Madison County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Allbright
Description:A small town in the southwest part of Big Creek Township, where a post office was established in 1908 and named for the first postmaster and merchant, Frank Allbright. The name is misspelled Albright on the Highway Map. (P.G., Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Church [1 of 2]
Description:A rural Christian Church in the east-central part of St. Michael Township, erected in 1824 with Geo. Nifong, Joseph Bennett, James Marshall and their families as the first members. It was the first church of this denomination in the county and was so named because ancinet Antioch in the Book of Acts (11:26) is said to have been the place where the disciples of Christ were first called Christians. (Goodspeed 560, McFarland)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Church [2 of 2]
Description:A Church of Christ in the southern part of St. Michael Township, organized in 1898. Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Arcadia Township
Description:In the northern part of the county. In 1848 Liberty Township was divided into two townships, one beginning at the St. Francois River and extending "down the river to the new road near Needham Frizell's thence west...to the Arcadia Valley (in Iron County), from which it was named." In 1857 it became a part of Iron County. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ashlinger's Creek
Description:A stream in east Marquand Township, which enters from Bollinger County, flows west, and empties into Castor River. It was named for a pioneer family. (Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barns Creek
Description:A stream in the northern part of Castor Township, which empties into Castor River; oubtless named for a family. (Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barren Hollow School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Liberty Township, located in a region of rocks and bluffs, a desolate spot of which the word "barren" is descriptive. The school is situated in a low place or "hollow," hence the name Barren Hollow. Many people of the community pronounce the word _____, as a monosyllable. (Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Belle Pointe
Description:A locality not certainly identified, but likely a place on the road to Mine La Motte. Louis Lacroix claimed an interest in a concession at Belle Point on the Saline in 1798, with Antoine and Gabriel Caillot dit Lachance. The French words translated mean "beautiful point or spot" and were doubtless thought descriptive of the surroundings. (Houck I 378)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Belmont Branch
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Berry's Mill
Description:A watermill in the northern part of St. Michael Township, named for Hiram Berry, who owned and operated it as early as 1855. Hiram Berry (1784-18--), came from North Carolina to Missouri in 1816 and to Madison County in 1821. (Watts, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethany Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church (of the United Churches of Jesus Christ) in the northwest part of Polk Township, named for Bethany in Palestine, the home of Mary, Martha and Lazarus. (Brown)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A United Baptist Church in the southern part of Castor Township. A favorite Bible name. (Brown)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beulah Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the southwest part of Liberty Township, organized between 1851-1886, and given this common church name by the founders. Beulah (Hebrew be'utah) literally means married (said of a woman), and is a term applied to Israel (Isa. LXII:4), a short form for Beulah Land. (Schulte, Brewington, Manser, Tong)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beulah School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Liberty Township, near Beulah Church (q.v.), from which it is named. (Price)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Creek
Description:A large stream which runs through Big Creek Township in the southern part of Madison County and enters Wayne County in the north part of Cedar Creek Township, where it flows into Castor River. It is named for its size. In Madison County the creek has three branches, East, Middle, and West Forks, all in big Creek Township. (Waggoner, McCormick, Stroup, Campbell (1873)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Creek Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Big Creek Township, the oldest in St. Francois Association. It was organized in 1835 in the home of Carter Graham and the first pastor was Henry McElmurry. It is named for Big Creek (q.v.), the principal stream in this region. Doubtless the church members were baptized in Big Creek. (Douglas I 477, Tong, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Creek Township
Description:In the southern part of the county organized in 1909 by dividing German Township (later Marquand). It was named for Big Creek (q.v.). (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Four School
Description:A rural school in the west part of Marquand Township. Mrs. Price says she has heard the story that it is so named because it is located at the place where four big creeks come together. Mr. King said it is in district 44. (Price, King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Mountain
Description:A mountain in the west part of Liberty Township, which was named for a pioneer family who owned a large tract of land here. (King, La Plant), (Watts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Mountain Church
Description:A General Baptist Church established in 1897 and named from Black Mountain (q.v.), near which it is located. (King, La Plant), (Watts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Mountain School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Liberty Township, organized in 1881 and named from Black Mountain (q.v.), the largest hill in the district. (King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Mountain
Description:A mountain in the western part of Polk Township on which Blue Mountain Lookout Tower was built. It was named for a pioneer family--Belew. The spelling has been changed, probably by the people of the community who spelled the word to correspond to the sound, and by the map makers, so that the original word has almost been forgotten. (Goodspeed, Berry, Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Mountain Lookout Tower
Description:Cf. above
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blush
Description:A rural post office in Polk Township maintained 1899-1904. The origin of the name could not be ascertained. (P.G., Road Map (1912) )
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boswell School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of St. Francois Township organized in 1883 and named for the landowner, John Boswell. The name is pronounced _____ or _____, the second pronunciation being that of people who do not enunciate carefully. (Mouser, Breevington, Howard)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brewer Creek School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Polk Township, located near Brewer's Creek (q.v.), from which it is named. (Brewington)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brewer's Creek
Description:A small creek in the northwest part of Polk Township, a western tributary of St. Francois River, named for the landowner, Monroe Brewer. (Brewington)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridgeville Store
Description:A store in the west part of Twelve Mile Township, near a recently constructed bridge across St. Francois River, facetiously named as if it were a city. (Marsh, Deguire)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck Mountain
Description:A mountain in the eastern part of St. Francois Township, named for the deer found there by pioneer hunters. (Waggoner, Ferguson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckeye Copper Mines
Description:Copper mines in the eastern part of St. Michael Township, discovered by Colonel Foster, who secured the interest and capital of a mining company in Ohio in 1846. The mines were so named because they were developed by men from Ohio, the Buckeye State. (Deguire, Watts, Campbell, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckhorn
Description:A small village in the southwest part of Big Creek Township, on Buckhorn Creek (q.v.), from which it is named. A post office was established in 1901. (Waggoner, Ferguson, P.G.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckhorn Creek
Description:A stream in the western part of Big Creek Township, named for the deer which the early hunters found here. (Waggoner, Ferguson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckner's Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the central part of Polk Township, named for Aylette Buckner who came to Madison County in 1849. His son was Robert A. Buckner. (Goodspeed, Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckner's Mountain
Description:A large mountain in the central part of Polk Township, named for Aylette Buckner. Cf. above. (Goodspeed, Andrews, County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burns School
Description:A rural school in the west-central part of Castor Township, organized in 1881 and named for John Burns, who gave the land for the school. His ancestor, Peter Burns, was a pioneer in this county and received a Spanish land grant. (Schulte, Andrews, King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Calloway Mill
Description:A pioneer mill located on a stream known as Calloway Mill Creek (see Mill Creek), in the west part of St. Michael Township. The mill was operated by John Calloway, pioneer, and by his son Peter Calloway. (Goodspeed, Thompson, Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Calloway Mill Creek
Description:See Mill Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Calvary Cemetery
