Marion County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Academy of St. Joseph
Description:See Immaculate Conception High School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Admiral Robert E. Coontz Memorial
Description:A memorial in memory of Admiral Koontz erected on Broadway in Hannibal, his boyhood home. Admiral Robert E. Coontz (1864-1935), of the U.S. Navy was Commandant of the Puget Sound Navy Yard and 13th Naval District, 1915-1918. He was made an Admiral on October 24, 1919, Chief of Naval Operation, 1919-1923, Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. Fleet, 1923-1925, and Commandant of the Fifth Naval District, 1925-1928. Admiral Coontz is buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery in Hannibal. (Memorial; Mo. Hist. Rev., Vol. 13, pp. 372-376; Ibid. Vol. 29, p. 248)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Amick Land
Description:A narrow roadway branching off from the Hannibal-Palmyra road at Mt. Zion Cemetery. So named for "Old man Amick" who lived on this road. An earlier name was Popinaw Lane, for an earlier resident. (Mrs. Frank Lane; Presley Lane; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Andrew Chapel
Description:A Southern Methodist Chapel, one and a half miles east of the Shelby-Marion line; founded in 1852, it was among the first Southern Methodist churches of the county. The old church had the word, South, in large letters over the door. Soldiers during the Civil War threatened to burn the church unless those letters were removed. The church complied and was saved. The building continued in use until the 1890s when a new building was erected. Regular services have now been discontinued. Few if any have actual knowledge of the origin of the name. It is thought that the church was so named for Bishop James Osgood Andrew (1794-1871), the bishop about whom the controversy raged that divided the church in 1844. The fact that he was a slave owner led to a dispute in the church which resulted in the formation of the Methodist Episcopal Church South in 1846. (Lou Sharp; Mrs. T.B. Carter (Palmyra Spectator) )
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Andrew Chapel Cemetery
Description:One of the largest rural cemeteries in the county. So named for Andrew Chapel (q.v.). (Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church in south Hannibal, established in 1871. Cf. Antioch Church above. (Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Church
Description:A Christian Church northeast of Palmyra, in Fabius Township; organized in 1859. The building was erected in 1871. It is gone, though indicated as late as 1910 on the Soil Survey Map. Cf. above. (HIST. MARION 1884, 782; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Arch Street Methodist Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church South when established in 1872 in Hannibal. It takes its present name from its location on Arch Street in that city. (HIST. MARION 1884, 982)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Athens of Missouri
Description:See Palmyra
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atlantic and Pacific Railroad
Description:See Palmyra and Marion City Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Auhaha
Description:See Salt River Country.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Backbone Pond
Description:A pond in the southeast part of Fabius Township, about halfway between North River and Mark, drained by Eastern Slough (q.v.), into the Mississippi. The pond is now practically drained. So named because of its location on a backbone of land which for some little distance stands above the level of the prairie. (Atlas Marion (1913); (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bank's Mill
Description:A mill on the North Fork of North River; before the Civil War. It lasted only a few years. So named for its owner. (Jacob Tate)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baptist Seminary
Description:See Bethel College.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barkley
Description:A post office in 1879, discontinued by 1889; a flag station in the northeast part of South River Township, five miles south of Palmyra, the only station when the line was established to Palmyra. It was at one time an important shipping point for stock and fruit. Colton (1861), gives the name as Barkleys; so given, 1861-1886; Campbell (1874), speaks of it as named for its first settler, Levi Barkley. (Campbell 1874; Polk 1879-1899; HIST. MARION 1884, 948; Maps Mo. since 1861; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barkleys
Description:See Barkley
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barr School
Description:A schoolhouse in Warren Township. So named for the family owning the land on which the schoolhouse was built. Around 1901, it was known as McClintic School for the McClintic family who have large land holdings on the Marion-Shelby Line. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barr's Mill
Description:A saw and grist steam mill on the South Fabius; from around the 1850s until after the Civil War. So named for its owner, Jerry Barr. (Jacob Tate)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bates School
Description:A schoolhouse in Miller Township. So named for Moses D. Bates, the original pioneer owner of the land. (See Hannibal), (E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bay Charles
Description:See Bay de Charles.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bay de Charles
Description:A bayou or cut-off starting in Mason Township just north of Hannibal and running northeast and north for about seven miles to re- enter the Mississippi in north Liberty Township. When full, it cuts off a strip of land known as Bay Island (q.v.), between it and the river, consisting of the northeast corner of Miller Township and the east end of Liberty Township. The name is undoubtedly one of the oldest in the section, and dates from the French occupation. If the pleasant story recounted in Holcombe's HIST. MARION County, and repeated in great detail by Mr. George A. Mahan in the chapter on Marion County which he contributed to the HIST. OF N.E. MISSOURI, could be verified, it would indeed go back to the famous explorer Father Louis Hennepin in the year 1680. As delightfully told by Mr. Mahan, the first story reads in part as follows: "Louis Hennepin...was the first white man to set foot in Marion...After bidding farewell to La Salle, Hennepin launched out...leaving Fort Creve Coeur on February 28, 1680. About a month later--recorded in the manuscripts as about April 1st--Hennepin and two friends caught glimpeses of the immense hills standing on the Missouri shore like giant sentinels, and they decided to land. They found an entrance and paddled their pirogues into the Bay de Charles, as they named it, and stepped onto the inviting land some two hundred yards from the inlets mouth. Hennepin exalted the crucifix and celebrated mass. Hennepin remained on the site two days, negotiating terms of friendship with the natives, and resumed the voyage northward to the Falls of St. Anthony. This account of Hennepin's landing at th Bay de Charles and christening is one of the things that should have happened; but unfortunately for the demands of romance there is not the slightest authority for it in Hennepin's own account, nor is there any trace of the Bay de Charles on Hennepin's map. From both his DESCRIPTION DE LA LOUISIANE, published in 1683, and his NOUVELLE DECOUVERTE of 1697, after telling how he started north from the mouth of the Illinois River on the 12th of March Hennepin says merely (Shea's ed., p. 196): "This great river is almost everywhere a short league width, and in some places two leagues; it is divided by a number of islands covered with trees, interlaced with so many vines as to be almost impassable. It received no considerable river on the western side except that of the Otontenta (the Des Moines), and another, seven or eight leagues from the Falls of St. Anthony of Padua." He makes no mention of stopping anywhere until he reached the Falls. The source for the statement given by Holcombe and the other historians of Marion County remains obscure. One suspects a historical romance, perhaps excusable by the fact that Hennepin was himself such a notorious liar in other parts of his travels. If so, the romancer may have given a sly hint of the true character of his story by dating the imaginary landing at the Bay de Charles on April 1. The earliest authentic use of the name that I have found occurs in the Spanish grant of land on its banks to Maturin Bouvet in 1795 (quoted by Holcombe, p. 134; see Bouvet's Warehouse). There is no doubt that the bayou was known by this name to the French, but its origin remains undiscovered. Perhaps it was named from the town of St. Charles, from which Bouvet came; or it may have taken its name, like so many other Missouri localities, from some French trader or voyageur now forgotten. It is called Bay St. Charles, or Bayou St. Charles, by Coues in his edition of PIKE'S EXPEDITIONS (I.9); Residents speak of it as Bay Charles; Pike himself apparently refers to it under the name of "the Big Bay, or Three Brothers" (I.8). See also Scipio River, supposed name given by Soulard. (Hennepin's DESCRIPTION OF LOUISIANA, ed. Shea, pp. 188 f.; Pike's Expeditions, ed. Coues, I. 7-9; Holcombe HIST. MARION 1884, 771; Mahan's "Marion County" in Hist. N.E. Mo. 1913, 444; Wetmore's Gazetteer 1837, 115; Maps Mo. 1844; Atlas Marion 1913)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bay Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River almost opposite Port Scipio, at the mouth of Bay de Charles. Indians came here to fish, followed by the Spanish Cavaliers. So named for the fact that it is at the mouth of the bay. (Atlas Marion 1875, 9; Morris Anderson; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bay Island School
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township. So named for Bay Island (q.v.), on which it is located. (E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bay Mill
Description:A water mill on Clear Creek, near its mouth and close to Bay De Charles; hence the name Bay Mill. An earlier name was Rush's Mill, since the mill, it was believed, was built by a John Rush. The first mill which was built about 1823 burned somewhat later; rebuilt, it was known for a time around 1828 as Glasscock's Mill, for its owner, Stephen Glasscock. Later still, it was known as Bay Mill because of its position in relation to the bay. It was always a saw and grist mill. It is still standing, known as "Old Bay Mill," on a lonely country road off the main highway, four miles northwest of Hannibal. Considering its age, it is in good condition, though the water wheel is gone, and the old millrace is dry. The main shaft and some of the gears are still in place. The structure though decaying is an excellent specimen of a well constructed building of that period. (HIST. MARION 1884, 173, 267, 639, 640, 897; Atlas Marion 1913)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bay Mill Road
Description:The road that was formerly Bouvet's Trail (q.v.), between Ralls and the Bay. Used around 1823 to reach Bay Mill, (q.v.), the grist mill on Clear Creek; hence the name. Now a part of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Highway. The old Bay Mill Road is still so known however, the name being applied particularly to the road from Palmyra to Bay Mill. (Atlas Marion (1901) )
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bayou Chute
Description:A name given Bay de Charles (q.v.), in Coues-Pike. A chute is a cut-off, an intervening run of water that cuts off a strip of land, forming an inlet or bayou. This will occur along a large river, bay or lake. In the first case, it is caused by a change of the bed of the stream. (Coues-Pike, Note, 11; LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI, Chapter 1, 58)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bayou St. Charles
Description:See Bay de Charles.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek [1 of 2]
Description:See White Bear.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A small stream which rises in South River Township and flows southeast through Miller Township down into the north edge of Ralls Township into the Mississippi at Hannibal. It divides the present city of Hannibal into two parts known as North and South Hannibal. Originally it made four loops within the city, all but one of which have been straightened. At the junction of Main Street and Broadway, the creek bed extended formerly almost to the middle of Broadway, and in high water steamboats were known to come up the creek and land there. Flat-boats loaded with wood were very commom moored in the first bend in the stream. The name Bear Creek is given by Beck (1823), and appears on maps from 1844 on. According to Holcombe it was so baptized by early hunters and trappers because there were so many bears along its banks. The site of the future city of Hannibal was then dense forest and a favorite hunting ground. Holcombe goes on to say that the stream was earlier named Hannibal Creek, about 1800, by the Spanish Surveyor-General Don Antonio Soulard, in honor of the great Carthaginian general, and that later, when the town of Hannibal was founded in 1819 it was named for the creek. The reasons for rejecting this complicated story, about which Holcombe himself was very doubtful and Mr. C.P. Green in the MIRROR OF HANNIBAL frankly skeptical, are stated under Hannibal. The name Hannibal Creek is not found on any map and is almost certainly mythical. The creek did, however, have an earlier name, given by Beck (1823), as Noyer. Coues says in a note to his editor of Pike's Expeditions (p. 7), that he has found it spelled on early maps Noir Creek. Pike himself refers to the stream (I.290), as being about fifteen yards in width, but does not name it; he goes on to describe the neighborhood as abounding in sugar maple, pecan, and black walnut trees. Coues adds in a further note on this page: "I suspect that Noir is not the F. adj. which means black," but a perversion of the noun Noix, Novau, or Noyer, meaning "nut" or "walnut." Coues's conjecture seems gratuitous, although it does have the support of the spelling as given by Beck. Either "Black Creek" or "Walnut Creek" would be perfectly plausible for the early French hunters to have given the stream. At any rate, we have an original French name for the stream, to be placed beside the French originals of the present Bay de Charles (q.v.), Fabius River (q.v.), and North River (q.v.). During the French occupation the four principal water courses of Marion County were evidently known by the names of Charles, Fabian, or Fabiane, Jeffreon or Geoffrion, and Noir or Noyer. (Atlas Marion, 1913; HIST. MARION, 1884, pp. 158, 771, 881; Stevens, p. 94; Mirror, p. 27; Beck, p. 260; Campbell, p. 353; Pike, ed. Coues, I.7, 290; Maps Mo., 1844 ff.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek Cemetery
Description:An old cemetery on what is now the Turner place, on the road between Hannibal and Palmyra, near Bear Creek. The earliest gravestone bears the date 1810. So named for Old Bear Creek Church (q.v.). (E.C. Bacon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek Church
Description:An Old School Baptist Church in Miller Township, on the road between Palmyra and Hannibal; organized in 1820 in George Turner's residence, with John Rush moderator, and Charles L. Turner, Clerk. Later the two were licensed to preach. The church had no regular pastor for about two years, and no house of worship for ten or twelve. They met in dwelling houses and in an old cooper shop about five miles from Hannibal, not far from Bear Creek Station. It took it's name from Bear Creek. The church is now extinct, and all old records are lost. (HIST. MARION 1884, 638; Hist. N.E. Mo., 90; Min. Bethel Bapt. Asoc., 1934; Luy Latimer; (F) Rev. Adolph Vollmer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek Hill
Description:A low hill close to Bear Creek, a site now "worked down"; incorporated within the city of Hannibal. So named for its location. (Mark Twain Biography, Chapter 30)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek Lime-Works
Description:See White Bear Lime-Works.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek School
Description:A pioneer schoolhouse in Miller Township, near Bear Creek Church, from which it received its name. (HIST. MARION 1884, 366)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek Station
Description:See White Bear.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek Township
Description:See Miller Township.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beaver Prairie
Description:A name given to the prairie land lying to the south of Bear Creek in the south part of Miller Township. The creek in this vicinity furnished an ideal dwelling place for beavers. (Campbell 1873)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bell Echo School District
Description:A school district partly in Marion County, now a part of the Durham Consolidated School District (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Russell Allen)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bell Town
Description:See Bellville.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bellville
Description:A community in Warren Township four miles west of the town of Warren. In an early period there was a blacksmith shop here run by a Mr. Zeiger. In 1886, D.W. Bell established a store here, and the village that grew up was called Bellville for Mr. Bell. It is also spoken of as Bell Town. (Palmyra Spectator (Clipping); Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Benbow
Description:A post office from 1876-1904 in Round Grove Township, on the branch of Troublesome Creek known as Bentbow (q.v.). It is eighteen miles northwest of Palmyra. The village was established in 1862 under the name of Midway, for the reason that it was midway between Quincy and Newark on the old stage route. On application of the village for a post office the name was changed to Benbow to conform with post office rulings, as there was another Midway in the state. The source of the name could not be determined. The explanation in the county history that it is "contracted" from Bentbow Branch (q.v.), obvioiusly reverses the actual order of derivation. Benbow is, of course, a common family name, but it could not be learned whether or not there were any Benbows in the vicinity at the time. The name appears recently also as Ben Bow. (HIST. MARION 1884, 756; P.G.; Maps Mo. from 1879; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bentbow Branch
Description:A branch of Troublesome Creek, in round Grove Township. The name is probably borrowed from the town of Benbow which stands on its bank, the change in spelling being due to popular etymology, suggested by the fact that the stream has a peculiar crook in its course. (HIST. MARION 1884, 756)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethany Church
Description:A Baptist Church one mile east of Cherry Dell; established in 1873, and a building erected. A Biblical name:--"And he left them, and went out of the city into Bethany; and he lodged there." (Mat. 21:27) (Atlas Marion 1901; Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934; Presley Lane; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Baptist Male and Female Seminary
Description:See Bethel College.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Branch
Description:A branch of Fabius Township, flowing into the South Fabius. Doubtless took its name from Bethel Chapel of Church (q.v.), close to its banks. (Atlas Marion 1901, 59)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Cemetery
Description:A cemetery established in Fabius Township as early as 1830. So named for Bethel Chapel (See Bethel Church). (HIST. MARION 1884, 178, 776)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Chapel
Description:A Baptist Chapel in Hannibal in the 1800s. (See Calvary Baptist Church). For name see Bethel Church. (Mirror, 207)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Fabius Township on the Fabius River; first known as Bethel Chapel. It was organized in 1823 and the first building erected in 1824. A Biblical name:--Bethel, the house of God (Gen. 28:19, 22). (HIST. MARION 1884, 178, 776; Hist. N.E. Mo. 92; Min Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934; Mrs. Frank Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel College
Description:A Baptist stronghold in the county, organized as a seminary at Palmyra in 1853. It was under control of the Palmyra Baptist Church, and was known as Baptist Seminary and as Palmyra Seminary. On its becoming the insolvent, a charter was taken out by the Bethel Baptist Association in 1855, under the name Bethel Baptist Male and Female Seminary. It became known as Bethel College in 1859, and was under the direction of R.M. Rhodes. During the Civil War, the building was used for hospital purposes. In 1865 the college was leased to R.M. Rhodes for a period of ten years, and continued under the same name. It was succeeded in 1874 by Ingleside College (q.v.). (Sutherland and McEvoy 1860; HIST. MARION 1884, 839, 840; Hist. N.E. Mo., 95; Atlas Marion 1901, 5; Shelby County Herald, July 31, 1935; Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934; Mrs. Frank Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel School
Description:A schoolhouse in Fabius Township, as early as 1831; the first country school of any importance in the county. So named for Bethel Church in the neighborhood. (HIST. MARION 1884, 178)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel School District
Description:One of the five school districts in 1842. For name see Bethel School. (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bier School
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township on Bay de Charles. So named for Henry Bier who owned the land. It was also known around 1901 as the Gottman School for the many families of that name in the neighborhood. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Bay
Description:See Bay de Charles.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Grassy
Description:See Grassy Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Round Pond
Description:A pond in the east part of Fabius Township; on a line with Little Round Pond (q.v.). So named for its shape and its size in relation to Little Round Pond. (Atlas Marion 1913; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Saltpeter Cave
Description:See Mark Twain Cave.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Spring
Description:The big spring at Palmyra, 100 yards or so northwest of the courthouse today. Before the timber was cut away, the spring was a resort for primitive inhabitants in the vicinity. The big spring was discovered by hunters from Ralls County at an early period. "Uncle Benny Flannigan" (See Palmyra), chose the site for his home because of the spring. Legend has it that whoever drinks the water from the spring will some day, even after many years, return to Palmyra. It seems true, for every once in a while some elderly person, whom no present citizen recalls, will come back for the purpose of drinking from the spring. (HIST. MARION 1884, 826; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bird Street
Description:A street in old Hannibal; so named for Thompson Bird, the surveyor, who laid out the pioneer city in 1819. On this street stands the frame building once the law office of John Clemens, father of Mark Twain. It was in the back room of this office that young Sam found himself at night in the room with the murdered man, and left via the window, taking "most of the sash" with him. "I did not need the sash, but it was handier to take it than to leave it, and so I took it. I was not scared, but I was considerably agitated." (Innocents Abroad, Chapter 18; Mark Twain Biography, Chapter 12; Lucy Latimer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blair Leggett's Ford
Description:A ford over North River in the northeast corner of Marion County. So named for the owner of the land, J.B. Leggett. (HIST. MARION 1884, 482; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blessed Sacrament Church
Description:A Catholic Church on Broadway in Hannibal. It was organized in the 1920s by Father Fox, who is still in charge of the parish. Blessed Sacrament--The Consecrated Host, or the consecrated Host, or the consecrated wafer used in the Mass in observing the Lord's Supper. (Webster; Morris; Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blessed Sacrament School
Description:A Catholic school in Hannibal controlled by the Church of the Blessed Sacrament, whence the name. (Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Grass Region of Northeast Missouri
Description:A region so designated by reason of its rolling prairies with their rich glacial soil, giving it a wide extent of blue grass country and extensive timber stretches. It is drained by numbers of unnavigable streams. (Sosey Palmyra Spectator)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bluff City
Description:See Hannibal
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Booker Island
Description:See Glasscock's Island.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boone (Boone's) Lick Country
Description:A name applied to the country lying between the Missouri and the Salt Rivers, the latter particularly famous for the licks worked by the family of Daniel Boone around the early 1800s; hence the name. The situation of Boone Lick Country led to exploration to the north along the whole extent of Salt River and its tributaries. It thus helped to write the story of all Northeast Missouri. Daniel Boone (1735-1820), famous woodsman and trapper, crossed the Mississippi River to become a Spanish subject around 1795. He was a true western American pioneer, a hunter, a scout, Indian fighter, and settler. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 625; MIRROR, 80; Shoemaker, 155; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boone Lick Road
Description:The oldest road in northeast Missouri, established in 1815. It ran originally from St. Charles County, in the south, in a northwesterly direction to Boone's Lick Springs in Howard County; hence the name. It has been directly and indirectly associated with the story of all east and northeast Missouri, as it was a means by which people were brought into this part of the state. It is now a part of the Ocean to Ocean Highway. Broadway in Columbia, Missouri is a part of the old roadway. Also written Boone's Lick and Boon's Lick. (Hist. N.E. Mo. 76; Chamber of Commerce, Columbia, Mo.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bostwick Chapel
Description:A Methodist Chapel west and north of Taylor, near Hester. So named for the Reverend Bostwick who organized the chapel. (Atlas Marion 1901; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bostwick School
Description:See Oak Dell School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bouvet's Lick
Description:See "The Bastion"
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bouvet's Mill
Description:A mill indicated by Hutawa, 1844, as SAW MILL, on Bay de Charles at the point later known as Scipio (q.v.). For name cf. Bouvet's Warehouse. (Hutawa Map Mo. 1844; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bouvet's Tract
Description:See Bouvet's Warehouse.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bouvet's Trail
Description:One of the oldest pack-horse trails in the state, long a source of mystery to the early settlers, who supposed it to have been an old Indian trail. It was cut out and located by the Frenchman, Bouvet, used around 1795 to transport salt from his works in Ralls to his warehouse on the Bay. (See Bouvet's Warehouse). From this point he shipped to St. Louis. A quarter of a century later the old trail was found, and used by the settlers. Known by them as the "Indian Road," later as the "Pack Horse Trail of Bouvet's." (Hist. N.E. Mo., 84; Mirror, 78)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bouvet's Warehouse
Description:"The oldest white settlement in Marion County, near the mouth of Bay de Charles, and a little south of Clear Creek. At this point in August, 1795, Maturin Bouvet established a warehouse for storing and shipping salt to St. Louis. (See "The Bastion"). He had been granted, as recorded in the "Old French Land Book" in St. Louis, a tract twenty arpents square of land (an arpent-12 rods), along the river, a tract that should extend no farther north than the River Jaustioni (q.v.), recorded as Bouvet's Tract. He tilled the land of "his plantation," he hired workmen; homes were established, for he was joined here by perhaps as many as fifteen or sixteen French families from Canada and from St. Louis. He carried on a successful business and acquired wealth. The little hamlet extended from the mouth of Clear Creek to the mouth of the bay. His own home, apart from the hamlet was in a recess in the bluff line just below the mouth of Clear Creek. Here after five years, in the spring of 1800, his warehouse was plundered and destroyed by the Sac Indians, led by Blackhawk, it was rumored, and Bouvet in defense of his property was murdered and his body left half burned. Under apprehension of Indian hostilities, the villagers had previously departed. Maturin Bouvet, though he carried on a lively trade with the Indians, was no common trapper or trader. Before coming to Missouri he had been in 1786 in Illinois a civil and criminal Judge of St. Philippe, and later held a position of importance in Cahokia. In St. Louis he was a man of standing, serving as notary public, an office he held long under the Spanish government, and as deputy surveyor under Soulard, the surveyor-general. Later, on American occupation, his tract was subjected to litigation under his administrator, M. Gratiot, of St. Louis, who undertook to settle the Bouvet estate (see Gratiot Tract). (Campbell 1874, 349; HIST. MARION 1884, 130-142; Hist. Lewis 1887, 10; Houck, II, 99, 100; Hist. N.E. Mo., 446-448; Amer. St. Papers, 5, 791; Mirror, 77, 78)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bowles Ranch
Description:A tract of land 5000 acres in extent on the Bay; so known for the owner, Captain R.L. Bowles. Marion City (q.v.), was on Bowles Ranch. Captain Bowles sold this land to Mr. Hiuskamp. (See Huiskamp) (George Shaeffer; (F), C.O. Willis; (F), John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boyce and Triplett Mill
Description:See Triplett's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridge Creek
Description:See Troublesome Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Broad Ax Tract
Description:A tract at one time north of Hannibal, now within the city, near the river. A part of the Grimard Tract (q.v.). Known today as Riverview Addition, for the view it affords of the Mississippi. It was named Broad Ax for its resemblance to that instrument of the woodsman. Up to the time of theCivil War, the woods remained a verdant forest, matted with grape vines and covered with heavy timber. All this would be readily suggestive to the pioneer of the broad ax. The name is still used. (Mirror, 21, 64; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Broadway
Description:One of the main streets of Hannibal. Formerly Market Street, for the old market house which stood in the middle of the street just beyond Third Street. The name was changed to Broadway when the new plank road turned the tide of travel to this street. (Mirror, 27)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Broadway Church
Description:A Merthodist Episcopal Church South established in Hannibal in 1835. Its first building was erected in 1841; its present building in 1881. It was known for a long period as Fifth Street M.E. Church for its location, but when the new building was erected the church adopted the present name. It stands near Broadway. (HIST. MARION 1884, 981)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brookville
Description:A post office from 1853-1860; northwest of Palmyra on the south side of the South Fabius in the north part of the county. Still existent in 1865. Nothing was learned about the origin of the name. (Hayward 1853; Parker 1865; Sutherland and McEvoy; 1860; Maps Mo., 1857-1871)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brower's Branch
Description:A branch in Union Township, flowing north and east into the South Fabius in the norrthwest part of the county. So named for Chancellor Brower, a Kentuckian, the first man to move into the west part of Marion County. (HIST. MARION 1884, 298; Atlas Marion 1901; (F) Dr. H.F. Rhodes)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brown's Mill
Description:A horse mill, one of the first mills in the county, about five miles north of Palmyra in Fabius Township, in 1819. So named for the owners, Wm. P. Brown and his father, John Brown, who came to Marion County that year. (HIST. MARION 1884, 773)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bruner's Branch
Description:A branch in the western part of the county. It is thought to have been a misspelling of Brower's (q.v.). (Atlas Marion 1875, 13; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brush College
Description:See Prairie School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brushy Slough
Description:A slough in north Mason Township, emptying into the Bay de Charles. So named by the hunters for the amount of brush growing along its sides. (Atlas Marion 1913; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Building of the Pilasters
Description:A building on the southwest corner of Main and Hill streets across from the Mark Twain Boyhood Home (q.v.). This building the older Mark Twain on his visit to Hannibal, 1902, was surprised to find so small. Little Sam Clemens had thought it the most beautiful building in the world. Into the upstairs of this building the Clemens family moved after the sheriff sold their home for debt, and here not long after John Clemens, Sam's father, died. Later relatives of the family from St. Louis bought the old home on Hill, and the family moved again to the home now famous. So named by Mark Twain for the decorative columns on the front of the building. (G.A. Mahan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bulkley Cave
Description:See Labeaume Cave.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bullions Landing (Bullion's)
Description:A landing on the Mississippi at the mouth of the Fabius rivers, as indicated on the Hutawa map of 1844. These were the years of the great Missourian, Thomas Hart Benton, known familiarly as "Old Bullion," and undoubtedly the landing was named for him. Thomas H. Benton (1782-1858), is still known as "the greatest man Missouri has produced," and even as "the greatest statesman of the West." He was a steadfast advocate of specie currency, bullion, or metal; thus he won his nickname, "Old Bullion." He served in the U.S. Senate for thirty years. In the election of 1844, the faction of the Democrats known as the "Hards" for hard money, silver and gold, stood for the return of Thomas Benton to the senate, while the "Softs" desired a liberal issue of paper by the "Wildcat" banks. Benton eventually went down to defeat on his opposition to the extension of slavery. As a result of Benton's position on the money question, Missouri stood for metal money and has been called the "Bullion State." Rader 76; williams 1904, 3, 20; Shoemaker, 147, 153, 155)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bullock's Ford
Description:Nothing is known of the location of this ford. The Bullock family were large landholders in these counties along the Mississippi. (HIST. MARION 1884, 203; Mrs. T.O. Tatje)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caldwell
Description:See Woodland
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caldwell School
Description:A pioneer schoolhouse in Warren Township, the first in this vicinity; located on the Caldwell land, hence the name. (E.C. Bohon, Palmyra Spectator, Clipping)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caldwell Station
Description:See Woodland
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Calvary Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1887 in Bethel Chapel, in Hannibal. The chapel continued to be the place of worship, and was moved to the site of the present church. The building is now sold and a new church building erected. The church is still maintained under this name. A Biblical name:--"And when they came to the place, which is called Calvary, there they crucified Him." (Luke 23:33), (Mirror, 207; Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc. 1934; Helen D. Birch)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cameron Cave
Description:A larger cave than Mark Twain Cave (q.v.), the entrance to which is one-half mile from the entrance to the latter. The two are in no way connected. People who know both caves say Cameron Cave is more interesting and more beautiful with more stalactites and stalagmites, than the better known cave, but it has no history. Visitors always visit the cave made famous by Mark Twain. Cameron Cave was discovered by Judge Cameron's son in February, 1923; hence the name. (Judge E.T. Cameron)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp Branch
Description:A stream in Ralls along the Old London Road (q.v.). It broke down the divide made by Crawford's Hill (q.v.). So named because its banks furnished many campsites. Mirror, 27, 45; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Camp Carrick
Description:A camp in the fair grounds of Palmyra during the Civil War. So named in honor of Major Robert Carrick, who commanded the post. (HIST. MARION 1884, 425)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Campbell Settlement
Description:A trading post established on Bay de Charles about 1816 by an Indian trader named Campbell; the second settlement in the county, and the first American settlement (See Bouvet's Warehouse). Campbell was the son of an Indian agent and trader in another location. In 1831, he left the vicinity of Hannibal, and established a store at the mouth of the Wyaconda River in Lewis County. A marker has been erected on the site along the Bay. (HIST. MARION 1884, 882; Mirror, 90; Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cannonville
Description:See Fosterville.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Captain Lewis Boulevard
Description:See Todd Spring Road.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cardiff Hill
