of the earliest settlements of the county was made in this region, and it was named by the early settlers in honor of the Virgin. (Douglass I 107, Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Landers Ridge
Description:A rural community, composed of Landers Ridge Church and Landers Ridge School, in the center part of West Township. The first settlement was made here about 1900 by the Landers family, for whom the community was named. (Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Landers Ridge Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church on Landers Ridge (cf. above). (Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Landers Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the community of Landers Ridge. (Cf. above). (Hoehn, Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:L'Anse a la Graisse
Description:See New Madrid
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Laque Terrible
Description:See Taylor's Slough
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:LaSalle's Landing
Description:A boat landing on the Mississippi River in 1889 in the southeast part of LeSieur Township, which was named for the LaSalle family who owned land there. (Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lester's Landing
Description:A boat landing on the Mississippi River in the southeast part of St. John Township, which was established about 1898 and named for the Lester family. (Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewis Prairie
Description:A prairie in the western part of New Madrid Township where Lilbourn Lewis, Sr. settled in 1830. The prairie was named for him although it is sometimes erroneously spelled Lew's Prairie or Louis Prairie in the early historical accounts. (Douglass II 732, Goodspeed 536)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewis Prairie Church
Description:An early rural Methodist Church in the western part of New Madrid Township, on Lewis Prairie (cf. above), from which it was named. It was constituted before 1840. In recording a meeting held there in that year a reference is made to "Brothers Haw and Dunleavy in a meeting at Lewis Prairie a half mile from an old town of that name." Doubtless this was the settlement or home of Lilbourn Lewis on Lewis Prairie, and not a town, as there is no other record of such a town. (Clark 17, 23, McAnaly 609, Goodspeed 536)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewis Township
Description:In the south-central part of the county; organized in 1906 and named for Lilbourn Lewis, a large landowner. (County C.R.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lew's Prairie
Description:See Lewis Prairie
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lilbourn
Description:A town in the north-central part of Lewis Township. The first settlement was made here in 1888 and called Pawpaw or Paw Paw Junction, from pawpaw thickets which surrounded the junction of the Cottonbelt Railroad and its branch line. Later the Frisco Railroad joined these two lines here. A post office was established in 1903 and the town named Lilbourn, for Lilbourn Lewis, a landowner. (Douglass 380, Parrett, Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Linda
Description:A small village on the Mississippi River in the southeast part of LeSieur Township. A post office was maintained from 1904-1919 when the mail was routed from Point Pleasant. The first settlement was made by the Stewart families and named for Linda Stewart. It is commonly pronounced Lindy. (Barnes, Hoehn, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Prairie Township
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little River
Description:A river flowing through New Madrid, Pemiscot, and Dunklin Counties. It rises in St. Francois County and flows south into Arkansas. Below the Cape Girardeau County line it is known as Little River; above as Whitewater. Whitewater is the name applied to the entire stream before the earthquakes of 1811-1812. The Indians called the river Ne ska or Unica. Schoolcraft says the Osage name for this river is Unica, meaning white, but he is said to have confused White River, largely in Arkansas and Whitewater, this stream. The Chippeway name for the river was Ne ska, meaning white water. It is often written Niska. The early Spanish explorers called the river Rio Blanch, and the French La Riviere Blanche or L'eau Blanche. In the English translation this became Whitewater, by which name the entire stream was known as late as 1817. The name "Little" seems to have been given between 1817-1822, in the French form La Petitie Riviere, and is a reference to the size of the river as compared with the Mississippi and St. Francois Rivers, between which it lies. (History of Dunklin 29, Campbell, Brown, Rand McNally, Schoolcraft 853, Douglass I 230, Houck I 17, 18)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little River
Description:See Morehouse
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little River School
Description:Two rural schools, one for whites and one for negroes have this name. Both schools are located in the southern part of Lafont Township and are named from Little River. (q.v.).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little River Station
Description:See Catron
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little River Valley and Arkansas Railroad
Description:See Cottonbelt Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Walnut School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Como Township. The present building was erected in 1910 and is almost a mile south of the original site of the school. The first school was built in 1900 and was named for a small walnut tree growing in the schoolyard. (Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lorwood