Description:A Catholic cemetery in the northern part of St. Michael Township, near the spot still called "The Village" (q.v.), where the original village of St. Michaels, the forerunner of Fredericktown (q.v.), stood. It is named in memory of Christ's crucifixion (Luke XXIII:33). (Rothensteiner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Campbell School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Castor Township organized in 1882 and named for Alfred Campbell, landowner. Moses Campbell, the grandfather, came from Kentucky in 1825. The father, George Campbell, owned a farm and operated a sawmill. (King, Goodspeed, Mouser, Brewington, Schulte, McCann, Watts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Creek
Description:A small creek in the western part of Liberty Township, named from the cane, hollow jointed ligneous stemmed giant reeds or grasses (L. canna, reed), which grow along the creek. (Dewitt, Tallent, Wiggs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in the western part of Union Township, enters Madison County in Castor Township, and empties into Castor River. Whether this creek was so designated when this was a part of Cape Girardeau County (commonly called Cape County), or whether the creek was so called because it forms a cape-like region in its course is a matter of conjecture. (Dewitt, Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Captain's Creek
Description:A creek rising in the southern part of St. Francois Township, flowing south through Central and part of Twelve Mile Township where it empties into St. Francois River. It was named for Captain Andrew De Guire, a pioneer who had served as a captain in the Civil War and was so called by all his acquaintances. (Campbell, Mouser, Ferguson, Thompson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Captain's Creek School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Liberty Township, organized in 1885 on Captain's Creek (q.v.), from which it is named. (Ferguson, King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1845 by Elders Graham, Settle, and Eaton in the home of Henry Whitener on Castor River (q.v.), from which it is named, in what is now the east part of Marquand Township in the Whitener settlement. It was later moved to Marquand. (Douglass I 476-477, Tong, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor River
Description:Castor River rises in St. Francois County, flows south through Madison County near the eastern boundary, then for a short distance along the boundary line between Wayne and Bollinger. It enters Bollinger in Fillmore Township and flows southeast through Wayne Township into Stoddard County, and thence into New Madrid County, where it empties into Little River. Prior to the white man's coming the region in what is now the southern part of Madison and the western part of Bollinger counties was a mass of canebrakes where pools of water collected in rainy seasons. Here beavers built dams and held back the water coming down from the St. Francois hills to the north. When heavy rains came, the beaver dams were broken and the water formed a channel. After many repetitions of this process a river was formed, and it was called Castor, a word meaning beaver, by the French who came to the Mine LaMotte district (in Madison County) near the source of this stream in 1725. Schoolcraft in 1818 refers to this branch as Crooked Creek. (Present Crooked Creek is a few miles east and joins Castor River in New Madrid County). Beck calls the river Castor or Crooked Creek in 1823; Wetmore calls it Castor in 1837, but the name Crooked Creek is not entirely separated from this branch until 1873. (Conard, Douglass I: XII, XIV, Schoolcraft, Beck, Wetmore, Long's Voyage, Campbell, Hopkins, Miss Hamlett's thesis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor Township
Description:One of the three original townships created in 1818 at the time the county was organized; it was named for Castor River (q.v.). Changes were made in the boundaries in 1846, and in 1909 the boundaries of all the municipal townships were redefined. (Douglass I 167, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Catherine
Description:A small settlement in the northern part of St. Michael Township, which had its origin in the Catherine Lead Mines. The mine owner, Mr. Cantwell, named the mine for his wife, Catherine Cantwell. Because Mr. Cantwell had bought the land from Mr. Schulte whose wife was also named Catherin, but Mr. Joe Schulte, nephew of the Schultes, says it was named for Catherine Cantwell. It was formerly called Catherine Place and is sometimes so written now, but the most common form is Catherine. The mines have changed owners and are now known as the Fredericktown Mines. (Schulte, Waggoner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Catherine Lead Mines
Description:See Catherine.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Catherine Place
Description:See Catherine.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Bottom School
Description:A rural school in the west part of Central Township, organized in 1881 and named for the cedar trees which surround this valley, hollow, or "Bottoms." (Schulte, Cooper, Berry)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Cabin
Description:Beck (1823), notes Cedar Cabbin (so spelled), on his map in the extreme southern part of Twelve Mile Township. Doubtless this was a well-known stopping place or inn for travelers along the old St. Michael Trail (q.v.), from south of Greenville to St. Michael and thence to Ste. Genevieve. (Beck, Conard)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A small creek in the southern part of Twelve Mile Township, named for the cedars which grow on the hillsides along the stream. (McCormick)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A small stream in the southern part of St. Francois Township, flowing into St. Francois River. Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Grove School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of St. Francois Township, organized in 1885 and named for the Cedar trees which are numerous in the neighborhood. (Schulte, Brewington)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Mountain
Description:A mountain in the western part of Central Township, named from the cedar trees which grow on the mountain or hillside. (Schulte, Brewington, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Central School
Description:A rural school in the east-central part of Central Township, organized in 1911. The school district was cut off from surrounding districts to make this a central location for a number of families and it was in Central Township, hence the name. (Andrews, Gipson, King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Central Township
Description:In the central part of the county, organized in 1909 from Twelve Mile Township and named from its location in the Central part of the county. (County Court Record, Waggoner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chore Creek
Description:A small stream in the eastern part of Castor Township, emptying into Castor River. The origin of the name has not been ascertained. (County Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Combs Branch
Description:A small stream which rises in Union Township, Bollinger County, flows west into Castor Township, Madison County, and empties into Castor River. It is named for Silas Combs, a well-known settler. (Madison Plat, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cook School
Description:See Mill Chapel School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Copper Mines School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Mine LaMotte Township, named from the copper mines which are operated there. "Copper," says Goddard writing in 1869 in "WHERE TO EMIGRATE AND WHY," is found extensively in Missouri, especially near the Mine LaMotte Mines." (Andrews, Schulte, Goddard)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cornwall
Description:A station on the Belmont Branch of the Iron Mountain Railroad, established in 1889 when the railroad was built, in the south-central part of Castor Township. The legend is that the place was named for Cornwall, England, because of the Sprowle hoax of the Tin Mines. (See Tin Mountain). Sprowle supposedly came from Cornwall, England. The name Cornwall goes back to Cornaria, probably derived from the tribal name Cornovu. O.E. Cornweales means "the Welsh in Cornwall." This folk name later became the name of the district. Cornwall is famous for its tin mines. (Douglass I 379, Oxford Dictionary of England, Hinchey, Campbell (1874) 754)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Daniel Boone Lodge
Description:A summer resort in Castor Township, which was named for the pioneer (1735-1820), whose name is a household word in America. (Watts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deguerre Mountain
Description:See Deguire Mountain.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deguire
Description:A post office in the western part of Polk Township, maintained 1891-1897 and named for Michael Deguire, grandson of Paul Deguire (cf. above). (P.G., Deguire)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deguire Mountain
Description:A mountain in the western part of Polk Township, having an elevation of four hundred and ninety-two feet. Goodspeed spells the word Deguerre, but this is a mistake, for the mountain is named for Paul Deguire (1792-1875), who came to Madison County in 1800 from France. Paul De Guire with three other French families hewed the road through the wilderness to Madison County. Theirs was the first wheeled vehicle to come over the trail. De Guire engaged in lead mining and also was an extensive farmer. The family's name was originally pronounced _____ and was spelled De Guire, but today it is Americanized to_____ and written Deguire. (Douglass I 669-671, Deguire)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Downs School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Castor Township, named for Thomas Jefferson Downs, who owns land there. T.J. Downs served as county surveyor 1878-1888, and county assessor 1896-1904. (Andrews, Douglass II 735)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Creek
Description:A small creek, also called Dry Fork, which is a branch of Twelve Mile Creek. It rises in the southwest part of Central Township, and falls into Twelve Mile Creek about half way between Twelve Mile and Saco. So named because it is dry except in rainy seasons. (McCormick, Conley)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:East Fork of Big Creek
