Lewis County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Airpoint School
Description:A schoolhouse in southwestern La Belle Township. It is situated on a high location; hence the name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen Branch
Description:A branch to the west in Salem Township, flowing south and east into the Troublesome in southeastern Salem Township. So named for N.E. Allen, at one time owner of land through which the branch flows. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; W.E. Hotchkiss)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen School
Description:A schoolhouse in northern Lyon Township. So named for the owner of the land on which the schoolhouse stood. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen Township
Description:A township which included on its organization all the territory west of the Troublesome, and the greater part of Knox. It was organized in 1836, and named for the first settler, Samuel Allen. This township was very short lived. Scotland County, which included Knox, was organized in 1841, and Allen Township was broken up into three Lewis County townships. The name is no longer used. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 149; HIST. KNOX 1887, 564)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alverson Pond
Description:A pond in the southern part of Union Township near the county line. It took its name from the landowner, C.J. Alverson, who until about 1900 owned the land on which it is located. (ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; (F) Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Church
Description:A Christian Church organized in 1847 four miles further up Sugar Creek from Christ Church. A building was erected a few years before the Civil War. It still exists as a community church, all denominations meeting there. A Biblical name: "And the disciples were called Christians first in Antioch." (Acts 11:26) (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 190, 191; W.B. McRoberts; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Argola
Description:A post office from 1883-1901; a store and a post office ten miles south and west of Monticello, in Highland Township, near the Troublesome. The store is no longer used, but the name continues. Argola is the community version of the name of an old couple living there bearing the name, Ogolar. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Polk 1883; Maps Missouri, 1903, 1904; E.G. Overton; (F) E.W. Lillard; (F) W.E. Hotchkiss)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Asbury Chapel
Description:A Methodist Chapel in the southern part of the county, west of Maywood and southeast of Durham; established at an early period. It is still in existence. It is named for one of the founders of the Methodist church in America, an early bishop. Francis Asbury was sent to America by John Wesley in 1771 to the first religious society, established in New York. Owing to the Revolutionary War, all of the early preachers returned home by 1778, with the exception of Asbury. It was owing largely to his influence that each conference about 1820 established a school. (See Centennary College). He became bishop of the church in 1784. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 137; INTERN CYC.; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Augusta
Description:A "paper" town laid out on the Lewis-Clark line to the east. Platted in 1837, and to the original plat denominated Marshall's Addition were added Moorman's and Colly's in the same year; yet the whole remained a town on paper only. The name lives today as a community name. It is said by all informants to bear the name of a family in the vicinity. Possibly what is meant is that it was a Christian name of some feminine member of a local family; or it may have been formed from the common family name August. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 226; Plat; Maps Missouri, 1857-1861; T.M. Story; O.C. Buck; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Augusta School
Description:A schoolhouse that serves northeast Lewis County and southeastern Clark County. It stands just within the line of Lewis County on the site of the "paper" town, projected in 1837, the name of which it bears. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson; Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baptist Seminary
Description:An early name for LaGrange College (See Hannibal-LaGrange College), William Ellis, instructor. An earlier name was that of Female Academy. At that time Mrs. C. Turner was the instructor. At this time the college was at La Grange. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barn Hill
Description:See La Grange.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barnes's View
Description:A post office in 1836 and 1837 south of the center of the county. Given by Wetmore as Barns' View. So named for its location and for G.A. Barnes, the postmaster. (Wetmore 1837; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 60; Maps Missouri, 1842-1870)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barney King Post
Description:A G.A.R. Post organized at Canton in 1883, and a hall erected. So named for Major Barnabas B. King of the 21st Missouri, killed at the Battle of Shiloh, 1862. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 197, 198; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barn's View
Description:See Barnes's View.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baxter Lake
Description:A lake in the extreme northeast in Canton Township, connected by a long slough with Offerrell Lake. It is now practically drained. So named for W.F. Baxter, whose land touched one side of it. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; (F) W.W. Henton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek
Description:A short branch south of Monticello, flowing east into the North Fabius. A name given it by the old settlers, who said that any morning they could go out and get a "bar" before breakfast. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek Church
Description:See Mount Moriah Bear Creek Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beckner Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Wyaconda during the Civil War. So named for the family who lived on the land at that point. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bell Echo School
Description:A schoolhouse in southern Highland Township; now a part of the Durham Consolidated School District. (See Bell Echo School District). A fanciful name given for the little dell in which the building stood. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Russell Allen)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bell Echo School District
Description:A school district partly in Marion County, now a part of the Durham Consolidated School District (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Russell Allen)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Belle Prairie [1 of 2]
Description:A post office from 1860-1867; south of La Belle. For name see La Belle Prairie. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Belle Prairie [2 of 2]
Description:See La Belle Prairie.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Benjamin
Description:A post office from 1870-1925; seven miles northeast of Monticello, on Sugar Creek in southeastern Lyon Township. Noted on the map as early as 1878 under the incorrect spelling of Bergamon; in 1879 it appeared as Benjamin. So named for Honorable John F. Benjamin (1817-1877), a member of Congress from this district 1865-1871. (Campbell 1874, 309; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 224; ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Eaton, 185; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1878; BIOG. DIRECTORY AMER. CONG.; W.B. McRoberts; (F) H.L. Loudermilk)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Benton Township
Description:A township of Lewis County set aside by the Lewis County Court for a separate county and organized for civil and military purposes. It originally included the present territory of Scotland County with a six-mile strip of Knox County. When in 1836 the Lewis County Court organized Mt. Pleasant Township (q.v.) out of Benton, the name Benton was retained for the eastern eleven miles from north to south. The township has undergone various changes. In 1844 that part of Benton that still lay in Knox was constituted a township and retained its name in that county. There is no township of this name today in Scotland County. Benton in Knox lies on the northern line of the county, with Colony to the east, Liberty to the south, and Greensburg to the west. Here it was one of the four original townships in 1845. So named for Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858). Democratic senator and representative to Congress from Missouri. He was elected to the 33rd Congress (1853-1855) as the Missouri Compromise delegate. (See "Bullion's Landing"). (HIST. KNOX 1887, 606, 740-742; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 417, 438, 439; COURT RECORD, SCOTLAND 1844; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 1898, 1916; (F) BIOG. DIREC. OF AMERICAN CONGRESS; (F: Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bergamon
Description:See Benjamin.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bestville
Description:See Ewing.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Betsy Branch
Description:A branch to the south and east of Lewistown, flowing northeast into the Middle Fabius. It is also known as the Betty Branch. The origin of the name is unknown. Cf. the numerous other feminine names used as place-names. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Betty Branch
Description:See Betsy Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Branch
Description:A branch which rises in northern Knox County, flowing southeast into Lewis County, where it enters the Middle Fabius. So named for its relations to larger streams. Around 1878, it was known as the South Fork of the Middle Fabius, again for its location. The county history says that in time the South Fork was called "Little Faba" this for the same reason. A still earlier name, around 1858, was Taylor Fork, for an owner of land in the vicinity. Colton (1858) gives it as Taylor's Branch, the same as Middle Fabius or South Fork of the same. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 23; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Colton 1858)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River, about five miles north of Canton. It comprises several hundred acres. So named because of its size. It has also been called Nelson's Island for the reason that it was pre-empted by a man of the name of Nelson. (Judge James T. Lloyd; W.B. McRoberts; (F) W.W. Henton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Wyaconda
Description:See Wyaconda River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Billups School
Description:See Plano School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Binger Mill
Description:A mill on the Middle Fabius River, northwest of Lewistown; around 1876. So named for the owner. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; E.V. Overton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blair Branch
Description:A branch north of Lewistown, flowing north and east into the Middle Fabius River. So named for Henry Blair, an old resident. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; E.V. Overton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bland School
Description:A schoolhouse in western Canton Township just north of Canton. So named for a family in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Grass
Description:See Tolona.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boat Slough
Description:A slough along the Mississippi River below the Canton Chute (q.v.) and connected with Oyster Lake (q.v.). Doubtless a part of the old channel. It is accessible to boats in time of high water; hence its name. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; Mrs. J.O. Tatje)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boudreau School
Description:A schoolhouse in Lyon Township. So named for a family near the building. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boulware Mounds