Description:The estate of G.E. Spitzler, also called Lorwood Place and Lorwood Plantation, and a stop on the Cottonbelt Railroad in the northeast part of Como Township. It was originally settled by Mr. Grayson prior to 1900. About 1903 the Hyman families of Payne, Ohio operated a sawmill and stave mill there and named the place Hyman from their name. In 1907 Mr. Charles Buchanan, of Wellington, Ohio, bought the mills. In 1909 Messers Shelley and Spitzler bought Bucnanan's property, invited Mr. S.S. Colvin to become a partner, and formed the Lorwood Cooperage Company. The name was coined by using the first three letters of Lorain, the county in Ohio from which Messers Shelley and Spitzler came, and Wood, the name of the county in Ohio from which Mr. Colvin came. Later this company was liquidated, Mr. Spitzler acquired the land and named his plantation from the company. (Robbins, Anderson, Spitzler)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lorwood Place
Description:Cf. above
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lorwood Plantation
Description:Cf. above
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lotta
Description:See Parma
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Louis Prairie
Description:See Lewis Prairie
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maple Grove School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Como Township, which was named because of its location in a maple grove. (Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mars Landing
Description:A boat landing on the Mississippi River in the southern part of St. John Township, established in 1879 by Mr. John Mar and named for him. (Cram, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marston
Description:A small town in the northeast part of Lafont Township. The first settlement was made by Mr. Stewart in 1878. In 1898 the Barnes family purchased the Stewart farms and named the place Marston for Laura Marston Barnes, mother of Charles Barnes. A post office was established in 1900 and the town incorporated in 1905. (Douglass 373, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Martin Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the southeast part of Lafont Township, which was known as Union Methodist Church when it was organized about 1866. In 1872 it became Martin's Chapel, named for John Martin, a prominent member of the community and church. (Croell, Penman, Riley, McAnaly, 36)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Matthews
Description:A small town in the center part of Big Prairie Township on the Frisco Railroad, established as a shipping station for the Scott County Milling Company of Sikeston and named for C.D. Matthews who settled there in 1873. A post office was established in 1904. (Bowman, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mays' Switch
Description:See Catron
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McBride School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Anderson Township, which was named for Scott McBride, superintendent of the Gideon Anderson Lumber Company, who gave the land for the school. (Hoy, Sharp)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Melba
Description:See Melby
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Melby
Description:A flagstop on the Cottonbelt Railroad in the eastern part of Como Township. It was established about 1905 as a log loading switch. The name is always written Melby on maps, but Mr. Spitzler writes it Melba, believing that to be the original name. This belief probably gave rise to the story, credited by Miss Hall, that it was named by an Italian railroad worker for a town in Italy. There is no such town in Italy. Melba, pronounced Melby, is a fairly common feminine name in this section of the state, but there is no proof that the name was Melba. Mr. Spitzler believes that the name was Melba because of the local tendency to pronounce words, especially proper names, ending in "a" as if they ended in "ie." The original name may have been Melby and the opposite tendency, common in Missouri, to pornounce names in -i or -y as if they ended in -a (cf. Missouri and Cincinnati), may have given rise to the "yarn" about the Italian worker. (Anderson, Spitzler, Hall, Ramsay, Read)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mettsville
Description:A country store in the southwest part of LeSieur Township, formerly a sawmill camp, established about 1916 by a man named Metts, for whom it was named. (Croell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Milburn School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Anderson Township, established in 1913 and named for Price Milburn who gave the land. It was abandoned in 1936. (Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Prairie
Description:A small prairie near Bayou St. Thomas on which one of the early settlements was made. It was called Prairie du Moulin (Mill Prairie), because of the mill which was operated there in early days. (Goodspeed 296, 435, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mitchell
Description:A flagstop on the Cottonbelt Railroad in the southeast part of Anderson Township near the present site of Gideon, which was maintained in 1902 for the benefit of a man named Mitchell who owned a hog ranch there. (Sharp)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moccasin Hollow
Description:A mocking name given to a small community in the western part of Lafont Township near Marston. The name is a common one and indicates a deserted, low, swampy place suitable only for snakes or water moccasins. (O'Keane, Oakley)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morehouse
Description:A small town in the northwest part of West Township, which was established in the early part of the nineteenth century as a sawmill camp. The first name given to this settlement was Little River, for the stream on which it is located. This name was in use from 1877 until about 1887. When the post office was established in 1893, it was named for A.P. Morehouse, lieutenant-governor of Missouri, who became governor at the death of Marmaduke in 1887 and served until 1889 when he retired from public life. He died in 1891. (Charley Barnes, History of Missouri, Rand McNally)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moreland Township