Description:See Big Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:East Fork of Shetley's Creek
Description:See Shetley's Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:East Prong of Shetley's Creek
Description:See Shetley's Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ebenezer Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of Central Township. Ebenezer is a Hebrew word meaning "stone of help" (I Sam. 7:12), and is a common name for churches. The church was organized in 1874 by F.M. Holbrooks and others. (Andrews, Tong, McCann)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ebenezer School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Central Township, organized in 1886 near Ebenezer Church from which it is named. (Andrews, Robbins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Einstein Silver Mine
Description:See Silver Mine.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Faro
Description:A village in the northwest part of Twelve Mile Township, on the St. Francois River. The name is said to have been coined. See Saco. (Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Farrar's Mill
Description:A post office maintained in 1867 and named for Robert Farrar, who operated the mill. The exact location of the place has been forgotten. (P.G., County Court Record, Waggoner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Finley School
Description:A rural school in Mine La Motte Township, established about 1867 and named for James Finley, the oldest man in the neighborhood. (King, Watts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fredericktown
Description:The county seat of Madison County since 1818, in the north-central part of St. Michael Township, on Saline Creek not far from Little St. Francois River. The first settlement was made in 1802 a few miles south of the present site by thirteen French families, viz: Antoine, Gabriel, Nicholas, Joseph, Francois, and Michael Caillot det La Chance; Peter Chevalier, Gabriel Nicollet, Pierre Variat; Paul, Andrew, and Baptiste De Guire, and Jerome Matis, French-Canadians who came from Ste. Genevieve and New Bourbon. These men were given concessions of land, and here they built a village which they called St. Michael. Nicholas Caillot had been a "Knight of the Grand Cross of the Order of St. Michael" in France, and this no doubt accounts for the name. It might be pointed out also, however, that there was a Michael Caillot in the group and Nicholas had a son Michael, whose patron saints were Michael. The village of St. Michael was forced by floods of 1814 to move to higher ground. The old site is still called "The Village" although there is nothing there to indicate the spot except Calvary Cemetery (q.v.). The new village numbered about 50 people in 1823. In the meantime, however, on the Saline opposite the village had settled Germans and other groups from North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Virginia, and these settlers evidently outnumbered their French neighbors, for in 1819 when a county seat was to be laid out the commissioners bought land from one Nathaniel Cook, who had come from North Carolina and laid out a town which they called Fredericktown. This new village gradually absorbed St. Michaels so that today the name is preserved only in the Catholic Church and in the name of the township. There are two schools of thought concerning the name Fredericktown, and the issue appears to be a bitter one. Older historians (e.g. Houck, Conard, Goodspeed, Douglass) say Fredericktown was named for George Frederick Bollinger, leader of the immigrants from North Carolina in 1800 who settled in what is now Bollinger County (a part of Madison County until 1851), and Cape Girardeau County. In 1936 Henry Thompson who had studied Madison County history wrote that "Nathaniel Cook proposed the name of George Frederick Bollinger be given the new town. Bollinger had taken part in most of the sessions of the general assembly (as had Cook), had done much to advance the interests of the territory, and had voted to set up the new county...besides, they were close personal friends and traveled together to and from the meetings of the assembly, spending several days together on the trips." The land for the town site and county seat was purchased from Cook for $300 and the town was named Fredericktown. Mrs. C.M. Andrews, protests that "There is nothing under cover of all the records to indicate that is was named for George F. Bollinger, as some people have said." She has pointed out that there was no reason for selecting his middle name. "Why not Georgetown?" she asks, since there was no Bollinger County at the time why not name the town Bollinger? (There was, of course, Bollinger's Mill and while it was not a post office until later, it was known to the settlers far and wide). Mrs. Andrews makes quite an issue of this middle name theory. She selected the middle names of ten or more well known Fredericktown citizens and asked newspaper readers to recognize them, thus proving, she feels, that people are not generally known by their middle names. She goes on to say that at the time Madison County was organized Frederick Bates was Secretary of the Territory. He signed the commissions and appointed the officers of the new county, including the commissioners to elect a county seat. "If the town was not named before then, " she says (and she thinks it may have been named Fredericktown before 1818), "the fact that his name was Frederick, and that German people were large landowners...and were mindful that Frederick the Great had been a powerful leader in their native land, it is probable that these facts were the cause of the town's being named Fredericktown." Mrs. Andrews' rejection of the direct evidence for the use of Bollinger's name, in favor of a quite unsupported origin from Frederick Bates or Frederick the Great, seems illogical and indefensible. Missourians are often known familiarly by their middle names, for one reason or another, and many Missouri places have been so named. Some instances are Madisonville in Ralls County, named in 1836 for one James Madison Crosthwaite (Miss Leech's thesis); Wingate in Cass County, named in 1904 for Governor Joseph Wingate Folk (Miss Johnson's thesis); Woodrow in Lafayette County, named for president Thomas Woodrow Wilson (Miss Atchison's thesis); and Quincy Adams (Mrs. Overlay's thesis). Eighteen other American places bear the sixth president's middle name, which was doubtless favored by his admirers to distinguish him from his father, President John Adams. Much the same reasons may have led to the selection of George Frederick Bollinger's middle name: there were many other Bollingers in his numerous family, and Georgetown would have been taken as merely one of the many Georgetowns, one in nearly every state, that have been named for George Washington. The town was laid out in 1819 and gradually absorbed the older settlement, St. Michael. (Douglass I 64, 177, 267, Houck 64, 181, 366, 378, Andrews, Ferguson, Thompson, Conard, Rothensteiner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:French Mills
Description:A village in the eastern part of Liberty Township on the St. Francois River, which was named for a Frenchman, Simon Durand, who owned land and operated a flour and grist mill as well as sawmills there. The mills are no longer operated. A post office was established in 1886. (Douglass I 379, Waggoner, P.G., La Plante)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fryeberg
Description:A small village in the Mine La Motte district in 1838, named for a Mr. Frye, on whose claim it was located. (Wetmore, Mouser)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:German School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Polk Township. This is a German settlement, and the school is so named. (Andrews, Compton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:German Township
Description:See Marquand Township
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gimlet Creek
Description:A small creek in the southern part of Big Creek Township, which flows east into the Castor River near Albright. Cf. Gimlet Creek in Bollinger County. (McCormick)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goff
Description:A post office in the southern part of Polk Township, was maintained here 1891-1902, and named for a family.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Castor Township, flowing into Saline Creek, and named for the wild geese which frequented the creek and marshy land nearby in pioneer days. (McCormick)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greasy Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Marquand Township. Messrs. Mouser and Stephens say this stream was so named because of the greasewood (sarcobatus vermiculatus), growing along the banks. Elsewhere in Missouri the term "greasy" is used in a common dialect sense of "muddy." This creek is called Mouser Creek at its mouth because it flows through the Mouser settlement. See Mouser School. (Mouser, Stephens, theses by Misses Zimmer and Pottenger, R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greene's Chapel
Description:A rural Christian Church in the eastern part of Liberty Township, named for Reuben Greene, a prominent man of the community. (Brewington)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greene's Chapel School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Liberty Township, located near Greene's Chapel (q.v.), from which it is named. (Brewington)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grounds Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in the northwestern part of Crooked Creek Township, flows west, enters Madison County in the northern part of Marquand Township and empties into the Castor River. It is named for a pioneer family, several members of which settled up and down the creek. (Berry) (Watts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hacker Creek
Description:A small creek in the western part of St. Michael and east Castor townships, named for the Hacker family who have a farm on the stream. Written Hackle on some maps, but this is obviously the map maker's error. (County Map, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hahn's Mill