Description:Indian mounds in the northeastern part of the county, near the Clark line. So named for the Boulware family, an early and prominent family in Missouri. John N. Boulware served as Representative from Clark County in the Assembly of 1860, and John H. Boulware in the same capacity in 1879. John W. Boulware was appointed Judge of the Marion County probate court, January 10, 1887. Other members of this well-known family have held important positions. (OFFICIAL MAN. OF STATE OF MISSOURI, 1915-1916; Houck, I, 88; JEFFERSON CITY DAILY TRIBUNE, Jan. 11, 1887; JEFFERSON CITY INQUIRER, June 23, 1860)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bowles Branch
Description:A branch west and north of Bunker Hill, flowing east into the North Fabius. So named for the Bowles family, owners of the land. The county atlas gives the name as Bowling, but there were no Bowlings in the county. The pronunciation in two syllables that locally used for the family. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bowles School
Description:See Bowls School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bowling Branch
Description:See Bowles Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bowls School
Description:A schoolhouse in northern La Belle Township. So named for the Bowles family who were early landowners. The name has changed in spelling and pronunciation; formerly Bowles. (See Bowles Branch) (HIST. LEWIS 1887; 190; Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bozarth School
Description:A schoolhouse southwest of La Grange. So named for the Bozarth family who were settlers. (See Bozarth Settlement) (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bozarth Settlement
Description:John Bozarth came into the county from Kentucky in 1819, when Lewis was still a part of Marion County, entering his land in Pike County. He opened up a small farm a little more than two miles below La Grange. His family followed him the next year, and established the settlement, the ruins from which could still be seen in 1887. The name Bozarth was originally Bosworth; sometimes pronounced Bosorth. It developed into Bozarth. The name is further reduced frequently to Bosier. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 27; QUNICY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 30, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bozarth's Mill
Description:A mill on the Wyaconda River one mile above the site of McKinney's Mill (q.v.), a few miles north of La Grange. Built by John Bozarth, whence the name (see Bozarth Settlement), perhaps in 1832. After some years it was purchased by White Halsey of Canton and Hewitt of St. Louis, and thereafter known as the White Halsey and Hewitt Mill. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 38, 47; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 381; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridge Creek
Description:A short branch near La Belle, flowing into the Troublesome. It bears the early name of Troublesome Creek (q.v.). (ATLAS LEWIS 1916)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Briscoe Station
Description:See Ewing.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Briscoe's
Description:See Ewing.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brush College
Description:A school northwest of Steffenville in Steffenville Consolidated School District (q.v.). A facetious name for a district school "in the brush." (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; A.F. Scott)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brushy Run
Description:A stream in the southern part of the county, flowing southeast into South Grassy Creek. So named because it flows through a brushy countryside. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck Branch
Description:A branch in the vicinity of Williamstown in the northwest part of the county. This name occurs many times in this part of the state, in evidence of the deer that roamed the prairie in an early period. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; E.L. Dorsey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck Branch School
Description:A school west of Williamstown (q.v.) on Buck Branch (q.v.), whence the name; a part of the Williamstown Consolidated School District (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; E.L. Dorsey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckhorn Bridge
Description:A covered bridge built over the Middle Fabius, around 1851. Governement deputies gave it the name by setting at one of the corners the horns of a deer killed on the bridge. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp; Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckhorn School
Description:A schoolhouse in Highland Township, by 1871; now a part of the Durham Consolidated School District (q.v.). The Fabius Lodge, I.O.O.F., organized here and united with the school district in building a house, the upper story of which was to be used for a hall. It took its name from the Buckhorn Bridge (q.v.). (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 197; T.J. Sharp; Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck's Run [1 of 2]
Description:A small branch or run about twelve or fifteen miles north of Canton, close to the county line. So named because a deer was killed on the stream after a long run. (E.V. Overton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck's Run [2 of 2]
Description:A branch or run in the southern part of the county, southeast of Lewistown, flowing northeast into Betsy Branch (q.v.). For name cf. Buck's Run in the northern part of the county. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878 E.V. Overton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buena Vista Church
Description:A Christian Church northwest of Canton, built since the Civil War. It holds services occasionally. A Spanish name meaning "Fair View" which is widely used, being found in more than twenty states. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buena Vista School
Description:A schoolhouse that serves a Catholic community in northern Canton Township. It formerly was known as the Ligon School for a family of early settlers in this part of the county. So named for Buena Vista Church (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bullock Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River above Long Island (q.v.). So named because it was owned by the Bullock family. (Mrs. T.O. Tatje)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bunker Hill
Description:A post office from 1855-1904; eight miles north-northwest of Monticello, between Memphis, Scotland County, and Quincy, Illinois. It was located on the old Santa Fe Trail between Canton and Memphis, and in stagecoach days was rather well-known for the hotel operated by David Hugh McCoy. The place is now abandoned. It stood on a rise midway between Sugar Creek and the North Fabius, and was named for the hill on which the Battle of Bunker Hill was fought in the Revolutionary War, June 17, 1775. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; 309; ATLAS LEWIS 1878; Maps Missouri 1860-1915; W.B. McRoberts; Judge James T. Lloyd; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bunker Hill School
Description:A schoolhouse on the site of the abandoned village of Bunker Hill (q.v.); hence the name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bushman Island
Description:See Funk's Island.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buzzard Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River across from La Grange. So named for the number of buzzards that lived there. For similar reasons it was known as "Pigeon Roost." Migratory pigeons in pioneer days flew over Missouri in season, in countless thousands, foraging from forty to fifty miles from their roosting place. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; MISSOURI HIST. REV., July, 1937, 430; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cain Branch
Description:A branch west and north of Bunker Hill, flowing south into the North Fabius. So named for the owner of the land. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caldwell's Mill [1 of 2]
Description:A water mill on Sugar Creek, to the north and east of Monticello in existence by 1833. Built by J.E. Trabue, it was known by his name. Previous to 1861, it passed into the hands of Mr. Caldwell and took his name. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 47; Maps Missouri, 1861; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caldwell's Mill [2 of 2]
Description:See Staples Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cannonsville
Description:See Durham.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canton
Description:A post office since 1853; eleven miles southeast of Monticello, in southeastern Canton Township, on the Mississippi River, within twenty-five miles of the great dam at Keokuk, Iowa. It is at Canton that the river takes its boldest sweep westward, making a beautiful semi- circle before the town. A settlement was made here as early as 1827, though the first settler, one Captain William Pritchard, came to the vicinity in 1819. The town was surveyed by 1830 by Messrs. Bozarth and Pritchard, among others, the plat being filed in Marion County in February of that year, and transferred to Lewis County the year of its organization, 1833. Previous to this time, Canton was designated the temporary seat of justice. It was incorporated in 1851. Canton was an important steamboat point, and has become the largest town in the county and dual county seat since the glory of Monticello (q.v.) has departed. For a long period there was a contention for the removal of the county seat to Canton, but that has been given up. After Tully (q.v.) was destroyed by flood, Canton grew rapidly up to the opening of the Civil War. On the coming of the railroad in 1871, Canton became one of the most important towns in northeast Missouri but since there is no shipping by way of river, it has ceased to grow though it is still more active than the usual small town. Canton was named for the town of the same name in Ohio. (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 309; HIST. MARION 1884, 177, 192; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 39, 213- 216; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 390; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Eaton, 185; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1860; (F) W.W. Henton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canton Bloomfield Railroad
Description:A railroad projected from Canton in Lewis County to Bloomfield, Iowa, the first in Lewis County. It was begun in 1860 and about fifteen miles of road were built, from Canton to Bunker Hill, when operations were interrupted by the Civil War. The road became involved and was sold after an engine stood on the track near Tully for a year or two, the iron being sold to the government for a railroad down in Tennessee. The road was again chartered as the Mississippi and Western Railroad, but nothing followed. At this time the Mississippi and Missouri Air-Line was proposed (q.v.). This was succeeded by the West Quincy and Alexandria, and a road was built, which through various consolidations became the St. Louis, Keokuk, and Northwestern (q.v.). The line is now a part of the Burlington System, and extends westward from Keokuk, Iowa, through Clark and Scotland counties into Iowa by way of Schuyler County, Missouri. (Campbell 1874, 309; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 170-173; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 454; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI 388; Judge James T. Lloyd; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canton Grove, No. 36
Description:An Order of Druids organized in Canton in 1877 by William Koch of La Grange. It no longer exists. The United Ancient Order of Druids, was a moral, social, and benevolent organization on the Masonic plan, the principles and teaching derived from ancient druidism, founded on reason and sound morality. The first order was formed in London, 1781; the first in New York in 1833. In 1898 the statement was made that there were probably 125,000 members in all the world, of which perhaps 20,000 were in the United States. In this country there were (1870) about 150 "groves," of which number about two-thirds were mainly of German membership. The Order was established in twenty-three states of America, England, Ireland, Scotland, British Colonies, Australia, and Germany. So named for that powerful priesthood of Gaul, perhaps common to all Celtic nations, of which Caesar (Book VI, Chapters 13-15) gives a description. To the Druids the oak tree was especially sacred, and the mistletoe when growing on an oak. They performed their rites in oak groves, and from this custom derived their name. The Welsh "derw," an oak, became "derwydd," a Druid. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 198; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canton Seminary