Description:The name given Hollidays Hill (q.v.), by Mark Twain in his stories of Tom and Huck. Payne states that he gave it the name for a Cardiff Hill that he knew in the east, where he does not tell us. It is true that there is a Cardiff in New York as well as one in Maryland and at least three other states. But it seems more likely that Mark Twain chose the name of the great Welsh seaport because his hill was the home of the "Welshman." Today it is known perhaps more often by this name than by its real name. The Missouri approach to Mark Twain Memorial Bridge (q.v.), is very appropriately on Cardiff Hill. At its foot stands the statue of Tom and Huck (q.v.); on its summit the Centennial Memorial Lighthouse (q.v.). Over the hill in reality and in story the boys played and roamed at will. Halfway up the hill stood the "han'ted" house up Still-House Branch (q.v.). At the home of the widow, Huck lived, much to his despair, preferring his old life in the hogshead where a man was free to do as he would. Cardiff Hill appears more often in Mark Twain's stories of the boys than any other one place. (ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapters 2, 7, 8, 25, 26, 29, 30, 33, 34, 35; ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN, Chapters 1-6; MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY, Chapter 11; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carpenter School
Description:See Oak Grove School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cave Avenue
Description:A name given to a winding road along the river and around the base of picturesque Lovers Leap, leading to Mark Twain Cave, whence the name. (Atlas Marion 1913)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cave Cemetery
Description:An old cemetery on the A.P. White farm; northwest of Palmyra, near Hester. So named for the gravestone bearing the name and date, W.M.D. Cave, 1812. (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cave City
Description:A little group of houses on Cave Avenue (q.v.), at the entrance to the grounds known as the site of Mark Twain Cave, whence the name. (Atlas Marion 1913; Plat of Hannibal; Judge E.T. Cameron)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cave City Cemetery
Description:A cemetery adjoining the group of houses known as Cave City (q.v.); hence the name. (Plat of Hannibal)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cave Hollow
Description:The valley between Lovers Leap on one side and the limestone hill in which lies the cave (See Mark Twain Cave), which gives the valley or hollow its name. The name was used by Mark Twain. This valley was a playground frequented by the boys; it was here that they ambuscaded the "A-rabs" in HUCKLEBERRY FINN. It is a popular name in Hannibal for the valley, though it is also known as Cave Park. (ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapter 33; ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN, Chapter 3; (F) Ed Burkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cave Park
Description:See Cave Hollow.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Centenary Academy
Description:An Academy established in Palmyra by the Methodist Episcopal Church South in 1884 in the buildings formerly used by the Palmyra Female Seminary (q.v.). It went first under the name of Centenary High School, and was under the presidency of James A. Lanius who came to Palmyra from the vice-presiency of old Smith Academy in St. Louis. Under Mr. Lanius the school had an auspicious beginning with enrollment of as many as 180 pupils. In 1891 Mr. Lanius left the school. He was succeeded by a Mr. Taylor. A year later new buildings on a different site were erected largely "on faith," and the school again under a new president became known as Centenary College, giving A.B. and B.S. degrees. The school authorities found themselves struggling with a huge indebtedness, and in 1898 recalled Mr. Lanius. Mr. Lanius refused to give degrees for the course of study offered and insisted that the name Centenary College be changed to Centenary Academy. The ensuing years found the school struggling for existence though excellent work was being done. Since sufficient finances were not forthcoming Mr. Lanius who had watched with interest the development of public schools interested the Palmyra school board in the purchase of the Academy for a high school. In 1913 the Academy closed. The building with part of the seven acres of ground was bought from the church by the school board and was used as the high school building until it burned in 1923. The new high school building stands on the site of the old Centenary. The name Centenary dates from 1884, the hundredth anniversary of the organization of the Methodist Church. In 1784, John Wesley executed the legal instrument constituting the organization which is known as the Wesleyan Methodists, and this is regarded as the charter of Methodism, although, of course, the name "Methodist" dates back to 1727, when the religious society at the University of Oxford organized by John and Charles Wesley and George Whitfield was so nicknamed by their fellow students. (Cf. Centenary Chapel at Central College, Fayette, Howard County, which was built in 1884 and named for the same reason). The use of this name for the new institution may also have been suggested to Mr. Lanius by Centenary Methodist Church in St. Louis of which he was a member. The latter was founded in 1839 commemorating perhaps George Whitfield's second visit to America in 1739, or Wesley's first inauguration of open-air preaching in the same year. The Centennial of Methodism in Missouri was celebrated in 1906. In 1806 the first preacher to the Missouri Circuit was appointed by Bishop Asbury. (See Asbury Chapel, Lewis County) (Atlas Marion 1901, 6; Centennial Vol. of Mo. Methodism 1806-1906, 403; Mrs. Frank Lane; Alma Lane; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Centenary College
Description:See Centenary Academy.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Centenary High School
Description:See Centenary Academy.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Centennial Memorial Lighthouse
Description:A temporary lighthouse on the summit of Cardiff Hill (q.v.), overlooking old Hannibal and the River; erected to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the birth of Samuel Clemens (1835-1935), famous as Mark Twain. The illumination of this lighthouse, January 15, 1935, opened the festivities which continued throughout the centennial year. President Roosevelt from Washington, D.C., pressed the switch which opened the celebration. The temporary structure is known also as the Mark Twain Memorial Lighthouse. It is hoped that the lighthouse may be made permanent when it will be more nearly deserving of the name. (Memorial; G.A. Mahan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Center School
Description:A schoolhouse on Centerville Road (q.v.), in Union Township. It was named for the road on which it stands. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Centerville Road
Description:A road so known because it led to Centerville in Reynolds County. (Atlas Marion 1901; Rand McNally Road Map, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Central Park
Description:The name given in recent years to the "public square," on Broadway in Hannibal. It lay near the center of the old town; hence the name. (Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cherry Dell
Description:A post office from 1879-1904; in the northwest corner of Union Township. Now abandoned. A Mr. Glasscock owned a store there. The story goes that one day he and some friends were sitting under a cherry tree discussing names to be sent in for the proposed post office. Mr. Glasscock proposed the name Cherry Dell, for the tree under which they were sitting and the contour of the country at that point. (Polk 1879-1893; Maps Mo., 1886-1915; Atlas Marion 1913; P.G.; Thaddeus R. Smith; (F), Dr. H.F. Rhodes)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Church of the Immaculate Conception
Description:A Catholic parish at Hannibal; organized in 1852. The first church building was erected in 1854. This church still stands and is used as a chapel. The present building was purchased in 1880 from the Congregational Church and dedicated in 1881. The church takes its name from the Virgin Mary, who is believed by Catholics to have been free from the stain of Adam's sin from the first moment of her life. (HIST. MARION 1884, 983; Saints We Love; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:City of Flowers
Description:See Palmyra
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Claggett Ford
Description:A ford over North River, 1.5 or 2 miles from North River Station (q.v.). So named for Claggett's Mill. (q.v.). (Hist. Lewis 1887, 140; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Claggett's Mill
Description:A mill in the southwest part of the county on North River about four miles from Palmyra. In existence long before the Civil War. So named for its owner. (Hist. Lewis 1887, 140; John Lemmons; Jacob Tate)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark's Mill [1 of 2]
Description:A steam flour mill in operation near Palmyra in 1835. So named for Dr. David Clark who was engaged in operating the mill. Cf. Clark's Mill above. (Wetmore 1837, 117)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark's Mill [2 of 2]
Description:A steam saw mill with two saws in operation, in 1835, on the site of the department of arts and sciences of Marion College (q.v.). Dr. David Clark was associated with Colonel Muldrow and Dr. David Nelson in the Marion College project. He was superintendent for this department in Upper College. The college was in operation at this time; hence the name. (Wetmore 1837, 117)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clay Lick School
Description:See Pee Dee School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clear Creek [1 of 2]
Description:An Indian settlement on Clear Creek, and so named. (Lucy Latimer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clear Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A creek in the northeast part of Miller Township, flowing east into the Mississippi, its mouth near that of Bay de Charles. Clear Creek heads on the old Moses Bates' farm. It was earlier known as Rush's Creek for John Rush who operated a mill on its bank. Later the settlers named it Clear Creek for the clearness of its water. It rises in a small brook; fed by many springs the water is clear and cold. (HIST. MARION 1884, 134, 144, 172, 639; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clear Creek Church
Description:A Baptist Church on Clear Creek, whence the name; organized in 1859. The church was dissolved in 1869. (Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clear Creek School
Description:A schoolhouse in Miller Township. It was originally known as the Stone School because it was built of stone. Around 1911 it was known also as the Hendren School for a family living near the schoolhouse. The schoolhouse was built in the late 1820s or early 1830s. Later the building was enlarged. Church services were held there before Mt. Zion Church (q.v.), was built. The old building is still standing. It has been sold with one acre of ground around it and is occupied as a summer residence by a family of Hannibal. A new schoolhouse was built in 1927 about 1/4 mile east and down the hill from the old stone building, nearer Clear Creek and about a mile west of old Bay Mill (q.v.). The new building is of brick and stone, and goes by the name of Clear Creek for its location. (Atlas Marion 1901; Palmyra Spectator, August 14, 1929; E.C. Bohon; (F), Lou Sharp; (F), Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clemens Station
Description:A station on the "River Railroad" south of Llasco (q.v.), along the Mississippi; a site made familiar by Samuel Clemens (Tom Sawyer of the story of that name), and his bosom friends, John Briggs, "his soul's sworn comrade"--the Joe Harper of the story--and Tom Blankenship, Huck Finn. "There was an easy, comfortable path along the shore under the bluff, but it lacked the advantages of difficulty and danger so valued by a pirate." It was easy, therefore, to appropriate a raft on which to sail the Spanish Main. From this point the three, the Black Avenger of the Spanish Main, Huck Finn, the Red-Handed, and Joe Harper, the Terror of the Seas, set sail for adventure as pirates to Glasscock's Island (Jackson's in the story), three miles down the river. (Mirror, 19; Tom Sawyer, Chap. 13; John Lemmons; Judge E.T. Cameron; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cloverdale School
Description:A schoolhouse originally built on the north side of Marion City road in 1859 on land deeded to the district by Dr. William Sites, and known by his name. This building burned; it was rebuilt in a different location, but retained the name. The new building was in a more nearly central location on a hillside on land deeded to the district by Mr. Bross. In 1918, the name Cloverdale was selected by the ladies of the Rural Library Club because Cloverdale was the name of the Bross farm. The farm had been so named for a dale in which there was an abundance of clover. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator, March 15, 1933)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:College Branch
Description:A branch or run southwest of Palmyra, flowing to the northeast into South River. So named for the college at West Ely. (Atlas Marion 1901; Lucy Latimer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:College Heights
Description:The site of Hannibal-Lagrange College, northwest of the city of Hannibal, on Mark Twain Avenue (q.v.). The college stands on a beautiful 160-acre campus on one of the many heights about the city of Hannibal; hence the name. It is known also by the name of College Hill for the same reason. Some of the land skirting the campus has been laid off in building lots; in time this doubtless will be one of the choice residential locations in Hannibal. (Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934; Palmyra Spectator, August 14, 1929).
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:College Hill
Description:See College Heights.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Columbus River
Description:A stately name given the branch of Bay de Charles (Mark Twain--THE GILDED AGE), across which Napoleon (q.v.), was to be built. "This, gentlemen, is Columbus River, alias Goose Run. If it was widened, and deepened, and straightened, and made long enough, it would be one of the finest rivers in the western country." For this enterprise the Columbus River Slackwater Navigation Company was formed. (The Gilded Age, Chapters 17, 25)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Constantinople
Description:The name occurs in TOM SAWYER: given by Mark Twain to Palmyra (q.v.), the county seat, twelve miles from Hannibal (St. Petersburg), Judge Thatcher in the story came to St. Petersburg "from Constantinople, twelve miles away--so he had traveled, and seen the world--these very eyes had looked upon the county courthouse--which was said to have a tin roof." Just as Palmyra was a bulwarkof the Hebrew Kingdom in the Solomonic age, so Constantinople was the capital of the Roman Empire, 330 A.D. Mark Twain is indulging here in a sly laugh at Western pretension to the classical. (See Hannibal). (ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapters 4, 22; Intern. Cyc.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coontz Branch
Description:A branch in Hannibal beyond 12th Street. It flowed down Coontz Street; hence the name. The street was named for the pioneer grandfather of Admiral Coontz. (Mirror, 27; Morris Anderson; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cooper School (Colored)
Description:A schoolhouse in Warren Township. So named for Nathan Cooper, owner of the land on which the schoolhouse was built. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cooper School (White)
Description:See Cooper School (Colored). (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cornet Branch
Description:A branch along the route to New London in Ralls. So named for William Cornet, an early settler who lived on the bench of land east of the branch near its mouth. (Mirror, 27, 45)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cotton Chapel
Description:An early Methodist Church about one mile northeast of Pleasant Grove Church (q.v.). The church is long since gone. So named for a Reverend Cotton who organized the church group. (John Lemmons; Lou Sharp; L.C. McCleod; Leona Stuetzer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cottonwood Fork
Description:A branch rising in Ralls County, flowing into the south part of Warren Township, thence into the South Fork of North River. So named for the cottonwood trees along its banks. (Atlas Marion 1913; (F) C.O. Willis)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cottonwood School
Description:See Oakview School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crabapple School
Description:A schoolhouse in South River Township. So named for a crabapple patch by the building. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Craig's Alley
Description:A narrow roadway in the northern part of old Hannibal. So named for a family living there. (HIST. MARION 1884, 898; Mirror, 50; Morris Anderson; Wm. Bertier)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crawford's Hill
Description:A very steep and rugged hill on the Old London Road (q.v.), between the headwaters of Cornet Branch (q.v.), and Camp Branch (q.v.), the two lapping each other before breaking down the divide made by the hill. So named for a family who lived on the hill. (Mirror, 45; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Creswell
Description:A settlement just within the line in the northern part of the county, in Round Grove Township. The origin of the name could not be discovered. (Campbell 1873)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Curd School
Description:See Suter School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Daulton's Branch
Description:A branch located south of Hannibal; rising in the hills, it drains a strange basin and empties into Mills' Branch (q.v.). So named for a family who owned land on it banks. Along the branch are seen surprising deposits of drifts singularly chiseled by the freshets. The stream riots in a wild and dangerous chasm. At its emergence from the hills, its sand deposits cover and efface every vestige of travel. Soon the explorer finds himself skirting the edge of a ditch with a depth of twenty ft. carved out in sinuous curves by the torrents that drain the basin. This branch furnishes most of the sand and gravel that lodges in the bed of Bear Creek. (Mirror, 23; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis School
Description:A schoolhouse in Warren Township. So named for Judge H.C. Davis, who owned the land on which the schoolhouse was built. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Day School
Description:A schoolhouse in Warren Township. It was known as late as 1913 as the Vanlandingham School, for an early owner of the land, honoring the memory of "Uncle Benny Flannigan" (See Palmyra), whose name the pioneers found so difficult that they gave him this nickname. It was Uncle Benny who made shoes at his cabin for many years for the pioneers. The name was changed to Day School for Martin Day, who bought the land about the building. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Presley Lane; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deer Lick
Description:Old timers' name for a district 1/4 mile south of Pee Dee School, in Warren Township. Deer were numerous here, congregating at a salt lick. (E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator; Mrs. T.B. Carter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deutsche Evangelical Lutheran Zions Kirche
Description:See Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dimmitt School
Description:See Salem School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dingle Cave
Description:A cavern, the entrance to which is now filled in, on the Dingle farm, two miles northwest of Palmyra. It was discovered accidentally by the loss of a colt which had broken through into what was discovered to be a cave-like opening from which could be heard the distant calls of the colt. It was never explored or the colt rescued because a light lowered into the aperture was always extinguished. Through fear the opening to the cavern was filled in. It took its name from the owner of the land. (HIST. MARION, 1884, 772; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dockery Chapel
Description:See Dockery Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dockery Chapel Cemetery
Description:A cemetery which took its name from Dockery Chapel (q.v.), by which it was located. The earliest gravestone bears the date 1822. (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dockery Church
Description:A Methodist Church about four miles south of Palmyra, near Woodland. It was an old church in 1877. Now extinct. So named for an early circuit rider. Governor A.M. Dockery of Missouri, 1900-1905, was a son of this early preacher. The church was known also as a chapel. (Williams 1904, 549; Palmyra Spectator, May 29, 1935; Rader, 192; Presley Lane; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dodge City
Description:A name given in derision to a group of five or six houses outside the city limits, east of Palmyra. An alleged effort to "dodge" the city taxes; hence the name. The first to build here was a banker, Mr. Joseph C. Anderson. (John Lemmons; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Douglas School (sic.) (Colored)
Description:A school established at Hannibal in 1868; remarkable for its superior standards. So named for Frederick Douglass (1817-1895), an American negro abolitionist and a great hero of the colored people. The spelling with one s may have been due to confusion with Stephen A. Douglas. (HIST. MARION 1884, 984)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Draper's Meadow
Description:An enclosed field outside Hannibal, now in the business section near 7th and Broadway; a boys' recruiting ground and a site for a great celebration when ground was broken here for the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. On this occasion several beeves were barbecued, and maneuvers were executed by the St. Louis Greys, brought up for the occasion. The field was owned by a Mr. Draper, hence the name. (Mirror, 33; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dunlaps
Description:An unnofficial station at the South River Bridge, northwest of Hannibal. There existed no village, but the name appears on the map 1861-1870, and again in 1886. It was so named for a Mr. Dunlap, who lived by the bridge and ran a blacksmith shop. It was the voting precinct for the Mt. Zion community. The place was a good camping ground also, having a deep well. (Maps Mo. 1861- 1870; Central Mo. Railroad Map, 1886; Morris Anderson; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dunsford
Description:See Mark.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:East Branch
Description:See North River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eastern Slough
Description:A slough which drains Backbone Pond (q.v.), in the southeast part of Fabius Township, flowing east to the Mississippi. So named for its elevation. This country has now been dredged and "leveled" until this old landmark is difficult to find. (Atlas Marion 1913; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ebenezer Church
Description:A Baptist Church on the southern bank of North River in the north part of Warren Township; organized in 1843. The church building was erected in 1846. A Biblical name:-Eben-ezer, the stone of help, raised by Samuel. (I Sam., 7:12). HIST. MARION 1884, 674, 689, 718; Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ebenezer School
Description:A schoolhouse in the southern part of Union Township, west of Philadelphia. So named for the Ebenezer Church (q.v.), in the neighborhood on the south bank of North River in Warren Township. (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eden
Description:The name applied in derision to Marion City (q.v.), by Dickens in his story MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT. Dickens visited America in 1842, January- May. He came to St. Louis in April when the Marion City site was flooded. In MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT, Martin and Mark Tapley invest their money in Eden, a flourishing city on the map of the Eden Land Corporation. It was "An architectural city: There were banks, churches, cathedrals, market-places, factories, hotels, stores, mansions, wharves, public buildings of all kinds, down to the office of the Eden Stinger, a daily journal--all faithfully depicted." It seemed a favorable opening for the would-be architect, though Martin wondered if the architectural display might not preclude any further employment for one in that capacity. On arrival at Eden, it appeared to the two "That the waters of the Deluge might have left it but a week before so choked with slime and matted growth was the hideous swamp that bore the name." The inhabitants were all either dead or apparently dying of malaria. "There were not above a score of cabins in the whole; half of these appeared untenanted; all were rotten and decayed. The most tottering, abject, and forlorn among them was called with great propriety the Bank and National Credit Office. It had some feeble props about it, but was settling deep down in the mud, past all recovery." The smooth-tongued sponsor, General Scadder (See "Eastern Run"), had proved a clever promoter of a dismal stretch of Mississippi swamp. Eden--the garden of the Lord (Genesis 2:8; Isaiah 51:3), "No man couldn't think of settling in a better place," as Mark Tapley remarks. But only such as the serpents could live in the "fetid vapour of the terrestrial Paradise." Some time after the novel appeared people who knew the HIST. MARION City said that it was the original of Dickens' "Eden." In the story the site was advertised as the "Valley of Eden," and the district around Marion City came to be known by this name. (See "Elm Lands"). (Stevens, 87; Hist. Shelby 1911, 132; Leacock's DICKENS, Chapter 4; MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT, Chapters 21, 33)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Egypt Hill
Description:An old name given to a hill between Palmyra and Monroe City, on the Philadelphia and Monroe City road, on the west side of the county. The hill of clay and gravel was excessively steep, rising to a point, reminding one of the Pyramids of Egypt. (Atlas Marion 1901, 72; Mrs. Frank Lane; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm Lands
Description:A name given the land embraced by the North and South Rivers; famous for its remarkable beauty and fertility, and notable for its magnificent elms. The name was applied by early settlers, who also spoke of it because of its fertility as the "Valley of the Nile." The vicinity was also known as the "Valley of Eden" (See "Eden"). (Campbell 1874, 356; HIST. MARION 1884, 770; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ely [1 of 2]
Description:See West Ely.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ely [2 of 2]
Description:A post office in 1876 under the name of Ely Station; in the southeast corner of Warren Township, near the county line, nine miles southwest of Palmyra, on the Han. and St. Hos. Railroad. Ely was not laid out until the railroad went through (1857-1858), and was known as Ely Station and so designated on the maps of Missouri, 1861-1886. It may have been named Ely Station (as a station), for its neighbor, the original Ely, known know as West Ely, and not on the railroad. Since Ely, however, was laid out on land indentified with Lower College (q.v.), tract, no name would be more likely than that of Dr. Ely, since its neighbor no longer bore the name. (Campbell 1874; Atlas Marion 1875, 10; HIST. MARION 1884, 236; P.G.; Maps Mo. from 1861; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ely City
Description:See West Ely.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ely Station
Description:See Ely.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ely Street
Description:See Happy Hollow.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elzea Addition
Description:An addition to Hannibal. So named for a prominent family owning a great deal of land there. (Atlas Marion 1901; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elzea Chapel
Description:A Congregtional Chapel at Hannibal in the Elzea Addition (q.v.); hence the name. It was completed shortly previous to 1905. Now defunct. (Mirror, 215)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Emerson
Description:A post office from 1867-1904, under present name; situated in the south part of Round Grove Township, north of the South Fabius River and thirteen miles west-northwest of Palmyra. It was established in 1837 as Houston, appearing under that name as a post office in 1853. Colton gives the name as Emerson in 1861. It was named Houston for General "Sam" Houston (1793-1863), hero of the Texas War of Independence in progress 1833-1836, and commander-in-chief of the Texan army. General Houston defeated Santa Ana, and secured the independence of Texas, of which he became president, 1836-1845, until its annexation to the United States. Between 1858 and 1861, the name was changed to Emerson in honor of John Emerson, one of the founders of the settlement and owner of the first house there. (Hayward 1853; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 353; HIST. MARION 1884, 755; P.G.; Maps Mo. from 1844; Intern. Cyc)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Emerson Consolidated School District
Description:A school district composed of Emerson grade and high schools, Gullion, Benbow, Vickrey, and Flint Creek (q.v.). (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ephraim Wilson's Saw Mill
Description:A mill near Palmyra around 1856. So named for its owner. (HIST. MARION 1884, 327; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Evangelical Immanuel Lutheran Church
Description:A Lutheran Church of this name at West Ely (q.v.). The Germans of West Ely worshipped until 1869 with the Zion Evangelical Lutherans at Palmyra. In that year they withdrew because both groups wished the pastor to live in their community. They could not come to an agreement and the West Ely Lutherans withdrew and called their own pastor. A Biblical name:--Immanuel from the Hebrew, meaning literally "God is with us." Used as a designation of Christ (Is. 7:14; Matt. 1:23) (Palmyra Spectator, August 14, 1929; Webster's Dictionary)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:See St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ewing School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township, south of the South Fabius to the west. So named for Wm. Ewing, owner of the land. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabba
Description:See Fabius Junction.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius Community House
Description:See Fabius Grange.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius Consolidated High School
Description:A consolidated high school at Smileyville (q.v.), Fabius Township. Now abandoned. (E.C. Bohon; (F) Lous Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius Consolidated School District
Description:This district has no high school, but included in the district are Oakview, Todd, Mark, Franklin, and Praire View Schools (q.v.). (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius Grange
Description:A grange in Fabius Township, for which it and the organization were named. On the theory that nearly all financial trouble were due to bad legislation, the "Grange" was an organized effort to unite all laborers, especially farmers, in an attempt to repeal bad laws and make all necessary good ones. The first granges in the county were organized at Hannibal and Palmyra in 1873. By 1883, the only grange in efficient working condition in the county was that in Fabius Township. An archaic meaning of the word, grange, was granary; another, a farm, especially a farmhouse with its outlying buildings: hence the name, Grange, as applied to this organization. Fabius Grange is now known as Fabius Community House. (HIST. MARION 1884, 576; Rader, 112, 113; Webster's Dictionary)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius Island
Description:The name is given to the land cut off by the slough into which the two Fabius Rivers empty; hence the name. It lies just above the mouth of North and South River. (Coues-Pike, Note, 10)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius Junction
Description:A post office from 1876-1886, but never platted. So named for the Fabius Rivers, at the junction of which it stood just before their combined waters flow into the Mississippi, near West Quincy. On the Map of Missouri, 1821, occurs the name, Fabba, in the same location. (Maps Mo., 1821, 1886; P.G.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius River
Description:Like North and South Rivers (q.v.), or "Two Rivers," the Fabius is a double or twin stream; the only difference being that "Two Rivers" never actually unite, though they empty into the Mississippi at practically the same point, whereas the North and South Fabius do unite just one mile above their mouth. The Fabius River proper is therefore but one mile in length. It empties into the Mississippi in east-cenrtal Fabius Township, Marion County, near West Quincy, about two miles above the mouth of "Two Rivers." The North Fabius rises in Iowa and flows southeast through Scotland County, which it bisects diagonally; then it cuts off the northeast corner of Knox County and the southwest corner of Clark County, and flows still in a general southeast direction, diagonally through Lewis County into Marion County, of which it cuts off the northeast corner. In Union Township of Lewis County it receives a tributary known as the Middle Fabius, which rises in Schuyler County and flows southeast through Scotland and Knox to the junction. The South Fabius also rises in Schuyler County and takes a southeastern course through Scotland, Knox, Lewis, Shelby, and Marion Counties. In Liberty Township, Knox County, it receives two tributaries known as the North and South Forks of the South Fabius (on the 1876 map named the North and South Branches). North Fork rises in Greensburg Township, Knox County; South Fork rises in Adair County and enters Knox County in Lyon Township, flowing southeast to the junction with the South Fabius. The North and South Fabius, like the other streams of northeast Missouri, are rivers only by courtesy, much too small for navigation. They are called creeks by Beck. The various name by which they had their tributaries distinguished are obviously mere colorless names of position, with the exception of the name Fabius itself. This name, has had a bewildering variety of spellings, and its origin presents a problem of peculiar difficulty. The oldest form of the name, found on the Lewis and Clark Map of 1809, is "R. Fabiane." This form, slightly shortened, appears as "Fabian" in Cumming's WATER PILOT of 1837 (p. 129), and as late as 1871 in James's RIVER GUIDE (p. 9), although farther on (p. 18) James speaks of it as "Fabin's River." On the Lincoln Map of 1822 it is varied to "Ferbien." Forms without the final -n begin to appear in 1821. The spelling "Fabba" is given on the Maps for 1821, 1824, 1826, and 1832. Beck in his GAZETTEER (1823) calls it "Fabba Creek" and speaks of the South Fabius as the "Little Fabba." Holcombe in the HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND (1887), p. 23, says the old forms were "Faba" and "Little Faba," and that the two streams together were known as the "Fabas" or "Fabbas;" so Coues in a note to his ed. of Pike's EXPEDITION (I.9). The modern spelling "Fabius" first appears on a map of 1834, and is used in Wetmore's GAZETTEER (1837). Wetmore calls the two streams together the "Fabii." A popular nickname today for them is the "Faby." After that "Fabius," and the distinctive "North and South Fabius" become general. The name "Middle Fabius" first appears on a map of 1844. On a map of 1881 appears "Trabius," an obvious misprint. The Soulard story offered by Holcombe in 1884 (HISTORY OF MARION P. 771) to account for the name, according to which it was given about 1800 by Don Antonio Soulard in honor of the Roman general Fabius Maximus, has been given at length and criticized under Hannibal (q.v.). In spite of the fact that Holcombe himself presented it doubtfully and later discarded it, it has been accepted by Mahan and Eaton. For the reasons given, and especially in view of the early spellings which have just been listed this story must be ruled out as clearly impossible. In 1887 Holcombe offered a substitute derivation from the Spanish word "faba," a pea or bean. "The Spaniards probably gave it that designation because of the great number of wild peas originally upon its banks. In time the south fork was called Little Faba; then both streams were spoken of as the Fabbas, and of course the corruption was easy to Fabius...With more light on the subject than he had in 1884, the writer is now of the opinion that the name came as stated above, and that the real English name of the stream is Bean Creek." (HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND, p. 23). Holcombe's second explanation must likewise be rejected, both in the light of the earliest forms listed above and for other reasons. The Spaniards named very few places in Missouri, and none in N.E. Missouri; and such a name as "Bear Creek," though not impossible has few parallels in Missouri nomenclature. And yet Holcombe had perhaps a glimmering of the truth in his ingenious suggestion that the modern Fabius might have arisen from the plural form of the name, as used for the two streams. If the earliest form of the name, as there is every reason to believe, a plausible chain of development would be as follows; Fabiane---Fabian---Fabia---Fabias (pl.)---Fabius. It would be very easy for the final nasal to disappear in American speech, as the later forms Faba, Fabba, and Faby demonstrate that it actually did disappear and with the -s added for the plural, it would be equally natural for some classically minded American, about the time of the founding of Hannibal, Scipio, and Palmyra to get a suggestion from it of the name of the Roman general. Indeed, it is altogether possible that the false etymology which made Fabius out of the old French river name was the actual germ of the "Carthaginian complex" and of the whole series of classical names that swept Northeast Missouri like an epidemic. (See for other classical names the discussion under Hannibal). If the true original of Fabius was indeed Fabiane of Fabian, it follows of course that we must accept a humbler name-father than the famous Roman "Cunctator" and contender against Hannibal. Probably he was merely another of those forgotten French traders and trappers who had left their imprint so widely on Missouri nomenclature. Certainly it is in accord with what we might naturally expect to find the three principal water-courses of Marion County, now known as Fabius, North River (q.v.)---originally the Jeffreon--and Bay de Charles, all of which must have been in the days of the French occupation veritable hunters' paradises, bearing the familiar French personal names of Charles, Jeffreon, and Fabian. (Maps Missouri, 1809-1881; ATLAS MARION, 1913, SHELBY, 1878, KNOX, 1898, LEWIS, 1916, CLARK, 1878, SCOTLAND, 1898; Holcombe's HIST. MARION, 1884, and HIST. LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, SCOTLAND, 1887; Mahan, HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 1913; Eaton; GAZETTEERS and GUIDES by Beck, 1823, Wetmore, 1837, Cummings, 1837, and James, 1871; Pike's EXPEDITION, ed. Coues, 1895)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius Township