Description:A community and mill in the eastern part of Castor Township. John Hahn operated a flour mill (waterpower), here about 1870. The mill is still standing though it is no longer operated. (Schulte, Deguire, Ellis) (Watts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Higdon
Description:A small village in the northeast part of Castor Township. A post office has been maintained since 1896. It was named for Captain William H. Higdon (1839-), whose father came to Missouri from Tennessee in the 1830s. Captain Higdon served in the U.S. Army more than four years, then returned to Madison County and settled on a farm where Higdon is now located. (Douglass I 773, P.G., Ferguson, Schulte)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Huzzah Creek
Description:A small east tributary of St. Francois River in the south part of Twelve Mile Township. This name probably had the same origin as Huzzah or Huzza creeks in Dent and Iron counties, or Hoozaw River in Warren and St. Charles: i.e., an earlier form of the Indian tribal name Osage. (See theses by Misses O'Brien, Harrison, Zimmer)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ireland Township
Description:A short-lived township in the northern part of the county, created in December, 1858, and in 1859 the "same is hereby vacated, set aside, and held for naught." Doubtless named for the country Ireland. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Iron Bank
Description:See Matthew's Mountain
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jack Diggins
Description:A spot in Mine La Motte Township, about a mile east of the village which was prospected about 1868 by Jack Lunsford and others. It was named Jack's Diggings, but in the course of time the common pronunciation prevailed and the name was spelled Diggins as it is pronounced. The loss of the apostrophe is also a common occurrence. (Watts, History of Mine La Motte)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jewett
Description:A post office and small village established in 1886 in the central part of Liberty Township. Possibly named for a family. The name is sometimes written Jewell. (Andrews, King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jewett School
Description:A rural school in the community of Jewett (q.v.), which was once called the Leatherwood School because it is located on Leatherwood Creek (q.v.). (Walker, Mouser)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:King's Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the western part of Liberty Township. It is at least fifty years old and was named for the King families who have lived there since pioneer days. (King, La Plante, Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:King's School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Liberty Township, organized in 1896 and named for the King families who were prominent there. S.M. King was one of the landowners at the time the school was organized. (L. and G.L. King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lance
Description:A post office maintained 1894-1904 in the central part of Polk Township. It was named for Daniel Jefferson Lance who was born in Madison County in 1840 and owned 1,000 acres of land. His father, Anthony Lance, came from Tennessee and put up the first wagon shop in Fredericktown. He also farmed. (Madison County Map, P.G., Madison County News, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lead Station
Description:See Mine La Motte Station.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leatherwood Creek
Description:A small western tributary of St. Francois River in central Liberty Township, near Jewett. Named for the species of timber known as Leatherwood (Dirca palustris), which grows there. Leatherwood is a small shrub with tough (leathery), pliant stems and small yellow leaves. It is also called moosewood. (Walker, Schulte, Berry)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leatherwood School
Description:See Jewett School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Township
Description:In the southwest part of the county. In 1841 John Matthews, John Miller et al were ordered to view township lines so as to strike off a new township to include the neighborhood called the Creek Nation, thus Liberty Township was created and given this ideal name. In 1845 the entire county was redistricted; in 1848 Liberty was divided, the new township being called Arcadia; in 1857 Liberty Township was attached to Polk Township after Iron County was created. In 1858 a new Liberty Township was created and its boundaries defined. The boundaries were redefined in 1909. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Rock Creek
Description:A small stream in the western part of Liberty Township. Cf. Rock Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little St. Francis River
Description:A small stream which rises in St. Francois County, runs south through Mine La Motte and St. Michaels townships., then west to form the boundary between Polk and St. Francois townships, and joins the St. Francis River near Silvermine. The name suggests the relative size of this branch and the main stream of St. Francis River. (Waggoner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Vine Church
Description:A General Baptist Church in the western part of Central Township. Little Vine is a common name for churches, especially for the Baptist denomination. The church was organized in 1846 with twenty-one members. (Douglass I 477, Ellis, Deguire, Brewington, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Vine School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Central Township, organized in 1881 near Little Vine Church (q.v.), from which it was named. (Brewington, Mouser, Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Branch
Description:A stream in the southwest part of Polk Township, running northeast into Stout's Creek. This is probably a family name. (County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lower Rock Creek
Description:A western tributary of St. Francois River in the northwest part of Central Township, south of Rock Creek (q.v.), from which it is named. (McFarland, Waggoner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Madison County
Description:Bounded on the north by St. Francois County, on the east by Perry and Bollinger counties, on the south by Bollinger and Wayne, and on the west by Iron County, Madison was created by Territorial Legislation in 1818. Originally the boundary on the west was Black River; it was reduced to its present size in 1867 when Iron County was formed. Originally the county was divided into three townships, viz: Castor (east), St. Michael (west), and Liberty (north). In 1821 two new townships were organized, Twelve Mile and German. At present there are ten townships. The first settlement within Madison County was made at Mine La Motte (q.v.). The county seat was established at Fredericktown (q.v.), in 1819. The name was given in honor of James Madison (1751-1836), President of the United States from 1809-1817, during the War of 1812. (Douglass I 167, Conard, Goodspeed 339-342)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marble Creek
Description:A western tributary of St. Francis River, in the west part of Liberty Township, named from the marble found there. (Schulte)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marquand
Description:A small village in the eastern part of Marquand Township, laid out in 1869 by Henry Whitener and named in honor of W.G. Marquand a director of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain Railroad, who donated a thousand dollars for building a Methodist Church in the village. (Douglass I 516, Conard IV 200, Whitener, Letts, Fitzsimmons 277-328)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marquand Township
Description:In the eastern part of the county. This township was first organized in 1842 and called German Township for the German settlers who were there. German Township remained in 1845 when the county was redistricted, and in 1909 it was divided to form Big Creek Township. In 1918, May 7, "came H.K. Lett, Wm. White, J.P. Ennes, et al (in number about 130), all citizens of German Township and present a petition praying that the name of their township be changed from German Township to Marquand Township," and the name was changed. The reason given is the feeling which existed during the World War against even the word German. Marquand is the principal settlement in this township. (County Court Record, Waggoner, Compton)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marsh Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Liberty Township, which flows into the St. Francois River. Named for Charles S. Marhs, merchant and landowner. (McCormick, Madison County Press (1937) )
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marsh Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A post office and rural community in the eastern part of Liberty Township. The post office was established in 1921 and named for Marsh Creek (q.v.), on which it is located. (P.G., County Map, McCormick)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marvin Collegiate Institute
Description:A Methodist institution organized in 1867 at Caledonia in Washington County as Bellevue Collegiate Institute. It was moved to Fredericktown in 1894 because Caledonia had no railroad. The new name was given in honor of Bishop Enoch Mather Marvin, pioneer Methodist in Missouri, noted as an eloquent speaker. (Douglass I 420, M.H.R. 23, Stevens)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mary Parkins Memorial Church
Description:The Methodist Church of Fredericktown in the central part of St. Michael Township, organized in 1837. The lot was donated by Colonel William Newberry and the first church erected in 1879. The present building was erected in 1903, the fund starting with $3,500 from Mary Parkin, in whose honor it was named. (Missouri Methodism 422)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mathew's Creek
Description:A small stream in the central part of St. Francois Township, running north into Little St. Francis River. It is named for John H. Mathews who came to Madison County in 1841, married Mary P. St. Genune, daughter of John B. St. Genune, who was one of the early French settlers. Mathews bought St. Genune's farm in 1852 and was a successful farmer and well-known citizen. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Matthews Mountain