Description:A seminary for women organized at Canton about 1860; established by John C. Risk. It was known also as De Soto Institute. For the latter name of De Soto. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canton Township
Description:A township in the northeastern part of the county, on the Mississippi River with Lyon and Dickerson to the west, and Union to the south Canton Township was formed in May, 1830, by the Marion County Court, and included all of Lewis and Clark Counties. On the organization of Lewis County in 1833, Canton was one of two townships; and on the reorganization of the townships in 1866, it remained the same politically as when it was a part of Marion. It was named for the town of Canton, established in 1830, which lies within its boundary. Settlement began in 1824 and 1825 with a few families along the river and to the south. The northern part was settled in the wave of immigration of 1830. The township is one of the best in northeast Missouri for fertility, excellent limestone, and magnificent river bluffs. (HIST. MARION 1884, 177, 192; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 29, 148, 156; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Eaton, 185; Maps Missouri from 1869)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canton, Monticello, and Memphis State Road
Description:The mail route from Canton, Lewis County, to Memphis in Scotland County by way of Monticello; established about 1855. There was a great deal of traffic over this road. (See Santa Fe Trail) (W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carnegy Mill
Description:A water, saw, and grist mill in operation, one authority says in 1824, another in 1833, on the Wyaconda, immediately below the bridge on the north road between Canton and Monticello. It was built by John B. Carnegy of Canton, whence the name. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 48; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Creek
Description:A creek to the east and north of Monticello, flowing southeast into the Wyaconda in Union Township. So named for an unusal growth of cedar trees in the immediate vicinity. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Central School
Description:A schoolhouse in eastern Lewis County, midway between Canton and Monticello; hence the name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Christ Church
Description:A Christian Church eight miles northwest of Canton, near the head of Sugar Creek. Organized in 1837 in its present location. The present building was erected during the Civil War. The congregation united with the Monticello church when the latter was organized, met with it for some time, then returned to Sugar Creek. Benjamin is now at this point. The church holds services irregularly, but maintains its Sunday School. The reason for the name is obvious. It has gone under the name of Sugar Creek Church because of its location. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 190; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; ATLAS LEWIS 1878; Judge James T. Lloyd; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Christian University
Description:See Culver-Stockton University.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:City of Mineral Springs
Description:A name given La Grange for its mineralized springs, the water of which was slightly saline and naturally carbonated. There were three in number; the Wyaconda Spring (q.v.), the La Grange, a smaller Spring; which took its name from the town, and another on the grounds of the Commercial Hotel. The hotel conducted a sanitorium for the treatment of rheumatism by reason of the medicinal quality of this spring water. (Mrs. J.O. Tatje)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clapp's Ford
Description:A ford in the northwestern part of the county, over the North Fabius on the Clark County line. It became prominent because in Civil War times Porter's raiders were overtaken here by McNeal. So named for the family owning the land. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 84; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 384; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 521; T.J. Sharp; W.W. Gillispie)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:College Hill
Description:The name given to the extensive bluff on which the buildings of Culver-Stockton University stand. (W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cool Springs
Description:A spring known by this name, north of Gilead, on the Middle Fabius. So named for the extraordinary coolness of the water. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cool Springs Church
Description:A Christian Church established about 1845 just across the Middle Fabius, north of Gilead. It no longer exists. So named for Cool Springs (q.v.). (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cooper Lake or Slough
Description:A lake or slough north of La Grange where there were in an earlier period two distilleries. The name is thought to have come from the copper vats used in the distilling process. (Mrs. T.O. Tatje)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Corinth Baptist Church
Description:See Lewistown Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cottonwood Church
Description:See Mt. Olivet.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cottonwood Islands
Description:A group of islands a few miles above Quincy, Illinois, opposite the slough which is connected with the Fabius River outlet, and receives Durgans (Durkee's Creek). So known for the cottonwood growth. (Coues- Pike, Note 11; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cottonwood Prairie
Description:A name given to the expanse of river bottom between the Wyaconda and "the Fabba;" occupied later by Canton, De Soto, and Tully. So named for the growth of cottonwoods in the locality. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 187; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; Maps Missouri 1821; Beck 1823)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cow Bridge
Description:A bridge over the North Fabius; built around 1886. So named for Irwin Cox, landowner. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crooked Creek
Description:A creek in the northwestern part of Union Township, flowing southwest into the Wyaconda. So named because of its winding course. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cross Roads School
Description:A school, two and a quarter miles south of Williamstown (q.v.) in the Williamstown Consolidated School District (q.v.). So named because of its location near a cross roads. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; E.L. Dorsey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Culver-Stockton University
Description:A school established in 1856 at Canton, and known for years as Christian University; the first institution of learning west of the Mississippi River to establish co-education. It was founded in 1853 by leaders of the Christian Church, whence the name, otherwise known as the Disciples of Christ, and operated by them to the present time. The location on the bluffs west of Canton was chosen for its natural beauty and its suitablity for a higher instituition of learning since it was a central location in the midwest. It was abandoned during the Civil War, and the building was occupied by soldiers; it was opened again in 1866. It has weathered a succession of ill fortune in that its early endowment was swept away, and buildings have been destroyed at various times by fire and the records lost. Through the aid of Mrs. Culver and R.H. Stockton of St. Louis in 1912, the new buildings were erected. The college was completely organized a second time in 1915 under its present name in honor of its donors. The graduates of Old Christian refuse, however, to recognize the new name. The University arose out of the abolishment of the Bible and prayer from our public schools; out of that element that insists upon the inculcation of the great moral and religious precepts of the Bible and especially of Christ. It is completely non-sectarian, no system of religious belief being taught. It has excellent rating, and was made a member of the North Central Association of American Colleges in 1926. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 176; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 390; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Curd's Mill
Description:See Hall's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dade Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Middle Fabius, built around 1876 by Judge Mitchell who undertook to cut off the distance from the old road between Lewistown and La Belle. For this reason it was first known as the Mitchell Cut-Off. It is known today by the name of an old colored man who lives near there. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dare School
Description:A schoolhouse in Reddish Township. So named for a family in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis Baptist Church
Description:See Dover Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Middle Fabius five miles south of Lewistown. So named for Davis Mill (q.v.). (E.V. Overton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis Mill [1 of 2]
Description:See Green's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis Mill [2 of 2]
Description:See Turner Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis Prairie [1 of 2]
Description:A store serving a country community in the eastern part of the county, designated by Colton, 1861. The prairie in this locality was known as Davis Prairie (q.v.); hence the name. (Colton Map 1861; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis Prairie [2 of 2]
Description:A stretch of prairie southeast of the center of the county, between the North Fabius and the Wyaconda Rivers. There was a mill there in an early day known as Davis Mill. Maps would seem to indicate that the prairie was so known between the years 1844 and 1861. The mill doubtless gave its name to the prairie. (Maps Missouri, 1844- 1861)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Day School
Description:A school east of Lewistown, now a part of the Lewistown Consolidated School District (q.v.). It bears a family name. (W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:De Soto
Description:An addition to Canton on the north; laid off in 1855 by Halsey White, agent of the De Soto Company, whence the name. A tract of land lying between the old site of Tull and Canton, purchased by a company of five men who organized under the name of the old Spanish explorer, Hernando or Fernando De Soto. De Soto (1500?-1542) was the first European to look upon the mighty river (1541). While marching along the Mississippi River he was taken with a fever and died. His body was sunk at night in the river to conceal the fact of his death from the natives. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Plat; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:De Soto Institute
Description:See Canton Seminary.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deer Prairie Grange
Description:A former Grange organization in the western part of the county. Deer Ridge (q.v.) in that part of the county might have suggested the name, though an old resident said it was selected merely for its attractiveness. For Grange cf. Fabius Grange. (W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deer Ridge [1 of 2]
Description:A long elevated ridge of land, running from northwest to southeast in Reddish Township. So named by pioneers in the county because of the number of deer found there. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 167)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deer Ridge [2 of 2]