Description:Cf. above
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morrison-Anglin School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Anderson Township organized in 1935 and named for Messers Anglin and Morrison, who were inteested in establishing the school. (Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mound Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery located on and near Big Mound (q.v.) and named from it. The older part of the cemetery covers the mound and was begun about the time of the Civil War. Some of the gravestones are dated in the 1870s. This was not used by the Indians as a burial ground, their burial place being in the lowlands just east of the mound where a cottonfield is now. (Riley, Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mound Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the western part of New Madrid Township, which was abandoned about 1878. It was established about 1850 and named from its location near Big Mound (q.v.), Houck refers to it as the "Cyprie" or Mound Church. None of the old settlers remember it as the Cyprie Church, but they believe it was a reference to the Decypri or Bayou de Cyprie nearby. (Houck I 60, Riley, Mrs. Riley)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mound School
Description:A rural school in the western part of New Madrid Township, which was abandoned in 1933. It was named for Big Mound (q.v.), near which it was located. (Davis, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Neska River
Description:See Little River
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Hope Cemetery
Description:An old rural cemetery in the eastern part of Lafont Township near the town of Marston. It was started about 1892 and given this common name by the early settlers. (Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Hope Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the eastern part of Lafont Township, which was organized prior to 1872 and given this common church name. (cf. above) (McAnally 35, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Hope School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Como Township, which was named from the rural school built earlier in Stoddard County and used as a Methodist Church. (Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Madrid
Description:The oldest town and the county seat; located on the Mississippi River in the southern part of New Madrid Township. The first settlement, known as L'Anse a la Graise or L'Aine a la Graise, was established by Francois and Joseph LeSieur in 1780 as a trading post one mile south of the present town. The name, meaning Grease Creek, was suggested by either of three facts, stores of bear meat were kept here for sale to passing boats, hunters killed an abundance of game, especially bears, or the richness (fatness), of the soil supplied the name. The first two explanations seem more logical. In 1787 the trading post became permanent. In 1788 Colonel George Morgan, of New Jersey, planned a pretentious city to be located on the Mississippi River where the old trading post stood. He secured land grants from Spain and planned the city to be named Nuevo Madrid from the Spanish capital. He laid out the town, but his plans were defeated by General James Wilkerson and the Spanish governor Miro. Pierre Foucher replatted the town in 1789 and used the French name Nouvelle Madrid. The town was almost totally destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812; in fact, the original site of the town is now across the river in the state of Kentucky, so that it was not until 1813 that the county was organized and not until 1830 that a courthouse was built and a post office established. The town was incorporated in 1867. No record is found concerning the Americanizing of the spelling and pronunciation of the name. In all probability it was first pronounced as is Madrid, Spain, but when the present pronunciation was adopted or became predominant no one knows. (Goodspeed 284, Douglass I 266, M.H.R. 11; 335, Houck's Spanish Regime)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Madrid County
Description:When the county of New Madrid was first organized in 1812, the boundaries were: On the north the south line of Cape Girardeau County; on the east the main channel of the Mississippi River; on the south a line commencing in the middle of the said river opposite the lower end of an island laid down in the navigator as No. 19: thence in a direct line to strike White River at the mouth of Red River to the western boundary of the Osage purchase, thence northward on said line to the south line of Cape Girardeau County. One of the five counties organized by Governor Benjamin Howard from Missouri Territory in 1812. Until 1818, when Wayne County (q.v.) was cut off from it, New Madrid County included all the counties here studied. Its name was derived from the old town of New Madrid, named in 1789 for the capital of Spain. (Eaton (44) V, p. 72; Houck (10) I, p. xxi; Haswell (11), p. 19) This territory was reduced in 1821 by the organization of Scott County; in 1829 by the organization of Stoddard County, and in 1851 to its present size by the organization of Pemiscot County. It was named for the principal town within its limits (cf. above). (Goodspeed 327-330, Douglass I 164-166)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Madrid Township