Description:A mountain in Liberty Township where iron ore was formerly mined. About 1870 it was referred to as "The Matthews Mountain Iron Bank" and was named for the landowner. (Campbell, Gipson, Schulte)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Fork of Big Creek
Description:See Big Creek
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mier
Description:A post office maintained in 1853 in the northern part of Twelve Mile Township, named for the Mier (Meyer), family who were pioneers in the county. The first wedding in Madison County was that of Andrew De Guire and Phebe Mier (Meyer), in 1818. (P.G., Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Creek
Description:A stream in the western part of St. Michael Township. Originally called Calloway settlement, and the creek is named from the water powered mill operated by John Calloway on this stream in pioneer days. John Calloway came to Madison County from Maryland in 1799. Some time later Peter Calloway came and their descendants still live in the county. (Andrews, Thompson, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Dam
Description:A post office maintained in 1853 near the dam on Little St. Francis River in the central part of St. Michael Township. So named from the mill dam built for a much used flour mill. (Andrews, P.G. (1853), Schulte)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Dam Road
Description:A county road leading from Fredericktown to Silvermine (q.v.), past the Mill Dam from which it was named. (Andrews, Schulte, Madison County Press)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Millcreek
Description:A small village in the western part of Castor Township on Mill Creek (q.v.), from which it is named. A post office has been maintained since 1910. (Andrews, Mouser)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the northern part of Marquand Township, named for Rev. Miller, an early pastor of the church. J.J.W. Miller came in 1811, entered land in 1855 during Pierce's Administration; C.W. Miller now lives on Marble Creek. (Stephens, Price)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller Chapel School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Marquand Township, named from Miller Chapel (q.v.), in the same community. The school is usually called the Cook School locally for Thomas Cook and family who are prominent in the community. (Price, Stephens)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mine La Motte
Description:A famous mine in the central part of La Motte Township, probably the oldest mine in Missouri. It is still a matter of contention among historians as to how old the mines are and for whom they were named. On one side are those who believe that the mines were discovered by Philip Francis Renault in 1720. Renault had left France in 1719 with 200 artisans to look for silver in this territory which then belonged to France. He stopped in St. Domingo and bought 500 slaves. With this group of 700 people he came up the river from New Orleans, stopped near Fort Chartres, Illinois, and sent out exploring expeditions. One man in his company was La Motte, a mineralogist. On one of these expeditions Mine La Motte was discovered. In 1723 Renault got a concession of "two leagues of ground at the mine called Mine de la Mothe." Then, according to this group Renault, not having found the silver for which he was searching, returned to France. La Motte remained and the lead mine was developed, attracting little attention, however, for many years. According to the second group, the mine was really discovered in 1714 by Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac, who came to Canada in 1683, established a post in 1701 at what was later Detroit, was appointed Governor-General of Louisiana in 1710, came to New Orleans in 1712, and visited Fort de Chartres in 1714. While there he went on an expedition of exploration and discovered lead at the place which is now Mine La Motte. This group, then, place the date of discovery in 1714 and say the mine was named for La Mothe (or Motte), Cadillac and not the mineralogist who happened to be in Renault's party. This, they argue, is why Renault came, the Governor-General reported his discovery of mineral and Renault organized his party at La Mothe Cadillac's insistence. Schoolcraft, who made a report on mines in the Illinois Country in 1819, believed the mines were discovered by Renault and La Motte. He is copied by Beck (1823), Peck (1831), and Wetmore (1837). Houck, however, insisted he had records to prove it was De la Mothe Cadillac who discovered the mine, whereas Schoolcraft had merely asserted a La Motte was with Renault. Later, local historians, among them Thompson, have concluded that there were the two men and that the mine was named for La Motte Cadillac. The mine was puiblic property 1738-40. In 1763 it was worked by members of the Valle family (from Ste. Genevieve), and in 1800 J.B. Pratte, St. Gemme Beauvois, Francis and J.B. Valle purchased the mine from the Valles, to whom the Spanish government had granted it. In 1827 the grant was confirmed by the U.S. Government and sold in 1838 to C.C. Valle, L.F. Linn and E.E. Pratte who leased the land to miners in 40-acre tracts. The entire tract had 24,000 acres. Since that time the property has changed owners many times, and is now owned by the Fredericktown Mining Company. The village of Mine La Motte grew up around the mine, as did many other small "villages" or settlements. (Ferguson, Andrews, Thompson, Schoolcraft (1819), Beck (1823), Peck (1831), Wetmore (1837), History of Mine La Motte (pamphlet), Conard, Houck I 279, Douglass I 379, 182)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mine La Motte Cemetery
Description:Near the village of Mine La Motte is this cemetery which has been used since 1800. (Hahn, Mouser)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mine La Motte Station
Description:The railroad station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad named for Mine La Motte (q.v.). It was sometimes called simply Lead Station.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mine La Motte Township
Description:In the northern part of the county. It was first established as a special voting precinct in St. Michael Township in 1856. In 1909 it was made a municipal Township. The name is that of the district around old Mine La Motte (q.v.). (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Railroad
Description:In 1849 the Pacific Railroad was chartered and so named because of the intention of the company to reach the west coast. On July 4, 1851, Mayor Luther M. Kennett of St. Louis turned the first spadeful of dirt for the construction of Missouri's first railroad. The first iron for the rails arrived in 1852. Thomas Allen began serving as president of the company in 1850. By 1853 the road had been constructed as far as the Pacific. In 1860 financial difficulties increased and the State Government seized the railroad. During General Price's raid in 1864 great strips of the Pacific Railroad were destroyed. The road was leased to the Atlantic and Pacific Company in 1872, sold at public auction to Andrew Pierce, Jr. September 6, 1876, sold to St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company two days later; sold to L.K. Garrison and reorganized as the Missouri Pacific and became, in 1879, a part of the Jay Gould system. On March 3, 1851, the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad was incorporated, the name indicating the purpose of building a road from St. Louis to Iron Mountain or Pilot Knob. The privilege of extending the road to the Mississippi River at Cape Girardeau or any other point south thereof was also granted. Preliminary surveys were made in 1852. By 1856 only twelve miles of the road had been built, but by 1858 it had reached Pilot Knob. In 1866 the state planned to sell the railroad, but since bids did not cover the indebtedness, the commissioners purchased it. After some difficulties and public protests in 1868 the road went to Thomas Allen, who had resigned as president of the (Missouri) Pacific Railroad in 1854. Already in 1854 J.H. Morley, civil engineer for the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad, had surveyed the 119 mile line from Bismarck in St. Francois County to Belmont in Mississippi County, a line passing through Madison, Bollinger, and Cape Girardeau Counties. Construction was started from both the Bismarck and Belmont ends of the line; and at midnight August 14, 1869, the two parts of the line were brought together in the middle of the Bollinger County Tunnel. It was opened for travel August 19, 1869. In 1880 the Missouri Pacific acquired the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad by purchase, and it has since been known by that name. The branch of the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad which extended from Bismarck to Belmont on the Mississippi River is known as the Belmont Branch, from its terminal. (Thornton, Douglass I 499, thesis by Fitzsimmon (1931), MISSOURI & MISSOURIANS I 765- 6)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moore's Chapel
Description:A rural church in the western part of Big Creek Township, named for Wesley Moore, an influential citizen in that community. (Schulte, Mouser, Brewington)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moore's Chapel School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Big Creek Township, named for Moore's Chapel (q.v.). The original name for this school was Rock Point School, so named because of the rock formation there. (Brewington, Schulte, Mouser)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morris Creek
Description:A small stream flowing into Big St. Francis River, in the southern part of Liberty Township, doubtless named for a landowner. (County Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Gilead Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the northeast part of St. Michael Township, organized about 1890, and named from the famous mountain east of the Jordan River, the scene of the covenant between Jacob and Laban (Gen. 31:48). (Watts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Pisgah School