Description:A post office from 1846-1904; a small village between the North and Middle Fabius, thirteen miles northwest of Monticello, in western Reddish Township. By 1916, only a church, school, and store remained at the site, and now only the school carries on the name. So named for Deer Ridge (q.v.), the elevation of land on which it stood. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 309; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 167; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 391; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1861; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deer Ridge School
Description:A schoolhouse on the site of the village of Deer Ridge (q.v.) now gone. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deer Ridge Township
Description:See Reddish Township.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dempsey Highway
Description:A short stretch of road between St. Patirck and Highway 61, joining 61 north of Canton by several miles. It was named for Father Dempsey who had charge of the Catholic Parish at St. Patrick before and during the time the right-of-way was secured for the road. Father Dempsey in the years before the World War was a policeman, but losing his wife by death, studied for the priesthood and served over seas as Chaplain, later coming to St. Patrick. He was greatly respected by all who knew him, Protestants as well as Catholics. (Mrs. Guy C. Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Derrahs
Description:A post office from 1891-1904; a country store ten miles north and east of Monticello, in northeastern Lyon Township. The store is still in existence and continues to be known by the name of the former post office. So named for Derrahs Branch (q.v.), on which it is located, just off the Wyaconda. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1902; W.B. McRoberts; (F) James Wheeler; (F) W.J. Logsdon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Derrahs Branch
Description:A branch in northeastern Lyon Township, flowing southeast to the Wyaconda River. The Atlas of 1878 gives the name as Ders. Named Derrahs for the family who were the first to enter land on the bank of the stream. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; T.J. Sharp; (F) James Wheeler)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Derrahs School
Description:A schoolhouse that serves the community known by this name, in northeastern Lyon Township. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Bradshaw)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ders Branch
Description:See Derrahs Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dickerson Township
Description:A township centrally located, with Lyon Township to the north, Canton and Union townships to the east, Highland to the south, and La Belle to the west. Immigration set in in 1830; the township was first organized in 1833. It was marked by diversity in soil and of scenery; along the North Fabius in the vicinity of Monticello, the scenery is picturesque and beautiful, even romantic. The township was named for Major Obadiah Dickerson, who made a settlement on the prairie bearing his name at a very date. Major Dickerson was a notable pioneer of northeast Missouri. He had a part in the story of four counties in this part of Missouri,--Marion, Shelby, Lewis and Scotland and his name is associated with Pike. He was the first postmaster of Palmyra (1819), at a time when Palmyra was the post office of this part of the state; and he was the first bona fide settler of Shelby County (1831), where he died (See Dickerson Ford). (Campbell 1874, 13; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 29, 148, 149, 158, 159; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 1916; Maps Missouri, 1869; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dover
Description:A store, and a blacksmith shop in the heart of a country community, so named for Dover Church (q.v.). It is a surmise that there was a post office here at an early period. (W.B. Anderson; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dover Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1834 in a log schoolhouse on the same site as the present building, five miles southwest of La Grange. It was organized by an old circuit rider, and a weather-beaten log building was erected in 1837. This was followed by the present building of brick made on the place. Dover Church was a leading church of the early period. Services are held here today once a month. The Atlas 1916 gives a Davis Baptist Church in this vicinity. This is evidently an error. Dover Church went always under its present name. It was located in the vicinity known as Davis Prairie (q.v.); hence no doubt the error. Dover is a popular name for Baptists as well as Christian churches in Missouri. It is applied to schools, townships, and towns, transferred names perhaps from a Dover Church. There are many American Dovers, all of which must have derived their names ultimately from Dover, England. Perhaps the association of the name with the church may be explained by way of the "Dover Association" of Virginia (1832), one of the oldest Baptists regional divisions. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 183; ATLAS LEWIS 1916; MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934; INTROD. TO SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE NAMES, Chap III, p. 30; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dover School
Description:A schoolhouse southwest of La Grange. So named for Dover Church (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Downing Branch
Description:See Hilbert Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dunkard Church
Description:See German Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgains Creek
Description:See Durgens Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgan
Description:See Durgen.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgan Creek Church
Description:A Christian Church organized in 1833 on Durgan Creek, whence its name. The members are called often "New Lights" for the liberal religious doctrines; specifically, one of the Calvinistic Methodist groups organized in the United States about 1740. The church still exists but holds no regular services. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 189; WEBSTER DICT., W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgans
Description:See Durgan.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgans Creek
Description:See Durgan.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgans' Landing
Description:A landing on the Mississippi River, three miles north of La Grange. For name cf. Durgens Creek. (Map Missouri 1861)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgans Mill
Description:See Durgen.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgans' Mill
Description:A mill located on Durgans Creek earlier than 1874. For name cf. Durgen. (Campbell 1874, 309)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgans Pond
Description:A small pond to the southeast in Union Township. For name cf. Durgens Creek. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgen
Description:A post office from 1860-1904, on Durgens Creek (q.v.); six miles southeast of Monticello. Now extinct. The post office was indicated as Durgans (1861), Durgans Mill (1874), Durgans Creek (1860-1876). Campbell (1874) gives Durgan also. The Postal Guides give Durgen's Creek, followed by Durgen in 1896, as does Polk (1876-1893). From 1878 the spelling Durgen prevails. For name cf. Durgens Creek. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 309; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Polk 1876-1893; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1861-1915)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgens Creek
Description:A creek which rises close to Monticello, and flows southeast through west Union Township, emptying into the horseshoe-shaped slough opposite Cottonwood Islands (q.v.). Pike speaks of its mouth as being fifteen yards wide. According to Coues, the creek bears the name of the old horse belonging to the first American settler, John Bozarth, (See Bozarth Settlement). The horse wandered off and was drowned in the stream; hence the name. Coues adds that the stream was sometimes known as Durkees Creek for a family of that name, landowners in the vicinity. The plat of Monticello (1834) gives the name Durkees as landholders in the vicinity and the Lewis County history speaks of Durkees as well-known citizens of the county. Old residents say that at an early period there were Durgans here also, a statement that spoils Coues' story of the old horse. From the fact that there was a mill there bearing the name as evident from the name of the post office in 1874 (Campbell) and a landing known as Durgan's (1861), it would appear that there were residents of the name. (See Durgen) It should be added in support of Coues' story however, that "durgen" or "durgan" is a dialect word used for "dwarf." It is in use in several English dialects, and is also reported from the Ozarks (Vance Randolph, THE OZARKS, p. 69). Coues must have had some authority for his odd anecdote, and "durgen" might well have been used as a nickname for a horse. (F) THE MISSOURI HAND BOOK (1881) gives the spelling Durgain: otherwise the spelling corresponds to that of Durgen (q.v.). (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 18, 152; Coues-Pike, Note, 11; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Maps Missouri from 1861; Judge James T. Lloyd; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durgen's Creek
Description:See Durgen.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durham
Description:A post office from 1876; a station since 1872 on the Quincy, Omaha, and Kansas City Railroad, fifteen miles from Quincy, Illinois, to the southeast in Highland Township. Near the site of old Kennonsville (q.v.). It was platted in 1874. Its greatest importance is that of a "tie-station," hundreds of railroad ties being shipped annually. Originally called Cannonsville for Newton Cannon (1781-1841) of Tennessee, delegate to Congress (1814-1817); (1819-1823), and Governor of Tennessee (1835-1839). For a short time there was an attempt to call the village Nunnsville, for David Alexander Nunn, also of Tennessee, and representative to Congress (1867-1869); (1873-1875). On the coming of the railroad, the name was changed to Durham, in honor of a railroad official. The latter appears on the map as early as 1872. (Campbell 1874, 309; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 223; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 392; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Postal Guide; QUNINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1872; BIOG. DICT. AMER. CONG., 1928; (F) Mrs. Ethel Shackleford)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durham Consolidated School District
Description:A consolidated school district at Durham (q.v.), consisting of Durham, Bell Echo, Oak Dell, and Buckhorn schools (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Russell Allen)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Durkees Creek
Description:See Durgens Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Egypt
Description:A name given to southeast Reddish Township around 1873 for the wildness of its scenery. (Campbell 1873)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elevengood Mill
Description:A mill six miles north of La Belle. So named for its owner. (T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm Grove
Description:A post office in 1853, presumably in the Elm Grove Country (q.v.). (Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm Grove Country
Description:A name given to a stretch of land in the southern part of the county because of the extensive elm grove there. (Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ewing
Description:A post office from 1895; a station south of the center of the county, eight miles from Monticello, in Highland Township, on the Quincy, Omaha, Kansas City Road. A trading center in the county. Originally called Bestville for the superintendent of the Quincy, Omaha, and Kansas City Railroad (q.v.), which ran through the town. Later it came to be known as Briscoe Station, for a family of that name who owned land there. It is located on the map of 1872 as Briscoe's. With the establishment of the post office, since there was another post office of that name in the state, the name Ewing was chosen in honor of William Ewing, an early settler. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 392; ATLAS LEWIS 1916; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1872; W.B. McRoberts; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter; (F) Mrs. Ethel Shackleford)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ewing Consolidated School District