Description:In the south-central part of the county. This was one of the five original townships organized in 1813 by a court composed of T. Neal, John LaValle, Wm. Winchester, and Wm. Gray. It included the territory of New Madrid and Little Prairie; that is, it included all of the territory now in New Madrid and Pemiscot Counties and was named for the town of New Madrid (cf. above). In 1822, when Scott County was organized, changes were made in the remaining township, and New Madrid Township now was "all that part of the county lying south of Big Prairie Township (q.v.), and north of a line beginning on the Mississippi River and running west so as to divide the surveys of McCoy and Vandebenden; thence to the west just south of the plantation of Robert Watson and Aaron T. Spear on Lake St. Ann to the western boundary of the county." This was about half of the present county of New Madrid. In 1845 when Dunklin County was organized, further changes were made, and it was reduced to its present size in 1851 when Pemiscot County was organized. (Douglass I 166, Goodspeed 329)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Slough
Description:A western branch of Taylor's Slough (q.v.), which was probably so named because it became known to the early settlers during a rainy season at a later date than Old Slough. Both branches were destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. (Douglass I 230, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Niska River
Description:See Little River
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nouvelle Madrid
Description:See New Madrid
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Noxall
Description:A small village in the southwest part of Big Prairie Township on the Frisco Railroad, established as the location of an elevator of the Scott County Milling Company and named from the cheapest brand of flour manufactured by the company. A post office was established in 1904, but discontinued between 1905-1910. (Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nuevo Madrid
Description:See New Madrid
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Island
Description:A tract of land which becomes an island in times of high water, when Little River or the drainage ditches overflow. It is named from the oak trees growing there. (Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Island School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Como Township, named from its location on Oak Island (cf. above). (Phillips, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:O'Bannon Negro High School
Description:A negro high school in the town of New Madrid, which was established in 1933 and named for Dr. W.N. O'Bannon, County Health Officer, and a member of the New Madrid Board of Education since 1923, who was instrumental in establishing the school. (O'Bannon)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:O'Bannon School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Le Sieur Township, which was named for Dr. Welton O'Bannon who gave the land for the school. (O'Bannon, Allen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ogden
Description:An old settlement in what is now Big Prairie Township between Lakes St. John and St. Mary. A settlement was made in 1856 and a post office established in 1886. The name disappeared soon after 1895 when the post office was discontinued. The Ogden families who were early settlers in the county gave the place its name. (Douglass I 108, P.G., Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Pole Road
Description:See Plank Road
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Slough
Description:A branch of Taylor's Slough (q.v.), which was probably given this name by early settlers to distinguish it from another branch of Taylor's Slough which they called New Slough. (Douglass I 230, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:O'Neil
Description:A flagstop on the Cottonbelt Railroad, now abandoned, in the western part of Como Township. This was a sawmill camp which was named for a man who operated the mill, a Mr. O'Neil. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Open Bay
Description:A small bay, forming with Portage Bayou and Portage Bay the boundary line between Pemiscot and New Madrid Counties. It was called Collins Lake or the Open Bay by Colonel J.H. Walker. Collins Lake was named for an early settler, A.J. Collins, and the name Open Bay, which has survived, was given because of the open appearance of the bay as contrasted with the thickly forested regions nearby. (Penman, Barns 78, Croell, Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Otter Bayou
Description:A stream or slough, also called Otter Slough, in the western part of Lewis and Portage Townships, which empties into Portage Bayou. It was so named about 1879, probably for the otter which frequented the stream. It was drained in 1902 by A.J. Klentachy. (Kochtitsky, Barnes, Weekly Record 1902)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Otter Slough
Description:See Otter Bayou
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Parma
Description:A small town in the northern part of Como Township, the location of which was determined by the crossing of the Frisco and the Cottonbelt Railroad in 1900. The village of Lotta, one mile away which had been established in 1874 and named by H.L. Shidler of Little River and Arkansas Railroad for his daughter Lotta, was incorporated with the village of Parma under the latter name in 1903. Parma was named by Louis Houck, who built the railroad through this section, for the city and province in northern Italy which he had admired in his travels (cf. Como). (Douglass 380, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Paw Paw
Description:See Lilbourn
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pawpaw Junction
Description:See Lilbourn
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peanut
Description:See Peanut School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peanut Mill
Description:See Peanut School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peanut School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Anderson Township, organized in 1911 and abandoned in 1933. It was named from Peanut Mill which later came to be called Peanut. This mill was established for the Gideon Anderson Lumber Company about 1906 by Mr. Max Sarff. The mill was so small it was jokingly called a peanut stand by the workers. The name was given to the school when it was organized in 1911. (Sharp)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pemiscot Township