Description:A rural school in the north-central part of Twelve Mile Township, organized in 1885 near Mt. Pisgah Church (q.v.), from which it was named. (Andrews, King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Zion Church
Description:A Methodist Church in the central part of St. Michael Township, which was established in 1835. Cf. Zion. (Douglass I 452)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mountain Oak School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Polk Township established in 1903 and named for the well-known species of trees growing on the mountain in this community. (King, Brewington)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mouser Cemetery
Description:A large rural cemetery in the east part of Marquand Township, in the community where a large group of Mousers live and have lived since they came in 1818. (Mouser)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mouser School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Marquand Township, organized in 1881 and named for the Mouser family who were large landowners there. Mr. Mouser says "all the Mousers went to school there." The Mouser family came to Madison County in 1818 and settled on the creek. (Mouser, Houck III 181)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mouser's Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Marquand Township, which empties into Castor River. It is named for the Mouser family, who lived in this region. The upper part of the creek is called Greasy Creek. (Mouser, McCann)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Pisgah Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the north-central part of Twelve Mile Township, organized about 1880. Pisgah was the mountain from which Moses viewed the Promised Land (Deut. 3:27). (McCann, Andrews, King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Musco Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Polk Township, named for the Musco Indian family who lived on the south bank of this creek for several years previous to 1817. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nachitoches Path
Description:An Indian path or trail leading from St. Anthonys on Ste. Genevieve County, in a southwestern direction through Wayne County, near Greenville, and on to Nachitoches, one of the Spanish posts of Mexico, now Louisiana. This path connected with the Virginia Warrior's Path and with a path leading north to the Osage. After the country was settled, the Nachitoches path became the military and wagon road of the immigrants to Arkansas, crossing the Mississippi River at Bainbridge or Cape Girardeau, thence moving to the St. Francois, crossing at the Indian ford, thence to Black River crossing near Poplar Bluff and Current River at what was known as Pittman's ferry. (Houck I 227- 228)
Source:Zimmer, Gertrude M. "Place Names Of Five Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1944.

Place name:New Village
Description:A name applied to the second village of St. Michael, built after the flood of 1814 near the site of the present Fredericktown (q.v.). (Rothensteiner, Andrews, Thompson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of St. Francois Township, named from its location in a grove of oak trees (Quercus). (Cooper, King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A rural school in the east part of St. Francois Township. Cf. above. (Cooper, King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pacific Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peter's Creek
Description:A small stream in Central Township, running south into Twelve Mile Creek near Zion, doubtless named for a landowner. (Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pickerville
Description:A mining village in the south part of La Motte Township. Zack Picker once owned all the land here and the place was consequently called Pickerville. (McCann)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Piney Creek
Description:A small eastern tributary of St. Francis River in the southeast part of St. Francois Township. It was named for the scrub pine growing along the banks of the stream. (Mouser, King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Piney School
Description:A rural school organized in 1881 in the southern part of St. Francois Township on Piney Creek (q.v.), from which it is named.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plum Creek
Description:A small creek which flows south through St. Michael Township, empties into St. Francois River. It is named for the thicket of wild plums which grew along its banks. (County Map, Paul Berry)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Polk Township
Description:In the northwest part of the county, organized in 1857 and named for Captain Charles K. Polk, Confederate soldier, who was born in Madison County in 1839 and served in the Civil War under Colonel Colton Greene. In 1873 he returned to Madison County to a farm. (Douglass I 843-44, County Court Record, Waggoner, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pond Branch
Description:A western tributary of Castor River in south Marquand Township, so named because the stream issues from a pond or small lake. (Waggoner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Providence Baptist Church
Description:The church was organized "at or near Fredericktown" in 1814 by Elders Thompson, John Farrar, and James E. Welch. Whether this church disbanded entirely or became the nucleus of the First Baptist Church of Fredericktown in 1870 cannot be ascertained. The church is no longer in existence. (Tong 125, Douglass I 201, History of Missouri Baptists 26, 7)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reed's Bend Church
Description:A rural church in the Reed's Bend community, named for the prominent settler, Jim Reed. (Andrews, Schulte)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reed's Bend School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Twelve Mile Township, named for Jim Reed, landowner there, and from the natural bend which the St. Francois River makes. (Schulte, Conley)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Revelle Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in the central part of St. Michael Township, which was named for Reverend Levi W. Revelle, preacher, teacher, and farmer. (Goodspeed, Gipson, Revelle)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Revielle Mines
Description:Mines located in the southern part of St. Michael Township, named for the Revielle family, who owned the mines. (Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rhodes Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the southern part of Liberty Township, named for King David Rhodes, a prominent man in the church and community. K.D. Rhodes is the son of Peter Rhodes who came to Missouri about 1815. (Price, Conard, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Pile Mountain
Description:A large hill or mountain in the center part of Central Township. At the top of the mountain is a large flat rock and on this are piled large rocks in a pattern. It is quite an extensive formation, covering about four acres and is believed to have been used by the Indians as a signal mountain. (Ferguson, Brewington, Berry)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Point School
Description:See Moore's Chapel
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Roselle
Description:A village in the west part of Polk Township. A post office was established in 1896. The story concerning this name is one which Mr. Ferguson says an old man, Vinton Allen, told him. This large community was on the main road from Ironton to Fredericktown, and in early days traveling road shows often passed by. Once the show stopped in this community and Roselle or Rosella, a girl in tights, performed. The community split into factions, the shocked or "aginsts" and the curious or "fers." Soon after Roselle's appearance the post office was applied for and some of the "fers" suggested this name which was accepted by the post office department. Mrs. Andres, on the other hand, relates that a Mr. Downs says it is named for two daughters Rose and Ella of a settler, though who he was is not known. (Ferguson, Andrews, Douglass I 379)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Saco
Description:A small village on Twelve Mile Creek in the west-central part of Twelve Mile Township. The name Saco was given by Carrol Ally when the post office was applied for in 1890. The name is said to be coined, but the original words from which the syllables were selected are unknown. (Waggoner, Mouser, Brewington)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Saline Creek
Description:A large creek which flows through Fredericktown in St. Michael Township, through Castor Township, into Perry County and empties into the Mississippi River. Salt springs were found along its banks; and near the mouth. Pegreau, a Frenchman, manufactured salt in 1804, although the salt deposits were known earlier. (Houck I 247, 277, Thompson, Beck (1823) )
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Saltpeter Cave
Description:A large cave in the eastern part of Liberty Township, named for the saltpeter (soapstone or pipe clay), which is found there. It has never been developed commercially, but pipes are made from this clay. (Brewington, Walker)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shady Grove Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of St. Michael Township, organized in 1854, doubtless named from the situation in a grove of shade trees. (Tong)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shady Grove School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of St. Michael Township, named for a beautiful grove in which the schoolhouse was erected about 1890. (McCann, Stephens)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shay's Creek
Description:A small tributary of Village Creek, which rises near Mine La Motte and flows south into St. Michael Township. It is named for an early settler. (Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sherrick School
Description:See Spring Valley School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shetleys Creek
Description:A large creek flowing into the Castor River in Marquand and Big Creek Townships. It was named for Caleb Shetley, a large landowner there. Two branches of the creek are designated East Fork or East Prong of Shetley's Creek and West Fork or Prong of Shetley's Creek from their location. (Deguire, Ellis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Silver Mine