Description:A consolidated school district at Ewing (q.v.), consisting of the schools known as Gilead, Mt. Pleasant, Highland, Independence and Johnson (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Raymond Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius Bridge
Description:A bridge on the Palmyra road over the Fabius River, whence its name, south of Monticello. It was authorized in 1834, but not completed until 1837. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 49)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius River
Description:Like North and South Rivers (q.v.), or "Two Rivers," the Fabius is a double or twin stream; the only difference being that "Two Rivers" never actually unite, though they empty into the Mississippi at practically the same point, whereas the North and South Fabius do unite just one mile above their mouth. The Fabius River proper is therefore but one mile in length. It empties into the Mississippi in east-cenrtal Fabius Township, Marion County, near West Quincy, about two miles above the mouth of "Two Rivers." The North Fabius rises in Iowa and flows southeast through Scotland County, which it bisects diagonally; then it cuts off the northeast corner of Knox County and the southwest corner of Clark County, and flows still in a general southeast direction, diagonally through Lewis County into Marion County, of which it cuts off the northeast corner. In Union Township of Lewis County it receives a tributary known as the Middle Fabius, which rises in Schuyler County and flows southeast through Scotland and Knox to the junction. The South Fabius also rises in Schuyler County and takes a southeastern course through Scotland, Knox, Lewis, Shelby, and Marion Counties. In Liberty Township, Knox County, it receives two tributaries known as the North and South Forks of the South Fabius (on the 1876 map named the North and South Branches). North Fork rises in Greensburg Township, Knox County; South Fork rises in Adair County and enters Knox County in Lyon Township, flowing southeast to the junction with the South Fabius. The North and South Fabius, like the other streams of northeast Missouri, are rivers only by courtesy, much too small for navigation. They are called creeks by Beck. The various name by which they had their tributaries distinguished are obviously mere colorless names of position, with the exception of the name Fabius itself. This name, has had a bewildering variety of spellings, and its origin presents a problem of peculiar difficulty. The oldest form of the name, found on the Lewis and Clark Map of 1809, is "R. Fabiane." This form, slightly shortened, appears as "Fabian" in Cumming's WATER PILOT of 1837 (p. 129), and as late as 1871 in James's RIVER GUIDE (p. 9), although farther on (p. 18) James speaks of it as "Fabin's River." On the Lincoln Map of 1822 it is varied to "Ferbien." Forms without the final -n begin to appear in 1821. The spelling "Fabba" is given on the Maps for 1821, 1824, 1826, and 1832. Beck in his GAZETTEER (1823) calls it "Fabba Creek" and speaks of the South Fabius as the "Little Fabba." Holcombe in the HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND (1887), p. 23, says the old forms were "Faba" and "Little Faba," and that the two streams together were known as the "Fabas" or "Fabbas;" so Coues in a note to his ed. of Pike's EXPEDITION (I.9). The modern spelling "Fabius" first appears on a map of 1834, and is used in Wetmore's GAZETTEER (1837). Wetmore calls the two streams together the "Fabii." A popular nickname today for them is the "Faby." After that "Fabius," and the distinctive "North and South Fabius" become general. The name "Middle Fabius" first appears on a map of 1844. On a map of 1881 appears "Trabius," an obvious misprint. The Soulard story offered by Holcombe in 1884 (HISTORY OF MARION P. 771) to account for the name, according to which it was given about 1800 by Don Antonio Soulard in honor of the Roman general Fabius Maximus, has been given at length and criticized under Hannibal (q.v.). In spite of the fact that Holcombe himself presented it doubtfully and later discarded it, it has been accepted by Mahan and Eaton. For the reasons given, and especially in view of the early spellings which have just been listed this story must be ruled out as clearly impossible. In 1887 Holcombe offered a substitute derivation from the Spanish word "faba," a pea or bean. "The Spaniards probably gave it that designation because of the great number of wild peas originally upon its banks. In time the south fork was called Little Faba; then both streams were spoken of as the Fabbas, and of course the corruption was easy to Fabius...With more light on the subject than he had in 1884, the writer is now of the opinion that the name came as stated above, and that the real English name of the stream is Bean Creek." (HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND, p. 23). Holcombe's second explanation must likewise be rejected, both in the light of the earliest forms listed above and for other reasons. The Spaniards named very few places in Missouri, and none in N.E. Missouri; and such a name as "Bear Creek," though not impossible has few parallels in Missouri nomenclature. And yet Holcombe had perhaps a glimmering of the truth in his ingenious suggestion that the modern Fabius might have arisen from the plural form of the name, as used for the two streams. If the earliest form of the name, as there is every reason to believe, a plausible chain of development would be as follows; Fabiane---Fabian---Fabia---Fabias (pl.)---Fabius. It would be very easy for the final nasal to disappear in American speech, as the later forms Faba, Fabba, and Faby demonstrate that it actually did disappear and with the -s added for the plural, it would be equally natural for some classically minded American, about the time of the founding of Hannibal, Scipio, and Palmyra to get a suggestion from it of the name of the Roman general. Indeed, it is altogether possible that the false etymology which made Fabius out of the old French river name was the actual germ of the "Carthaginian complex" and of the whole series of classical names that swept Northeast Missouri like an epidemic. (See for other classical names the discussion under Hannibal). If the true original of Fabius was indeed Fabiane of Fabian, it follows of course that we must accept a humbler name-father than the famous Roman "Cunctator" and contender against Hannibal. Probably he was merely another of those forgotten French traders and trappers who had left their imprint so widely on Missouri nomenclature. Certainly it is in accord with what we might naturally expect to find the three principal water-courses of Marion County, now known as Fabius, North River (q.v.)---originally the Jeffreon--and Bay de Charles, all of which must have been in the days of the French occupation veritable hunters' paradises, bearing the familiar French personal names of Charles, Jeffreon, and Fabian. (Maps Missouri, 1809-1881; ATLAS MARION, 1913, SHELBY, 1878, KNOX, 1898, LEWIS, 1916, CLARK, 1878, SCOTLAND, 1898; Holcombe's HIST. MARION, 1884, and HIST. LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, SCOTLAND, 1887; Mahan, HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 1913; Eaton; GAZETTEERS and GUIDES by Beck, 1823, Wetmore, 1837, Cummings, 1837, and James, 1871; Pike's EXPEDITION, ed. Coues, 1895)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fair Oak School
Description:A schoolhouse in northeastern Lyon Township, previously known as the Lane School for a family close to the schoolhouse. This name is still used also. It received its present name for the oak trees in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Female Academy
Description:See Baptist Seminary.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fenway
Description:The shipping station farthest north on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, five miles from Canton, earlier known as Hardin for several families of Hardins who were early settlers in this part of the county. Given as Harding on the map of 1879, the time this form of the name occurs. The name Harden appeared on the map as early as 1872. Following this time it was spelled Hardin, and was known also as Hardin Station. In 1900 a post office was established here by the department under the name Santuzza, 1900- 1901. This name occurs in the two atlases, 1878 and 1916. Reasons for the name Fenway and Santuzza are unknown. The local pronunciation is unexplained. Perhaps there is an association in the popular mind with the Santa Fe Railroad in the neighboring county. This station is also on or in close proximity to the old Santa Fe Trail (q.v.). (Campbell 1874, 309; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1872; Judge James T. Lloyd; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; (F) E.W. Lillard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Finley's Prairie
Description:A prairie southeast of Monticello. So named for John Finley, a son-in-law of John Bozarth, who came with the Bozarth family in 1820 (See Bozarth Settlement). He became a notable citizen of the county. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 27, 95; Judge James T. Lloyd; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fisher Branch
Description:A branch flowing from the southwest into Reddish Branch, east of La Belle. The land is now adjoining the property of Dr. Cole. So named for a previous landowner. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Forest Grove Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in the eastern part of Canton, known for its beautiful growth of trees, which give it its name. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; W.B. McRoberts; Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Forsee Branch
Description:A branch west and north of Bunker Hill, flowing south and west into Cain Branch (q.v.). So named for William Forsee, landowner. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Freemore's Lick
Description:A lick given by the County History with the information that in 1817 Giles Thompson built a cabin there. Nothing further was found in regard to the location or the name. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 24)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fretwell Branch
Description:A branch in the northern part of the county, flowing south into Fabius Creek north of Monticello. So named for the owner of the land. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878, T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frog Pond School
Description:See Walnut Grove School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Funk's Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River opposite Canton. So named for its owner. Also at one time known as Bushman Island for the same reason. (W.B. McRoberts; (F) W.W. Henton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garnett Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Middle Fabius; built around 1867. The Garnett family owned the farm at this point. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garnett Grange
Description:A former Grange organization west of Monticello, in the vicinity of the Middle Fabius. So named for John Garnett, a prominent resident. For Grange cf. Fabius Grange. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 198; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garnett School
Description:A schoolhouse which stood in the timber near La Belle. It was moved later to La Belle to the site of the present building. It was earlier known as the Young School. Both names were for families in the vicinity. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 222; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:German Baptist Church