Description:A township organized March 27, 1827, one of the three original townships (See Mason and Liberty Townships). It extended at first practically to the north boundary of the state, including the counites of Lewis and Clark, and portions of Knox and Scotland Counties. It occupies today the northeast section of Marion County, separated from Liberty on the south by North River; Round Grove and Union Townships lie to the west. The township was named for the Fabius Rivers which unite in the east part of the township. (HIST. MARION 1884, 167; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview
Description:An addition to Hannibal. So named for its location. (Atlas Marion 1913)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview Church
Description:A Christian Church, four miles southeast of Shelbyville; established in 1898 by the County Board. The church is abandoned, the building being used at present as a Grange Hall. The name was given it for its location. (Hist. Shelby 1911, 194; Nathan Winetroub; Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fall Creek
Description:A creek with a rapid fall, whence the name, about four miles east of Hannibal. (See Fall Creek Gorge). (Mirror, 20)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fall Creek Gorge
Description:A remarkable ravine cut out by Fall Creek (q.v.), for which it is named. The gorge is about 30 ft. deep by 50 ft. wide, each side a vertical rock wall sinuously winding. Every feature indicates newness. (Mirror, 20)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fifth Street Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church at Hannibal; a consolidation of the First Church and the Hannibal Church, both of which had dissolved. It takes its name from its location. It was organized in 1839 as Zoar Church, meeting first at the home of Stuart Self, two miles west of Hannibal, then in a neighboring schoolhouse. Later it was moved to Hannibal and consolidated with the Hannibal Church under the name Hannibal United Baptist Church. It was later known as First Baptist Church, and still later as Fifth Street Baptist Church. Zoar, a Biblical name meaning "little." (Gen. 14:20-22) (HIST. MARION 1884, 980, 981; Mirror, 216, 217; Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fifth Street Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:See Broadway Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flag Pond
Description:A pond northwest of Mark in the east part of Fabius Township, emptying into Little Round Pond (q.v.). So named for the luxuriant growth of flags around it. (Atlas Marion 1913; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flint Creek
Description:A creek in round Grove Township. So named for the flint rock in the creek bed. ( (F) Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flint Creek School
Description:A schoolhouse in Round Grove Township. So named for Flint Creek (q.v.), on which it is located. (E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fort Mason
Description:A fort on the Mississippi River which stood just below the site of Hannibal. It was a provision against hostile Indians, and a rendezvous for U.S. troops and rangers previous to the summer of 1812. So named after the builder and commander, Lieutenant Mason. (Davis and Durrie, 63)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fosterville
Description:A store site in the northern part of Warren Township, near Palmyra. Formerly Cannonville for the store owned by a Mr. Cannon. The store later became the property of Mr. Foster, and the name was changed to Fosterville. (Rand McNally, 1935; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Four Corners
Description:A rural locality west of Palmyra about two miles, between Palmyra and Philadelphia. A crossroads community; hence the name. (Rand McNally 1935, 234)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Four Corners School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township. The present building was erected in 1899. The earlier stood 1/2 mile north and 1/4 mile west of A.L. Bittleston's farm. After the St. Paul District was set aside, the schoolhouse was moved to a crossroads at the center of the district. It took its name from its location. Around 1901, it was also known as the Powell School for the many families of that name in the neighborhood. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Franklin School
Description:A schoolhouse in Fabius Township, north of the South Fork of North River. In 1825, the enactment was passed compelling each township to form at least one school. In 1841, land was deeded by Jeremiah Taylor, and the building erected was known as Taylor School. It was a paid school, the first in the county, the tuition five cents per day. The tuition school was succeeded by the Potter School, so known for H.S. Potter, owner of the brick building. It was swept away by a tornado in 1881. Its successor was named for Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790). (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator, Clipping; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frytown
Description:A settlement of five cabins, one of the first, in the vicinity of Hannibal; made by the Frys; hence the name. Campbell speaks of them as coming as early as 1819. They and their descendants have lived in Hannibal ever since. (Campbell 1874, 349; Atlas Marion 1875, 10; HIST. MARION 1884, 950; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gash Mill
Description:See South and Easton's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gash School
Description:See Stone Hill School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gash School District
Description:One of five school districts in 1842; along North River. It took its name from the Gash Settlement (q.v.). (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gash Settlement
Description:A settlement two or three miles northwest of Palmyra. The settlement of the Gash and Palmer families is still identified in the community; known as the Gash Settlement for Martin Gash, the pioneer settler, who, one account says, came in 1818 to South River Township and took up land on South River. He became an important figure in the pioneer life of the vicinity. John Palmer was related to the Gash family. To the Palmers was born the first child in this part of Marion County. The Gash Settlement with "Old Benj. Vanlandinghan" near the "Big Spring" (q.v.), otherwise "Uncle Benny Flannigan," (See Palmyra), were the first to come to this vicinity. The settlement is known also as the South River Settlement. (Campbell 1874; HIST. MARION 1884, 659, 772, 773, 803, 885; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gateswood Ford
Description:A ford established near Gateswood Mill (q.v.), for which it was named. (History of Shelby 1884, 629; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gateswood Mill
Description:A flour mill northwest of Palmyra by a few miles, on North River; the old dam is now used as a ford. It was established by Major Gateswood, whence the name. Major Gateswood served in the War of 1812; he came to Marion County from Virginia. (HIST. MARION 1884, 267; History of Shelby 1884, 629; Thaddeus R. Smith; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gateswood School
Description:A pioneer school on North River. For name cf. Gateswood District. (Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gateswood School District
Description:A school district on North River, one of five school districts in 1842. It took its name from Gateswood Mill and Gateswood Ford (q.v.). (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gay's Mill [1 of 2]
Description:See Triplett's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gay's Mill [2 of 2]
Description:See John Lyle Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:German Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:A church established in an early day on North River. It is long since abandoned. (Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:German Lutheran Church
Description:See Evangelical Lutheran St. John's Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:German School
Description:See West Ely School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ghost Hollow
Description:A hollow about one and a half miles down the river from Hannibal off Burlington Railroad Yards. So named, it is thought, because it is opposite the point where, June 3, 1903, the Flying Eagle, a riverboat, struck a pier of the bridge and sank. Four persons were lost. The place becasme more suggestive of ghosts when the lower water of recent years exposed the wreckage. (Lucy Latimer, Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gibbons School
Description:See Hickory Grove School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gilbert's Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River ten miles below Hannibal. It was so known for its owner. There lived Captain Neil Cameron, his home known as the "Ten-Mile House," by reason of its distance down the river. This island threw the channel away over on the Illinois side. (Mirror, 69; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Giles Thompson's Band Mill
Description:A mill near Salt River, south of Hannibal, now in Ralls County. A kind of grist mill run by a rawhide thong around a large horizontal wheel. So named for its owner. Known also as Thompson's Mill. (Mirror, 83)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glasscock's Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River, opposite the lower part of Hannibal. It is now the well- defined island near the mouth of Bear Creek, overlooked by Nipper's Bark (q.v.), and is today within the boundary of the state of Illinois. So named for its owner, Stephen Glasscock. It has been known in the vicinity of Hannibal as Pete's Island, for "French Pete." The island is below high-water mark, but people have lived on it at various times. Around 1875, a man named Peter Cardinal erected a building there which he used for infamous purposes. "French Pete," as he was known, was convicted of robbery; the building was abandoned in 1882, and burned the next year. It was known as Booker Island at one time, for Uncle Sammy Booker who lived there. (See Jackson's Island). (Mirror, 53; HIST. MARION 1884, 940, 941; Coues-Pike, Note, 8; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glasscock's Mill
Description:See Bay Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glaucus Island
Description:An island off the mouth of Bay de Charles, near Twin Islands (q.v.), and the Marion City site. The island is now washed into the river. So named for its owner. (Coues-Pike, Note, 8; George Shaeffer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glover
Description:See Smileyville
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gloverville
Description:See Smileyville
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River just below the mouth of North River. Known also as Island No. 7. It is known as Goose Island for the number of geese that used to be found there. For the number name, see Baldwin Island. (Atlas Marion 1913; George Shaeffer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Run
Description:See Columbus River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gottman Branch
Description:A branch in the southeastern part of Liberty Township, known earlier as McRae's Branch, for Wm. McRae, an early settler. It was later named for the Gottman family who own the land. (HIST. MARION 1884, 803; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gottman School
Description:See Bier School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Governor Clark Mission School
Description:A school at Palmyra established in 1848 by George Clark who named the school for his father, Governor William Clark, the famous explorer. The school was opened in one room of a small dwelling house located on a fifty-seven acre tract of land in the northeast part of the city, and was under the instruction and management of the rector of St. Paul's Mission as the parish was then known. (See St. Paul's Church). It also supported a number of charity pupils; hence the name Mission School. The Mission School developed into St. Paul's College (q.v.), under Dr. William Corbyn who came to the parish in 1848. Governor William Clark, (1770-1838), of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, was Governor of Missouri, 1813-1820. (HIST. MARION 1884, 847; Palmyra Spectator, June 23, 1937; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grassey Creek
Description:See Grassy Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grassy Creek
Description:A creek which rises in the western part of Lewis County, flowing southeast through La Belle and Highland Townships into Marion County where it enters the Troublesome. It is known also as the Big Grassy, for its relation to the Little Grassy. The 1916 County atlas gives the spelling Grassey. So named for the fact that grass grows completely across the creek bed. (Campbell 1874; Hist. N.E. Missouri, 74; Atlas Marion 1913; Atlas Lewis, 1878, 1916; Soil Survey, Marion 1911; R. McN., 1935; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gratiot Tract
Description:A later name for the Bouvet Tract (q.v.). Gratiot, a merchant of St. Louis, took out an administration on the estate of Bouvet and bought in all his holdings. The government "Daniel Booned," or forcibly traded, the Gratiot interest out of the tract. Litigation ran for a long time after American occupation began. Gratiot was the friend and counselor of George Rogers Clark. He died in 1817. (Hist. N.E. Mo., 448; Mirror, 79)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenfield
Description:See Union Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green's Ferry
Description:A ferry on North River, around 1831; operated by Willis Green, whence the name. (HIST. MARION 1884, 179)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green's Landing
Description:A little frequented landing at the point of Marion City some years previous to the establishment of the latter. Established by Dr. Green, for whom it was named. (HIST. MARION 1884, 234)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grimard Tract
Description:A narrow tract of land, now included in Hannibal, extending from Bird Street north to the mouth of Rock Creek, the northeast corner dipping into the Mississippi. The land was settled by various squatters and many claimants acquired transfers purporting to convey the land or part of it, but no chain of titles could ever be made. Jean Baptiste Grimard took out in Howard County the certificate to this strip. It became the subject of various transfers and finally fell into the hands of Major Taylor Berry of Howard County. At this time U.S. patents were issued to Grimard or his legal representatives. Litigation followed over a number of years. Major Berry was killed in a duel over the matter. The Grimard land became a mystery to all who knew it. There is nothing on record anywhere but in Howard County to show ownership of the tract. (Mirror, 21, 22, 24)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Guernsey's Lane
Description:A narrow alley, probably the remains of a public road, in old Hannibal. It took its name from a Mrs. Guernsey, an old and well known weaver or webster who lived there. (Mirror, 96e)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gullion School
Description:A schoolhouse in Round Grove Township. So named for an old family. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hampton Boulder Site
Description:A site on "Tadpole Road" (q.v.), in an earlier period less than one-half mile from Hannibal, now a part of the city of Oakwood. It was so known for a huge granite boulder that, since there is no granite rock in Missouri, must have come here as "drift granite" in the ice age. The adjoining farm was that of a Dr. Hampton's; hence the name. The shape suggests a rude cabin with the gable end toward the road. In 1832, holes were drilled in the north end of the rock, and fragments blasted off, out of which two mill stones were made. This gives one an idea of its size. Such depredations were stopped. (See Shelbyville Boulder) (Mirror, 5, 6,; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hanley Mill
Description:See Massie Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hanley's Mill
Description:A mill at Palmyra in 1833, "The first steam mill in the county;" owned by a company, of which Mr. Hanley was a member. On the failure of the company to agree, Mr. Hanley took over the mill, and he and his son-in-law, Mr. Metcalf, operated it under the name of Hanley's Mill. Mr. Hanley bought the Old Massie Mill (q.v.), and moved the machinery up to Palmyra. The Hanley Mill later became People's Mill under Metcalf and Dingle. It is now a warehouse owned by Anderson Yaeger. The sobriquet "People's Mills" was doubtless conferred for advertising purposes. (HIST. MARION 1884, 191, 841; Thaddeus R. Smith; Presley Lane; John Lemmons; George Shaeffer; Jacob Tate; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal
Description:A city on the Mississippi River at the mouth of Bear Creek, in the southeast corner of the county. It is now occupying most of Mason Township and is reaching into the neighboring township of Miller. Situated on lofty bluffs above the river, and the rich and productive outlying country, it occupies the best natural site for a river town above St. Louis. The old Hannibal stretched from Lover's Leap (q.v.), on the south to Holliday's Hill (q.v.), on the north and was divided by Bear Creek to the north and south Hannibal, the north part being the site of the original settlement. The first settler in Hannibal was Moses Bates, who came to the vicinity, then dense forest and a favorite hunting ground, in 1819. He built flatboats and kept the first store, which was for many years a trading center for the surrounding countryside, and later ran a keel boat between Hannibal and St. Louis and St. Genevieve. Bates deeded land to the town, and it was laid out in 1819 by Thompson Bird. A plan for a future town at the mouth of Bear Creek, to be named Hannibal, was announced on March 19, 1819, but the existent plat was not filed until 1828. The name appears on the map, however, as early as 1824, and the first steamer arrived in 1825. A post office since 1837, Hannibal was incorporated in 1839, and became officially a city in 1845. The exact circumstances of the naming of Hannibal remain obscure. Obviously it is named for the great Carthaginian general (247-183 B.C.), who won a succession of crushing victories over the Romans in the Second Punic War (218-201 B.C.), until he was held at bay by the Roman general Fabius Maximus and was finally defeated by Scipio Africanus. But how his name came to be chosen for the little Missouri settlement is less obvious. According to the commonly accepted explanation, published apparently for the first time and without stated authority by Holcombe in his HIST. MARION (1884), the selection is ascribed to Don Antonio Soulard, the last Spanish Surveyor-General. Soulard was appointed surveyor of Upper Louisiana on February 3, 1795, under Governor Zenon Trudeau, and served in that capacity until the cession of Louisiana to the United States in 1805. Holcombe does not, of course, represent Soulard as having christened the as yet undreamed-of city of Hannibal. What he is supposed to have done may best be stated in Holcombe's own words (p. 771): "Don Antonio Soulard...was a great admirer of some of the characters of Roman and Carthaginian history, and on his first voyage up the Mississippi, somewhere about 1800, he christened a number of the streams after some of the ancient heroes. In this county he named what we now call Bear Creek for the great Carthaginian warrior, Hannibal; the Bay Charles he christened Scipio River, in honor of Africanus, the Roman general who conquered Hannibal and subdued Carthage; Two Rivers was already named, but the next stream he called Fabius in honor of Fabius Maximus, the Roman general so skillful in retreat...After a time the town at the mouth of "Hannibal Creek" was named Hannibal, but the settlers changed the name of the stream to Bear Creek. The shipping point at the mouth of "Scipio River" was called Port Scipio, but the water itself was identified as the Bay de Charles of Father Hennepin." As for the truth of this picturesque but slightly complicated story, Holcombe himself was more than doubtful. In a footnote on p. 881 he says with regard to it: "The writer will not vouch for the absolute truth of this statement. It is given on very good authority, however, and is the mot probable version of the origin of the name." In 1887 he had become still less certain about its authenticity. In his HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND COUNTIES published in that year, he makes a frank confession in connection with the name Fabius (in a footnote on p. 23)" "In the HIST. MARION COUNTY by the present compiler it is stated that the Fabius was named by Don Antonio Soulard, the Spanish surveyor, in honor of Fabius Maximus, the great Roman general. With more light on the subject than he had in 1884, the writer is now of the opinion that the name came (otherwise)." (See under Fabius above) Most later historians of Hannibal have accepted Holcombe's explanation of the name Hannibal far more unquestioningly than he offered it (so Mr. Mahan in his HISTORY OF N.E. MISSOURI, 1912, and others); but Mr. C.P. Green in his MIRROR OF HANNIBAL (1905), is frankly skeptical, and makes the shrewd suggestion that the Soulard story should be transferred to the American Surveyor-General, William V. Rector, who was a contemporary and had an important part in the founding of Hannibal. The apocryphal character of the anecdote, like that of Holcombe's other story of the naming of Bay de Charles (q.v.), by Father Hennepin, is apparent from the entire lack of confirmatory evidence. No earlier source for it has been discovered; there is no authority, so far as is known to me, for the existence of any of the three classical names Fabius (in that spelling), Scipio, or Hannibal prior to the founding of Hannibal in 1819; and there is no evidence that Bear Creek was ever called Hannibal Creek, or Bay de Charles Scipio River. Nor was it the habit of the Spanish or French to resort to classical history for any of the places they named. On the other hand, the adoption of classical names was a marked characteristic of the later American settlers. An apposite quotation on this point is cited by Mr. Green in the MIRROR from RURAL HOUSE (p. 488) by Miss Cooper (daughter of James Fenimore Cooper): "After the Revolution came the direful invasion of the ghosts of old Greeks and Romans headed by the Yankee Schoolmaster with an Abridgement of Ancient History in his pocket. It was then your Troys and Uticas, your Tullys and Scipios, your Romes and Palmyras, your Homers and Virgils were dropped about the country in scores." Doubtless Hannibal and the other two names were proposed by some classically minded settler, perhaps the same man who was responsible for the name of Palmyra (q.v.). Rector might have done it, or Ely, or Muldrow (see under "Eastern Run"), or any of their associates fired by the same spirit that led to the ambitious planning of that center of classical learning that was christened under the name of Marion College (q.v.). (For a conjecture as to how all the Marion County classical names may have been originally suggested by a misunderstanding, or false etymology, of the old French name for the Fabius River, see disscussion of that stream above). Several other names have been attached to Hannibal during its history. When Pike came up the river in 1805, he mapped the site of the future city as Hurricane Settlement; but the only inhabitant he observed in the vicinity was a Frenchman, married to a woman of the Sac nation, and living about a mile below opposite to Hurricane Island. Coues, Pike's editor, doubts the existence of such a settlement, and thinks that Pike may have confused it with Hurricne Landing, Hurricane Island, or Hurricane Creek lower down in Lincoln County, in as much as the present inhabitants of Hannibal have never heard the name applied to their town. At any rate it is an extremely widespread name in Missouri; besides the Lincoln County names there is a Hurricane Creek in Daviess County (see Miss Ewing's thesis), a Hurricane Hollow in Christian County (see Miss Bell's thesis), and others--all owing their names to some notable local tornado. In steamboating days, Hannibal was known on the river as Stavely's Landing. According to a note by Coues in his edition of Pike (I.9), this was a piece of fugitive sarcasm in the newspapers of a river town, arising in the habit of one John W. Stavely, a saddler of Hannibal, who used to haunt the landing when steamers arrived. (So Mr. C.P. Green in the MIRROR, 1895, p. 56). The sobriquet "Bluff City" is sometimes used today, suggested, of course, by Hannibal's striking situation on the lofty bluffs about the Mississippi. Finally two famous authors connected with Hannibal have both provided it with fictitious names. When Charles Dickens went up the river in 1842, he evidently found both the place and its name ridiculous. Hannibal is obviously in his mind when in his MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT (chap. xxiii), when he describes the town of "New Thermopylae,"--the landing, on a hill, reached by Martin and his friend Mark Tapley just before their arrival at "Eden" (a.v.), or Marion City. The jaundiced eye of the great British novelist, the place appeared as "a steep bank with a hotel like a barn on the top of it, a wooden store or two, and a few scattered sheds." The name Hannibal must have seemed to him several sizes too big for the straggling little village, and his fictitious substitute for it is a sly dig at American grandiloquence and classical pretensions. Hannibal's own author, Mark Twain, calls the town St. Petersburg in his TOM SAWYER and elsewhere; and his description of it, "the poor little shabby village of St. Petersburg," is not much more complimentary than that of Dickens. Dr. M.M. Brashear, in her MARK TWAIN, SON OF MISSOURI (1934, p. 40, note), thinks the suggestion for this name came to Mark Twain from a varnished town named Petersburg in Pike County, which she found located on early maps near the present site of Louisiana. As the oldest river town in the state north of St. Louis, the Clemens family may have landed there when they first came up the river from Tennessee to settle in Missouri, and their impressions of it may have been transmitted to the future author of TOM SAWYER. (Holcombe's HIST. MARION, 1884, pp. 146, 881, 887, and Hist. Lewis, Clark, Knox, and Scotland, 1887, p. 23; Mahan's Hist. N.E. Mo., 1912; Stevens, p. 94; Houck, III, 186; Mirror, pp. 56; 96a; Wetmore; Campbell, p. 353; Eaton; Atlas Marion, 1875, p. 10, and 1901, p. 6; Maps Mo., 1824 ff.; P.G., 1837 ff.; Pike, ed Coues, 1895, I.9)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal Academy
Description:An academy at Hannibal, in operation by 1851; established by Wm. O. Cross. It went out with the passing of academies and seminaries, giving place to the modern high school. (HIST. MARION 1884, 903; Quincy Herald- Whig, December 29, 1935; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal and Central Missouri Railroad
Description:A railroad from Hannibal, passing through the extreme southeast corner of the county, following the south line of Marion County for only about twelve miles. The establishment of this early road goes back to the antagonism of long standing between Hannibal and Palmyra. Shortly after the Civil War, a partner of R.F. Lakenan, of the Hannibal and St. Joeph Railroad (q.v.), saw in the station at Palmyra the notice, "Change cars for Hannibal." To see Hannibal thus reduced to a "jerk-water station" was a blow and at once (1867), measures were set on foot for a new road. As projected it was to connect Hannibal and Central Missouri. By 1870, it was transferred to the Missouri, Kansas, and Texas Railroad. It is now the property of the Wabash. (Campbell 1874, 353; HIST. MARION 1884, 936, 937; Hist. N.E. Mo. 455, Mirror 40, 44; Williams 1904, 303)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal and Chariton Road
Description:Said to be the oldest road in the county, running from Hannibal to Keytesville in Chariton County, whence the name. (HIST. MARION 1884, 662)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal and Naples Railroad
Description:As a project it was known as the Pike County, Illinois, Railroad. On its completion it was known as the Hannibal and Naples, connecting Hannibal with Naples in Pike County, Illinois. It was one of Hannibal's efforts directed to the creation of a line flanking Chicago. It was launched in 1857 and completed after the Civil War. It was ultimately absorbed by the Wabash. (Hist. N.E. Mo., 455; Mirror, 44, 45)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal and North Missouri Railway
Description:An electric interurban line to be operated between Palmyra and La Plata in Macon County; projected around 1912, but never built. (HIST. SHELBY 1911, 134; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal and Northern Missouri Railroad
Description:A short line from Hannibal that connected with the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy at Palmyra. It is now the property of the latter line. (Atlas Marion 1910)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal and St. Joseph Highway
Description:The main highway established at an early date between Hannibal and St. Joseph, and followed in the 1850s by the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad (q.v.). It follows the old Bouvet Trail, 1795 (q.v.), the old Bay Mill Road (q.v.), and the old train laid out by Muldrow (See Palmyra and Marion City Railroad). It crossed the Old State Road of N.E. Missouri (q.v.), in Shelbyville. It is known also as the Hannibal and St. Joseph State Road. (HIST. MARION 1884, 292; Hist. N.E. Mo., 77; Shelby County Herald-Whig, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad
Description:A railroad projected in 1846; the initial steps were taken at Hannibal in the office of Judge John M. Clemens, the father of "Mark Twain." The charter, drawn up by R.F. Lakenan, passed in 1847, but even the projectors were lukewarm. It was not until 1851 that the ground was broken, in Hannibal at Draper's Meadow (q.v.). The road was completed to Palmyra in 1856, and to St. Joseph in 1859, the first railroad to cross the state. It was nicknamed the "Old Reliable" (q.v.). Now a part of the Burlington System. (See Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad, Shelby County). The "Pony Express" run of April 3, 1860 is notable, in that the speed record, 206 miles in four hours has never been broken. On that occasion orders were given the engineer to set a record that would stand for fifty years. (It was styled the "Pony Express" Run for the old Express by ponies, so named, from St. Joseph to the coast). On the tracks of the old Hannibal and St. Joseph ran the world's first mail car, built, it is to be noted, in the railroad shops in Hannibal. (HIST. MARION 1884, 218, 337, 904, 942, 950; Hist. Shelby 1911, 124; Hist. N.E. Mo., 455; Stevens 1915, 137; Shelby County Herald, July 31)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal and St. Joseph State Road
Description:See Hannibal and St. Joseph Highway.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church at Hannibal, known also as Harmony Church, an ideal name. It existed from 1866 to 1870, when it was dissolved. (See Fifth Street Baptist Church). (Min. Bethel Baptist Association, 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal Cave
Description:See Mark Twain Cave.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal City Institute
Description:See Hannibal Institute.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal College
Description:A college the cornerstore of which was laid in 1869 at Hannibal; hence its name. It offered a complete collegiate education non- sectarian, and self-supporting. R.F. Lakenan, an official of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad, was one of the original founders of the college, donating its own endowment, thirty-five acres of land. A controversy arising, the endowment was withdrawn, and the institution died around 1875. (HIST. MARION 1884, 70, 985; Atlas Marion 1875; Davis and Durrie 1876, 289)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal Creek
Description:See Hannibal
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal Female Seminary
Description:A seminary at Hannibal; established in 1851 by Sarah B. Stebbins or Stebbings (both spellings are given). The school is long since gone. (HIST. MARION 1884, 903, Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal Ferry
Description:A ferry at Hannibal; so designated on the Hutawa Map of 1844. In 1833, Samuel Stone secured the right for himself and his heirs to operate the ferry at this point. It was then known as Samuel Stone's Ferry. The ferry at this point had previously been run by Jordan W. Hyde, who lived on the Illinois side of the river. Next, a flat-boat propelled by hand was operated by Theophilus Stone (1884). The steam ferry was introduced, "The Ibex," in 1845. In 1846, there was a steam flat boat ferry called "The Hannibal." (HIST. MARION 1884, 179, 896; Mirror, 51; Hutawa Map 1844)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal Institute
Description:A private school at Hannibal, established before 1864. It was unsuccessful, and was purchased by the Academy of St. Joseph (q.v.). Sutherland and McEvoy give Hannibal City Institute, 1860, conducted by I.A. Summers. The two are doubtless the same. (HIST. MARION 1885, 985)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal United Baptist Church
Description:See Fifth Street Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal, Ralls County and Mexico Line
Description:A railroad projected through these points; graded and bridged to New London in 1871. (HIST. MARION 1884, 577, 937; Mirror, 48)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hannibal-LaGrange College
Description:This college was established at LaGrange, Lewis County, by the Wyaconda Baptist Association in 1857-1858. It was then known as the LaGrange Female Seminary. In 1859, it was taken under control of the Baptists of the state whereupon it was converted into a senior college, co-educational in nature, and known as the LaGrange Male and Female College. It was still so indicated as late as 1916. (Atlas Lewis, 1916). It was prosperous up to the Civil War, but was closed during that period. It was re-opened in 1866, and there succeeded a period of unusual prosperity. Its name was shortened in these years to LaGrange College. In 1929, it was moved to Hannibal, and the name changed to Hannibal-LaGrange College. The college has had a place in Baptist life in northeast Missouri since early pioneer days. It remains under the jurisdiction of the Baptist Church, and is a strong junior college today. (Campbell 1874, 309, 310; Atlas Lewis 1878, 10; Hist. Lewis 1887, 181; Hist. N.E. Mo., 392; Davis and Durrie, 290; Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935; Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934; Mrs. Frank Lane; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hanson
Description:A post office from 1853-1860; in the extreme south part of the county. Never platted. Nothing could be learned about the origin of the name. (Hayward 1853; Sutherland and McEvoy 1860; Maps Mo. 1857-1861; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Happy Hollow
Description:A depression between Ide's Hill and the adjoining hill unnamed, two of the hills on which Hannibal is built. There seems no particular reason for the name. The hollow is otherwise known as Ely Street, possibly so named for Dr. Ely (See Eastern Run). On the drowning out of Marion City (q.v.), many of the drowned-out citizens found a warm welcome in Hannibal, settled there and began to build. Here may lie the explanation of the origin of both names. (HIST. MARION, 1844, 896; Lucy Latimer; Judge E.L. Cameron)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hardshell Baptist Church
Description:See South River Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harmony Church [1 of 2]
Description:See Hannibal Baptist Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harmony Church [2 of 2]
Description:See Warren Baptist Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hatch Dairy Experimental Station
Description:A government station adjoining Hannibal on the south, operated by the State and Federal governments serving the dairymen of the Corn Belt. So named for Wm. H. Hatch (1833-1896), lawyer, Congressman (1878- 1895), and Father of Agriculture Experimental Stations. Mr. Hatch sponsored the law erecting the office of Secretary of Agriculture. (Memorial on Broadway; BENCH AND BAR, 64, 65; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawkeye
Description:Just outside the platted city of Napoleon (q.v.), in THE GILDED AGE stood a guide board bearing the sign "10 miles to Hawkeye." In chapter 7, the author speaks of Hawkeye as a pretty large town for interior Missouri. A fanciful name which may or may not have referred to Palmyra. There is close association in the story between Hawkeye and the proposed Napoleon, just as in the real project Palmyra and Marion City were closely associated. There was also no other town of interior Missouri that could have fitted this location, though Palmyra was built six miles from Marion City. (THE GILDED AGE, Chapters 7, 17)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawkins Branch