Description:See Silvermine
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Silver Mines School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Polk Township, near the village of Silvermine (q.v.).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Silver Mountain
Description:A large mountain in the southern part of Polk Township, which is named from the silver deposits found and mined there in 1893 at what is known as Silvermine (q.v.). (Ferguson, Schulte, Watts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Silvermine
Description:A small village in the southern part of Polk Township. A post office known as Einstein Silver Mine was established in 1886 and maintained under that name until 1893, since when it has been Silver Mine or Silvermine. It had its origin in a discovery of silver made by Hiram N. Tong while following turkey tracks. He bought the land and put men to work in 1862; the results were encouraging enough to interest William Einstein, a capitalist, who bought out Tong and in 1877 organized the Silver Mountain Mining Company and began operations. He planned to use water power and built a dam across St. Francois River, which is still in existence and the road to which is still called The Mill Dam Road. The silver mines are no longer operated. (Ferguson, Waggoner, Stevens II: 388- 390, W.P.A. Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Simmstown
Description:A small village in Mine La Motte Township, near the La Motte Mine, which existed in 1867 and was named for its most prominent family, Simms. (Watts, Schulte)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sisters of Loretto Academy
Description:An institution for higher learning established in the northwest part of Fredericktown in 1832, the first in the county, under the supervision of the Sisters of Loretto, for whom the Academy, as well as the Convent maintained in connection with the Academy, was named. The Sisters of Loretto (an educational sisterhood), were founded in 1809 in Washington County, Kentucky by Father Nerinckx (1761-18--). They first came to St. Marys of the Barrens in Perry County in 1819, whence they went out to found other academies, establishing the institution in Cape Girardeau in 1828 and here in Fredericktown in 1832. They came to Fredericktown at the request of Fr. Francis Cellini, who was born at Ascoli in the Marches, 1781 and died in St. Louis in 1849. (Rothensteiner, Cath. H.R. I:159-)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sisters of Loretto Convent
Description:See Sisters of Loretto Academy.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Skrainka
Description:A post office kept in a farmhouse in the eastern part of Polk Township, 1891-1897 and named for the Skrainka Construction Company of St. Louis then operating in the county. The construction company was owned by Wm., Fred, Louis, and Morris Skrainka. (P.G., Missouri Mother of the West V 194, Mo. G. & D. (1890-91)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slab Town
Description:A village in Mine La Motte Township, so named because the houses were roughly constructed of slabs. (Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slater's Creek
Description:A southern tributary of Little St. Francis River, in east St. Francois Township. On the Highway Map of 1940 it is called Slater Branch; it is doubtless named for a landowner. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Smith's Mountain
Description:A high mountain in the northern part of Central Township, named for the Smith family, prominent pioneers. (Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snowden Branch
Description:A small stream in the northern part of Marquand Township, running north into White Springs Branch, named for Professor J.F. Snowden, pioneer teacher and landowner in the community. (Stephens)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snowdenville Church
Description:A rural Presbyterian Church in the northern part of Marquand Township, named for Professor J.F. Snowden, teacher, pioneer settler and landowner in this community, who contributed largely to the erection of this building. (Stephens, Mounce)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snowdenville School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Marquand Township, named for Professor J.F. Snowden. Cf. above. (Stephens)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sonderman Town
Description:A small village in Mine La Motte Township, which was named for Ben Sonderman, who originally owned all the houses. (Sonderman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spring Valley Church
Description:A rural church, Methodist, in the eastern part of Castor Township, named from its location in a pleasant shady valley through which flows a spring, known for its good water. It was organized soon after the Civil War. (Whitworth, Price, Stephens, Combs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spring Valley School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Castor Township, organized in 1883. Named from the Spring Valley Church (q.v.), which is nearby. This school is often called locally the Sherrick School for a prominent family in the community. (Whitworth, Price)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francois Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the western part of St. Francois Township which was organized in 1825 by William Street and John Farrar and named for St. Francois River near which it was located, and in which stream doubtless the new members were baptized. (Douglass I 201, Price, History of Missouri Baptists, 25, 26)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francois Township
Description:In the north-central part of the county. In 1845 the county was redistricted into six municipal townships and St. Francois was named from the St. Francois River (q.v.). Its boundaries were enlarged in 1857 when all the residue of Liberty Township that remained after Iron County was cut off was added to St. Francois Township, and finally the present boundaries were established in 1909 when the county was redistricted. (Douglass I 167, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Michael Trail
Description:A post road was established by act of Territorial Legislation in 1819 "from St. Michael by the seat of justice in Wayne County to Hix's Ferry." This road is believed to have followed an old Indian trail and was a very important thoroughfare in pioneer days. (McCormick, Andrews, M.H.R. 26: 298)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Michaels
Description:See Fredericktown
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Michael's Church
Description:The Catholic Church of Fredericktown. It was originally established in 1802 in the village of St. Michaels by the French families who came here to Mine La Motte and dedicated to St. Michael, the Archangel (cf. Jude 9, Rev. 12:7), to whom early christians gave the care of their sick. Whether the church was blessed on St. Michael's day or was dedicated to the patron saint of one of the members, we do not know. The village was also named St. Michael's (q.v.). (Goodspeed 446, Cath. M.R., Rothensteiner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Michael's School
Description:A Catholic school in Fredericktown founded in 1883 by Fr. Tannarath (1856-1890), and placed in charge of the Ursuline Sisters of St. Louis; the school is named from St. Michael's Church (cf. above).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Michaels Township
Description:One of the three original townships organized in 1818 when the county was formed. Named for the oldest settlement in the county, St. Michaels, which later became Fredericktown (q.v.). It was retained in 1845 when the county was redistricted; its boundaries were changed in 1846 by order of the court, in 1857 when Polk Township was created and in 1909 when Mine La Motte Township was created. (Douglass I 167, 177, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Starkey Branch
Description:A small stream which enters Marquand Township from Bollinger County, running into Castor River at Marquand. It is named for a family who own land on the creek. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stephens Creek
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Marquand Township, flowing into East Prong of Shetley's Creek. It was named for Uncle Billy Stephens, a prominent citizen. (Stephens)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stephens Creek School
Description:See Greasy Creek School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stout's Creek
Description:A small stream which enters Polk Township from Iron County, running east into St. Francois River. It was named for Ephraim Stout, who pioneered in Arcadia Valley as early as 1805. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stricklin Creek
Description:A small creek in the southern part of St. Francois Township, running north into Cedar Creek. This is doubtless named for the Stricklin family. (Andrews)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stringtown
Description:A small village in Mine La Motte Township, so called because the village has only one street and the houses are in a string. (Stevenson, Mouser)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Grove School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Marquand Township, organized in 1885. No sugar maple trees grow here now, but it is conjectured that the school was originally located in a grove of sugar trees. (King)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tesrow Creek
Description:A small creek which rises in the central part of Polk Township, flows north and empties into Stout's Creek. It was named for an early French family (Tessereau), who settled here. The spelling has been anglicized to Tesrow. (Tessereau)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tessereau Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in the eastern part of Mine La Motte Township, which was in use before the Civil War. It was originally the family cemetery of Joseph Tessereau. (Watts, Tessereau)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tessereau Creek