Description:A Dunkard Church organized in 1833 at Steffenville in the schoolhouse. A large part of the Steffens settlement was of this denomination. The church no longer exists. In 1719 the Dunkards began to come to Pennsylvania, whence the sect spread, mainly westward. Non-comformity to the world has been their important principle, following closely the teaching of Scripture, and of observing the primitive simplicity of the church. They received their leading name of Dunkards from their enemies. "Tunkers," or as pronounced in England "Dunkers," is a term which signifies "Dippers." The word really comes from the German "Tunken," to put a morsel in sauce. It was given the sect because of the manner in which they perform baptism, which is by putting the person forward by kneeling, head under water. Later the church assumed the name of Brethren (Matt. 23:8), and is known officially as German Brethren. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 192; Belcher 1864, 263, 264; WEBSTER DICT.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:German Congregational Church
Description:See Salem Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gilead
Description:A post office from 1860-1904; a store and post office on the west bank of the Middle Fabius, twelve miles west-southwest of La Grange, in Highland Township, on the old Palmyra and Waterloo road. Campbell (1874) gives it as Gilead Station. It took its name from old Gilead Church (q.v.), organized on the site in 1833. Now the church is all that remains. A school today also marks the site. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Campbell 1874, 309; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 224; Judge James T. Lloyd; (F) Mrs. Minnie Minter; (F) Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; (F) E.W. Hotchkiss)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gilead Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church, known also by this name, about seven miles south of Monticello, on the Middle Fabius; organized in 1833. It has been absorbed somewhat by the church at Ewing, but some remain affiliated with the old church which holds meetings once a month. A Biblical name:--The mount and land of Gilead lay east of Jordan. (Gen. 31:21-25) (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 183; ATLAS LEWIS 1878; MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934; (F) Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; (F) E.W. Hotchkiss; (F) Rev. Adolph Vollmer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gilead School
Description:A school in the Ewing Consolidated School District (q.v.). So named for the old settlement of Gilead (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Raymond Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gill Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Fabius River; built around 1875. So named for the Gill family living at this point. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glaves School
Description:A schoolhouse in southeastern La Belle Township. So named for a family living near the schoolhouse. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Government School
Description:A schoolhouse in northern La Belle Township. So named it is thought for a poor family living near whom the government had to help, and who was known for this reason as "The government family." (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green School
Description:A school south of Lewistown, now a part of the Lewistown Consolidated School District (q.v.). It bears a family name. (W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greene
Description:A store and community near the site of Green's Mill (q.v.) on the Wyaconda. Given also as Greens. It took its name from the owner of the mill. (Maps Missouri, 1857-1859; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greens
Description:See Greene.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green's Mill [1 of 2]
Description:Established as the Davis Mill, around 1836; around five miles northwest of Canton, on the Wyaconda River. So named for its owner, Isaac D. Davis. It soon passed into the hands of the Green family when it became known as Green's Mill, though the old name remained in use also. The mill was operated for a number of years by Senator James S. Green and his brother, General Martin E. Green. James Green came to the county in 1836, and represented it in the Eighteenth Assembly, 1854. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 48, 86; Hutawa Map 1844; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green's Mill [2 of 2]
Description:See Ligon Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gregory School
Description:A schoolhouse in southwestern Reddish Township. So named for a family living near the building. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hall's Mill
Description:A mill on the South Fork of the North Fabius (another name for the Middle Fabius), erected in 1834 by Benjamin P. Curd and known as Curd's Mill. It was later purchased by a Mr. Hall and came to be known as Hall's Mill. (HIST. LEWIS (1887), 48; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; Judge James T. Lloyd; T.J. Sharp; (F) E.W. Lillard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hamilton Ford
Description:A ford over the North Fabius, close to Caldwell's Mill north of Lewistown; around 1880. It took the name for the owner of the land, an old settler. (HIST. LEWIS, 1887, 203; E.V. Overton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hard Scratch School
Description:See Mount Pleasant School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harden
Description:See Fenway.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hardin
Description:See Fenway.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hardin School
Description:A schoolhouse on the site of the old station now known as Fenway (q.v.). So named for the family that gave the name of Hardin to the station. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hardin Station
Description:See Fenway.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harding
Description:See Fenway.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawkins Branch
Description:A branch in the northern part of Jeddo Township in Knox County, flowing east and south into Lewis County where it joins the Troublesome. So named for the Hawkins family who were large landholders in the vicinity. (ATLAS KNOX 1876; Plat of Monticello)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawkin's Slough
Description:A long slough lying between Offerrel Lake (q.v.) in the north in Canton Township and a point in the Mississippi River just above Canton. So named for a prominent family in Canton who owned land in the vicinity. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Mrs. Mary Vaughn; Mrs. J.O. Tatje)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Haycraft Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Troublesome; built around 1885. So named for the Haycraft family living at this point. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Haycraft School
Description:A schoolhouse in southeastern Salem Township. So named for a family in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hazel Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse northwest of Canton. It stood formerly in a hazel grove; hence the name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Heelstring School
Description:See Liberty School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:High Hill School
Description:A schoolhouse in the northeastern corner of Union Township. So named for its location. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Highland School
Description:A school in the Ewing Consolidated School District (q.v.). So named for its location.(Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Raymond Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Highland Township
Description:The south central township along the Marion line, one of the oldest in the county, with Dickerson to the north, Union to the east, and Salem to the west. Originally covered with timber, it was a favorite hunting ground for the Indians and pioneers. It was settled very early as timbered lands were always in favor with the pioneers. It was organized in 1838 on petition and reorganized in 1866. It was so named for the general situation and hilly nature. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 29, 249, 160, 161; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Map Missouri 1869; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hilbert Creek
Description:A creek which rises in the southwest corner of Reddish Township, flowing southeast into the Middle Fabius in northern La Belle Township. It was previously known as the Downing Branch for the Downing family living by the creek. It takes its present name from several Hilbert families living along the stream. (ATLAS LEWIS , 1878, 1916; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; T.J. Sharp; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hillside School
Description:A schoolhouse southwest of La Belle. So named for its location. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holstein Female Seminary
Description:See Kennonville Academy.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hopewell Methodist Church
Description:A Methodist Church organized as early as 1865 in Salem Township, southeast of Steffenville. A building was erected in 1881. The church is still standing, but services have been abandoned. It bears the name of the man instrumental in organizing the church. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 189; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Horseshoe Bend
Description:A bend in the course of the North Fabius River, resembling a horseshoe in shape; northwest of Monticello. It was the site of the "Secession Camp" (q.v.). (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 81; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 384)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Independence School
Description:A school in the Ewing Consolidated School District (q.v.). An ideal name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Raymond Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Irwin Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Middle Fabius River, north of Lewistown, around 1875. So named for the landowner at this point. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jerusalem
Description:A "paper town" laid out by Abram Oyster, in 1840, in the southwestern part of the county, one-half mile northeast of Troublesome Creek, in what is now Salem Township. It was planned on a large scale, the streets were named for men of national fame, beginning with Perry, the famous Commodore of Lake Erie. It was announced that it had a commodious and beautiful elevation, and could be extended and enlarged. It never got beyond the prospectus. The name Jerusalem was given it by Mr. Oyster with the provision that a name be seelcted, if desired, by the residents. Since it lay in the vicinity of Old Salem Church, it is a surmise that the church influenced the owner in selecting the name. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 226; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; Stevens, 95; (F) W.E. Hotchkiss)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson School
Description:A school in the Ewing Consolidated School District (q.v.). So named for a family in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Raymond Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jones Mill
Description:A mill northwest of La Grange on the Wyaconda River, indicated on a map as early as 1861. It took its name from its owner. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; Colton Map 1861; Judge James T. Lloyd; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jones Mill Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Wyaconda River, northwest of La Grange, fifty yards from the old mill for which it was named (q.v.). It was built around 1886. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jordan Bridge
Description:See Weston Bridge.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kennonsville
Description:A village that stood south of the center of Highland Township, about twelve miles south of Monticello. It was laid out in 1836 by Reverend Joseph Anderson and named by him in honor of a friend, Honorable William Kennon (1793-1881), an old time Democratic member of Congress from Ohio (1829-1833); (1835-1837), and judge of the Supreme Court of Ohio, 1854-1856. The village was a regular stopping place for stagecoaches, and had an extensive tavern. It early gained an unsavory reputation, according to an old resident. By 1840 the county history says it had become "but a local habitation and a name." Its legal status was wiped out by the legislature in 1861, and by 1878 every house was gone. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 62, 224, 225; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; Stevens, 95; Maps Missouri, 1844-1876; BIOG. DICT. AMER. CONG.; (F) W.W. Henton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kennonsville Academy