Description:A branch which rises in eastern Shelby and flows into the North Fork of North River in Marion County. So named for a family in the vicinity. (PLAT BOOK 1930; Mrs. D.M. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawkins Burch
Description:See New Market
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Heather
Description:A post office in 1904 only; a store building on the side of a hill, situated in the west part of Union Township, a little south of center. Now extinct. So named for a landowner in the vicinity, H. Clay Heather, of Palmyra, who was a representative (1917-1918), and for sixteen years senator to the State Assembly (1900-1916). (Official Man. of State of Mo., 1901-1902; 1935-1936; Maps Mo. from 1915; P.G.; (F) Mrs. Will Anderson; Belle Lee; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Heather Bay
Description:The west arm of Bay de Charles, running parallel to the Bay. (See Three Brothers). It seems to be growing into a resort. Six or seven club houses have been built along the shores. So named for the Heather family who owned great tracts of land in the vicinity. (Atlas Marion 1913; Belle Lee; Presley Lane (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hebron Church
Description:A Methodist Church north of Grassy Creek in the northeast corner of the county; organized in 1838, meeting in the home of the Wisemans. In 1863, a church was built 1.5 miles southwest of Maywood, Lewis County. A Biblical name;--Abraham came to Hebron and there built an altar unto the Lord. (Gen. 13:18) (Atlas Marion 1901; Soil Survey, Marion 1911; Thaddeus R. Smith; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hebron School
Description:A schoolhouse in the northeast corner of the county. No longer in existence. It took its name from Hebron Church in the vicinity. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Helping Hand Baptist Church (Colored)
Description:A Baptist Church in Hannibal on the corner of 11th and Lyon Streets; a recent church. An ideal name. (Hannibal Courier-Post, February 20, 1937)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Helton
Description:A post office in 1879; discontinued by 1883; a station of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, six miles east of Palmyra, on the boundary between Miller and Liberty Townships. Known also as Helton Station. Spelled Hinton on the map of 1877. So named for Judge Helton who owned land at this point. (Polk 1879-1883; Atlas Marion 1913; Mirror 80; Maps Mo. from 1877; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Helton Station
Description:See Helton
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hendren School
Description:See Clear Creek School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hester
Description:A post office from 1848-1904; a little store on Grassy Creek just before it joins the South Fabius River, nine miles north of Palmyra and eight miles west of Quincy. Formerly the post office under this name was kept in the home of Mrs. Elizabeth Coons, a daughter of Daniel Boone. The Coons' house was a large two-story house of logs with a good-sized hall in the middle which served as the post office. It stood about three miles from Taylor's Mill on the main road from Palmyra to Taylor, now Highway 61. Here there plied a four-horse stagecoach from Quincy to Palmyra and westward. (See Santa Fe Trail). About 1861 the Hester post office was moved about six miles west to the new stagecoach line from Moberly to Quincy, its present location, and a post office was opened at Taylor (q.v.). The origin of the name could not be discovered. It looks like a feminine Christian name. (Cf. Lenora and Maud in Shelby County). (Hayward 1853; Sutherland and McEvoy 1860; Campbell 1874, 353; Atlas Marion 1875; 10; HIST. MARION 1884, 756; P.G.; Maps Mo. from 1861; John Lemmons; Jacob Tate; Lena Coons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Warren Township. It was known earlier as the Gibbons School, for a family who had large landholdings in the district. It took its present name from the grove of hickory trees by which it stands. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hick's Mill
Description:See Marshall's Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hinton
Description:See Helton
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holliday (Holliday's) Hill
Description:A hill on the north of Hannibal (q.v.), lying principally in the Broad Av Tract (q.v.), overlooking the river; now within the city. It is known for the Holliday home, "the mansion," that stood on the summit of the hill. Mrs. Holliday was the richest widow in town, and because of this fact and the fact that she lived on this hill, a delectable land to Tom and his playmates, she became famous as Widow Douglas in the Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn stories. The Holliday home was burned in 1894. Mark Twain often spoke of the hill as Holliday's Hill. In INNOCENTS ABROAD, he says that to him in early years Holliday's Hill was "the noblest work of God. It appeared to pierce the skies." The hill was then nearly 300 ft. high. (See Cardiff Hill). (Mirror, 25, 96g; Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935; INNOCENTS ABROAD, Chapter 58; MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY, Chapter 12)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Home of Becky Thatcher
Description:A rather modern looking frame house across the street from the Mark Twain Boyhood Home. It has been added to and changed with the years. Becky was Tom's sweetheart whom Tom thought the essence of all that is charming in womanhood. Becky was a real little girl, Laura Hawkins by name, who became Mrs. Laura Frazier and lived to be an old lady in the 90's, dying around 1931. In the story she was the daughter of Judge Thatcher who came to Hannibal (St. Petersburg), from Constantinople, (Palmyra), twelve miles away. (G.A. Mahan; ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapters 6, 7, 29, 31)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Home of Huckleberry Finn
Description:The rattletrap home of Huck Finn was across from Cardiff Hill (q.v.). It stood at the other end of the alley which runs a few feet west of the Mark Twain Home in Hannibal. The house was torn down years ago. Huck, "ignorant, unwashed, and insufficently fed," was the son of the town drunkard. "He was the only independent person in the community,--boy or man,--and was envied by all the rest of the boys." And since his society was forbidden, he was sought as a constant playfellow by the boys who liked him and enjoyed his society. Huck, whose real name was Tom Blankenship, grew up to be a respected citizen. (MARK TWAIN AUTOBIOGRAPHY, March 8, 1906; ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER; ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Horse Railroad
Description:See Palmyra and Marion City Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Horseshoe Bend
Description:A horseshoe-shaped bend in North River, in the western part of the county, whence the name. (Atlas Marion, 1901)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Horseshoe Pond
Description:A pond opposite North River Station (q.v.), across the railroad, about halfway between Palmyra and Mark. The pond is in the shape of a horseshoe with an island in the center, whence the name. (Atlas Marion 1901, 30; Presley Lane; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Houston
Description:See Emerson
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Huggins Mill
Description:See South and Easton's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Huiskamp
Description:A village established along in the 1890s, in the eastern part of Liberty Township, on Bay de Charles; surveyed to overlook Bay Island (q.v.). It is reclaimed land, originally known as Bowles' Ranch (q.v.). To the north by a little distance a levee extends across to North River, and from there southward, and across almost to Hannibal. The village is not given by Rand McNally 1935. So named for the family that owns the land. (Atlas Marion 1913; Belle Lee; Leona Stuetzer; (F) John Lemmons; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hurricane Island
Description:Spoken of by Pike as opposite the mouth of Bear Creek. (Refer to maps of Nicollet and Owen). Pike's island is not now determinable if existent, unless he meant a tract of bottom land opposite Hannibal which may have been cut off at the time of high water. (Coues, Note 8). Originally a large island stood above the mouth of Bear Creek, but this island disappeared in 1849. For possible origin of the name see under Hannibal. (HIST. MARION 1884, 902; Mirror, 53; Coues- Pike, 8; Brown 1817, 181)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hurricane Settlement
Description:See Hannibal
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hyde's Ferry
Description:See Hannibal Ferry
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ide's Hill
Description:A hill in south Hannibal. So named for a family who lived on it. (Campbell 1874, 352; Morris Anderson; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ilasco
Description:A town of foreign population scattered over a wide extent of territory, the Ilasco Tract (q.v.), established in 1900 by the Portland Cement Company. Residents of Hannibal say that in the beginning there were representatives of every nationality there, each maintaining his foreign habits of dress and manner of living. Today all but the older members of the community are Americanized. For the name cf. Ilasco Tract. (Mirror, 12; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ilasco Tract
Description:A tract of land at Hannibal, the site of the Portland Cement Plant and the town that has grown up about it. (See Ilasco). The name was made by the company out of the initial letters of the minerals that go into the production of the cement; I for iron; L for lime; A for aluminum; S for silicon; C for calcium; O for oxygen. (Mirror, 12; Lucy Latimer; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Immaculate Conception High School
Description:Established as a parochial school by the Sisters of St. Joseph in 1864 at Hannibal. It was conducted in the buildings formerly known as Hannibal Institute (q.v.), the buildings and grounds having been purchased by the Catholic organization. From a parochial school it grew into a flourishing academy, known as the Academy of St. Joseph, for the Sisters who operated the school. It is still operated by the Sisters of St. Joseph, the name only having been changed to that of Immaculate Conception. It is also known as the McCooly High School, as a memorial to James Henry McCooly. For the present name cf. Church of the Immaculate Conception. Academy of St. Joseph--A Biblical name:--Joseph, the spouse of the Virgin Mary, canonized by the Catholic Church. (Luke 1:27) HIST. MARION 1884, 985; Atlas Marion 1901, 6; Mirror, 231; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Immanuel School
Description:See West Ely School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Mound Addition
Description:An addition to northwest Hannibal. So named for the Indian Mounds in the locality. (See Indian Mound Park). (Plat; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Mound Park
Description:A park on the northwest side of Hannibal; so named because of the Indian mounds found there. The statement is made that it was the site of an old Indian settlement. The mounds, thirteen in a series, it is thought, were ceremonial mounds instead of burial mounds. (Morris Anderson; Lucy Latimer; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Road
Description:See Bouvet's Trail
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ingleside Academy
Description:See Ingleside College
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ingleside College
Description:A college in Palmyra organized in 1874 under the name Ingleside Female College. It followed Bethel College (q.v.), but was undenominational. Mrs. Baird, the principal, named it "Ingleside" as meaning "cozy nook." Campbell in 1874 speaks of it as Ingleside Academy. Not many years later it was changed into a residence. In 1894 the building was dismantled. (HIST. MARION 1884, 839; Atlas Marion 1901, 5; Hist. N.E. Mo., 95; Mrs. Frank Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ingleside Female College
Description:See Ingleside College
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Inspiration Point
Description:The highest point in Riverview Park, overlooking the Mississippi River. Here stands the famous statue of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, "Mark Twain," humorist and philosopher, erected by the state. From this point the statue looks out over the river he loved. At his doorway in his youth the river attracted him, as later it challenged and inspired him. Samuel Clemens (1835-1910), after early work on newspapers, returned to Hannibal, where he had spent his boyhood along the river, and carried out a long-cherished ambition to be a river pilot. He worked on the river (1857-1861). From the river he took his nom de plume "Mark Twain," the old river term that was the leadsman's call, signifying two fathoms, twelve feet, a call the pilot loved for it meant "Safe Waters." There had been a real "Mark Twain," the foremost river pilot of pre-war days, Isaiah Sellers (1802-1864), who wrote navigation items for a New Orleans paper and signed himself by this same nom de plume. That was before the days of Samuel Clemens, but the latter heard of him and wrote about him. For his pen-name Mark Twain revived the name as a sort of tribute to the old man, and thus brought him immortality. This old leadsman, by the way, was the last to use the old term, as it was he that devised the bell system which did away with the phrase. (Mirror, 30; Nat. Ency. Amer. Biog.; Mark Twain Biog., Chapter 27; LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI, Chapter 50; Hannibal Courier-Post, August 15, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Island, No. 7
Description:See Goose Island
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Island, No. 9
Description:See Poage Island
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jackson School
Description:A schoolhouse in Warren Township, west of See's Branch. It no longer exists. So named for the Jackson family, landholders in the district. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jackson's Island
Description:The name given Glasscock's Island (q.v.), by Mark Twain in the stories of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. It was the rendezvous of the "Black Avengers of the Spanish Main," and the hiding place of Huck and Nigger Jim. In the story Mark Twain places the island three miles below St. Petersburg (q.v.), at a point where the Mississippi was a trifle over a mile wide. Mark Twain describes it as heavily timbered and standing up out of the middle of the river, big, dark, and solid, like a steamer without any lights. It was three miles long and 1.25 miles wide, with a wide shallow bar at its head and a long steep hill or ridge in the middle about forty feet high. This was a very good description of Glasscock's Island at that time, with this difference that it was but one-half mile from old Hannibal. Little Sam Clemens and his playfellows often swam the distance and frolicked on the sandbar. (ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapters 4, 13; ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN, Chapters 7-11; MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY, Chapter 12; Morris Anderson; G.A. Mahan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jacob Smith Saw Mill
Description:A mill on Bear Creek in 1834; the first steam saw mill on the site of Hannibal and the second in the county. It stood on the corner where Mark Twain Hotel stands today. It was burned in 1836. It was operated by a Jacob Smith and a Mr. Johnson of St. Louis, and was known as the Jacob Smith Saw Mill and also as the Johnson and Smith Saw Mill. (Atlas Marion 1875, 10; HIST. MARION 1884, 897; Mirror, 58; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jaynes' Mill
Description:See Marshall's Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jesse James Retreat
Description:See Mark Twain Cave
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:John Lyle Mill
Description:A mill on the south bank of the Fabius, five miles northwest of Philadelphia; a flour mill around 1861. It was washed away in 1865. It was owned by John Lyle (spelled also Lyell), a prominent and wealthy resident of the locality. Known also as Lyle Mill. An earlier name for this mill was Gay's Mill. After disposing of his mill on North River, Mr. Gay established and operated this on the Fabius about 1835. (HIST. MARION 1884, 719; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson and Smith Saw Mill
Description:See Jacob Smith Saw Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jones Branch
Description:A branch in the southeastern part of the county, rising in the eastern part of Jackson Township and flowing generally southeast into Marion County. So named for families of Jones in the locality. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878, Judge V.L. Drain)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kempf School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township. So named for Caspar and John Kempf, owners of the land. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keyes' Ferry
Description:A ferry at the point on the Mississippi River later known as West Quincy; operated in 1827 by Willard Keyes, from whom it took its name. This was the first ferry across the Mississippi north of Louisiana. Keyes was succeeded by Eli Merrill. In 1840 Governor Carlin of Illinois built the ferry-house, and the first steam ferry was operated. (HIST. MARION 1884, 781)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keyser's Cotton Factory
Description:A cotton factory near Palmyra, the first in the county. Established by Kit Keyser, whence the name. Cotton was raised quite successfully in the first years of the settlement of the county. The cotton was handginned, and the process was slow and tedious before the factory was established. The cultivation and manufacture were attended with too many difficulties and disadvantages and were consequently abandoned. (HIST. MARION 1884, 153, 161)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kickapoo Pond or Slough
Description:A slough (now drained), near the site of Marion City. A name given by hunters for the Kickapoo Indians. There were a few settlements of Indian villages upon the left shore of the Mississippi from the first discovery of the country by the French in 1683. Indian camps were in and around Hannibal. Where the Bouvet Warehouse (q.v.), had stood, there was a large Indian camp around 1812. The Kickapoo had a transient village in Missouri in 1805, just about the junction of the Missouri with the Mississippi. Their stay at that time was probably short, as in 1819 they were granted rights to a tract of land in southwest Missouri. Sac (Sax, Sauk), and Fox Indians roamed up and down the west side of the Mississippi, hunting over the entire region. The site of Palmyra was a council ground long before the coming of the white man. There was a large Fox village near Prairie de Chien and on the Des Moines. These two tribes were given a strip of land along the west shore of the Mississippi by the treaty of 1804, which gave to the Indians the rights of occupation to the territory north of the entrance to the Jauflioni River (see North River), up the Mississippi to Des Moines, Iowa, above Prairie des Chiens, and westward to the Missouri River. The Kickapoos were of the Algonquin family to which the Sac and Fox Indians also belonged. "Kickapoo" comes from Ki wig a pa wa which means, "he stands about, standing now here, now there." This is characteristic of water in boggy places like a slough. All Indians move about in this way. It seems reasonable to believe that hunters hit upon the word "Kickapoo" because of the characteristics of the place and the appeal of the word rather than Sac or Fox, for example. (Darby 1818, 145; Campbell 1874, 350; HIST. MARION 1884, 881, 882; Coues-Pike, Note 11, Appendix, 57; Mo. Hist. Rev., III, 276, 288, 289)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kimbal Island
Description:A long island in the Mississippi River lying between the mouths of North River and the Fabius Rivers; a little above the site of Marion City and near Fabius Island. So named for Dr. Kimbal, the owner. Previoiusly known as Orton Island, for an old engineer of that name of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad, who used to camp on the island. (Coues-Pike, Note 11; Soil Survey, Marion 1911)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kincaid School
Description:A schoolhouse in Warren Township. It took its name from John F. Kincaid, owner of the land on which it stands. (E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:King's Ferry
Description:A ferry at the Marion City point across the Mississippi, in 1839. So named for its owner, Barnabas King. (HIST. MARION 1884, 234, 247)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Bastile
Description:See "The Bastion"
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Labeaume Cave
Description:A cave in the northern part of Ilasco Tract (q.v.), south of Mark Twain Cave, abutting on the Mississippi. The entrance to the cave was originally so narrow that access was impracticable until a few years ago when Alfred W. Bulkley made some blastings to clear the way. For this reason the cave is sometimes known by the name of Bulkley Cave. The opening is distinguished as being very high up, some upheaval of the stratum having occurred. It is known for its beautiful stalactite phenomena. It is known as Labeaume Cave for the french family who owned the land. (Mirror, 18, 19; Morris Anderson; (F) Ed Burkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Labinnah Club
Description:A name given the club and the building occupied by the Hannibal Club, a club purely social in nature, influential for a time in city affairs. Now the Eagles Club. The Labinnah Club went out when the Elks Club organized. The name was formed by reversing the spelling of the word, Hannibal. (Williams 1904; 306; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lafon School
Description:See Salem School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lamb
Description:A recent town in the east part of Miller Township, on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, about two miles north of Hannibal. The place appears on the map of 1888 as Lamb's. So named for A.W. Lamb, attorney for the railroad company, and a large landholder in the vicinity of Hannibal. (Maps Mo. from 1888; Thaddeus R. Smith; (F) Archie C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Laurel
Description:A post office in 1853 only; about eighteen miles west and south of Palmyra. Never platted. A stock name, found in twenty other states. (Hayward 1853; Maps Mo., 1857, 1858; Thaddeus R. Smith; (F) Mendelhall Map 1876; (F) Maude Bramblehe)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lazy Branch
Description:A branch in Fabius Township, flowing generally east into the North River at North River Station. It was formerly known as Sycamore Branch, for the sycamore trees growing on its banks. The name, Lazy Branch, was given it by W.C. Dingle, 1834, in conversation with Judge John Rice. Mr. Dingle had just arrived from Kentucky and thought the settlers along the stream lazy because they preferred to hunt and run horses rather than work. He dubbed the stream Lazy Branch. The Marion County Atlas, 1913, gives both lazy and sunflower as names for the branch, the latter name for the wild sunflowers on its banks. (HIST. MARION 1884, 771; (F) James Dingle)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Le Bastion
Description:See "The Bastion"
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leola
Description:A post office from 1860-1867. Apparently a feminine Christian name, but nothing could be learned about its origin. (Sutherland and McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Township
Description:One of the three original townships of Marion County, organized at the same time as Mason Township and Fabius, March 27, 1827. With Mason, it was not only one of the three original townships of Marion County, but was one of the two original townships of Ralls. When Ralls County was organized, December, 1820, all territory north of the Salt River was formed into two townships, one of which was called Liberty, the other Mason. Liberty included all the territory but the strip along the Mississippi known as Mason, and extending northward indefinitely, thus included all of what is now Marion County. Today Liberty lies south of Fabius Township, from which it is separated by the North River, with the Mississippi and Mason Township on the east, Mason, Miller, and South River on the south, and Warren on the west. Liberty--An ideal name. (HIST. MARION 1884, 167; R. McN., 1935)
Source:

Place name:Lick Creek
Description:A creek which rises in South River Township, and flows through the west part of Liberty Township, into North River. It is fed by three springs, of salt, sulphus, and magnesia, which boil up into beautiful pools. It is in the neighborhood of the famed Shannon Sulphur Springs (q.v.). So named from the many deer licks on its banks caused by the saltish springs. (HIST. MARION 1884, 674, 802; Atlas Marion 1913)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lick Crossing of North River
Description:See Salt Lick Ford.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lick Ford
Description:See Salt Lick Ford.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lincoln School (Colored)
Description:A school at Palmyra. Named for Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), fourteenth president of the United States, 1861-1865. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Intern. Cyc.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Round Pond
Description:A pond northeast of Mark and north of Flag Pond (q.v.). So named for its shape. (Atlas Marion 1913; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Union
Description:A post office from 1876-1886; halfway between Palmyra and Philadelphia, in Union Township. Now abandoned, though the vicinity still retains the name. So named for Little Union Church (q.v.). (Maps Mo., 1879-1886; P.G.; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Union Church
Description:See Union Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Union Churchyard
Description:An old Baptist cemetery midway between Palmyra and Philadelphia. The earliest gravestone bears the date 1821. Here William Muldrow is buried. (See "Eastern Run"). It was so named for Little Union Church (q.v.). (E.C. Bohon; Mrs. Frank Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Union School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township in the vicinity of Little Union (q.v.), a village now abandoned, for which it was named. The first building was erected in 1854; the present in 1875. (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lockhart's Branch
Description:A branch in Liberty Township, flowing southeast into South River in the northeast part of South River Township. So named for a family of Lockharts who were early settlers on the branch. (Atlas Marion 1913; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Locust Grove Academy
Description:A preparatory school for boys; at Palmyra, in successful operation by 1853. So named for its location in a locust grove. (HIST. MARION 1884, 840; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Branch
Description:A branch which rises in eastern Salem Township, Lewis County, and flows southeast through the corner of Highland Township into Marion County where it enters the Troublesome. The land through which it flows is the property of T.C. Long, whence the name. For some reason undiscovered the stream was given as the Long Hungary Branch in the Lewis Atlas of 1916. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; PLAT BOOK; W.B. Mcroberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Line
Description:See St. Louis, Keokuk, and Northwestern Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lovers (Lovers') Lane
Description:A narrow winding road shaded by a beautiful growth of trees; between Hannibal and Palmyra, before you enter Mark Twain Avenue (q.v.). (Leona Stuetzer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lovers (Lovers') Leap
Description:A famous height on the Mississippi, south of Hannibal, standing 300 ft. above the river. The name was prompted by the story oft repeated, of the Indian maiden who leaped to her death for her love. This point is most notable for its slides in 1858 when the entire mass from the top slid fifty or sixty feet. On the occasion of his last visit to old friends and old haunts (May, 1902), Mark Twain recalled the fact that on Lovers Leap the Millerites (See Seventh Day Adventist Church), one night put on their robes to go to heaven, and remarked, "None of them went that night, but I suppose most of them have gone now." (Campbell 1874, 352; HIST. MARION 1884, 880; INNOCENTS ABROAD, Chapter 39, MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY, Chapter 221, G.A. Mahan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lower College
Description:A preparatory school associated with Marion College (q.v.), on Upper College; hence the name. About one mile northeast of West Ely, so close to the site of Ely (q.v.), and West Ely (q.v.), that the school was identified with both places. The charter of the junior college was identical with that of Upper College. Dr. Ezra Stile Ely was the head of this department. It was a manual labor system school projected on as large a scale as was Upper College, and had to be abandoned for the same reasons. Like Upper Marion College, it was a post office in 1837, and was known both as Lower Marion College and Lower College. (Wetmore 1837), (Wetmore HIST. MARION 1884, 227, 228, 233, 234, 236, 726; Hist. N.E. Mo., 124; Colton Map Mo. 1857-1858; Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lower Marion College
Description:See Lower College
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lyle's Mill
Description:See Marshall's Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:M.V. and W. Railroad
Description:See Mississippi Valley and Western Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marble Creek Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church south of Hannibal, 1859-1870. So named for its location. (See Marble Creek Valley). (Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marble Creek Valley
Description:A valley two miles south of Hannibal, deriving its name from the quantity of rock noted there. (Mirror, 12)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marion City
Description:A post office from 1853-1867; a projected city to be built on the Mississippi River, six miles to the east of Palmyra, and nine miles north of Hannibal. The name was doubtless borrowed from the county. It was laid out in 1831 as a project conceived by Wm. Muldrow (See "Eastern Run"), of a great city that should "hold the key to the west, and eventually dominate the commerce of the Orient." The plat was filed in 1835. Even so early it was acclaimed the "Metropolis of the West," and rejoiced on paper in the name of the county it was to make famous. Muldrow laid out the city on a magnificient scale with great public buildings, broad highways, pretentious colleges and churches. It was to reach along the Mississippi for a mile and a half across two of the three branches of Bay de Charles. A city magnificient, but one doomed never to exist otherwise than on paper. Some valuable and substantial buildings went up, some mercantile houses, a hotel, two large steam saw mills and three other large steam mills, warehouses, a Presbyterian Church. It became a considerable village--never a city or even a town. It was never incorporated. The site which had been an unfrequented landing (See Green's Landing), became a noted shipping point, however, for the few years of its existence, and for some years following. For years it was the steamboat landing for Palmyra and Shelbyville. Then came the high water of 1836 and again of the 40s and 50s which left the projected city but a city of dreams, and by 1860, the site was no more than a squalid little steamboat landing. The land on which it was to be built was prairie cut off from the mainland by an arm of Bay de Charles. It was a great stretch of soggy marsh, a site which Muldrow defended on the grounds of its being an advantageous situation. The slough was to be deepened to afford first class navigation for steamboats which could thus come up directly to warehouses at the backdoor of the city, while the great city itself would look out over the majestic river, over which drawbridges were to be thrown, as well as over the channel at the back of the city, while a levee was to protect the city from high water. Some work was done on a levee, but the water rose so high before all this could be effected that even the roofs of most of the houses could not be seen. People were rescued in boats, some never to return to their homes. Some of the houses were taken apart after the water receded, and moved to Palmyra. Many of them originally had been shipped to their sites ready to be put together, perhaps the first instance of this mode of building, and a part of Muldrow's plan. Many of them were demolished. Attempts were made after the first innundation to begin anew, but enthusiasim was dampened by the successive floods. The Mississippi River now covers the location of the east part of the projected city. A native red granite marker has been placed to the west where the city was to stand, and the locality still bears the name of Marion City. Many visit the site; there are few, if any, more beautiful spots on the whole river than this site. It has been called by historians the "Mystic City of Missouri," while Mark Twain, who often visited the site, terms it in his GILDED AGE the "City of Napoleon" (see "Napoleon"). Charles Dickens, who visited the United States in 1842, and came as far west as St. Louis, satirized the project in his "Eden" (q.v.), in MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT. (Wetmore 1837, 115, 116; Hayward 1853; Maps Mo. 1837-1886; HIST. MARION 1884, 234, 244, 246, 247, 248; Stevens, 89; Presley Lane; Thaddeus R. Smith; Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marion City Road
Description:See Todd Spring Road
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marion City School
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township; near the site of old Marion City (q.v.), from which it takes its name. (E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marion College
Description:A Presbyterian college about twelve miles west of Palmyra, on a 5000 acre tract; identified closely with the town of Philadelphia, which it preceded by a little. The charter was granted January 15, 1831, and the institution was named for the county. Established by Colonel Muldrow and his asssociates, it was a part of the "Eastern Run" (q.v.). Dr. David Nelson was the first president. He was a man of fine talents and a minister of distinction but he lacked discretion for a man in his position. Like Marion City (q.v.), the college was conceived on a large scale, and for a time had all the air of Yale and Harvard, of which the promoters sought to make it the counterpart. It was a manual labor experiment, the students paying their expenses by labor on the tract of land. Unfortunately in 1836, under Muldrow and Nelson, it became the head of anti-abolition sentiment. This contributed to the collapse of the project, which was hastened by the financial distress of 1837-1840. It was known also as Upper Marion College and as Upper College, both because of its relation to Lower College (q.v.). The project flourished for ten years, Campbell says. It was established as a post office under the name Marion College in 1837, and was so indicated on the maps of Hutawa (1844), and Colton (1857-1858). Following the collapse of the college, it was succeeded by Masonic College (q.v.), and later yet by Marion Female Seminary (q.v.). Still indicated by Colton as Upper Marion College in 1857-1858. Some of the buildings were still standing in 1884. (Wetmore 1837, 116; Campbell 1874, 351; Atlas Marion 1875, 9; HIST. MARION 1884, 227, 228, 233, 234, 236, 726; Hist. N.E. Mo., 124)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marion County
Description:Marion County was taken from Ralls County, and its boundary defined on December 14, 1822. It was not organized until December 23, 1826, four years later. Previous to this, when the United States, in 1803, bought Louisiana Territory, what is now Marion County was a part of the District of St. Charles. It was in turn a part of Charles County when that county was formed, June 4, 1812, by proclamation of Governor Benjamin Howard; it was a part of Pike, framed December 14, 1818, becoming in turn a part of Ralls, November 16, 1820. At the time of its organization, Marion County included to the north of the present county limit, a large part of Lewis County and all of Shelby to the west, subject only however to judicial administration. On the east of the present Marion, are the Mississippi River and the state of Illinois; on the south Ralls and Monroe Counties. Marion County antedates in the beginning of its history any other section of the state except that of Southeast Missouri. Its dominant life was Virginian and Kentuckian, many of the settlers being descendants of the soldiers who had fought against British oppression. It was named for the "Swamp Fox" of South Carolina, General Francis Marion. General Marion (1732-1795), saw service in various campaigns against Indians; and in North Carolina in the Revolutionary War earned his sobriquet of "Swamp Fox" when Marion's brigade of poorly armed volunteers performed service of greatest value through their intimate knowledge of localities and their native shrewdness, seeming to cover all points at once, and causing no little embarassment to the British forces. No other Revolutionary hero except Washington has been more generally remembered in American place-names. Sixteen other states besides Missouri have counties named for him. Twenty-nine towns and cities bear his name, besides thirteen others which contain it with various suffixes. The immediate source for the Missouri county name was probably Marion County, Kentucky, from which many of the first settlers came. (Campbell 1874; Hist. N.E. Mo., 1, 4, 450; Williams 1904, 569; Eaton, 193; Intern. Cyc.; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marion Female Seminary