Description:See Tesrow Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Narrows
Description:A place on St. Francois River, where the stream passes between two mountains, hence the name. It is in the south part of Polk Township. (Stevens II 390)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tin Mountain [1 of 2]
Description:A mountain in the eastern part of St. Francois Township which was the scene of a magnificent hoax. In 1870 an Englishman named Stoker announced that he had found tin on the banks of Little St. Francis. He interested Moody and Michel, grocers, of St. Louis. A Mr. Sprowle, acting as their agent, bought the land. They formed a company and in a short time a community of 1,500 people were at Tin Mountain. Mr. Taylor of Connecticut, a chemist, bought stock, as did Lamoreaux and Schaeffer of St. Louis. Shafts were sunk, a mill was erected with a furnace costing $65,000; in short, it is estimated that $200,000 was spent by the company. But there was no tin. No one has ever been able to explain the hoax completely. (Stevens IV 387-88, Ferguson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tin Mountain [2 of 2]
Description:A temporary or "mushroom" community which grew up around Tin Mountain (q.v.). (Stevens II 387-88)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tip Top School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Marquand Township, situated at the top of a high elevation, and so named because it is at the "tip top" of the community. Mrs. Price says it was "some hill for school children to climb." (Price, Stephens, Ferguson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trace Creek
Description:A large creek in the western part of Central and Twelve Mile Townships which follows approximately the old Indian trace or trail (q.v.), from which it is named. It flows south into Twelve Mile Creek near Saco. (McCormick)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trace Creek
Description:A small creek which begins in the western part of Lorance Township, flows across the southeast corner of Madison County, and then to the western part of Fillmore Township and empties into Castor River in Wayne County. Like the larger Trace Creek in Madison County it is believed to have been named from an old Indian trail or trace. (Dewitt, Wiggs, McDonald)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trace Creek School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Central Township, organized in 1886 and named for Trace Creek (q.v.), on which it is located. (Mouser, Brewington)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tucker Creek
Description:A stream in the southeast part of St. Michael Township, which empties into Castor River. It was named for Francis Marion Tucker who came to Mine La Motte in 1781, purchased a farm in 1888 and lived there the rest of his life. He is a grandson of Francis Tucker who came from Maryland to Perry County, Missouri, and started the well-known Tucker Settlement (q.v.), there.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A small creek flowing into Castor River in the eastern part of Castor Township, and named for the wild turkeys found there by the pioneer hunters. (Waggoner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A small stream in East Polk Township, an eastern tributary of St. Francois River. Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Twelve Mile
Description:A settlement or village in the southern part of Twelve Mile Township, on Twelve Mile Creek (q.v.), from which it is named. (Mouser)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Twelve Mile Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the northeastern part of Twelve Mile Township, organized prior to 1885 by Judge E.L. Graham at his home on Twelve Mile Creek (q.v.), from which it was named. (Tong)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Twelve Mile Creek
Description:A large creek flowing west through Central, Marquand, and Twelve Mile townships and emptying into the St. Francois River near Saco. So named because its headwaters are approximately twelve miles from the County Seat, Fredericktown. The name is also written Twelvemile Creek. (Ferguson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Twelve Mile School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Twelve Mile Township, organized in 1902. Named from Twelve Mile Creek (q.v.), near which it is located. (Brewington, Mouser)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Twelve Mile Township
Description:In the southern part of the county organized in 1842, changed in 1845 when the county was redistricted into six townships, changed in 1851 when Union Township was cut off, enlarged in 1857 when the residue of Union Township remaining after Iron County was formed was attached to Twelve Mile Township, and changed in 1909 when Central Township was created. Named for the creek. (Douglass I 167, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Twelvemile Creek
Description:See Twelve Mile Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Underwood Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the western part of Castor Township. It was named for Chet Underwood, who gave the land and was the first person buried there. (McCombs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Underwood School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Castor Township, named for David Underwood on whose land the school is located. (Whitworth, Combs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of St. Michael Township, organized by Rev. Levi W. Revelle. So named because it was built by the united efforts of the entire congregation, who donated all materials and labor. (Watts, Price, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of St. Michael Township, named from Union Church in the same neighborhood. (King, Watts, Price)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Township
Description:In the southwest part of the county, it was erected in 1851 from Twelve Mile Township, disbanded and attached to Twelve Mile Township in 1857 when Iron County was organized. The name is a common one. (Douglass I 167, 8, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Village Creek
Description:A small creek in the northeast part of St. Michael's Township, a tributary of Little St. Francis River, which is named from the "Village," i.e. the place where the original village of St. Michael was located before the flood of 1814. The creek was evidently called Village Creek when the village was first settled in 1804. Schoolcraft refers to it in 1819, saying of the second or "New Village," St. Michael is situated on a plain on Village Creek." (Ferguson, Rothensteiner)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Village Creek School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of St. Michael Township, named for Village Creek (q.v.), on which it is situated. (Deguire)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Village, The
Description:A spot where the original village of St. Michael stood before the flood of 1814. Nothing remains to mark the site. (Rothensteiner, Ferguson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wash Creek
Description:A small stream which enters eastern Marquand Township from Bollinger County and runs into Castor River at Marquand. The name doubtless refers to the "wash" or low swamp from which the creek flows. (Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wash Creek
Description:A small stream which enters Marquand Township from Bollinger County (q.v.), and runs into Castor River just south of Marquand.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wesley Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church in St. Michael Township, six miles west of Fredericktown. It has existed for at least one hundred years. It was named for John Wesley (1703-1791), founder of Methodism. (Price)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Fork of Big Creek
Description:See Big Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Fork of Shetley's Creek
Description:See Shetley's Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Prong of Shetley's Creek
Description:See Shetley's Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Creek
Description:A small stream, flowing into Castor River in the eastern part of Marquand Township from White Springs (q.v.), from which it is named. (Andrews, White, Francis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Spring
Description:A village or health resort which grew up at White Springs. Cf. above. (Andrews, White)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Springs
Description:Mineral springs on a farm belonging to Pressley White in the southwest part of Castor Township. Mr. White established a health resort here which has grown into a village, developed especially by people from Sikeston, in Scott County, Missouri. (Andrews, White)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Springs Branch
Description:A small stream in the southwest part of Castor Township, a western tributary of Castor River, named from White Springs. Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whitener's Creek
Description:A stream in the eastern part of Marquand Township, which empties into Castor River. It was named for the Henry Whitener family. Henry Whitener came to Madison County in 1804 from North Carolina. He married Elizabeth Bollinger, of Bollinger County. Henry Whitener is a descendant of Henry Wetner, of Belgium, and brother of Ernest I of Saxe-Coburg and Victoria. He came to America and took the name Henry Weidner, fought in the Revolution, married Cathrine Muehl. His son Henry Americanized the name to Whitener and was the father of the Henry who came to Madison County. (Goodspeed, Thompson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion
Description:A post office was established here in 1886 and named from Zion Church (q.v.). It is in the south part of Central Township. (Gipson, Price)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the southern part of Central Township, organized before 1870 and named for Jerusalem. Zion was a hill in Jerusalem, the sight of the regal residence of David, and as the center of Hebrew worship has come to be synonymous with the city itself.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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