Description:A Presbyterian school chartered by the state in 1837 but never built. It was projected by Mr. Oyster (See Oyster Prairie) as Holstein Female Seminary, and was to be located in southern Highland Township at Kennonsville, whence the name. This part of Highland Township was used extensively for grazing purposes; hence perhaps the fantastic name Holstein as given to the proposed academy. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 225; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kerfoot Bridge
Description:See McLain Bridge.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kinney's Mill
Description:See McKinney's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Belle
Description:A post office from 1857; near the west line in La Belle Township, fourteen miles west of Monticello, on the Quincy, Omaha, and Kansas City Railroad. It was established in 1857 by William Triplett, who opened a post office in his store. The origin of the town can hardly be accounted for. It lies on the prairie known as La Belle Prairie (q.v.), for which it was named. During the Civil War, the site was well-known, but no improvements were made upon it. It was laid out in 1871, and the railway station established in 1872. It was a flourishing village in 1878, the center of an excellent agricultural region, and today is the third largest village in the county. It is sometimes called "Queen of the Prairie," which is appropriate to its location, and suggested by La Belle (the Beautiful). (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 309; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; ATLAS LEWIS 1916; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 220-222; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 392; Eaton, 185; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1860)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Belle Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1856; originally two miles northwest of La Belle, and known as Mount Pleasant Church, for its location. It was moved to La Belle in 1883, whereupon it became known by its present name. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 185; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Belle Prairie
Description:The prairie south of the present site of La Belle. In the early history of the county, Dr. Polonzo Conduit, a Frenchman, lived on this land. His daughter named it La Belle Prairie for its beauty. It is also called Belle Prairie. (Campbell 1873; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Belle Township
Description:A township in the western part of the county, midway between the north and south; organized in 1866. A beautiful expanse of prairie; yet it was the latest settled township in the county. Some of the best land was not opened until after the Civil War. It took its name from the post office, La Belle. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 150, 165; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Map Missouri, 1869)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Grange
Description:A post office from 1836; fourteen miles southeast of Monticello, in Union Township, on the Mississippi River, about six miles from the south line of the county, and a short distance south of the junction of the Wyaconda River and the Mississippi River. The first settler came in 1828 to the site of La Grange. One of the first merchants was Campbell, the old Indian trader from Marion County. (See Campbell Settlement). The town was laid out in 1830, and the plat filed in Marion in 1832. It was incorporated as a village in 1838, the first town to be incorporated in the county, and as a city in 1853, the only town to be so incorporated in the county. La Grange stands on the bluffs, here within a few rods of the river. Limestone is very abundant, and has been quarried in the streets of the town itself. At the close of the 1840s La Grange had become a town of considerable importance, surrounded by a productive agricultural community. Its period of greatest prosperity lay between the years 1850-1861, when it drew trade from a territory sixty miles in extent. The Civil War brought growth to a standstill. The town today prides itself on being the oldest town in in the county, notwithstanding the claim of Canton to that honor. The town is doing a fair business though it has been sadly broken by the removal of La Grange College (See Hannibal-La Grange College). It was known some few years ago as the "City of Mineral Springs" (q.v.). La Grange was first called Skinner's Landing, for C.S. Skinner and other members of the family who had land there. It is not known how the name of La Grange came to be chosen. Doubtless the place was named by someone of French extraction among the early settlers. It may have been named for Lafayette's hometown in France; or perhaps those who founded the town recognized the great agricultural possibilities of the new country and thought of the town a futurre storehouse, and thus named in "The Granary." Pike says that La Grange was so called from the "hill under which it nestled, the English of which would be Barn Hill." It is cited as "The Barn" in Pike's French-English vocabulary. The grange in feudal days was an outlying farmhouse with barns, etc., belonging to a monastery or to a feudal lord, where rents and tithes, paid in grain, were deposited. (Wetmore 1837; Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 310; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 60, 220-229; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 378, 383, 392; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; ATLAS LEWIS, 1897, 1916; Postal Guide; Eaton, 185; Coues-Pike, Note, 12; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1842; Mrs. J.O. Tatje; (F) Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; (F) W.W. Henton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Grange and Monticello Plank Road
Description:The La Grange and Monticello plank road company was chartered and began the construction of a fourteen-mile road in Lewis County. It had spent $1600 when work on the road was abandoned. The project was a part of a "plank road mania" that extended over a number of states in 1849-1865. Forty-nine where chartered in Missouri alone. (MISSOURI HIST. REV., April, 1937, 273, 279)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Grange Iron and Steel Mills
Description:In 1872, the La Grange Iron and Steel Company was organized by eastern capitalists for the manufacture of railroad iron, a rolling mill and machine shop. The plant was conceived on too large a scale for the community, and for years it was idle. A proposal was made around 1887 to trade it for a natural gas well. This came to nothing. It was later purchased by the Gardiner Iron Works of Quincy, Illinois, and is now in operation. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 229; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Grange-Palmyra Road
Description:The road connecting these two points, one of the first roads in this part of Missouri. (W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lane School
Description:See Fair Oak School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Laura
Description:A post office from 1893-1902; in the northeast part of the county. The source of the name could not be discovered. Cf. the many other feminine names used as place-names. (Maps Missouri 1904, 1915; Postal Guide)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lay's Bridge
Description:See Steele Bridge.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lay's Ford
Description:A ford on the North Fabius by Ewing. So named for the family living at this point. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 49; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lefler Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Wyaconda River, around 1865. It originally was near La Grange, and was named for a Lefler family in that vicinity. Later the road was changed, and the bridge was moved to the river to a site west of Canton. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Legg Branch
Description:A branch in northwestern Lyon Township, emptying into Derrahs Branch (q.v.). So named for J.L. and Billy Legg who lived on its banks. ( (F) W.J. Logsdon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:LeSeur's Port
Description:A trading post and shipping port at the mouth of the Wyaconda River in 1795; established by Godfrey LeSeur, a French trader. He ran a business here at this port for a long time. There is a surmise that LeSeur and the Frenchmen "under the hill," mentioned by Pike, at Hurricane Settlement may have been the same. (Campbell 1874, 307; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 24, 25, 226; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewis County
Description:Lewis County, bordering on the Mississippi River, has a river frontage of twenty-five miles in extent. It is bordered on the north by Clark, on the south by Marion and Shelby, and on the west by Knox. It was reduced to its present limits by the organization of Clark County in 1838, Scotland in 1841, and Knox in 1845. Inclusive of this territory, Lewis was organized with permanent boundaries in 1833 nearly three years after the towns of Canton and La Grange were established. Immediately previous to this time, all this territory had been attached to Marion County, as part of Fabius Township, for military, civil, and judicial purposes. In 1830, Canton Township was formed, followed in 1831 by Union. The county was thus divided into the two townships in 1838 on its organization. There followed by 1841 a division into six townships, and on the reorganization of the county in 1866 a division into eight, its present number. On its organization, the county was named for Governor Meriwether Lewis, the second governor of Missouri Territory, 1807. Captain Meriwhether Lewis (1774-1809), a native of Virginia, became private secretary to President Jefferson in his first term, and when in 1803, the President projected an expedition to explore the country just purchased west of the Mississippi River, he selected Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, officers both of the American Army, to take charge of the expedition. In the two years (1805-1806) that the expedition was absent, they crossed the country by way of the Missouri River to the Rockies and then descended the divide to the Pacific by way of the Columbia River. In 1807, Captain Lewis was honored by being made Governor of Missouri Territory. He died while in office. (Campbell 1874, 308; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 38, 62; HIST. MARION 1884, 192; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 378, 380, 381, 383, 386; Davis and Durrie 1876, 49; Eaton, 185; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Map Missouri, 1834)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewisburg
Description:A "paper town" laid out northwest of Canton in Canton Township, in September of 1837, but never built. So named for the county. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 225; Plat)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewiston
Description:See Lewistown.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewistown
Description:A post office from 1886; a station on the Quincy, Omaha, and Kansas City Railroad, six miles southwest of Monticello, in LaBelle Township. It was laid out by the railroad in 1871 as a shipping center for that part of the county, and named for the county. The post office was established as Lewiston, but the spelling was changed in 1899 to its present form. (Campbell 1874, 310; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 222; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 391; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Eaton, 185; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1872; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewistown Baptist Church