Description:A seminary established at Philadelphia in 1842, following the collapse of the Marion College project, with Dr. David Clark, who was associated with the earlier project, as superintendent. Designed as its name indicates for the education of young ladies. Never a complete success, it died in a few years. (HIST. MARION 1884, 726)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marion-Ralls School
Description:A schoolhouse in Mason Township. So named because it serves both counties in that vicinity; Marion and Ralls. (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mark
Description:A post office from 1915-1926; a village in the southeast corner of Fabius Township, on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, fifteen miles northeast of Palmyra. First known as Moody (Atlas, 1901), later as Dunsford (1920), for the two partners who established the place. Later yet the name was changed to Mark for Clayton Mark of Chicago, who sank a large sum of money in attemting to promote a town where he already had invested land. (Atlas Marion 1901; R. McN., 1935; P.G.; Thaddeus R. Smith; (F) Roger Feaster; (F) James Dingle)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mark School
Description:A school in Fabius Township, in the village of Mark (q.v.), from which it takes its name. Known as the Moody School in 1901 for the earlier name of the village. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mark Twain Avenue
Description:The Hannibal end of the roadway between Hannibal and Palmyra, known formerly as Palmyra Avenue. In honor of the approaching Mark Twain Centennial in 1835, the street was renamed for Mark Twain. It is one of the oldest streets in Hannibal. (Atlas Marion 1875, 10; Lucy Latimer; Morris Anderson; Leona Stuetzer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mark Twain Boyhood Home
Description:A two-story frame building on old Hill Street in northeast Hannibal; built by Mark Twain's father in 1844. On the coming of the family to Hannibal from Florida, Missouri, when little Sam was four years old, John M., later Judge, Clemens bought up land which the family later retained only a strip of 30 feet on which stood the house. When the family left Hannibal, the home passed into other hands. In 1911, it was purchased by Hon. George A. Mahan and his wife, and presented to the city. It has been restored and converted into a museum, a shrine visitied by thousands each year. In it are some notable things closely associated with Mark Twain's life. At the side of the house stretches the high board fence which received three coats of whitewash on a memorable day, at the expense of little Tom's friends, who "if he hadn't run out of whitewash would have bankrupted every boy in the village." (Mirror, 30; MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY, Chapter 10; ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapter 2; Leona Stuetzer; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mark Twain Cave
Description:The cave two miles to the south of Hannibal; made famous by Mark Twain. Here Tom and Becky were lost for three days, and here Indian Joe died the death all villains are supposed to die. The "Hanging Rock" marks the spot where Tom and Becky finally stayed when Becky lay down to die. At "Number 2, under the cross," Tom and Huck found the hidden treasure. It is preserved today exactly as it was in the days of young Sam Clemens. It is a marvel of deep passages, the whole seven miles in length, leading back into the bluffs and far down into the earth, even, it is said, below the river. Until 1873 this cave was the only one exposed of the cave system of the Hannibal region. It is the largest of the caves with fissures in the rock avenue from ten to twenty feet wide and sometimes forty feet high. The original entrance was about thirty feet above the present one in the valley. One enters today at the foot of a wooded limestone hill in Cave Hollow (q.v.), 1/2 mile distant from the Mississippi River, and finds himself in a broad, level corridor. Off this open aisles that widen into rooms bearing such fantastic names as the King's Parlor, so named becaue of its "grand piano." As in all such caves there are great rock formations so cut by the sculpture nature that they take on strange and suggestive resemblances. Among such in this cave there are the Ship's Prow and the Alligator, the Devil's Footprints and the Devil's Backbone. Mark Twain gave them names even more fantastic--The Cathedral, Aladdin's Palace, Devil's Hall, Altar Chamber, Bat Avenue. Bats used to hang in great masses from the dark chasms above the passage ways, but they now are gone. There are ample and secure hiding places where Jesse James' Gang could have concealed themselves for days, as they are fabled to have done in the caverns known as Jesse James' Retreat, although in actuality the famous bandit never operated in northeast Missouri. The cave was discovered in 1819-1820 by Jack Sims, a hunter who lived seven miles from the cavern in the adjoining county of Ralls. As is usual in the discovery of such caves, he was tracking an animal, in this case a panther, closed the opening, and later returned with his neighbors to capture the animal. Entering they found themselves in an underground labyrinth extending over a half-mile. The cave was first called Big Saltpeter Cave because a large quantity of saltpeter was manufactured for the bat-guano in the cave, used in making powder for the United States during the Mexican War. The cave was later purchased by a Dr. McDowell of a St. Louis medical college and was known by his name. It is so indicated on the Map of Missouri, 1859. The doctor purchased the cave for experimental purposes, suspending in the cave the body of his dead child in a copper cylinder filled with alcohol, thinking that in the air of the cave the body would petrify. Dr. McDowell was carrying on his experiment during the childhood of Mark Twain. When McDowell gave up the site, the cave became known as Hannibal Cave for the city. Still later it gained the name of Mark Twain Cave in honor of the man who as a boy knew as much of the cave as any one person and made the cave famous in story; and today is known as often by the name Tom Sawyer Cave for the story itself of the real adventures of the boy Sam Clemens and his playmates. (See McDougal's Cave). The grown man never forgot the fascination that the vaulted cavern possessed for him as a child and the thrill of his adventures there. In INNOCENTS ABROAD, Genoa under the stars recalls the cave with "its lofty passages, its silence, and its solitude." In THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY he speaks of it as "a tangled wilderness of lofty clefts and passages--an easy place to get lost in." And in LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI he remembers the body of the child suspended in one of the dismal avenues. The cave today is the property of Judge E.T. Cameron. It is visited by numbers of people every year who come to the cave as they go to the boyhood home of the author. (Mirror, 101; Stevens, 604; HIST. MARION 1884, 880; HISTORY OF N.E. MISSOURI, 457; Map Mo. 1859; ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapters 26, 29-33; ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN, Chapter 2; INNOCENTS ABROAD, Chapter 17; MARK TWAIN AUTOBIOGRAPHY; EARLY DAYS, March 16, 1906; LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI, Chapter 55; MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY, Chapter 12; Judge E.T. Cameron)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mark Twain Hotel
Description:A hotel in Hannibal on the corner of South Main and Church Streets; it occupies a site made famous by the boy who later wrote under the name which the hotel now bears. Here once flowed the classic but muddy waters of Bear Creek, and at this particular spot was the swimmin' hole where little Sam Clemens was rescued from a watery grave by the negro slave. It was a path along Bear Creek near this site that young Samuel Clemens and his friends traveled one night in search of the Confederate Army they expected to join. The army had disappeared, and the would-be soldiers were nearly captured by the young Federal Colonel, later General, Grant. (MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY, Chapter 9; MARK TWAIN AUTOBIOGRAPHY, March 9, 1906; MARK TWAIN NOTEBOOK, Chapter 18; G.A. Mahan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mark Twain Memorial Bridge
Description:The million-dollar bridge over the Mississippi River on U.S. Highway 36, an expanse of steel and concrete joining the states of Missouri and Illinois. It was built and named for Mark Twain to commemorate the Centennial of his birth in 1935. The approach takes in the lot upon which stood the home of the "Welshman" halfway up Cardiff Hill (q.v.), facing Main Street. Not only was the "Welshman" a character in the story of Tom Sawyer, but it was in front of this house that little Sam saw a woman shoot a drunken man in defense of her daughter, upon which occasion a streak of lightning caused Sam and his companions to think the Devil was coming, and they beat the lightning home. (MARK TWAIN AUTOBIOGRAPHY; EARLY DAYS; MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY. Chapter 11; ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER; Chapters 29, 30; G.A. Mahan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mark Twain Memorial Lighthouse
Description:See Centennial Memorial Lighthouse.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mark Twain Museum
Description:On the 101st anniversary of Mark Twain's birth, observed November 30, 1936, there was presented to the city of Hannibal the building next to the Mark Twain boyhood Home (q.v.), to be used as a museum. The building was purchased through popular subscription. There has been an overflow of the museum exhibit kept in the Home, the overflow having been housed in an abandoned bank building on Broadway. This will be moved to the center of interest on Hill. (Mo. Hist. Rev., Vol. 31, January, 1937)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Market Street
Description:See Broadway
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marshall's Mill [1 of 2]
Description:A mill on the south fork of North River, in Warren Township, halfway between Warren and Monroe City. It was known earlier as Jayne's Mill. So named for the owner in both cases. (HIST. MARION 1884, 684; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marshall's Mill [2 of 2]
Description:A mill built in 1837 in Round Grove Township on the South Fabius River, a valuable mill in the vicinity of Upper College (q.v.), four miles north of Philadelphia. It was known earlier as Hicks' Mill, for it's owner, Jeter Hicks; later as Lyle's Mill, for its owner, John Lyle or Lyell, and yet later as Marshall's, again for its owner. It was washed out a few years after 1865. (Wetmore 1837, 117; HIST. MARION 1884, 414, 719, 751)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mason Township
Description:Mason Township was organized March 27, 1827, and was one of the three original townships of the county. (See Liberty Township). On the organization of Ralls County in 1820, the strip of land 2-3 miles in width along the Mississippi, fitting into a curve in the river line, was called Mason Township. Today, besides Liberty to the west, there is a later towsnhip, Miller. The city of Hannibal occupies practically all the habitable part of Mason Township. The remainder is a stretch of swampy land to the north. Mason Township was named doubtless for Fort Mason (q.v.), which stood not far from the present site of Hannibal. (HIST. MARION 1884, 168; Peck 1851, 730; Rand McNally, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Masonic College
Description:About 1843, the Masonic fraternity of Missouri bought buildings, farms, and property of Marion College (q.v.), with the object to educate orphan sons of Masons. In 1844, a female department was added. The site was shortly decided unfavorable for the purpose; the land and buildings were sold; and Masonic College was relocated at Lexington, Missouri, where it flourished until the outbreak of the Civil War. (Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Massie Cemetery
Description:See Massie Mill Cemetery
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Massie Mill
Description:The first water mill in the county; established in 1825 or 1826 at the edge of the clearing on North River, at a point a little above the bridge, north of Palmyra. It was so named for its owner, a pioneer miller. After the death of Mr. Massie the mill was purchased by Mr. Hanley who soon moved the machinery up to Palmyra. Residents today know the old Massie Mill by its original name. It is regarded as one of the high spots in early Marion County history. This mill and Glasscock's (See Bay Mill), were the only mills in the county in 1828. (HIST. MARION 1884, 152, 172, 173; Hist. N.E. Mo., 632; Thaddeus R. Smith; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Massie Mill Cemetery
Description:A cemetery on the top of a hill close to the old Massie Mill location (q.v.), from which it takes its name. It is known also as Massie Cemetery, Old Massie Mill Cemetery, and coming to be known more recently (1935), as "Peg- Leg Shannon Cemetery." Here is buired George Shannon, more familiarly known as "Peg-Leg Shannon." George Shannon, at the time but sixteen, was the youngest member of the Lewis and Clark expedition (1803-1806). He later (1807) was injured in a battle with Indians and as a consequence lost a leg. Thereafter he was known as "Peg-Leg." He was a prominent lawyer who practiced down in St. Charles, and a U.S. District Attorney. Holcombe speaks of him as a leading attorney of Palmyra. He died August 30, 1836, while on court business in Palmyra; and since he was without a family, he was buried there. On Highway 61, a roadside marker dedicated to his memory was erected October 21, 1935, and calls attention to his burial place about one mile north of that point. (History of Marion 1884, 203; Williams 1904, 572; Missouri History Review, January, 1936, 184; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Matthew's Mill
Description:A grist mill four miles northeast of Palmyra, in an early period. So named for its owner, George Matthews. (John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Matt's Branch
Description:Rises in Jackson Township, joining Long Branch in South Fork Township. Probably the Christian name of some pioneer. (Monroe Atlas 1917)
Source:Leech, Esther. "Place Names Of Six East Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Mays' School
Description:A pioneer subscription school in Mays' Settlement (q.v.), around 1829. (HIST. MARION 1884, 776)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McClintic School
Description:See Barr School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCooly High School
Description:See Immaculate Conception High School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McDougal's Cave
Description:The name substituted by Mark Twain in TOM SAWYER for the name McDowell as the Mark Twain Cave (q.v.), was then known. Of it he says "the cave was but a vast labyrinth of crooked aisles that ran into each other and out again and led nowhere." (ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapter 29)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McDowell Cave
Description:See Mark Twain Cave.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McDowell Mill
Description:A band mill near Philadelphia, owned by Samuel McDowell, and known by his name; built in 1831 at his home. (HIST. MARION 1884, 719)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McFarlan Pond
Description:A pond just south of Backbone Pond (q.v.), in Fabius Township. At one time it was a great resort. Now practically dry. So named for a Mr. McFarlan who controlled the land. (Atlas Marion 1913; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McFarlan's Branch
Description:A branch in southeast Fabius Township, draining a large pond known as McFarlan Pond. All this site is now in cultivation owing to the levee. The name is that of an early settler. (HIST. MARION 1884, 771; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McLeod School
Description:See Oakview School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McPike School
Description:See Prairie View School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McRae's Branch
Description:See Gottman Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Meadow Lane
Description:A narrow roadway in TOM SAWYER that led away from the old village of Hannibal; traversed by the boys on their way to the point where Clemens Station (q.v.), now stands. (ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapters 13, 20)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Merrill's Branch
Description:A branch which rises in northeastern Jackson Township in Shelby County. It flows generally east and north through the southeast corner of Tiger Fork Township into Marion County, where it enters the North Fork of North River. So named for a pioneer. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; ATLAS MARION 1901; ATLAS MARION 1913; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Merrill's Ferry [1 of 2]
Description:A ferry over the North Fabius River on the line of travel to and from the settlements then opening in Lewis and Clark Counties. It was operated by Eli Merrill, whence the name. Eli Merrill later operated the ferry across the Mississippi at West Quincy. (See Keyes' Ferry). (HIST. MARION 1884, 175, 179)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Merrill's Ferry [2 of 2]
Description:See Keyes' Ferry
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Metropolis of the West
Description:See Marion City
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Midway
Description:See Benbow
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Race Road
Description:The name applied in the southeastern part of the county to the road approaching Bay Mill from the west. It ran for a way along Clear Creek, on the bank of which stood the mill, whence the name, Mill Race. (Atlas Marion, 1901)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller Township
Description:A township formed from Mason Township, March 1, 1847, under the name Bear Creek Township, for the creek of that name. After a few months the name was changed to Miller for Samuel Miller, alleged first permanent settler, who came to this section October 21, 1818. Miller Township is on the southern boundary of this county; with Mason to the east, South River Township to the west, and Liberty Township to the north. (HIST. MARION 1884, 145, 636, 640, 641)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mills' Branch
Description:A branch rising south of Hannibal and emptying into Bear Creek. So named for early settlers. (Mirror, 2, 3; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Minnow Branch
Description:A branch emptying into Bear Creek between Hannibal and Oakwood. It was so known for the minnows found in it. (Mirror, 6; Morris Anderson; (F) Archy Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miss Burr's Academy
Description:See Mrs. Burr's Academy.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mississippi Valley and Western Railroad
Description:A railroad running parallel to the river in the 1870s from Keokuk to Hannibal, and contemplating St. Louis when it merged with the St. Louis and Keokuk line becoming St. Louis, Keokuk, and Northwestern (q.v.). Before the merger, it was known as the M.V. and W. It is now the property of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy. (Campbell 1873 , 55; Atlas Marion 1875, 10)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri, Kansas, and Texas Railroad
Description:The Missouri, Kansas and Texas Company came into existence in 1870, and the project was laid for the pioneer railroad of the Great Southwest. It was to invade what was then the outpost of civilization in crossing Indian Territory now Oklahoma, to Texas. By 1871, the road was the chief thoroughfare from Texas to Kansas City and other northern markets. The road was constructed with unparalleled rapidity. It has been extended to the foothills of the mountains, running down from Colorado through New Mexico and Texas to the Gulf. The system serves a vast territory in the southwest, with north and east terminals at Kansas City and St. Louis, and south terminal at nearly every city of importance in Oklahoma and Texas. It was begun as a part of the federal government's policy of inducing western development and recognition of the necessity of maintaining troops west of the Mississippi and the need of quick transportation. For more than sixty-five years, it has operated, as it stands today, a great independent railroad. The road is known as the M-K-T, but more often as the "Katy." The best tradition regarding the origin of the name "Katy" as applied to the M-K-T is that the employees and much of the public abbreviated M-K-T to K.T., which eventually produced "Katy." (Morris Anderson; J.F. Rector; E.F. O'Herin)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:M-K-T Railroad
Description:See Missouri, Kansas, and Texas Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Monkey Run
Description:A name given to the community of foreigners down past the cement plant, one and one-half miles south of Ilasco. (q.v.). (Lucy Latimer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Monroe City
Description:A town established in 1857 on a high, rolling prairie thirty miles southwest of Quincy, Illinois; given Monroe by Colton, 1861. It was incorporated in 1869 in Monroe County, from which it takes its name. It was one of the first villages laid out on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad, and is today a live, flourishing town. Monroe City identifies itself with each of three counties, Ralls, Monroe, and Marion, being situated at the intersection of the three. One of the school districts of Marion County belongs to the Monroe District. Indicated as a part of Marion County in 1886. (Atlas Marion 1875, 10; HIST. MARION 1884, 382, 713; Atlas Marion 1901, 7; Mirror, 36; Leona Stuetzer; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Monroe Female Institute
Description:A regularly incorporated collegiate school at Monroe City in 1860. It was still in operation in 1884, but is now abandoned. It took its name from its location. (HIST. MARION 1884, 713; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Monroe Male and Female Seminary
Description:An early seminary at Monroe City; still in operation in 1884, now abandoned. It took its name from its location, and was frequently known also as "The Seminary." (HIST. MARION 1884, 383, 713; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moody
Description:See Mark
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moody School
Description:See Mark School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mosquito Valley Line
Description:See St. Louis, Keokuk, and Northwestern Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Zion Community
Description:A community of about seven residents halfway between Hannibal and Palmyra on Highway 61; so named for Mt. Zion Church (q.v.). There was a little store and post office there in the years 1899-1902, known by the name of Uva. After a few years the store burned and was never rebuilt. The place has never been called Uva since though indicated by that name on the Rand McNally map of 1935. Residents do not know the reason for the latter name. (P.G.; Maps Missouri from 1915; Thaddeus R. Smith; Firmin T. O'Dell; Mrs. Emma Miller)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mr. Cross's School
Description:A "pay school" in old Hannibal, held in a frame house on the hill, facing what is now the public square. It was an advanced school that later developed into Hannibal Academy (q.v.). It was attended by Samuel Clemens; it was here Sam "held a mortgage" on the medal for spelling. It was established by Wm. O. Cross; hence the name. (MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY, Chapters 9, 13)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mr. Dawson's School
Description:The school in old Hannibal attended by Samuel Clemens at the time of the early school episodes in TOM SAWYER. Mark Twain gives the master's name in the story as Mr. Dobbins. (Mark Twain's Autobiography, February 2, 1906, March 9, 1906; ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapters 6, 7, 18, 20)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mrs. Burr's Academy
Description:A boarding school in Palmyra around 1843. It was taught by a Mrs. Ann Burr, whence the name, who came to Palmyra from teaching among the Indians farther south. She brought some Indian children with her to Palmyra. The statement has been erroneously made that she was the widow of Aaron Burr (1756-1836). The name of the school is given as Miss Burr's Academy in MARION COUNTY HISTORY. (HIST. MARION 1884, 836; Daney Shannon; Mrs. Frank Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mrs. Horr's School
Description:A log house on Main Street in old Hannibal; later moved to Third. A primitive school where little Sam Clemens learned his A B C's. It was a "pay school," the tuition being twenty-five cents a week. It was "kept" by a Mrs. Horr; hence the name. (MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY, Chapter 9)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Olivet Cemetery [1 of 2]
Description:A cemetery at Hannibal; deeded to the trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1847. Incorporated under the name Mount Olivet in 1871. It included the Old Methodist Cemetery. In Mount Olivet are buried the parents and brothers of Mark Twain. The name was probably suggested by the hills of Hannibal. Cf. above. (HIST. MARION 1884, 938)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Olivet Cemetery [2 of 2]
Description:A cemetery in Fabius Township, regularly laid out in 1872; a little south of Mt. Olivet Church (q.v.), for which it was named. (HIST. MARION 1884, 783)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Olivet Church
Description:A Methodist Church South, in the northeast part of the county in Fabius Township; established July 30, 1871. A brick church building erected in 1872. It was built in a pleasant natural grove which doubtless suggested the name. For name, cf. above. (HIST. MARION 1884, 783; Soil Survey, Marion 1911; Mrs. Frank Lane; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Olivet School
Description:See Shannon School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Vernon Church
Description:A Methodist Church South, close to Ely, in Warren Township on See's Branch; established in 1850. Residents are disposed to think that it was named for Washington's home. A frequent name for churches; evidently the pioneers considered quite as sacred as any of the mountains of Scripture. (HIST. MARION 1884, 690; Presley Lane; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Vernon School
Description:A school in Warren Township. Name transferred from Mt. Vernon Church (q.v.). (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Zion Cemetery
Description:A cemetery on the corner of Amick Lane (q.v.), on the highway between Palmyra and Hannibal; near Mt. Zion Church (q.v.), for which it is named. (Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Zion Church
Description:A Christian Church in Miller Township, about halfway between Palmyra and Hannibal; established December 28, 1861. Organixzed around 1834. A prominent skirmish of the Civil War occurred here. For name cf. above. (HIST. MARION 1884, 576, 643; Mrs. Frank Lane; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Muff Potter Jail
Description:"A trifling little brick den that stood in a marsh at the edge of the old village" of Hannibal. The site is close to the foot of Cardiff Hill (q.v.), today not far east of the Memorial to Tom and Huck. Here Muff Potter was imprisoned for the murder of young Dr. Robinson, the murder having been committed by Injun Joe. (TOM SAWYER). During the Civil War this building was used to confine Confederate prisoners. (ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapters 11, 23; G.A. Mahan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Muldrow Schoolhouse
Description:First public schoolhouse in Liberty Township. So named for a Jack Muldrow who came to the locality in 1819. (HIST. MARION 1884, 803, 804)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Muldrow's Lick
Description:See Trabue's Lick
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Munger's (Mungers)
Description:A former station of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad; now extinct. So named for a Wm. Munger, who lived in Hannibal and was connected with the railroad. A Mungers Mills is given by Mitchell (1850), as a station on an early stage line. It appears from its location to have been the same as Munger's and would appear from its name- form to have been a mill. (Atlas Marion 1875; John Lemmons; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mungers Mill
Description:See Munger's
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Murphy's Cave
Description:A cave in Ide's Hill in Hannibal; discovered in 1862 by workmen digging for fire clay, and named for one of the workmen. (Campbell 1874, 352; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mystic City of Missouri
Description:See Marion City
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Naomi
Description:A post office from 1876-1904; situated to the northeast in Round Grove Township, on Troublesome Creek, sixteen miles northwest of Palmyra. It was laid out by Wm. Tucker about 1869, the first station on the old stage route from Quincy, Illinois, to Newark, Knox County. It is surrounded by farms in one of the richest farm vicinities in northeast Missouri. Laid out at a time when reaping was performed with a sickle, as it was in the days of Ruth and Boaz, it was named Naomi for the mother of Ruth, the reaper in the field (See Book of Ruth). Probable the name was taken directly not from the Bible, but from some local young woman for Naomi has always been a favorite among girls' names in Missouri. (Campbell 1874, 353, 356; HIST. MARION 1884, 806; P.G.; Maps Missouri from 1879; (F) W.L. Tucker)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Napoleon
Description:The name given by Mark Twain in THE GILDED AGE to the metropolis to be built on Bay de Charles (See Marion City). "The Almighty never laid out a cleaner piece of level prairie for a city (the marsh along the Mississippi). Here the first inhabitants of the metropolis to begin the active business of the day were the venerable mud turtles which crawled up and roosted upon the old logs in the stream. The town was laid out liberally, not lacking room, leaving space for the railroad to come in (Salt Lick Pacific Railroad), and for the river (Columbus River), as it was to be when improved." The project closely parallels that of Marion City (q.v.). The mud turtles were put to flight by a swarm of men set to work to straighten the river and start a cut-off canal across the peninsula. Active work was also begun in building warehouses, etc. The project in the Mark Twain story, however, came to a sorry end when the money, $200,000, appropriated by Uncle Sam, was otherwise disbursed before it could be applied to the enterprise. The city bears the name of the "Little Corporal" (1769-1821), who dreamed of a world-empire. (THE GILDED AGE, Chapters 16, 17, 23, 25, 28; Intern. Cyc.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nelson School
Description:A select school in 1834, near Philadelphia just north of the college site. So named for Mat Nelson who owned a lumber yard there. (HIST. MARION 1884, 718; George Shaeffer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nelson's Branch
Description:A branch in Miller Township, flowing into South River where it cuts through the northwest corner of Miller Township. So named for the settler who owned the land. (HIST. MARION 1884, 635)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nelsonville
Description:A post office in the northwest corner of the county, twenty-five miles west-northwest of Palmyra. The post office was established at this point by 1860. Between 1876 and 1878, it was shifted under this name to northeast Shelby (See Nelsonville, Shelby County). In 1891 it was moved back to Marion. It is still a post office in this county. So named for a Nelson who was the first to live on the site. (Sutherland and McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; Atlas Marion 1875, 10; Atlas Shelby 1878; P.G.; Maps Missouri since 1860; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nettleton
Description:See Woodland
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New London Gravel Road
Description:A road which runs along Bear Creek from Hannibal to New London in Ralls County, from which it takes its name. (Mirror, 6)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Market
Description:A town laid out in 1836 by Hawkins and Burch, and known for a time by the name of Hawkins Burch. It was southwest of the center of Warren Township on the south fork of North River, twelve miles west of Palmyra, in the section known as "Turkey Shin" (q.v.). It was an old muster ground. The story goes that after the first store at Warren had died out, a store was started at this point, soon known as the "new" market; hence the name. More likely, however, it was a borrowed name, taken from one of the thirteen other New Markets or newmarkets in as many different states, all of which of course came originally from Newmarket in Cambridgeshire, England. It was at one time a flourishing village. Today (1935), there are a dozen old unoccupied houses standing, and only an old negro lives there surrounded by scrub oaks. (Campbell 1874, 353; Atlas Marion 1875, 10; Soil Survey, Marion 1911; HIST. MARION 1884, 457, 688; Maps Missouri, 1861-1913; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Providence Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church established around 1834 near Benbow in Round Grove Township. A building was erected in 1842, the present building in 1866. The name was transferred from a Providence Church in Kentucky. (HIST. MARION 1884, 756; Mrs. Frank Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Thermopylae
Description:"A steep bank with a hotel like a barn on top of it; a wooden store or two, and a few scattered sheds--three days this side of Eden." The ancient Thermopylae was the famous pass from northern into southern Greece. It won celebrity as the scene of the heroic death of Leonidas and his 300 Spartans in their attempt to stem the tide of invasion under the Persian Xerxes (480 B.C.). The name is used by Charles Dickens in MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT for Hannibal, it would appear. For futher discussion, see Hannibal. (MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT, Chapters 22, 23; Intern. Cyc.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nichols School
Description:See Stone Hill School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nipper's Park
Description:A paved and parked waterfront on River Point (q.v.), in Hannibal; converted into a park in an effort to beautify the levee at the Point. So named as a memorial to S.M. Nipper, who died in 1933. He had long served the city as superintendent of light and water. (Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935; Helen D. Birch)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Noir Creek
Description:See Bear Creek
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North River