Description:One of the old townships which became a part of Pemiscot County in 1851 (cf. above). (Goodspeed 329)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Phillips Landing
Description:A boat landing on the Mississippi River in the southeast part of St. John Township on the Phillips farm, which was established in 1879 and maintained until 1889. It was named for the Phillips family. (Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Phillips School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Como Township, which was named for Judge L.C. Phillips who gave the land for the school. (O'Bannon, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pilgrim's Rest Church
Description:A rural negro church in the northeast part of Como Township, established in 1926 and named for the church (cf. above). (Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pilgrim's Rest School
Description:A rural negro school in the northeast part of Como Township, established in 1926 and named for the church (cf. above). (Hoy)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plank Road
Description:A road built of planks or poles, and so called Plank or Pole Road or Old Pole Road, over the vast swamp from Weaversville in New Madrid County to Clarkton in Dunklin County by the Blanton Plank Company. The road was destroyed during the Civil War, and afterward Henry E. Clark and Otto Kochtitsky obtained a charter to rebuild the road in 1875; they started to work, but instead built a narrow gauge railroad from Malden to New Madrid in 1876-1878. This railroad was known as the St. Louis, Texas, and Arkansas Railroad, and is now a part of the Cottonbelt System (q.v.). (Goodspeed 386, Penman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of West Township, which is sometimes locally called Crossroads School because it is located at the crossing of two country roads. The first name given was Emory School, from the landowner, John Emory, who gave the land for the school. In 1913 the name was changed to Pleasant Valley, a name selected for its agreeable sound rather than because of its location in a "pleasant valley." (Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Point Pleasant
Description:An old settlement in LeSieur Township on the Mississippi River. An old Indian village existed here from an early time. In 1815 Francois LeSieur settled here and gave the town its name because of its location and appearance. In 1846 a new town was laid off by Wm. Summers. A post office was established there in 1853. In 1860 a town was planned and platted on a large scale, but because of the caving of the banks of the Mississippi River the town did not grow, and today only a very few houses remain, (Goodspeed 439, Douglass 266-267)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pole Road
Description:See Plank Road
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Portage Bay
Description:A small bay near the place where Portage Bayou enters Little River. It was named from Portage Bayou (q.v.). (Douglass 26, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Portage Bayou
Description:A bayou forming part of the boundary line between Pemiscot and New Madrid Counties. So named because it was a part of the early portage line from St. Francois River to the Mississippi River. (Douglass 266, Campbell, Penman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Portage Township
Description:In the southern part of the county; organized from LeSieur Township August 4, 1874. The boundaries were changed in November, 1874 and it was reduced to its present size by the organization of Anderson Township in 1901. The name is from Portage Bayou (cf. above). (County Court Record, Douglass I 166)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Portageville
Description:A town in the southeast part of Portage Township on the Pemiscot County line. Two dates of its settlements are given - 1807 and 1848. Perhaps a small settlement was made there in 1807 and destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812 so that a permanent settlement was not made until 1848. A post office was established between 1867-1876. The name was obtained from Portage Bayou (q.v.), and from the fact that this settlement was at the point from which boats and loads had to be carried over dry land to the Mississippi River. (Douglass 266, P.G., Penman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie du Moulin
Description:See Mill Prairie
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Presnell's School
Description:An old rural school in the eastern part of East Township, long abandoned, which was established in 1874. It was one of the first schools in the county and was probably named for an early settler. (Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rabbit Track Ridge
Description:A large place or ridge in the eastern part of Anderson Township on which grew brush and undergrowth to make a good hiding place for rabbits. Hence, hunters called it Rabbit Track Ridge. (Sharp)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rawl's Mill
Description:An old mill in the center part of the county, and evidently a well known landmark, for it is used in describing the boundary of Big Prairie Township. It was named for an early settler who had a sawmill there. (Douglass I 165, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Risco
Description:A small village in the center part of Como Township. A post office was established in 1904 when the town was laid out as a shipping point for farm products on the Frisco Railroad. The name suggested was Frisco, but that was preempted by a post office in Stoddard County, so the name was made by dropping the letter "F" from Frisco. (Tucker, VanCleve, Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ristine