Description:A river formed by the union of North and South Forks of North River between Warren Township and Union Township, near their eastern boundaries. It flows east and slightly north to enter the Mississippi River between Fabius and Liberty Township, less than one- half mile above the mouth of South River (q.v.), and about ten miles north of Hannibal. The North Fork of North River rises Knox County, in northeastern Salt River Township, flowing southeast to enter Shelby County in Behtel Township and on through Black Creek and Tiger Fork Townships into Marion County till it unites with the South Fork. The South Fork of North River is much shorter, rising in southwestern Warren Township of Marion County, from the confluence of three short branches known as East Branch, Middle Branch, and West Branch, and flowing northeast to unite with the North Fork. North River with its two forks is named North Two Rivers, in distinction from South Two Rivers, used for the present South River, on the maps for 1832, 1866, 1867, 1869, and 1870, but the present simpler names appear as early as 1861 and after 1870 becomes fixed. At an earlier period, first on the map for 1822, North and South Rivers appear merely as Two Rivers, the country lying in between them being known as the Two River Country. The original name of the stream was probably the Jefferon River, although the identification is not absolutely certain. The Jefferon was a well-known river of northeast Missouri before the war of 1812. It was used as the boundary between the United States and the Sac and Fox Indians in the treaty made at St. Louis on November 3, 1804, the line being traced in the following words: "Beginning at a point in the Missouri River opposite to the mouth of the Gasconade River; thence on a direct course so as to strike the River Jeffreon, at a distance of thirty miles from its mouth, and down said Jeffreon to the Mississippi River" (See American State Papers, Indian Affairs, Vol. I, No. 107, p. 693). The treaty was reestablished after the War, on September 13, 1815, in the same terms. With the spelling Jeffrion, it appears in the legal records of the Bouvet-Gratiot litigation (Am. State Papers, Vol. V, pp. 791-2), and again in an Act passed by the General Assembly of the Territory of Missouri in 1814, in which the "river Jeffrion" is used as the boundary of the newly constituted county of St. Charles. As Jeffrion it appears in Morse's UNIVERSAL GAZETTEER in 1821. Beck refers to it in his Gazetteer (1823) as Geoffrions, and in the HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND (1887) it appears for the last time under the spelling Geoffrions, and in the HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX and Scotland, (1887) it appears for the last time under the spelling Geoffrion. Meanwhile a very disturbing element in the chequered orthographical history of the name was introduced by Pike. In the published journals of his Expedition of 1805, he mentions what is obviously the same river several times, but with three different and much distorted spellings. It what is known as the "Early Text" or preliminary publication of 1807 it appears (p. 4) as the Jauflione, and the same spelling is used on the map included with the "regular edition" of 1810. But in the text of the 1810 edition it appears as the "river Jaustioni, which is our boundary between the Sac nation, and the United states on the west side of the Mississippi" (App. to Part I, Document No. 18) (See Coues ed. of 1895, I.290). On the next page Pike adds a remark which helps to locate the stream: "About seven miles below the Jaustioni a Frenchman is settled on the west shore. He is married to a woman of the Sac nation, and lives by a little cultivation and the Indian trade." This Frenchman is mentioned in the Journal for August16, 1805, in a way that enables us to fix his home as about one mile below the present site of Hannibal (q.v.). On a still later page in "Document No. 18" (Coues ed., I.339), the boundary river takes on the spelling Jauflioni. All students of Pike's famous Journal have remarked upon the utter confusion of his spellings of Indian, French, and Spanish names. The publisher of the original edition prefaced it with a note of apology, declaring that "he very much doubts whether any book ever went to press under so many disadvantages as this one;" and his latest editor Coues sums it up in the words (I.xxxvii): "Pike's pen proved mightier than his sword in putting bookmaking to confusion and editors to despair...He seems never to have spelled the same name twice in the same way." Some excuses may be found in the many vicissitudes which the precious manuscript underwent during its 4000 miles of travel. In the first letter written by Pike after he has escaped from his Spanish captivity to United States territory, he says: "My papers being in such a mutilated and deranged state, it will require some time to arrange them..at Washington I can obtain some necessary assistance, as it would take one person a great length of time to make copies." It would seem from this that what finally reached the printer was a copy of a copy, perhaps made by some ignorant or careless transcriber; Pike never corrected the proofs, and the original manuscripts have disappeared. It is therefore quite fair to assume that what the brave explorer originally wrote down as the name of the little Missouri stream was a good deal nearer to the original Jeffreon than appears in the published work. Such a spelling as "Jeofrions" for example, in Pike's exeorable handwriting, might very easily have been interpreted as "Jauflioni" or "Jaustioni." This mare's nest of military orthography produced by Pike would be unimportant if it were not for its after-effects. To it was probably due the disuse of a good old French river name, and even an uncertainty of its identification,. No such result would have been produced, in all likelihood,, if it had not been for the break in tradition cause by the War of 1812. During the struggle, white Americans were practically driven out of northeast Missouri altogether. When they returned, the living tie between the original names and the places they denoted had been interrupted, and the old names had largely been forgotten. But Pike was the hero of the day, and his EXPEDITION was enormously popular throughout the Middle West. His bizarre versions of the old river name actually began to be adopted. Beck in his Gazetteer (1823), though he knows the old form Geoffrione, gives also the form Jaufflione, and even adds to the confusion by suggesting that the river ought to be called Javelot, for etymological reasons. Beck's work is full of wild etymologies, and his curious argument here deserves to be quoted: "Javelot is a French word, signifying war-club, and doubtless the Indian word was of the same signification." Fortunately his suggestion did not find favor. Pike's other invention, Jaustioni, was preferred in Brown's GAZETTEER in 1817, and was passed on to Cramer's widely NAVIGATOR (p. 221) in 1824. In the form Justioni it was even continued in to later steamboat manuals, the WATER PILOT (1837) of Cummings (p. 129) and the RIVER GUIDE (1871) of James (p. 9). But Pike's names are clumsy and uncouth, and it is not surprising that the incoherent state of things was finally remedied by discarding all the forms of the old names and replacing them by the colorless Two Rivers, North Two Rivers, or North River. Even the identity of the old Geffreon with the modern North River has been doubted, but the argument for it given by Coues (Footnote 14 in his ed. of Pike, I. 10) seems conclusive. Coues admits that from Pike's references alone it would be impossible to decide whether his "Jaustioni" or "Jauflione" was North River or South River just below it, or the Fabius just above it. But the terms of the treaty of 1804 seem to rule out South River, which is hardly thirty miles long, whereas the treaty describes the Geffreon as over thirty miles. Identification with the Fabius, though supported by Holcombe in his HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX AND SCOTLAND, is excluded by the fact that Beck, Cummings, and Cramer give them as separate streams. For the same reason the identification made by Violette of the boundary stream as "the river Jeffron or Salt River" is clearly impossible. Finally Coues affirms that a map in the Bureau of Indian Affairs at Washington in connection with the treaty makes the identity of Geffreon and North River absolutely certain. The recent names Two Rivers, North Two Rivers, and North River, as well as North Fork and South Fork, East, Middle, and West Branch, are obviously names of position and direction. The origin of the old name Geoffreon is unknown, but it seems likely that it was one of the large group of Missouri River names derived from forgotten French hunters or voyageurs (cf. under Fabius River above). It is just possible that the Frenchman who gave his name to the stream was the well known Godfrey Le Seur, who Holcombe asserts (p. 226) was trading near the present site of La Grange in 1795, and whom he thinks (p. 25) perhaps the same as the Frenchman mentioned by Pike in 1805 as living near the present site of Hannibal (q.v.). His last name has certainly survived in the name Le Seur (q.v.) in Lewis County. Conceivably his first name in the French form Geoffreon or Jeffreon may have become attached to the principal stream of the county in which he operated. For a similar use of the first name cf. Riviere Xenon, named for Governor Xenon Trudeau, Mine a Joe, etc. Professor John Francis McDermott has suggested in his edition of Brackenridge that the James River, frequently written Riviere a Jacques, was named for Jacques d'Eglise. But the identification must remain a mere conjecture until more and better documentary evidence about Godfrey Le Seur becomes available. (HIST. MARION, 1884; HIST. LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, and SCOTLAND, 1887; Atlas Marion, 1913, Shelby, 1878, Knox, 1876 and 1898; Maps Missouri 1822 ff.; Gazetteers and River Guides, Beck, 1823, Cummings, 1837,and James, 1871; Pike's Expedition, ed. Coues, 1898; Acts Passed by the General Assembly of the Territory of Missouri, 1817; Am. State Papers)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North River [1 of 2]
Description:A post office from 1870-1886; located in the forks of North River nine miles west-southwest of Palmyra, east of Warren. It took its name from its location. (Campbell 1874, 356; Maps Missouri, 1877-1886; P.G.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North River [2 of 2]
Description:A village on North River, and a station on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, about nine miles from Quincy, Illinois, and five miles northeast of Palmyra. So named for its location on the river. It was known earlier as North River Station; the word, Station, was dropped as early as 1879. (Campbell 1874; Maps Missouri from 1869; (F) C.O. Willis)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North River Bridge
Description:A bridge over North River, whence the name, on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Highway (q.v.). The bridge was built in November of 1833. (HIST. MARION 1884, 191)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North River School
Description:A schoolhouse on the bank of North River, for which it is named. It was earlier known as the Thurwachter School, for the family of that name who had large landholdings in the district. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North River Station
Description:See North River
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Two Rivers
Description:See North River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Noyer Creek
Description:See Bear Creek
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:O.K. Railroad
Description:See Quincy, Omaha, and Kansas City Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Dell School District
Description:A school district partly in Marion County, now a part of the Durham Consolidated School District (q.v.). So named for its location in a little valley where there are a number of oak trees. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Russell Allen)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Round Grove Township, in the northwest corner, on the Marion-Lewis line and the Marion-Shelby line. So named for the grove of oaks by which it was built. An earlier name was Carpenter School. (See Oak Grove School District). (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove School District
Description:A school district in the northwest corner of Marion County on the Marion-Lewis line and the Marion Shelby line. Formerly known as the Carpenter District. The district is "cut at an angle" to take in portions of the three counties. (I am led to believe that the name Carpenter around 1901 was applied to the district for its peculiar shape. I can find otherwise no reason for the name). For the present name, see Oak Grove school. (ATLAS MARION, 1901)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Ridge School
Description:See Suter School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakridge School
Description:A schoolhouse in Warren Township, about two miles west of Woodland. It stands in a body of oak trees on a ridge; hence the name. (E.C. Bohon; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakview School
Description:A schoolhouse in the Fabius Consolidated District. It was built in 1850 under the name Cottonwood School, so known for a cottonwood growth near the building. It soon became known as the McLeod School for Dan Bell McLeod, the owner of the land. Later it took the name of Oakview after the fashion of Prairie View, a school in the vicinity; hence the name. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator; Mrs. T.B. Carter; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakwood
Description:A post office from 1888; originally a village in the extreme southeastern part of Miller Township, now a suburb of Hannibal. It was platted in June of 1882, and became a part of Hannibal in March of 1883. It was previously called Stringtown because it stretched out so long a way; then the name was changed to Oakwood for the many oak trees there. (Atlas Marion 1913; P.G.; Rand McNally, 1935; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ohaha
Description:See Salt River Country
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Bay Mill
Description:See Bay Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Covered Bridge
Description:A large covered bridge across North River near Palmyra; built in 1868. The bridge was 200 ft. in length and it was found when it was torn down that it contained 4,500 wooden pins. It was an old landmark for many years. Now replaced by a modern steel structure. (HIST. MARION 1884, 770; Presley Lane; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Ironsides Baptist Church
Description:See South River Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old London Road
Description:A dirt road over Crawford's Hill from Hannibal to New London in Ralls, whence the name. It was an old trail made by the Indians who never deflected for a grade. (Mirror, 45; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Massie Mill Cemetery
Description:See Massie Mill Cemetery
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Providence Church
Description:A Baptist Church South and west of Palmyra on the site of New Market (q.v.); established in 1823. It was an Old School Baptist Church, and is long since gone. (Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Providence Church Cemetery
Description:An old cemetery one-half mile east of New Market. The earliest gravestone bears the date 1811. It was named for Old Providence Church which stood near. (E.C. Bohon; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Reliable
Description:A nickname for the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad; from the fact that it verified its boasts that its trains always arrived and departed on the advertised hour, nothing but trhe most extraordinary circumstances occasioning a deviation. (HIST. MARION 1884, 950; Atlas Shelby 1878, 10)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Ship of Zion
Description:"A shabby little brick church by the public square" in Hannibal, where Sam Clemens went to Sunday School. Here Tom Sawyer, having "swapped" tickets, appeared as a prodigy one Sunday morning and won the prize. The oldest church in Hannibal and the one to which the Clemens family belonged was the Presbyterian Church about one and a half blocks north of Central Park (q.v.), on Fourth. (LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI, Chapter 54; ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapter 4; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oldham's Springs
Description:See Todd's Springs
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Orton Island
Description:See Kimbal Island
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pack Horse Trail of Bouvet's
Description:See Bouvet's Trail
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra
Description:A post office since 1830; east of the center of Liberty Township, the first settlement in that township, twelve miles northwest of Hannibal and seven miles from the Mississippi River. It was laid out in 1819, declared the county seat in 1827, and incorporated in 1830. Moses Bates, it is said, gave the land for the settlement as he did for Hannibal. The name of Uncle Benny Vanlandingham, nicknamed "Flannigan" for short, is associated with the early story, as also the names of Moses Bates and Obadiah Dickerson, the old "Bee- Gum hat" of the latter furnishing the first post office, and he himself the first rural delivery. There were seven never-failing springs in and around the settlement which form a stream that runs through the heart of old Palmyra and empties into North River. "Uncle Benny," among the first pioneers, stumbled upon the mighty spring (See Big Spring), in truth, finding himself submerged in it to his knees, hidden as it was by the undergrowth of the forest. This spring, later known as the "town spring," was known by immigrant and Indian for its fine water. The first name proposed was Springfield by reason of the spring and the clearing around it already made by the first settlers. The vicinity was the heart of "Elm Lands" (q.v.), in the Two Rivers Country (q.v.). Palmyra is midway between the two rivers. Samuel Caldwell, Obadiah Dickerson, Joel Shaw, and John McCune, who laid out the town determined on the name, Palmyra, for the ancient city of Syria, the Tadmor of Scripture, founded or enlarted by King Solomon in the wilderness in the 10th century B.C. II Chron. 8:4--"And he built Tadmor in the wilderness, and all the store cities, which he built in Hamath." The old Palmyra stood in the midst of a palm grove, and the site was chosen for its springs. It was called Palmyra by the Greeks, Tadmor by the Syrians. Both names mean palms. There were no palm trees in Missouri, but there was a wealth of beautiful elms, and the land promised fertility. For its profuse cultivation of flowers, Palmyra was often in the past spoken of as the "City of Flowers." For its early splendid educational facilites, it was known as the "Athens of Missouri." By 1853, it had three colleges besides two academies, and these were followed by others. At one time it was the metropolis of northeast Missouri. For ten years (1825-1835), it was regarded as one of the future great cities of the west in a group of six, New London (Ralls), Hannibal, Scipio, Marion City, and Quincy (Illinois). In 1825, New London was its rival. In 1837, rivalry lay between Palmyra and Marion City. This was followed by spirited rivalry between Palmyra and Hannibal, giving rise to a feeling between the two not altogether dead. In TOM SAWYER, Mark Twain gives Palmyra the name of "Constantinople" (q.v.). Palmyra remains the county seat where county business is transacted though a second courthouse has been erected at Hannibal. It is today a live little town of around 2000. (Wetmore 1837; Hayward 1853; Sutherland and McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 355; Atlas Marion 1875, 9; HIST. MARION 1884, 803, 829; Mirror, 31; P.G.; Tom Sawyer, Chapter 4; Encyc. Amer.; Maps Missouri from 1824; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra Academy
Description:See Palmyra Female Seminary
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra and Marion City Railroad
Description:A project of Colonel Muldrow's (See "Eastern Run"). The railroad was to run through Railroad Street in Marion City, connect that place with Palmyra, with a branch at this point to Ely City (See West Ely), cross the county to Philadelphia (q.v.), connect with New York (q.v.), in Shelby County, and finally reach the Pacific, so that "one might leave Marion City on Monday and wash his face in the Pacific Saturday morning." Eventually the two oceans were to be linked by way of Marion City, that should thus "tap the trade of the Orient," by way of a great "Atlantic and Pacific Railroad." The project was contemplated in 1835. Some of the road was laid. The rails were of wood, and mule cars were designed to be drawn over it. For this reason it was called the "Horse Railroad." The high water of 1844 and 1851 dealt a death blow to the project. People previous to this time seemed to have grown lukewarm over the matter, even when it was announced that all obstacles in the way of money were removed. The contemplated building of the Hannibal and St. Joseph (q.v.), a steam line, extinguished the faint blaze forever when it was discovered that both Hannibal and Palmyra were to have a railroad. About twenty miles of railway were made. Portions of grading of the contemplated road are still to be seen through pasture lands east of Palmyra. The Hannibal and St. Joseph (q.v.), practically follows through this part of the county line of the projected road. (HIST. MARION 1884, 236, 272; History of Northeast Missouri, 23; Stevens, 88; Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra and Marion City Turnpike
Description:A highway that should connect the two cities named, projected by Muldrow (See "Eastern Run"), and his associates in 1835, and incorporated under this name in 1836. The route was laid out, but the project was never executed. The projected route is now a part of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Highway (q.v.). (History of Northeast Missouri, 84)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra Avenue
Description:See Mark Twain Avenue
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra Female Seminary
Description:A school established in 1851 by Dr. Hobson of the Christian Church; known also as Palmyra Academy and Palmyra Seminary. It was in successful operation by 1853 with six teachers. Later it became undenominational. It had a fair existence until 1884 when it became the property of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and was changed to Centenary High School. (See Centenary Academy). (HIST. MARION 1884, 202, 839, 840; Atlas Marion 1901, 6; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra Gas Well
Description:Thinking to discover natural gas, prospectors drilled about 1890 in Palmyra. At the depth of 1,700 ft. mineral water, largely iron, overflowed the opening. A pump was installed, and for a time the water was held in high repute for its curative properties. By 1905 the interest waned, the well was abandoned, later plugged, and is now buried beneath the gravel driveway of the Graystone Gasoline Station. (Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra Junction
Description:The Railroad station for the city of Palmyra, about a half-mile west of the city. ( (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra Massacre: Memorial
Description:A memorial which stands on the corner of the courthouse square in Palmyra; erected to commemorate the death of twelve Palmyra citizens, prisoners in Palmyra jail on the charge of sympathy for the Confederacy. It was reported to General John McNeil in command in northeast Missouri that a "bushwhacker" had shot a Union man and in retaliation General McNeil on October 18, 1862 had these twelve citizens shot without the semblance of a trial. The act is known for this reason as the "Palmyra Massacre," and General McNeil is "the man most hated in Missouri." The late editor of the PALMYRA SPECTATOR, Frank Sosey, wrote a stirring novel which he called ROBERT DEVOY based upon this deplorable "circumstance of war." The memorial bears on its face the names of the twelve victims. (MISSOURI DEMOCRACY, Vol. I, 212; KAHOKA GAZETTE-HERALD, Oct. 9, 1936.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra School District
Description:One of five school districts in 1842. (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra Seminary
Description:See Bethel College. See Palmyra Female Seminary
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmyra-Shelbyville Wagon Trail
Description:A pioneer road connecting these two points. (Mrs. D.M. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Park Methodist Episcopal Church South
Description:The mother church of Methodism in Hannibal. A regular organization prior to 1835. The present church building was erected in 1881. So named for Central Park (q.v.), near which it stands. (Mirror, 199; Morris Anderson; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pearl Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River, below Glasscock's Island. It became notorius as a gambling place. So named for a man who lived on the island. Also known as Pearl's Island. (Coues-Pike, Not, 8; Geo. Shaeffer; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peddicord School
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township, on Lick Creek. So named for the owner of the land. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pee Dee Branch
Description:A small branch in Warren Township; said to have been so named by early settlers from Virginia by reason of its similarity to a branch of that name in that state. This branch is not indicated on the map of Virginia, but there is the Pee Dee River and the Little Peedee (so spelled in both cases), in the Carolinas (Rand McNally Road Map, 1930); given in the International Cyclopedia as the Great Peedee and Little Peedee (so spelled in both cases). Both rivers in South Carolina are near Marion and border on Marion County in that state. The name occurs otherwise in South Carolina as Pee Dee and Peedee. The sheriff of Marion County, Missouri, in 1879 was a native of North Carolina, born on the Peedee River. (Atlas Marion 1901; Rand McNally Road Map, 1930; International Cyclopedia; E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator; A.P. Calvert)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pee Dee School
Description:A schoolhouse in Warren Township. No deed is recorded, and no definite knowledge exists as to the time of its establishment, though records reveal that a school was taught here in 1842. It was first known as the Clay Lick School, for its proximity to Deer Lick (q.v.), where the soil was of clay. When the name was changed to Pee Dee is unknown. Little is known of the school prior to 1870, though it is certain it was named for the Pee Dee Branch, (q.v.). (Atlas Marion 1901; Palmyra Spectator; A.P. Calvert; E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peg-Leg Shannon Cemetery
Description:See Massie Mill Cemetery
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pendle Mill
Description:A steam flour mill in the 1850s near Palmyra. So named for its owner. (Jacob Tate)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:People's Mills
Description:See Hanley's Mills
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pepper Branch
Description:A branch in the northern part of Warren Township, flowing north into the North Fork of North River. So named for the Pepper family who has large landholdings in Philadelphia. An earlier name was Vandever's Branch, for Jacob Vandever, an early settler. (HIST. MARION 1884, 675; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pete's Island
Description:See Glasscock's Island
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pettibone's Mill
Description:A great saw mill on the river, at Hannibal, east of Lovers Leap. It was established as a pioneer mill and continued under this name until torn down about 1906. It was built and operated by Wm. Pettibone, whence the name. (HIST. MARION 1884, 238; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Philadelphia
Description:A post office since 1853; north and west of the center of Union Township twelve miles west of Palmyra. It was laid out in 1835 by Muldrow and his associates as a part of the "Eastern Run" (q.v.), following by a little the building of Marion College. It was so closely identified with the college as to be almost a part of it. Its streets were named for founders of the college. The "City of Brotherly Love" in the East was thus honored in that Dr. Ely and others had come from that city. At the same time was laid out by the same projectors a New York (q.v.), in Shelby County, that should be a second counterpart of a great city in the "East. (Hayward 1853; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; Colton Map Mo., 1857; HIST. MARION 1884, 236, 725; P.G.; Eaton, 193)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Philadelphia Consolidated School District
Description:A school district composed of Philadelphia high and grade schools, Ewing, Prairie, St. Paul, and Spence (q.v.). (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pike County, Illinois Railroad
Description:See Hannibal and Naples Railroad
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pilgrim Congregational Church
Description:A Congregational Church in Hannibal; organized in 1880 out of the First Congregational Church. The congregation no longer exists. The building was sold to the K.P. Lodge after 1916; they rent it now to the new religious sect known as the Gospel of Peace. Pilgrim--a wayfarer; one who travles to some holy place as a devotee--(I Chr. 29:15) (HIST. MARION 1884, 982, 983; Mirror, 213; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pine Grove Addition [1 of 2]
Description:An addition to Marion City (q.v.), in Marion County. So named for a grove of pines in the locality. (Plat; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pine Grove Addition [2 of 2]
Description:An addition to Hannibal; incorporated July, 1889. It took its name from a grove of pine trees that formerly stood there. (HIST. MARION 1884, 950; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Grove Church
Description:A Methodist Church northwest of Palmyra by about six miles, on the Emerson road, before 1860. Scant record remains of this church though it was but recently abandoned. It is a brick building standing in a beautiful grove; hence the name. (Soil Survey, Marion 1911; Mrs. Frank Lane; Presley Lane; John Lemmons; Geo. Shaeffer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church
Description:A Baptist Church about six miles southwest of Palmyra, and one-half mile west of Woodland; organized in 1833, the first church in Liberty Township. The first meeting house of logs was erected about 1837. The church was disbanded in 1905, but later reorganized. Services are now held once a month. So named for its location. (HIST. MARION 1884, 804; Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934; Mrs. Frank Lane; Thaddeus R. Smith; (F) Rev. Adolph Vollmer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:See Woodland School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Poage Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River just above Huiskamp (q.v.). Known also as Island No. 9. (Cf. Baldwin Island). So named for its owner. (Atlas Marion 1913; Geo. Shaeffer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Polk Smoot's Blacksmith Shop
Description:See Shanks' Blacksmith Shop
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Popinaw Lane
Description:See Amick Lane
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Port Scipio
Description:A former settlement and landing at the mouth of the Bay de Charles, just north of Hannibal; now a part of Hannibal. It was doubtless projected at the same time and named under the same circumstances as Hannibal (q.v.). Of their rivalry Campbell declares (p. 355); "From 1825 to 1835 new London (in Ralls County), Palmyra, Hannibal, Scipio, Marion City, and Quincy, Illinois, were the great cities of the West, and much jealousy existed between them. In 1825 New London and Palmyra were rivals; in 1827 Palmyra and Marion City; in 1829 Hannibal and Scipio; and finally there was a spirited rivalry between Palmyra and Hannibal. The last came off victor in the succeeding decade, and was incorporated as a city in 1839." In the MIRROR (p. 87), we are told that the plat of Port Scipio was filed October 4, 1847. The name Port Scipio first appears on a map of Missouri in 1869. The change from the earlier name Scipio was perhaps an acknowledgment that it was destined never to be anything but a shipping port for its victorious rival. When it was finally incorporated as a part of Hannibal (although the original site of the town has never been included within the Hannibal city limits), history would seem to have been reversed. In ancient times Scipio conquered Hannibal; in modern Missouri it was Hannibal that conquered Scipio. (HIST. MARION, 1994, p. 771; Atlas Marion, 1913; Map Mo., 1869; Campbell's Gazetteer, 1874, p. 355; Mirror of Hannibal, 1905, p. 87; F.T. Russell)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Potter School
Description:See Franklin School or Four Corners School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Potter's Slough
Description:See River Slough
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Povidence Church
Description:A Baptist Church east and south of Palmyra at Withers Mill in Miller Township, established in 1849. It was known earlier as a Missionary Baptist Church (See South River Church). It is a strong church today. (HIST. MARION 1884, 565; Atlas Marion 1901, 26; Min. Bethel Baptist Association, 1934; Mrs. Frank Lane; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie Baptist Church
Description:See Union Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie School [1 of 2]
Description:A schoolhouse built around 1840, two and a half miles northeast of Philadelphia in Union Township. It stood originally about one mile north of the present building, and was known facetiously as "Brush College." It was surrounded by virgin forest. This school was broken up by the Civil War. In 1868, was established Prairie School; so named because the acre of land on which it was built was covered with prairie grass as tall as a horse's back. In 1906, this schoolhouse was burned. The new building overlooks the State Highway linking Philadelphia with Palmyra. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator; Mrs. J.B. Sams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie School [2 of 2]
Description:See Prairie View School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie School District
Description:One of five school districts in 1842. (See Prairie View School) (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie View
Description:An addition to Monroe City (q.v.), in Marion County. So named for the locality. (Plat; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie View Family Burying Ground
Description:An old family burying ground northwest of Palmyra, on the farm now George Weller's. The earliest gravestone bears the date 1806. The name is one of location, a large body of prairie land lying to the east. (E.C. Bohon; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie View School
Description:A schoolhouse in Fabius Township, dating back to the 1840s. It was first known as the Prairie School for its location on the prairie. It was built on land deeded the district by the McPike family, and became known by their name. Recently rebuilt; it was given the name Prairie View, again for its location. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator; Mrs. T.B. Carter; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Presbyterian Female Institute
Description:A preparatory school at Palmyra; in successful operation by 1853, with four teachers. Conducted by Reverend F.A. Shears. (Sutherland and McEvoy 1860; HIST. MARION 1884, 840)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prince Avenue Baptist Church
Description:Organized as the Oakwood Baptist Church in 1891. The church was discontinued in 1899, but was reorganized in 1911 in Hannibal (See Oakwood), as Prince Avenue Church. So named for the avenue on which it stands. (Min. Bethel Baptist Association, 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Providence School
Description:One of the oldest and best known of the rural schools; a short distance from the Burlington Station at Withers Mill. In 1831, land was deeded by John Withers to the trustees of the school district. The school built was the first to be given the name of Providence School. The present stone building is on this site. It was named for Providence Church (q.v.). (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator; Mrs. T.B. Carter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Quincy and Palmyra Railroad
Description:A railroad built from Quincy, Illinois, to Palmyra; hence the name. The project was that of a junction with the Hannibal and St. Joseph road at or near Palmyra. The roadway was located in 1856, and completed to Palmyra in 1860. Owing, however, to the jealous rivalry between Quincy and Hannibal, and Palmyra and Hannibal, no connection was allowed between the two roads at that time. When war came on, Secretary Stanton objected to the interference in transportation at Palmyra, and issued a ukase that trains run through, and trains have been running through ever since, although Palmyra Junction (q.v.), is of course a regular stopping place. The road was purchased by the Hannibal and St. Joseph (q.v.), in November of 1866. (HIST. MARION 1884, 328, 336, 339, 557, 949; History of Northeast Missouri, 445; Mirror, 38)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Quincy, Missouri, and Pacific Railroad
Description:See Quincy, Omaha, and Kansas City Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Quincy, Omaha, and Kansas City Railroad
Description:This road from Quincy, Illinois, crosses the northeast corner of Marion, the southwest section of Lewis, and Knox well to the center. It was organized as the Quincy, Missoiuri, and Pacific, in 1869, with its western objective the Missouri River and eventually the Pacific. It was constructed to Kirksville, Adair County, by 1878, and thence was continued westward to Kansas City. After 1882 it was operated by the Wabash. It underwent from this time various changes in ownership. At one time it was absorbed by the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe (q.v.). After assuming its present name, it was known jocularly as the "O.K.," intitial letters of Omaha and Kansas City. Along with this nickname ran the story that trains on this road would pick anyone up at any point along the road or stop for passengers to pick berries. (Campbell 1874, 309; Atlas Lewis 1878, 10; History of Lewis 1887, 173; History of Knox 1887, 727, 728; History of Northeast Missouri, 368, 388; Williams 1904, 388, 443; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Raynor and Edmonds Mill
Description:A saw and grist mill one mile south of the Four Corners, on North River, between Warren and Union townships. In existence before 1861. So named for its owners (see "Yankee Town"). (John Lemmons; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Raynor Ford
Description:A ford on North River by Raynor and Edmonds Mill (q.v.); hence the name. (John Lemmons; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Redd's Schoolhouse
Description:A pioneer schoolhouse in Fabius Township. So named for the pioneer owner of the land. (HIST. MARION 1884, 576)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reformed Church
Description:See Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rensselaer Academy
Description:A Presbyterian preparatory school "for classical and advanced education;" prior to 1850. Organized in the neighborhood of Big Creek. Now in Ralls where there is a station named for the school which no longer exists. It was a strong institution in its day; patronized widely by people of all religious beliefs. It passed with the passing of the academies. There was an effort around 1900 to revive the school, but it lasted only a short time. So named for Rensselaer in Troy, New York. The school in Missouri was known widely also as Van Rensselaer Academy. (HIST. MARION 1884, 71; History of Northeast Missouri, John Lemmons; Geo. Shaeffer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rickey Hollow
Description:A depression between the hills, southwest of Hannibal, on Highway 61. So named for a family living there. (Lucy Latimer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rightmire Ford
Description:A ford above Stony Riffle Ford (q.v.), on North River west of Palmyra. A Mr. Rightmire lived at this point for a long time though not owner of the land. (HIST. MARION 1884, 705; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ritchie's Woolen Mill
Description:A mill in the west part of Miller Township; around 1825. So named for its owner. (HIST. MARION 1884, 161, 637)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:River Point
Description:A projection of land on the Mississippi River in Hannibal at the foot of Church Street. A high wall was erected at this point where inundation formerly ocurred annually. It affords a beautiful view of the river, of Mark Twain Bridge (q.v.), to the left, and Lovers Leap (q.v.), to the right. To the right of the point empties Bear Creek (q.v.). The point has been converted into a small park known as Nipper's Park (q.v.). (Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935; Helen D. Birch)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riverside