Description:A railroad stop on the Cottonbelt Railroad in New Madrid Township founded in 1882 at the time of the grading for the construction of the railroad and named for Mr. Ristine of the St. Louis, Arkansas and Texas Railroad Company. (Barnes, S.W. Immigration 1888)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:River Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of West Township, established in 1914 and named from its location on a ridge near Little River. (Taul)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:River St. Thomas
Description:See Bayou St. Thomas
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riviere Petitie
Description:See Little River
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ruby
Description:A name given by the conductor of a crossing on the Cottonbelt River in the west part of Anderson Township because Miss Ruby Reeves, a stenographer for the Gideon Anderson Lumber Company, asked to have the train stop there each weekend when she went home. (Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rudd
Description:A flagstop, now abandoned, on the Frisco Railroad in the western part of New Madrid Township. It was named for Rudd Lee who owned land there. (Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ruddle's Point
Description:A settlement on the Mississippi River in the southern part of LeSieur Township which was made about 1880 by Abram Ruddle, son of Isaac Ruddle who was a celebrated fighter in the Indian wars of Kentucky. It was named for the first settler. This settlement disappeared before 1904 and was probably washed into the river. (Houck III 181, Riley)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ruddle's Point Church
Description:An early Methodist Church named for Ruddle's Point. (cf. above) (Goodspeed 536)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sarff
Description:A switch on the Frisco Railroad in the northern part of Anderson Township maintained from 1924-1927 on the farm of Max Sarff, for whom it is named. (Sharp)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scott School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of LeSieur Township, named for the Scott families, early settlers, who gave the land for the school. (Phillips, O'Bannon, Rhodes, Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scrub Ridge
Description:A slight elevation in the southern part of Portage Township where an old settlement was made about 1870. It was named for the small or "scrub" timber growing here as contrasted with the finer timber nearby. (Mrs. Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Selkirk
Description:A small settlement in the northern part of St. John Township. It is a station on the Cottonbelt Railroad established about 1905 on land belonging to the Singer Sewing Machine Company and named for the Selkirk family who lived there at the time the station was established. (Peck, Robbins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sims
Description:An abandoned switch on the Frisco Railroad just south of the town of Lilbourn in the northern part of Lewis Township. It was established in 1900 and named for E.W. Sims, superintendent of the Frisco Railroad. (Barrys, Jim Baker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sky
Description:See Dodd's Spur
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Small
Description:A flagstop, now abandoned, on the Frisco Railroad in the center part of Lewis Township, which was established in 1908 to unload gravel for the highway which was being built between Lilbourn and Marston. It was named for a landowner. (Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Pacific Railroad
Description:See below
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spurdod
Description:See Dodd's Spur
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Eustache Church
Description:The Catholic Church of Portageville, dedicated in 1902 by Father Furlong of New Madrid to St. Eustace, who was one of the companions of St. Columban and the second abbot of the Irish monastery of Luxeuil in France. The date of his birth is unknown; he died in 625. (Hoehn, C. En.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francis Pond
Description:A small pond or lake in the southern part of New Madrid Township, which is shown on the map of Colonel Morgan's plan for the city of New Madrid in 1789. It was probably named for the patron saint of Francois LeSieur, who, with his brother Joseph, had established a trading post here in 1780. (Houck I 120-121, with map from Collot's Voyage Dans L'Amer.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Isidore Church
Description:See Immaculate Conception Church
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. John Baptist Church
Description:See Immaculate Conception Church
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. John Township
Description:In the southeast part of the county. As first organized in 1831 it included all the eastern part of the county, that is, all of what is now Mississippi County. The present boundaries were fixed in 1851 when Pemiscot County was organized and New Madrid County reduced to its present size. It was named for St. John Bayou (q.v.). (Douglass I 166, Goodspeed 329, County Court Record, Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. John's Bayou