Description:An addition to Hannibal along the river, whence the name. Site of Riverside Cemetery. (Plat)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riverview Addition
Description:See Broad Ax Tract
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riverview Park
Description:A park of two hundred acres in the northwest part of Hannibal, along Mark Twain Avenue. It was presented to the city by Wm. B. Pettibone. (See Pettibone's Mill). It was so named for its beautiful view of the Mississippi. Here the picturesque roads wind up and up, commanding views at vantage points of the river until they reach the crest of the hills, 200 ft. above the Mississippi, and finally the highest point of all known as Inspiration Point (q.v.). (Atlas Marion 1913; Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riviere au Sel
Description:See Salt River Country.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Robards' RoBards Mill
Description:A mill at Hannibal around 1853. Captain Robards was a pioneer miller who came to Hannibal from Kentucky. In 1849 he organized a company that participated in the California Gold Rush. (This well-known Hannibal family write their name with an internal capital, which they defend by saying it is so written in old deeds. Doubtless they are misled by the large "b" often found in old script). (History of Northeast Missouri, 22; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Bridge Slough
Description:A slough over by old Marion City (q.v.), and the more recent Huiskamp. It opened out of Bay de Charles. Captain Bowles built over the slough a bridge of rock; hence the name. (Presley Lane; George Shaeffer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Creek
Description:A branch in Hannibal which takes its name from Rock Street of that city. It empties into the Mississippi at North Street. It abounded in springs, pure and clear, and supplied the first settlers with water. (HIST. MARION 1884, 890; Mirror, 22, 60)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Cut
Description:An old roadway north one mile from Palmyra; blasted out of the rock in the building of the railroad between Palmyra and Quincy; hence the name. The site is known today for its picturesque beauty, and is a favorite picnic grounds. (Presley Lane; Lou Sharp; Leona Stuetzer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock-Cut Bridge
Description:A highway bridge over North River at Rock Cut (q.v.). Replaced when the new Highway 61 was constructed in 1930. (Lou Sharp; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Grove
Description:A noted grove nearly circular in form, whence its name, which once stood northeast of Emerson (q.v.), and gave its name to the township in which it was located. (HIST. MARION 1884, 750)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Grove Meeting House
Description:A meeting house in the records of the county as early as 1833, but there is no record of the denomination. It is a guess that it was a Christian organization. So named for "Round Grove" (q.v.), in the vicinity of which the meeting house was built. (HIST. MARION 1884, 750; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Grove Township
Description:A township organized February 6, 1833. It originally comprised a large part of what is now Shelby County. It is the northwestern township, separated from Union to the south by the South Fabius River, with Fabius Township to the west. For name cf. Round Grove. (HIST. MARION 1884, 750; Rand McNally, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rowe School
Description:A schoolhouse in South River Township, near West Ely. So named for Judge Rowe, owner of the land. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Running Slough
Description:A name given in the past to Bay de Charles for the reason that it is an arm of the great river that makes its way through a marsh, doubtless an old bed of the river. (Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rush's Creek
Description:See Clear Creek
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rush's Mill
Description:See Bay Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rutter's Ferry
Description:A ferry at Port Scipio (q.v.), in 1831, operated by Edmond Rutter, from whom it took its name. (HIST. MARION 1884, 179, 896)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem Church
Description:A little church at an early day a short distance from Union Church (q.v.), on North River. There is no record of the denomination. Cf. above. (Lou Sharp; Jacob Tate)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem School
Description:Established as a subscription school in 1855 on the Dimmitt farm in Fabius Township and known as the Dimmit School. In 1860 the building ws moved to 1/4 mile northwest of the Lycurgus Lafon farm, south of the Philadelphia and Palmyra road, whereupon it became known as the Lafon School. In 1865, it was brought to its present location, and took its present name from old Salem Church (q.v.). (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator; Mrs. T.B. Carter; Jacob Tate, Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Saline du Bastion
Description:See "The Bastion"
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Saline River
Description:A name apparently given to South River by Campbell, 1873. Both names are indicated on the map of that year. The other authorities cited mention the river by name. Residents know nothing of the name. Since South River rises in Saline Township in Ralls County the name is doubtless given for that reason. (Campbell 1873; Campbell 1874; History of N.E. Missouri, 74; Thaddeus R. Smith; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sallee's Mill
Description:A water mill on North River on the Warren road, north of Palmyra. So named for its owner. (HIST. MARION 1884, 299; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salt Lick Ford
Description:A place on North River below the forks, held by Colonel William Muldrow. (See "Eastern Run"). Colonel Muldrow dug a number of wells here, and poured into them salt which he had hauled in by the wagon load. The wells filled about half full of water, which he drew and evaporated for the salt. By this deception he got men to buy the place for a good sum for apparently rich salt licks. There was a wagon crossing here. The name Salt Lick comes from the project of Colonel Muldrow. The ford was known also as Lick Ford and Lick Crossing of North River. ( (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salt Lick Pacific Railroad
Description:A prospective railroad in THE GILDED AGE, which though this route was twenty miles off the proposed straight line of the road was to run through "Stone's Landing" (q.v.), and bring navigation to "Goose Run" (See "Columbus River"), and prosperity to the proposed city that was to be built up like that the rod of Alladdin had touched (See "Napoloen"). Known also as the Salt Lick Union Pacific Railroad. The name is selected for the location and the project. Cf. Palmyra and Marion City Railroad. (THE GILDED AGE, Chapters 16, 17, 22)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salt Lick Union Pacific Railroad
Description:See Salt Lick Pacific Railroad
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salt River Country
Description:A name applied to all Northeast Missouri. It took its name from Salt River, "pole star attraction," owning to the salt springs discovered as early as 1687. (See Boone Lick Country). (Houck, I, 238) DeLassus, the French governor (1799-1804), strained every nerve to make the French Territory independent of the importation of salt,--salt sold for $6 a bushel. Salt water is found over the whole extent of this region, yielding from one-eighth to one-twelfth of its weight in pure salt. In many places this water breaks out in the form of fountains or springs. Sometimes veins are to be secured by boring. (Peck, 1831, p. 88) Salt River was originally the Ohaha or Auhaha, an Indian name of unknown origin. It was laid down on the maps before 1700. The French gave the river the name, "Riviere au Sel," translated by early settlers Salt River because of the salt springs which lay near it in Ralls. Under this name Salt River is first given on the map of Missouri Territory, 1818. (MIRROR, 79, 83; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; Miss Leech's Thesis)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salt River Road
Description:One of the old trails, laid out in 1823 to the Salt River Country (q.v.). It ran at right angles to the old Boon Lick Road (q.v.), following the direction of the Mississippi from the vicinity of Salt River to Hannibal, then crossed Marion County by way of Clark County. (History of N.E. Missouri, 77, 82)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scipio
Description:See Port Scipio
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scipio River
Description:According to Holcombe (HIST. MARION, 1884, p. 771), the name given by the Spanish Surveyor-General Soulard in 1800 to the Bay de Charles. The name never appears on any map, and Holcombe's story is almost certainly fictitious. For discussion see under Port Scipio and Hannibal.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scott School
Description:A schoolhouse in Round Grove Township. So named for J.W. Scott, owner of the land on which the schoolhouse was built. (E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:See's Branch
Description:A branch in the southeast part of Warren Township, flowing in a northerly direction to the South Fork of North River. So named for the first minister in the vicinity, Wm. See, and the first settler in Warren Township, Geo. See. The Sees came to this vicinity from Kentucky in 1818. (HIST. MARION 1884, 673, 675; Soil Survey, Marion 1911)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:See's Branch Church
Description:A Methodist Church established around 1818 in South River Township, on See's Branch, from which it took its name. The church no longer exists. The first minister was Wm. See, a Methodist minister who established the church. The second minister was Reverend Jeremiah Taylor, a well-known Baptist preacher of that period. (HIST. MARION 1884, 676; Thaddeus R. Smith; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:See's Branch Settlement
Description:A settlement established on See's Branch (q.v.), around 1818, in Warren Township. For name cf. See's Branch. (HIST. MARION 1884, 676; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seventh Day Adventist Church
Description:This church was established at Palmyra a little after the middle of the nineteenth century. The Adventists believe that the second coming of Christ and the end of the world (or age), are near at hand--a doctrine preached by many clergymen in the early years of the nineteenth century. Prominent among them for his chronological calculations from the prophecies was William Miller of New York. Early calculations fixed the coming of Christ for about the year 1843. (See Lovers Leap). The followers were often called Millerites. Some followers of Wm. Miller began in 1844 and 1845 to observe the seventh day, and organized with their present name, Seventh Day Adventists, at Battle Creek, Michigan, in 1860. They set no date for the Second Advent. The Seventh Day Adventists believe in the observance of the seventh day (Exodus 20:10), and in immortality only through faith in Christ; they also believe that after the Second Advent (Act 3:21) and the Millennium (Rev. 20), Satan and the wicked will be annihilated. (Intern. Cyc.; Mrs. Jesse Lee Kelton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shacklett Mill
Description:A mill at West Ely in 1836. So named for its owner. (HIST. MARION 1884, 664; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shade's Ford
Description:A ford four miles up North River from Palmyra. So named for a Mr. Shade who lived at this point. (Presley Lane; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shanks' Blacksmith Shop
Description:A shop on the south bank of the South Fabius River; once an important voting precinct. An earlier name was that of Polk Smoot's Blacksmith Shop. Both names were for the owners at different periods. (Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shannon School
Description:A schoolhouse in Fabius Township. So named for a George Shannon, who owned the land on which the schoolhouse was built. An earlier name was Mt. Olivet for Mt. Olivet Church in the neighborhood. This Shannon and the one referred to in the next entry is not the same as George ("Peg-Leg") Shannon who was a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, buried in the Masssie Mill Cemetery (q.v.). (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shannon Springs
Description:Springs in South River Township, west of Palmyra. They are sulphur springs rising from blue shale along Lick Creek (q.v.). A resort for picnic parties, political meetings, etc. So named for the son of George A. Shannon accidentally shot here by his brother in 1882. (HIST. MARION 1884, 659; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shanty Bend Pond
Description:A pond located on the south bank of the Fabius River, about one mile north of Mark. It got its name from the shanties built around it by the fishers, hunters, and woodcutters. ( (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sharpsburg
Description:A post office from 1853-1867, in the southwest corner of Marion County, about six miles southwest of Palmyra. It was established by the 1830s, and was at one time the leading village in Warren Township, but the laying out of Monroe City (1857), and the completion of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad (1859), killed it. So named for Reverend Richard Sharp, an early circuit rider. The Sharps were among the first settlers. (Hayward 1853; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; HIST. MARION 1884, 688; Mirror, 14; Shelbina Democrat, July 31, 1935; Shelby County Herald, July 31, 1935; Maps Mo., 1844 - 1886; Lou Sharp; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sharpsburg Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Sharpsburg (q.v.), whence the name. The church was organized in 1868. It dissolved in 1878. (Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sharpsburg Cemetery
Description:A cemetery at the old village of Sharpsburg. The first burial was that of an Indian, 1839. (HIST. MARION 1884, 691; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sharpsburg Church
Description:An early Methodist Church at Sharpsburg (q.v.); established by the 1830s by Reverend Richard Sharp, an early circuit rider. (Shelbina Democrat, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Short Line
Description:See St. Louis and Hannibal Railroad
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sites School
Description:See Cloverdale School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slee's Mill
Description:A steam mill on Lick Creek (q.v.), southwest of Palmyra by three or four miles, on the Warren road. So named for the owner. (Soil Survey, Marion 1911; Presley Lane; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Smileyville
Description:A post office from 1891-1902; in the southwestern part of Fabius Township, about nine miles west and north of Palmyra. So named for Mr. Smiley, the storekeeper. An earlier name was Glover (or Gloverville), for Samuel Glover, the blacksmith. Indicated as Glover in 1886; as Smileyville in 1904. (HIST. MARION 1884, 470; Maps Mo., from 1886; Presley Lane; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sni
Description:See Snicarty
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sni Island
Description:Originlly bottom land on the Illinois side of the Mississippi River opposite Hannibal; the old channel of the river. From 1792-1800, the French called the channel "Chenal Ecarte" (Separate or Divided Channel). The expression was finaly shortened to Sni; spelled also Sny. (See Snicarty). As late as 1838, French hunters often met Indians here as it was a favorite harbor for deer and wild turkeys. (Mirror, 96, Note-53)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sny
Description:See Snicarty
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Soap Hollow
Description:A hollow so designated from a soap factory which stood on the present site of the Hannibal water works in Riverview Addition (q.v.). The boat yard was just below the mouth of the Hollow. (Mirror, 64)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South and Easton's Mill
Description:Th old Gash Mill on North River near Palmyra, on the Palmyra and Philadelphia Road; around 1843. It was sold later to the Huggins Brothers and known under that name; still later it became the property of Mr. South and Mr. Easton. For the name Gash, cf. Gash Settlement. The name in each case is that of the owner. (HIST. MARION 1884, 272; Presley Lane; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South River
Description:A river rising in Ralls County, Saline Township, and entering Marion in the south-central part of South River Township. It flows northeast into the Mississippi River about two miles south of the mouth of North River. See under Noth River for the earlier name Two Rivers for both streams, used on maps from 1822 to 1844. The name South Two Rivers appear first in 1824 and alternatively thereafter, until after 1861 it supersedes the other names. All are obviously names of position and direction. (HIST. MARION 1884, p. 148; Atlas Marion, 1913; Maps Mo., 1822 ff.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South River Bridge (Highway) [1 of 2]
Description:An old bridge a stone's throw east from the new bridge erected in 1926. (Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South River Bridge [2 of 2]
Description:A bridge built over South River, three miles south of Palmyra, in the year 1853. It was destroyed during the Civil War, wrecking a train load of Northern soldiers. The present bridge has been there since 1900 or before, but there have been many repairs, the last in 1930-37. Over it ran the old Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad (q.v.), opened in 1857. Another bridge a stone throw west was built in 1926 to carry the highway. (HIST. MARION 1884, 218; Thaddeus R. Smith; Presley Lane; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South River Church
Description:A pioneer Baptist church on South River, whence its name; organized in 1821, it was the first church in the county, and doubtless the oldest in northeast Missouri. The church house of logs with a sort of gallery stood in the Gash Settlement (q.v.), on the bank of the river in the woods, near Smith's Mill and Distillery (See Hawkins Smith's Mill), and about three miles south of Palmyra. One date fixes it as early as 1821; another gives it as 1826. The preacher was Uncle Billy Fuqua who came to the vicinity in 1800-08. He had been a captive and had been maltreated by the Indians. The later church was built in 1868. After the division in the Baptist Church, which took place in 1835, this church was known variously as Old School, Primitive, or Hardshell Baptist Church, the last term applied in sarcasm for the extreme Calvinistic views of this group in the church as opposed to the newer and more liberal views of the Missionary group, who believe that all modern auxiliaries such as Sunday schools, missionaries, and the like, are authorized by the Bible. From the term, Hardshell, came the still more derisive "Old Ironsides." The feeling ran high for a period between the two, breeding a church truly militant. (HIST. MARION 1884, 161, 162, 661, 665; History of N.E. Missouri, 450; Stevens, 169; Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South River Levee
Description:A levee which runs along South River on th south, extending from the Mississippi Levee to the south of the mouth of South River. The land so enclosed is said to be perhaps the most important and wealthy poducing of any body of land tributary to Hannibal. All the produce finds its market in Hannibal. By this levee upwards of 10,000 acres of land are made possible for cultivation. (Mirror, 127, 128)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South River Settlement
Description:See Gash Settlement
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South River Township
Description:A township organized out of Liberty Township, November 9, 1836. It lies west of Miller and south of Liberty, with Warren to the west. It is separated from Liberty by South River, for which it was named. (HIST. MARION 1884, 203; Rand McNally, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Two Rivers
Description:See South River
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spaulding Spring
Description:See Trabue's Lick
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spears Schoolhouse
Description:A school existing in 1831 in the vicinity of the later Ebenezer Church (q.v.). So named for the owner of the land. (HIST. MARION 1884, 718)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spence School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township. So named for Edward Spence, owner of the land on which the building stands. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spooner Creek
Description:A small ravine or gulch in southern Hannibal, ordinarily dry but at times full. An independent water course with a fall of 180 ft. to the mile, and a consequent disposition to change quickly from a dry branch to a raging torrent. So named for George Spooner who helped to construct the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. (Mirror, 96e; HIST. MARION 1884, 670, 938)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Springdale
Description:A village given by Campbell as eight miles west of Hannibal; new in 1874, laid off after the completion of the M. K. and T. Railroad (q.v.). It does not appear on any map after 1875. The name was given because of the spring at the site, and its location in a dale. (Campbell (1874), 357; Atlas Marion (1875), 9; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Charles Road
Description:The earliest main road (1823), at its earliest no more than a trail, beginning at St. Charles, first capital of the State, and coming north through Palmyra, La Grange, and Canton to the Des Moines River. (Clark County Courier, October 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Elizabeth's Hospital
Description:A Catholic hospital in Hannibal. It is not controlled by either of the Hannibal Catholic Churches. St. Elizabeth was the daughter of King Andrew of Hungary. Her palace was open daily to the sick and needy, for whom she cared with her own hands. She died in 1231. (SAINTS WE LOVE; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:A church organized in 1860 at Hannibal as a German Lutheran Church, and so known. It soon adopted the name, United Evangelical Lutheran which indicated a strong leaning toward the so-called Evangelical Church. Later the word "United" was dropped; the Lutheran background was thus emphasized. It is known also today as Saint John's Lutheran Church. The first church building was dedicated in 1864, the present building in 1897. A parochial school was also established from the beginning of the church. For the first thirty-two years the congregation was strictly German. Beginning around 1893, all evening services were conducted in English, and in 1903 regular morning services were conducted in English, and in 1903 regular morning services on the first Sunday of the month. All services have been held in English since 1918. A Biblical name:--John, the disciple whom Jesus loved. (St. John 13:23) He died at Ephesus in the year 100. (Mirror, 190; SAINTS WE LOVE: Rev. W.G. Schwehn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. John's Lutheran Church
Description:See St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph's Cathedral
Description:A Catholic Church established at Palmyra in 1863, and Parochial School in 1864. The first building was erected in 1879, the present church in 1899. The school held its sessions in what is now the home of the priest until 1918, when the school building was erected. A Biblical name:--Joseph, the spouse of the Virgin Mary, canonized by the Catholic Church which honors him as her patron. (Luke 1:27) HIST. MARION 1884, 850, 852; SAINTS WE LOVE)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis "Short Line" Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and Hannibal Railroad
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis and Hannibal Railroad
Description:A railroad projected in the early 1870s between St. Louis and Hannibal. It was opened to traffic to Prairieville, Pike County in 1878 and connected with the Wabash for St. Louis at Gilmore in 1882. Though the line was never completed it continues under this name. For a long time there was a controversy over the route as to whether it should run along the water or farther removed, a longer way. The longer route was selected, the St. Louis, Keokuk, and Northwestern (q.v.), taking the route along the river. The St. Louis and Hannibal was however called the St. Louis "Short Line" becaue it was the short route to residents of the interior. The road was heralded as a new, speedy, and commodious route from Hannibal to St. Louis, and the statement was made by the author of the HISTORY OF N.E. MISSOURI that it was regarded as one of the best lines in the West. The author of the MIRROR, however, says that in Pike County at Prairieville, the "Short Line" degenerated into a squirrel track and ran up a hollow tree. Tody the St. Louis and Hannibal runs from Hannibal through New London, Bowling Green, and Troy to Gilmore as in 1882, and thence goes by the Wabash to St. Louis. There is but one train a week from Hannibal to Bowling Green to hold the charter and right of way which the State of Missouri will not let the road delinquish. (HIST. MARION 1884, 577, 937; History of N.E. Missouri, 455; Mirror, 48, 49; Williams 1904; 303; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis, Keokuk, and Northwestern Railroad
Description:A railroad projected in the early 1870s, merging with the Mississippi Valley and Western (q.v.). It was known as the "Long Line," forming direct railway connection with St. Louis from Keokuk through Hannibal, paralleling the river through three counties. The line was completed between St. Louis and Keokuk in 1872. The northern part of the line was commonly known in Hannibal as the "K," for Keokuk, the northern terminal, and as "Mosquito Valley" Line for its location along the river. This line is now the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy. (Atlas Clark 1878; HIST. MARION 1884, 325, 937; History of N.E. Missouri, 455; History of Clark 1887, 300, 303; Mirror, 48; Williams 1904, 361; Wm. Bertier)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Mary's Avenue
Description:A roadway that is an extension of Broadway in Hannibal, leading off to the northeast to St. Mary's Cemetery; hence the name. (Plat; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Mary's Cemetery
Description:The Catholic Cemetery to the northwest of Hannibal, on the Palmyra-Hannibal road. For name cf. above. (Plat; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Paul College
Description:A college at Palmyra succeeding the Governor Clark Mission School (q.v.), in 1852, a charter being granted in that year under the name of St. Paul's College. At that time the building so known was erected. It was an Episcopalian school for boys, and was conducted for nineteen years by Dr. Wm. B. Corbyn, Rector of St. Paul's. It had all the powers and privileges of a university. The annual attendance until the Civil War was about 120 boys, one-half of whom were boarders. For many years it was one of the outstanding educational institutions of this section of the country. The Rector Corbyn became widely known for his disciplinary skill, and under him the school developed into a school for incorrigibles. Many prominent men in various parts of the country declare their indebtedness for their early training to Dr. Corbyn. Debt and Civil War brought the school to the verge of bankruptcy. Efforts were made in 1869 and again in 1871 to revive it. It became the personal property of Dr. Wainwright in the latter year. He conducted the school under the highest educational standards of the time, and it enjoyed a large enrollment for several years. In 1882 he found it was operating under a loss, and suggested to the parish that the operation of the school be suspended. It has never again opened. The building today is used as a tenement house for charity families. A Biblical name:--Paul, Apostle of the Gentiles, died the death of a martyr under Nero, 67. (Sutherland and McEvoy 1860; HIST. MARION 1884, 839, 847; History of N.E. Misouri, 113, 114; Palmyra Spectator, June 23, 1937; Mrs. Frank Lane; Thaddeus R. Smith; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Paul School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township, two miles south and east of Philadelphia and a part of the Philadelphia Consolidated School District. It is not being used at present. It is located in the vicinity of old St. Paul College (q.v.), for which it was named. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Paul's Chapel
Description:See St. Paul's Episcopal Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Paul's Episcopal Church
Description:An Episcopal Church that was established as a mission in the year 1837. It was the second Episcopal Church in Missouri, the first having been established in St. Louis. By 1838 the mission was able to lease a small plot of ground north of the location of the present St. Paul's Church, and began the erection of a building suitable for services. It was completed in 1839 and was maintained, as it had been built, largely by contributions from the church in St. Louis. During 1846 the lease on the ground expired, and the membership, unable to redeem the building, lost the church. Services were maintained with difficulty until 1848 when Dr. W.B. Corbyn of Danbury, Connecticut, came as rector to the parish. He started the mission school (See Governor Clark Mission School), which grew into St. Paul's College (q.v.), and in 1852 began the erection of a chapel to be known as St. Paul's Chapel. It stood on the ground of St. Paul's College as the Mission School was then known, and was used both for the college and local membrership of the church. It was built of white limestone in Gothic style, furnished with an open oak roof and a tower. It was planned to add transepts and a chapel making the building when finished cruciform in shape. This however was never done; the church as erected served the congregation for twenty-eight years. Dr. Corbyn resigned the rectorship in 1857, but returned in 1861 and remained in charge of the church and college until June, 1871, when he was succeeded by Reverend J.A. Wainwright of St. John's Church, Salisbury, Connecticut. The chapel at the college was not conveniently located for the use of most of the members, and it was decided that a new church edifice should be erected near the center of Palmyra. The lot on which the present church stands was purchased in 1877 and the new building was erected in 1880. All material that could be used from St. Paul's Chapel was employed in the new church, which lends an historic distinction to the new building. The stone of the walls all came from the old chapel and the handsome chancel furniture was made from timbers from the earlier building. In addition to being an old church edifice, the original church had a connection with the Civil War. Federal officers used the building as a stable, and when the building was razed the marks where the guard bunks had been fastened to the walls were still visible. Dr. Wainwright served the church until his death in 1898. The church celebrated its centennial on June 27-28 of 1937 with appropriate exercises. It is a strong church today. For name cf. above. (Sutherland and McEvoy 1860; HIST. MARION 1884, 839, 847; History of N.E. Missouri, 113, 114; Palmyra Spectator, June 23, 1937; Thaddeus R. Smith; Presley Lane; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Petersburg
Description:The name adopted for "The poor little shabby village" of Hannibal in the Mark Twain stories of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. St. Petersburg, capital of the old Russian empire, was ramified by many small streams, branches of the Neva; hence there was by so little a resemblance between the two places, the old Hannibal being traversed by many little streams that found their way down the hills into Bear Creek and the Mississippi. For a more probable reason for the name, see Hannibal. (ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapters 1, 5, 6, 13, 32, 35; ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN, Chapters 11, 12, 42; Intern. Cyc.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Statue of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn
Description:The famous statue stands at the foot of Cardiff Hill, facing Main Street, in old Hannibal. The memorial marks the favorite rendezvous of Tom Sawyer (Mark Twain) and his playmates. This is said to be the first statue erected to literary characters in America. (G.A. Mahan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stavely's Landing
Description:See Hannibal
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Still-House Branch
Description:A branch to the rear of Cardiff Hill (q.v.), in TOM SAWYER. On its bank was the old ha'nted house where the boys, Tom and Huck, sought and--saw the buried treaure. (See Stillwell Branch) (ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER, Chapter 25)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stillwell Branch
Description:A branch back of Holliday's Hill (Cardiff Hill), in Hannibal. Doubtless the one given the name of Stillhouse Branch (q.v.), by Mark Twain. The branch ran through land belonging to a Mr. Stillwell, whence the name. (Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stillwell Island
Description:See Stilma Island
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stilma Island
Description:An island just above Port Scipio; so named for its owner. At an earlier period it was known as Stillwell Island again for its owner. Mr. Stillwell owned all the outlying islands at one time. (Atlas Marion 1913; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stone Hill School
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township, four miles south of Palmyra. One story is that it was so named for the old stone building that stood on the hill; another, that it took its name from the rocky hill on the top of which the building stands. Antedating 1820, it stood in the South River Settlement on the Gash holdings, and was known as the Gash School. It was the first in the vicinity. Later it became known as the Nichols School for the owner of the land at that time. The present school land was deeded to the district by Moses Gash, 1859, and John Young. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator, Clipping; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Moris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stone School [1 of 2]
Description:See Clear Creek School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stone School [2 of 2]
Description:A schoolhoue in Warren Township. So named for a Mr. Stone who owned the land. (E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stone's Ferry
Description:See Hannibal Ferry
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stone's Landing
Description:The name given by Mark Twain in THE GILDED AGE to the landing on the site of Marion City (see Green's Landing). Here in the story the great city of "Napoleon," was to be built. (THE GILDED AGE, Chapter 16)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stony Riffle Ford
Description:A ford on North River, west of Palmyra. The vicinity is still so known. So named because of great boulders in the stream at this point. (Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stratford Lake
Description:A lake in Stratford Park (q.v.), Hannibal, whence the name. It was scarcely more than a pool fed by a spring; now cultivated. (Atlas Marion 1913; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stratford Park
Description:A section of the city of Hannibal to the northwest, opened for investment in 1909; across from Indian Mound Park. The name was chosen for no other reason than its appeal to the promoter, Charles Rendle. Possibly it was suggested to him by Stratford, England, the birthplace of Shakespeare. (Atlas Marion 1913; Morris Anderson; Helen D. Birch)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Strawberry Hill
Description:A hill which adjoins Oakwood on the north and Hannibal on the south, now a part of Hannibal. In 1923 it was bequeathed to the state by William Hatch, and the Bureau of Dairy Industry by the U.S. Department of Agriculture which was established here. (See Hatch Dairy Experimental Station). The hill was so named for the abundance of wild strawberries which in pioneer days grew here. (Lucy Latimer; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stringtown
Description:See Oakwood
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sudduth School
Description:A schoolhouse in Round Grove Township, west and north of Hester. So named for the pioneer family who owned the land. (Atlas Marion 1901; E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sunflower Branch
Description:See Lazy Branch
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sunny Slope
Description:An addition to Hannibal. So named for its location. (Atlas Marion 1913)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sunnyside
Description:An addition to Hannibal on the northwest, and the site of the Hannibal Country Club; along Mark Twain Avenue. So named for its location. (Plat; Atlas Marion 1913; (F) Ed Burkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Suter School
Description:A schoolhouse known first as the Curd School, near the old South River Bridge on the lower road to the Mississippi bottom land. It was so named for Benjamin Curd, an early settler in that vicinity. During the Civil War, the school used the Sites building, (q.v.). In 1869 or 1870, a frame building was put up on the Suter farm, and the school became known as the Suter School, for J.J. Suter, who was one of the earlier settlers of the county. The building was also called Oak Ridge, for the many oak trees surrounding it, and the high ridge on which it stood. Th name Suter School continued however, and has since been adopted. (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sycamore Branch