Description:A large bayou which enters the county from the north and empties into the Mississippi River just east of the town of New Madrid. The early name of the stream was Chepoosa Creek or Chapoosa River. Hodge says, "Chepoosa probably is a name applied by LaSalle to a group of Indians along Kaskaskia River to which the name Chepoosa is sometimes given, or to the group collected at his invitation at Kaskaskia, from some chief or leader." LaSalle visited the race or tribe of Chepoosa in 1677. This name was changed to Sound River by the white settlers, and is so called by Kitchens and Hutchens in 1766. The stream was changed by earthquakes in 1811-1812 and later by drainage. Francois and Joseph LeSieur gave the name St. John in 1815, honoring the apostle. (Douglass I 82, 229, Spanish Regime I 280, Hinchey, Hodge, Magazine of American History Vol. II;622)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Description:This railroad was first organized as the Southwest branch of the Pacific Railroad in 1849, along a surveyed route from St. Louis west to the Pacific Ocean. In 1851 it became the South Pacific Railroad and was completed to Rolla in 1861. In 1866 it was created the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad by an act of Congress, and authorized to build to the Pacific Coast. It was finished to Vinita in Indian territory in 1871. In these counties the road is the result of the consolidation of a number of short lines which were connected to form the present system. It had its beginning in the Cape Girardeau and State Line Railroad Company, which proposed to build a line from Cape Girardeau to the Arkansas line in 1869. No work was done on this road, and in 1871 Governor Fletcher of Missouri reorganized the company as the Illinois, Missouri and Texas Railroad Company with the idea of connecting those three states by rail. This charter was purchased in 1880 by Louis Houck and organized as the Cape Girardeau Railroad Company because the businessmen of that city were to furnish the capital. In 1881 the branch was built to Lakeville in Stoddard County, and the name changed to Cape Girardeau and Southwestern Railroad Company, indicating the direction of the road from Cape Girardeau. In 1891 the name was again changed to the St. Louis, Cape Girardeau, and Fort Smith Raiload, named to indicate the intention of extending the road north to St. Louis and south to Fort Smith, Arkansas. The railroad also includes the line of the Missouri and Arkansas Railroad organized in 1891 by Mr. Houck to build a road from Morley to Cape Girardeau, and the St. Louis, Kennett and Southern Railroad, which was built in 1890 from Campbell to Kennett, and the Kennett to Caruthersville Railroad, which was built in 1894. In 1902 all these roads were consolidated under the name St. Louis and Gulf Railroad with the intention of extending the road from St. Louis to the Gulf of Mexico, and shortly afterward the property was transferred to the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad. The latter company extended the line from St. Louis to Memphis, Tennessee, thence to Pensacola, and west from Memphis to Oklahoma, but it has not yet reached its intended destination - San Francisco. In Pemiscot County the company purchased a right-of-way extending from Caruthersville to the Arkansas line and thence to Blytheville, Arkansas from Cunningham Brothers of Caruthersville, who had been interested in building a railroad and had begun private operations. This road is commonly called Frisco, a shortened from of San Francisco. (Willis, Douglass 502-504, Wollman 16, Ham, Wilson, Barns 615, 673)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis and Southern Missouri Railroad
Description:A short line of railroad, eight miles long, built in 1911 from New Madrid to Marston by capitalists E.L. McCathy, L.A. Lewis, A.B. and Lee Hunter for the purpose of connecting New Madrid with Frisco Railroad. (Douglass I 507)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis Southwestern Railroad
Description:See Cottonbelt Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis, Arkansas, and Texas Railroad
Description:See Cottonbelt Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Mary School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of New Madrid Township, named for the St. Mary family, early settlers. (Davis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Mary's River
Description:An old river which emptied into Lake St. Mary (q.v.) from which it was named. It was destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. (Douglass I 107)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stansfield Switch
Description:See Canalou
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stubblefield School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Como Township, which was named for Dick Stubblefield, a landowner, whose family now lives at Sikeston. (Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Tree Ridge
Description:A small elevation in the eastern part of St. John Township, which was named from a grove of maple sugar trees which grew along a ridge. A mill was once operated there, but it has been abandoned and only a rural school marks the site. (Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tallapoosa
Description:A small village in the eastern part of Anderson Township, established in 1902 on the Houck Railroad and named by Houck from Tallapoosa, Alabama, the home of his friend Mr. Sturdivant who helped finance the building of the railroad. Tallapoosa is a comprehensive name for the Creek towns and tribes formerly living on Tallapoosa River in Macon County, Alabama. A post office was maintained there from 1818-1821. The name is sometimes written Tallipoosa; Cram gives Tallapoosa as the post office name and Tallipoosa as the railroad name. (Barnes, Hodge, Kenyon, Cram, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tallipoosa
Description:Cf. above
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Slough
Description:A large slough in the southern part of the county; named by the early French settlers Laque Terrible because of the size and depth of the swamp, which contained terrible dangers such as mosquitoes and fevers. It was later called Taylor's Slough for the Taylor family who settled there. Before the earthquakes of 1811-1812 there were two branches on the west side of the slough; these were called New and Old Slough (q.v.). (Douglass II 230, Barns, Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Terrein Moville
Description:A large slough in the northern part of New Madrid Township, which flowed into Bayou St. John (q.v.). It was given this name by early French settlers. Goodspeed is the only historian who records this name. The spelling has been corrupted, probably by carelessness. The correct French for terrein is terrain (earth or soil), and moville is probably a corruption of mobile (moving). Terrain Mobile, then would mean "moving soil" or quicksand. This slough disappeared during the earthquakes of 1811-1812 and the name is unknown to any of the old residents of the county who were interviewed. (Goodspeed 437, Ramsay, Fess)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Texas and St. Louis Railroad
Description:See Cottonbelt Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tinsley School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Lewis Township, named for G.L. Tinsley, presiding judge of the county court between 1927- 1931, when the school was organized. (O'Bannon)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tram Switch
Description:A log loading station on the Old St. Louis and Gulf Railroad in the western part of West Township just north of Canalou. It is called Deshler on the maps, for a man who had charge of lumbering operations for the Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company, but it is known to the community as Tram Switch. The tram, or tramway, is a short roadway or railway used for transporting logs or lumber from the camp to the railroad. It was built by the Himmelberger Harrison Lumber Company. (Rand McNally, Cram, Taul, Hoehn, Himmelberger)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Travis
Description:A flagstop, now abandoned, on the Frisco Railroad in the central part of Lewis Township, just north of Lilbourn, which was named for Z.H. Travis, who operated a sawmill and shipped timber from that place. (Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tywappity Township
Description:An old township organized in 1813 to include the territory lying east of St. John's Bayou and extending "north as far as the Lucas place, where Thomas Phillips now lives." It included most of the territory of Scott and Mississippi Counties, and was named from Tywappity Bottoms (q.v.). (Douglass I 165, Goodspeed 328)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Unica
Description:See Little River
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Grove Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the southwest part of East Township, established before 1881 and given this common church name by the founders. (McAnaly 35)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Grove School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of East Township, which was named from Union Grove Church (q.v.). (Riley, McAnaly 35)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Methodist Church
Description:See Martin Chapel
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ward School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of LeSieur Township, which was named for the Ward family, landowners in that community. (Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Warrington
Description:See Dodd's Spur
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Washout, The
Description:See Decypri
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Watson's Landing
Description:A boat landing on the Mississippi River in the southeast part of LeSieur Township just south of Point Pleasant, which was established in 1889 and named from the landowner, who shipped his products by boat from this point. (Phillips)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Lake
Description:A large lake or slough in the northeast part of West Township, named as early as 1876 from its position in the western part of the county. (Houck I 60, Hoehn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Township
Description:A township in the western part of the county; cut off from Big Prairie Township May 6, 1890 at the request of Ephraim Brown et. al., and named from its position. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White River Township
Description:One of the original townships oganized in 1813 to include all of the western part of the county; that is, that part which is now Dunklin County. It was named from White River, which is in Arkansas. The Township was abolished in 1845 at the time of the organization of Dunklin County. (Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wila
Description:See Wiley
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilburn School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Big Prairie Township, which was named for the Wilburn family. (O'Bannon, Robbins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wiley
Description:A country store in the northern part of Como Township, where a post office was maintained from 1895-1899. It was named for Wiley Webb, whose father operated the store. The post office name was Wila. This interchanging use of the final "ie" and "a" sound may have either of two explanations (cf. Melby). (Hall)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Winchester
Description:A small village in the northern part of what is now Big Prairie Township, which was laid out in 1814 and named in honor of Colonel Henderson Winchester, who lived in that vicinity. The village was succeeded by Sikeston (q.v.). The county seat of New Madrid was placed here in 1814, after New Madrid had been almost destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812, and it remained until 1822 when it was returned to New Madrid. (Houck III 196, Goodspeed 327, 463, Douglass I 291)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Woodland Township
Description:An old township erected in 1842 from the southern part of Big Prairie Township (q.v.). It was divided in 1845, part of it being attached to Big Prairie Township and part to New Madrid Township. The name is descriptive of the natural surroundings - the woodlands. (Douglass I 166, Goodspeed 329, Moore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:York School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Big PrairieTownship, named for the York family who gave the land for the school. (O'Bannon, Phillips, Rhodes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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