Description:See Lazy Branch
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tadpole Lane
Description:An old road south of Bear Creek leading down to what is now Spaulding's Spring, a location still known by old people as Trabue's Lick (q.v.); hence the lane is also known as Trabue Lane. The road crosses the creek many times, the bed of which is filled with tadpole holes. (Mirror, 6; Wm. Bertier; Judge E.T. Cameron)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tank
Description:See Tanks
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tanks
Description:A post office at some time between 1883 and 1886, discontinued by the latter year. A station about eight miles northeast of Palmyra on a branch of the Quincy road. A water tank was located here for the watering of trains, and the station came to be spoken of as Tanks. Also known as Tank. Now extinct. (Polk (1889); P.G.; Map Mo., 1886; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor
Description:A post office under this name since about 1861; in the northeast corner of Fabius Township on the North Fabius River, ten miles north of Palmyra, and five and a half miles west of Quincy. An earlier form of the name was Taylor's Mills; given under this name as a post office in 1837, the only time the name occurs. Colton Map of Missouri (1857), gives Taylors Mills. Hutawa (1844), gives Taylor Mill, indicating the saw mill as well. It is indicated under its present name as early as 1874. It took it's name from Taylor's Mill (q.v.), and was laid off and owned chiefly by Captain John Taylor, who owned and operated the mill. (Wetmore (1837); Campbell (1874), 351; Atlas Marion (1875), 10; HIST. MARION (1884), 777; Atlas Marion (1913); P.G.; Maps Mo. since 1837; Thaddeus R. Smith; Jacob Tate; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor School
Description:See Franklin School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River below Hannibal by a little distance; opposite Cincinnati Landing on the Illinois side of the river. There was a landing on the island also. So named for the owner. (Coues-Pike, 8; Geo. Shaeffer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Mill [1 of 2]
Description:See Taylor
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Mill [2 of 2]
Description:A mill on the South Fabius River on the site of the village of Taylor (q.v.), as early as 1827 or 1828. Given on the Hutawa Map of 1844 as Saw Mill, north of Palmyra. Campbell gives the date of its establishment as 1816. For name cf. Taylor. (Campbell (1874); Atlas Marion (1875), 10; HIST. MARION (1884), 777; Thaddus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ten-Mile House
Description:See Gilbert's Island
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Bastion
Description:Known also as La Bastile and Le Bastion, as Saline du Bastion in the grant, otherwise as Bouvet's Lick. The name applied by Bouvet to his salt-works in what is now Ralls County, a short distance south of the mouth of Clear Creek, across the country from which Bouvet transported his salt by pack trail to his warehouse. (See Bouvet's Warehouse; also Hannibal and St. Joseph Highway). Bouvet had in 1792 been established in Ralls, bu twice his crude plant had been raided by the Indians during his absence in quest of supplies, and his tools stolen and destroyed. A third time, in 1800, the plant was destroyed by the same agents along with the destruction of Bouvet's Warehouse (q.v.), on the Bay. The term "bastion" is merely the French word for fort, palisade. The nickname "La Bastile" may have been borrowed from the name of the famous Paris fortress whose fall in 1789, just three years before, had resounded throughout the world and ushered in the French Revolution. (HIST. MARION 1884, 134, 188; Hist. N.E. Mo., 194, 446, 449)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Cut-Off
Description:A bend of the Fabius River which was cut off when the river was straightened; hence the name. It is located in the east part of the county, on a line with McFarlan's and Backbone ponds. ( (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Eastern Run
Description:The founding of Marion College (q.v.), the laying out of Marion City (q.v.), and of Philadelphia (q.v.), in Marion County, of New York (q.v.), in Shelby County, and the project contemplated in Clark (See Muldrow College),--all alike were projected as counterparts of institutions and cities in the east. People in the east, where the investment were sold in large part, invested their fortunes in the hope of participating in the promised riches of the virgin lands of the west. Those who bought land and came to Marion City, first of the projects to be attempted, were for the most part from east of the Alleghenies. And, finally, the promoters themselves were from the east. From all these facts came the expression "Eastern Run." The main promoter in the "Eastern Run": was Colonel Wm. Muldrow (1797-1872), who came to Missouri about 1826 directly from "Muldrow's Hill," Marion County, Kentucky. He was said to have been uneducated and uncultured, but to have been posessed of a strong intellect and a convincing manner. He was a natural born salesman and a promoter of rare ability. In this capacity he is credited with inducing more immigrants to come to Marion County than any other promoter of his day. He could be practical, at the same time that he was the most impractical of men. He showed the settlers how to bring the prairie farmland under subjection (Wetmore 114). His idea of establishing schools where students might support themselves through manual labor was a practical one (See Marion College and Muldrow College). In being a man of mighty ideas and extraordinary initiatives, he was, however, swept away by the vastness of the projects he contemplated, (See Marion City and "Atlantic and Pacific Railroad") and sometimes set out directly to deceive (See Trabue's Lick, Salt Lick Ford, Muldrow's College). As a promoter he is intimately associated with the story of the making of Northeast Missouri. Overwhelmed at length by lawsuits, he stood his ground for a time, putting up a plausible defense. But on the discovery of gold in Claifornia, in 1849, Muldrow followed the 49ers. On the coast he sought to establish another city, and became involved in more litigation. After failure in California, he returned to Missouri where he was known as "Old Bill Muldrow." When he died, he left his affairs so involved that it took twelve years to settle his estate. (See Kahoka). He is buried in Marion County, in Little Union Churchyard (q.v.). It is sometimes said that Mark Twain drew his characterization of Colonel Mulberry Sellers in GILDED AGE from Colonel Muldrow, but in his autobiography Mark Twain says that Colonel Sellers is a picture of a cousin of his mother's, James Lampton, whom he "put on paper as he was." Mark Twain does however connect his story with the Marion City project (See "Napoleon," "Columbus River"), though the story is also concerned with his father's Tennessee land, with which he connects James Lampton. James Lampton was the same type man as Muldrow; both were "always trying to build a house by beginning at the top." Charles Dickens in MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT used Muldrow as General Zephaniah Scadder, the "General" who, representing the Eden Land Corporation, engaged in selling city sites in "Eden" (q.v.). (Wetmore 1837, 114, 117; HIST. MARION 1884, 203, 297, 624, 718; Hist. Shelby 1911, 132; Stevens, 88, 90; Gilded Age, Chapters 17, 23; MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT, Chapters 21, 22; Mark Twain AUTOBIOGRAPHY: EARLY DAYS, and Vol. II, Chapter 30; Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935; Mo. His. Rev., 18:597)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Philippines
Description:A colony of negroes who lived in disreputable hovels on the Junction road west of Palmyra. The colony long since demolished was flourishing in 1900 and was referred to as the "Philippines." The Philippine Islands came on the map for half the people of the United States in 1898. Dewey entered Manila Bay in May of that year; the American Army followed in August. The years 1899- 1901 were marked by a revolution of the islanders. For these reasons the new name, applied thus to their neighbors, seemed a suitable one to the residents of Palmyra. (Lauback 1925; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Rhine
Description:A stretch of buildings in Palmyra, across Main Street from the courthouse. Nearly every building, fifty years ago was occupied by saloons kept by proprietors of German descent. "Down the Rhine" signified the lower end of Main Street. The Rhine is the most important river in Germany. A name most loved by German people; theme of German song and story, it has become almost synonymous with Germany itself. (Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Seminary
Description:See Monroe Male and Female Seminary
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thompson's Mill
Description:See Giles Thompson's Band Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thrasher's Chapel
Description:A Methodist Chapel to the north of Mt. Zion Church (q.v.), and east of Palmyra; now abandoned. It was in existence by 1851; in that year it was the site of a camp meeting. So named for John Thrasher, a pioneer who owned land on the Palmyra road. (HIST. MARION 1884, 166; History of N.E. Missouri, 451; Soil Survey, Marion (1911); Mrs. Frank Lane; Presley Lane; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Three Brothers
Description:See Bay de Charles. "Bay Charles runs up into three principal branches which would all form natural canals." Wetmore (1837), 115. These three branches no doubt gave the idea for the name.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thurwachter School
Description:See North River School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tilden
Description:An addition to Hannibal, platted in January, 1859; laid out by the proprietors, Tilden R. Selmes and Jonathan Gore. It was named for Mr. Selmes. (Plat)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tilden Academy
Description:See Tilden School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tilden School
Description:A school established in 1876 at Oakwood. The name as suggested by Mrs. Henry Holmes was Tilden Academy. Samuel J. Tilden (1814-1886), had just been defeated in the election that year as Democratic candidate for President. The Holmes family were staunch Democrats; hence the name. (Atlas Marion (1901); E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator: Mrs. T.B. Carter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Todd School
Description:A schoolhouse in Fabius Township, to the west of North River Station; organized in 1843. It was a log building until 1851 when it was succeeded by a building of brick. So named for Geo. W. Todd, owner of the land. (Atlas Marion (1901); E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Todd Spring Road
Description:A road along the base of the bluffs, on the western edge of South River Levee (q.v.). It extends from Clear Creek north to South River. The site is singular in that there is no terrace between the river plain and the bluff hills, the bottom land coming sheer up to the overhanging bluffs. The road is named for Todd's Springs (q.v.), which are located on this road. It was originally known as the Marion City Road because of its location (See Marion City). A more recent name is Captain Lewis Boulevard, for a family living on the road. The Captain Lewis who gave the name to the road was a captain in the Confederate Army in the Civil War. Known most frequently by the name indicated. (Mirror, 28, 29, 128; Kathleen Gash; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Todd's Springs
Description:Springs between Palmyra and Taylor, off Lazy Branch and just off Highway 61; so called for an early settler in that locality. They bore an earlier name, Oldham's Springs, for the owner of the land. The vicinity of the springs was a favorite place for camping in an early period. There was a springhouse there before the Civil War. The springs were ruined in the building of the highway. (John Lemmons; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tom Sawyer Cave
Description:See Mark Twain Cave
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trabius
Description:See Fabius River
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trabue Lane
Description:See Tadpole Lane
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trabue's Lick
Description:The old Bouvet Lick and so earlier known (see "The Bastion"); over the line in what is now Ralls County. At one time it was the property of Wm. Muldrow (see "Eastern Run"), and was known as Muldrow's Lick. Muldrow sold it to Trabue. This is said to have been Muldrow's first venture as a promoter. He showed himself already skilled in the snares of the profession. He was a good advertiser. Wetmore (1837), says that Muldrow's Lick was remarkable, that Muldrow bored into the earth 300 ft. and made salt water rise 50 ft. above the surface. "It is a remarkable fact that in this boring Muldrow carried his auger through 60 ft. of solid rock salt which he found on trail fit for use of the table. At some future time in all probability this salt will be quarried and brought forth from its bed, to supply the surounding country." The great salt well, worked successfully by Bouvet, had in truth dwindled by this time to an insignificant deer lick. Muldrow had salted the well heavily, whence the glowing account of Wetmore's. As a result Muldrow sold the well (1826), at a good price to Charles Trabue. Old people still use the name Trabue's Lick in speaking of the location. The locality is now Spaulding Spring for the present owner of the land. It is no more than a small pleasure ground today. (Wetmore 1837, 117; HIST. MARION 1884, 133, 144, 624, 625; Wm. Bertier; Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trinity Church
Description:An Episcopalian Church in Hannibal; holding its first services in 1845 on the organization of Trinity Parish. The Parish House was built in 1859 or 1860; it was rebuilt in 1905 and a tower added. It is known today as a perfect example of Gothic architecture. A Christian doctrine. Divine titles are applied to the Three Person in One (II Corinthians 13:14; I John 5:7). (HIST. MARION 1884, 982, 983; Mirror 196, 197; Lucy Latimer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Triplett's Mill
Description:A mill on the north bank of North River, in Union Township near the Shelby line; established in 1833 or 1834, the first mill in the west part of the county. It was built and operated first under the name of Gay's Mill, for John Gay, the owner. The mill was later sold to Elias Triplett, and was known as Triplett's Mill. It was a saw and grist mill combined until in 1840 a distillery was added about 100 ft. down stream. It seems about this time to have been known as the Boyce and Triplett Mill. Both mills were washed away in the floods of 1844. (HIST. MARION 1884, 196, 674, 677, 718, 719; Shelby County Herald, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Troublesome Alley
Description:A name given to the east end of Guernsey's Lane (q.v.). So named for the wrangling that so frequently occurred there. (Mirror, 96e)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Troublesome Creek
Description:A stream which rises in Schyuler County in northern Missouri, and flows in a southeasterly direction through Knox and Lewis counties, entering Marion at the northwest corner, and emptying into South Fabius in the northern part of the county. Hunters gave it the name for the fact that when other streams were tranquil, this stream was raging after a shower and often out of its banks. Originally it was known as "Bridge Creek" for the reason that when raging it afforded hunters a rough crossing. Campbell in 1874 gives the name Troublesome. (Campbell 1874; HIST. MARION 1884, 748)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tucker's Mill
Description:A mill built in 1865 on the present site of Naomi; operated by William Tucker, for whom it was named. (F) W.L. Tucker)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek
Description:A creek which flows into Salt River in Ralls County, not far from Spauldings Springs (q.v.). So named for the wild turkeys which abounded there in an early day. (Mirror, 45; Lucy Latimer; Wm. Bertier; Judge E.T. Cameron)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Shin
Description:A name given by hunters to the vicinity of Warren Township and the western part of Marion County, generally because of the number of wild turkeys abounding there, and because the early inhabitants made regular hunting excursions tramping over the locality. ("Shin" for leg, a colloquialism) (Campbell 1874, 353; Webster's Dictionary)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turner Burial Ground
Description:A family burial ground on the Turner land in Miller Township; hence the name. Earliest grave 1823. (E.C. Bohon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turtle Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River off the mouth of Bay de Charles, and opposite Riverview Park. So named because of the number of turtles that lived there. In an earlier day you could have loaded a car with turtles and their eggs there. (Coues-Pike, Note, 8; MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY, Chapter 12; Lucy Latimer; (F) Ed Burkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turtle Toe
Description:A small island at the end of Turtle Island (q.v.), apparently broken off from the latter, and in consequence bearing this name. (Mrs. Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Twin Islands
Description:Two islands about one and a half miles long, opposite Marion City, on the Illinois side of the Mississippi; in existence since the early 1880s. So named because they are cut by a small draw. (Geo. Shaeffer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Two Rivers
Description:See North River and South River
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Two Rivers Country
Description:The strip of country between North Two Rivers (see North River) and South Two Rivers (Ibid.) came to be so known for the two rivers which embrace a large portion of Marion County. The name was applied particularly by St. Charles, Lincoln, Pike, and other counties to the south. (Lincole [n?] Map, 1822; Wetmore (1837); HIST. MARION (1884), 148, 770
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church organized between Palmyra and Philadelphia in 1833. Its first building was erected midway between the two places in 1834, a later building of brick in 1856, the latter being rebuilt in 1917. The church is still active. The site, out in the woods, was first known as Greenfield for the location. It was then called Prairie Baptist Church for the same reason. The congregation separated over the Muldrow-Nelson anti-abolition sentiment, 1836, (See Marion College), and reorganized, calling themselves Little Union. The church is so indicated as late as 1911 on the Soil Survey map. Later on "Little" was dropped, though old people still know the church by this name. (HIST. MARION (1884), 728; Soil Survey, Marion (1911); Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934; Belle Lee; Presley Lane; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Township
Description:A township framed out of Fabius Township August 10, 1837. First settlements were along North River about 1820. In 1832 this part of the county comprised the south and part of the west portion of what is now Lewis County. Union lies south of Round Grove Township and north of Warren on the west side of the county between the South Fabius and the North rivers, with Fabius Township to the east. The name was possibly suggested by that of the church which though established earlier under another name had around 1836 become known as Little Union Church. (See Union Church), (HIST. MARION (1884), 182, 210, 717, Rand McNally, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Valley Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church to the west of See's Creek in the southwest part of the county, halfway between Palmyra and Monroe City. Now torn down. It was known by the name, Union Valley, because it stood in See's Creek Valley, and the Presbyterians were joined here by Methodists from old Mt. Vernon Church, (q.v.). (Atlas Marion (1901); Lou Sharp; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:United Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:See St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upper College
Description:See Marion College
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ure's Cave
Description:A cavern in Ide's Hill (q.v.), on the opposite side of Murphy's Cave. Not so extensive as the latter. So named for the lumberman, Ure, who owned the ground. (Campbell (1874), 352; Wm. Bertier)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Uva
Description:See Mt. Zion Community
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Valley of Eden
Description:See "Elm Lands"
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Valley of the Nile
Description:See "Elm Lands"
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Van Rensselaer Academy
Description:See Rensselaer Academy
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vandever's Branch
Description:See Pepper Branch
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vanlandingham School
Description:See Day School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vickrey School
Description:A schoolhouse in Round Grove Township, north of the South Fabius; a crossroads school, named for the family owning the land, though they spell their name Vickery. (E.C. Bohon; Palmyra Spectator (Clipping) )
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vinegar Hill
Description:A hill in the western part of Palmya. About forty years ago an old man living on this hill brewed an inferior bitter wine purchased by "old soaks" who could afford no better. "To go up Vinegar Hill" was a sub rosa way of saying that one was going to purchase some of the old man's illegitimate product. (Edwin Smith; Tudor Lanius)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walker's Slough
Description:A slough in northern Mason Township, emptying into Bay de Charles just east of Brushy Slough (q.v.); a long slough midway between Bay de Charles and the Mississippi. So named for the man who owned the land around it. (Atlas Marion (1913); (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walnut Springs
Description:A community name used as early as 1853; west of Palmyra. So named for a walnut grove and spring. (Palmyra Spectator, May 29, 1935; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Warren
Description:A post office since 1853; fifteen miles west-southwest of Palmyra, in the north part of Warren Township, from which it took its name. Campbell gives the date of settlement as 1844. It was laid out in 1854. (Hayward (1853); Campbell (1874); Atlas Marion (1875), 10; HIST. MARION (1884), 688; P.G.; Maps Mo. from 1844)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Warren Baptist Church
Description:An organization of Missionary Baptists in 1842 at Warren, whence the name. The first church house was built in 1877. It was originally known as Harmony Church, an ideal name. The division in the Baptist Church took place in 1835. The Primitive group, called in derision "Hardshell" and "Old Ironsides," believed that the employment of missionaries, Sunday schools, and other agencies as auxiliaries in evangelizing the world is unauthorized by the Bible. The Missionary group believed in these auxiliaries, as its name indicates. (HIST. MARION, (1884), 665, 689; Thaddeus R. Smith; Min. Bethel Bapt. Assoc., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Warren Township
Description:This township lies in the southwest corner of the county with Union to the north, and with Liberty and South River townships to the east, the ancient landmarks as first fixed in August, 1831, remaining unchanged. Some say it was named in honor of General Joseph Warren (1741-1775), who fell at Bunker Hill; others that it was named for Warren County, Kentucky, the earlier home of many of the first settlers in this township. The Kentucky county was doubtless named for General Warren. (HIST. MARION (1884), 179, 683; Rand McNally, 1935; Intern. Cyc.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Webster School
Description:A schoolhouse in Round Grove Township. Now extinct. So named for Daniel Webster (1782-1852), orator and statesman. (E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wells' Mill
Description:A steam grist mill around 1870 in Liberty Township, west of Palmyra. It was built of brick, torn down in a few years, and the brick used in the building of houses in Palmyra. It was named for its owner, Clabe Wells. (Jacob Tate)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Branch
Description:See North River
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Ely
Description:A post office from 1853-1904; south to east of the center of South River Township. It was established in 1836, following by a little the establishment of Lower College (q.v.), by Reverend Ezra Stiles Ely. The name at first was Ely for the founder of the college. It was known also as Ely City. It is not known how the prefix "West" came to be added. It was so given by Wetmore (1837), and so appeared in the county records of 1839. We know that Lower College stood one mile northeast of the village. Doubtless out of this fact came the prefix "West." It is a misnomer with regard to Ely as the latter is much the later village of the two, and is itself west of West Ely. The village is designated as Westely on map of Missouri, 1915, and in P.G., 1897-1904. A less likely explanation has been given; that the German settlers came from Ely in Pennsylvania and named the settlement West Ely because they had come west. There is no Ely in Pennsylvania today, though the name occurs in New Jersey and five other states, all doubtless springing originally from the Isle of Ely in England. But in view of the dates as shown above it seems likely that the source of the Missouri name is personal. Today West Ely is a small German settlement not much more than a trading post. Some old college buildings are still standing, but heaps of brick and other debris mark the ruins. (Atlas Marion (1875), 13; HIST. MARION (1884), 236, 663; P.G.; Maps Mo. from 1844; Quincy Herald-Whig, December 29, 1935; Tudor Lanius; Thaddeus R. Smith)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Ely Graveyard
Description:A Presbyterian burying-ground over a hundred years old; in the town of West Ely, whence the name. Dr. Ely, associated with the "Eastern Run" and Lower College (q.v.), is buried here. (Mrs. Frank Lane; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Ely School
Description:A school in the village of West Ely (q.v.), in South River Township. A German Lutheran Parochial School originally known in the county as the German School; now named for the village. It goes also by the name of Immanuel for the Ev. Immanuel Lutheran Church (q.v.), in the community. It was established as a parish school in 1869 with the beginning of the congregation in West Ely. The first school was held in the church with the pastor serving as teacher. In 1884 a regular teacher was employed, and a building was erected in 1911. Instruction was given the first year in the German language, but as early as 1870 the church resolved to give some instruction in the English. Instruction is given in all secular branches; besides that, the children are instructed in the Christian religion, catechism and Bible history which they regard as the foundation of all instruction. (Palmyra Spectator, August 14, 1929; E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Quincy
Description:A post office in 1883; a station in the northwest corner of Fabius Township, on the Mississippi River across from Quincy, Illinois; hence the name. In 1827, a ferry was operated at this point (See Keyes' Ferry). This was the origin of the town, first indicated in 1861. It was laid off in 1874. It is indicated by Rand McNally, 1935; however, nothing remains but the ruins of the station and a few scattered houses along the river. It is still used as a terminal for the Burlington. (Campbell (1874); Polk (1883); HIST. MARION (1884), 780, 781; Maps Mo. from 1861; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Quincy School
Description:See Willow Bend School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Westely
Description:See West Ely
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Westfall Hall
Description:A hall in south Hannibal. So named for a local family. (Mirror, 7; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Westfall Hill
Description:A hill in the southern part of Hannibal, named for a family who once lived on it. The hill is no longer known by any particular name. (Mirror, 7; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Westminster College
Description:Land so indicated on the plat, T. 57, N., Range 8 W. is the property of Westminster College, at Fulton, Calloway County. This college owns land in many of the counties in this part of Missouri. The college derives its name from Westminster Abbey in London, a favorite name with Presbyterians because their Confession of Faith was there composed by the famous Westminster Assembly of 1643-1649. (Morris Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whaley's Mill
Description:A mill located at a spring on Clear Creek at an early period. So named for its owner, Edward Whaley. In 1817, Edward Whaley came to Marion County from Kentucky, and chose for his home a location between Hannibal and Palmyra, which his sons homesteaded. Later Captain Whaley returned to Marion County and made it his home. (Mirror, 82, 83; Lucy Latimer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Bear
Description:A station on Bear Creek in the south part of Miller Township, five miles west of Hannibal. Originally Bear Creek, for its location; known also as Bear Creek Station. A post office here from 1879-1883, when it was returned to Withers Mill (q.v.). Later the Hannibal Lime Company began working quarries in the locality, and the name of the station became White Ledge, written also Whiteledge, for the white lime ledges. Under this name the station was a post office from 1892-1904. The name occurs on maps of Missouri from 1904-1915. The lime company named their product White Bear, the latter word for the location, and the former for the particular quality of limestone. The name was transferred to the station. (Goodwin (1867); Campbell (1874), 353; Polk (1879-1883); History of Marion (1884), 636; Soil Survey, Marion (1911); Atlas Marion (1913); P.G.; Rand McNally, 1935; Maps Mo. from 1861; (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Bear Lime-Works
Description:Limestone quarries at Bear Creek Station, on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad; earlier known as Bear Creek Lime-Works, for the location. For the present name cf. White Bear. The limestone is now being ground for use on farm land. (HIST. MARION (1884), 635; Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Ledge (Whiteledge)
Description:See White Bear
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wild Cat Corner
Description:The corner of Main and Bird Streets, near the railroad yards, in old Hannibal. On this site Moses Bates built his home, the first house on the site of Hannibal, in 1819. Here he successfully defended his home against the Indians in 1820. It was at Selms' store, also on this corner, that the boys, Huck and Tom, needing money, sold and resold Huck's coonskin until the keeper of the store discovered the open window by his pile of pelts. Old residents do not know the reason for the name. It is a sorry enough looking spot just off the railroad yards so that the name seems appropriate. (Mirror, 7; MARK TWAIN BIOGRAPHY, Chapter 12; Morris Anderson; G.A. Mahan; Wm. Bertier)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Willow Bend School
Description:A schoolhouse in Fabius Township; on a bend of the South Fabius River, along which grow many willows; hence the name. Formerly known as West Quincy School, for the village of that name in which it stood. (Atlas Marion (1901); E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilsonville
Description:A post office from 1860-1867. Nothing could b learned about the origin of the name. (Sutherland and McEvoy (1860); Goodwin (1867) )
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Withers' Mill
Description:A mill in 1855 on Bear Creek on the site of Bear Creek Station. The mill gave its name to the station house built in 1867 on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. So named for the miller, J.R. Withers. (Campbell (1874); HIST. MARION (1884), 636)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Withers Mill [See also Withers' Mill and Withers Mills]
Description:A post office in 1876, transferred to Bear Creek, 1879-1883; retransferred to Withers Mill by 1886. In the west part of Miller Township, seven and a half miles from Hannibal and the same distance from Palmyra, on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. The station house was built in 1867. Also known as Withers Mills. So named for Wither's Mill on Bear Creek. (Campbell (1874); Polk, 1876-1886; HIST. MARION (1884), 636; P.G.; Maps Mo. fom 1874)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Withers Mills
Description:See Withers Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Woodland
Description:A post office since 1876; in the southwest corner of Liberty Township, five miles southwest of Palmyra, near South River, on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. Earlier known as Caldwell, for Samuel B. Caldwell, who deeded the right of way to the railroad. This name occurs on the maps from 1861 through 1874; also known at this time as Caldwell Station. An attempt was made to name the village for Geo. Nettleton, an official of the road, and this name was indicated on a map of 1871, but the name was not popular. At the time the railroad burned wood, and hundreds of cords of wood were piled at this station. Thus the place came to be called Woodland, the name appearing on the maps from 1879. Perhaps the fact that the neighborhood is a beautiful section of country had something to do with the selection of the name, also. (Campbell (1874); HIST. MARION (1884), 812; Maps Mo. from 1861; P.G.; (F) John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Woodland School
Description:A school in Woodland, in Liberty Township; hence the name. Known earlier as Pleasant Hill School, so named for Pleasant Hill Church (q.v.). (Atlas Marion (1901); E.C. Bohon; (F) Lou Sharp; (F) Morris Byrum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Woodlawn
Description:A suburb of Hannibal to the north. It derives its name from that of the former country home of John H. Garth located at that site. (Plat; Atlas Marion (1913); (F) Archy C. Robards)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wood's Island
Description:An island off Marion County in the Mississippi River. At this point, connecting with Wood's Slough, there was a railroad bridge across the river in 1868. The island was the property of a Mr. Wood. (HIST. MARION (1884), 781; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wood's Slough
Description:A slough in the eastern part of the county along the Mississippi River. For name cf. Wood's Island. (HIST. MARION (1884), 781; John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Yaeger Mill (or Warehouse)
Description:See Hanley's Mill
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Yankee Town
Description:A settlement of "Yankees" on North River between Warren and Union townships, previous to 1861. They established a saw and grist mill. (See Raynor and Edmonds Mill). Later all left but the two men who operated the mill. (John Lemmons; Lou Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Young's Landing
Description:A steamboat landing at the fork of the Fabius. After the loss of Marion City, many farmers used this place as a point of delivery for their wheat. It was named for its owner. ( (F) John Lemmons) )
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zeiger Mill
Description:A saw and grist mill on the site of Bellville (q.v.). So named for its owner. (Presley Lane)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:A German Lutheran Church established in 1835 or 1836 at Palmyra. The church house was built in 1847 under the name, Deutsche Evangelical Lutheran Zions Kirche. The present building was erected in 1913. It is a strong church today. Campbell (1874), speaks of it as the Reformed Chuch. The church adheres to the doctines of Luther, whence the name Lutheran. Martin Luther (1483-1546), was the greatest of all Protestant reformers of the 16th century. The cardinal doctrine of the church is that of justification by faith alone. For name cf. above. (Campbell (1874), 356; HIST. MARION (1884), 849, 850; Thaddeus R. Smith; Intern. Cyc.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Lutheran School
Description:A parochial school in Palmyra conducted by the Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church (q.v.), from which it takes its name. It began under most primitive conditions, at first consisting of very little more than instruction preparing for church membership given by the pastor, Reverend Mr. J.P. Best in his tin shop. This was in the days prior to the Civil War. To this instruction was added in the course of time instruction in the German language because practically all the members of Zion Lutheran Church had immigrated from Germany. Other branches were added as soon as possible, until in the 1870s there was a complete school which prepared not only for church membership but aimed at a well-rounded elementary education. The German language was dropped both as a subject and as a medium of instruction at some time prior to the World War. Pastors were the first teachers. Later trained graduates of Lutheran teachers' colleges were called to take charge of the school. Members of the congregation assisted in keeping the school when no regular teacher was available. Various rooms were used for school purposes. By 1929 the school was occupying a brick building set aside for the purpose. Cf. above. (Palmyra Spectator, August 14, 1929)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zoar Church
Description:See Fifth Street Baptist Church
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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