Description:Previously Union Chapel (q.v.) which stood near Lewistown. The building in 1872 was moved to its present site in Lewistown where it was later known as Corinth Baptist Church. This in turn was succeeded by its present name. A Biblical name:--Paul's Letter to the Corinthians--"Unto the Church of God which is at Corinth, to them that are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints." (Cor. 1:2) (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 185; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewistown Consolidated School District
Description:A consolidated school district at Lewistown (q.v.), consisting of the Green and Day schools (q.v.). (W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Church
Description:A pioneer Methodist Church, in Union Township, six miles below La Grange; organized around the 1840s with the first settlements. The first building was erected in 1862. It was built and maintained for a long time, but was abandoned when Mr. Wood left the vicinity. The name is ideal. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 152; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:A school in the southeastern part of the county, part of the Maywood Consolidated School District (q.v.). In 1905 a new building was erected and the name was changed. It took its present name from the pioneer Liberty Church in the vicinity (q.v.). It went previously under the name of Heelstring School for no known reason unless it was for its location in the hills. Heelstring--the "Tendo Achillis" (Syd. Soc. Lex.) (OED 26.c.; Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; C.E. Merrell)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ligon Mill
Description:A mill on the North Fabius River, established by William Green, and known as Green's Mill. Later it became the property of Daniel Ligon and was known as Ligon Mill. (Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ligon School
Description:See Buena Vista School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lincoln School (Colored) [2 of 3]
Description:A school for colored children at Monticello. For name cf. Washington School (Colored). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradsahw; Russell Allen)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lincoln School (Colored) [3 of 3]
Description:A school for colored children at La Belle. For name cf. Washington School (Colored). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lincoln School [1 of 3]
Description:A school for colored children at Canton. For name cf. Washington School (Colored). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lindale School
Description:A schoolhouse in northeastern Highland Township. So named by the first teacher because she liked the name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Linn Branch
Description:A branch in Union Township, flowing southeast into the Wyaconda River, northwest of La Grange. So named for the linn trees found in the vicinity. (ATLAS LEWIS 1897, 14; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Faba
Description:See Big Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Grassey Creek
Description:A creek which rises in northeastern Salem Township, flowing generally east and south into the Big Grassy in Highland Township. It takes its name from the Big Grassey, known also as the Grassy (q.v.). The Little Grassey of 1916 is the South Grassy of 1878. (ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Sugar Creek
Description:A creek in Union Township, flowing east and south into Sugar Creek, from which it takes its name. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Sugar Creek Church
Description:See Christ Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Troublesome Creek
Description:A creek rising south of the center of Myrtle Township, leaving the county in the southeast corner of that township, and emptying into the Troublesome in Lewis County. It takes its name from Troublesome Creek. (ATLAS KNOX 1876)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Star Church
Description:A Methodist Church organized in 1873 at the Lone Star Schoolhouse where the meetings were still held in 1887. It took its name from the schoolhouse (q.v.). (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 189)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Star Schoolhouse
Description:A former schoolhouse near Canton, in existence by 1873. It no longer exists. An emblem name. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 189; W.B. ANDERSON)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Tree
Description:An old landmark in the southeastern part of the county, on the Mississippi River, two miles south of La Grange; around 1874. Given as a flag station on the St. Louis, Keokuk and Northwest Railroad in 1879. The riverboats tied up here to a "lone tree" which stood on the gravel bank; hence the name. The tree was finally pulled up by a boat that was tied to it. (Campbell 1874; Polk 1879-1883; Maps Missouri; 1872-1878; (F) H.L. Loudermilk)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Branch
Description:A branch rising to the west in Salem Township, and flowing southeast into the Big Grassy in Highland Township. So named for T.C. Long, owner of the land in the vicinity. (ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916, Plat)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Branch
Description:A branch which rises in eastern Salem Township, Lewis County, and flows southeast through the corner of Highland Township into Marion County where it enters the Troublesome. The land through which it flows is the property of T.C. Long, whence the name. For some reason undiscovered the stream was given as the Long Hungary Branch in the Lewis Atlas of 1916. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; PLAT BOOK; W.B. Mcroberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Hungary Branch
Description:See Long Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River opposite north Union Township, south of Canton. So named for its owner. The County Atlas of 1878 gives it the name Stallion Island. Residents do not know it by this name. Reasons for the animal name are unknown, but perhaps they were similar to those for Bullock Island (q.v.) just above it. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; Mrs. T.O. Tatje)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Longmire Private School
Description:A private school in 1887 under the direction of a Mr. Longmire, whence the name. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 223)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Longville
Description:See Maywood.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Loudermilk Branch
Description:A branch which rises to the northeast in Union Township, and flows generally south and east into Oyster Lake or Pond. It is so named for Joseph Loudermilk, a landholder in the northern part of the township. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lyon High Seminary
Description:A Presbyterian private school north of Monticello in Lyon Township, in the vicinity of Sugar Creek, in one of the historical parts of the county. It was known also as Zion Hill High for Zion Hill Church (q.v.). The latter name was a combination of the early name with that of the township. (W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lyon Township
Description:The last township created; added in 1866 on the reorganization of the townships. It lies on the north line of the county, with Canton to the east, Dickerson to the south, and Reddish to the west. The land was originally timber and prairie in about equal proportions. Organized after the Civil War, it was named for General Nathaniel Lyon (1818-1861) who fell in the battle of Wilson Creek, August 10, 1861. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 168, 169; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Map Missouri, 1869; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mansfield Branch
Description:A small creek which rises in the northwest part of Millwood Township and flows northeast into Waverly Township, where it enters Sulphur Fork. It was named for Nicholas Mansfield, an early settler. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 5, 46; Andy J. Brown)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maple Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse south of La Grange. It stands in a grove of maples, whence the name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maple Lake
Description:A small lake in the southeast corner of Union Township. So named for the abundance of maple trees around it. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; (F) Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marks Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in northern La Grange on the land originally owned by Marie M. Marks, whence the name. (ATLAS LEWIS 1897)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mayberry
Description:A post office in 1853; south of La Grange, on the La Grange-Palmyra road (q.v.). It took the name of a family living there. (Hayward 1853; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maywood
Description:A post office by 1876; a station on the Quincy, Omaha, and Kansas City Railroad since 1872. It is but eleven miles west of Quincy, Illinois, in the southwest corner of Union Township, just within the county line. Campbell (1874) gives it as in Marion. Near the Marion line, it receives trade from both counties. Within the years, 1926-1936, Maywood has been wrecked by the depression. The place was tentatively called Longville for Gabriel Long who gave the land for the town site. On the establishment of the post office, since there was another Longville in Missouri, the name Maywood was assigned to the town; some say by the Department, others by some citizens to whom the name appealed. Since it appears on the map as early as 1872 as Maywood, it would appear that the post office was established by that year. (Campbell 1874, 310; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 223; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 392; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1872; Judge James T. Lloyd; (F) Mrs. Mildred Long Lillard; (F) H.L. Loudermilk)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maywood Consolidated School District
Description:A consolidated school district at Maywood (q.v.), consisting of the Maywood and the Liberty schools (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; C.E. Merrill)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McKinney's Mill
Description:A grist and sawmill, about 1822, the first mill in the county; on the Wyaconda River a short distance above where the river empties into the Mississippi River. The site was unfortunate, the first high water washed away the dam, and it was never rebuilt. The mill was built by John McKinney, whence the name. He was often called "Kinney;" hence the mill must have been called "Kinney's Mill." (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 28; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 378, 279; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McLain Bridge
Description:A bridge over the North Fabius, west of Williamstown; built around 1881. So named for the family living at this point. It was earlier known as the Kerfoot Bridge, for an old family living there. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McPheeters Mill
Description:A mill on the Middle Fabius, in operation in 1834, and may have been built the previous year. So named for its owner, John McPheeters. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 48, 191; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Melrose School
Description:A schoolhouse near the center of Canton Township. No reason has been discovered for the name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Memphis-La Grange Road
Description:A road known earlier as the Memphis-La Grange Trail, which connected these two pioneer settlements, Memphis in Scotland County, and La Grange in Lewis County, in 1835. (MISSOURI HIST. REV., Jan., 1936, 221)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Memphis-La Grange Trail
Description:See Memphis LaGrange Road.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Merridith Branch
Description:A short branch in Salem Township, south of the center, flowing generally east into Troublesome Creek. So named for the owner of the land. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916. T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Methodist Seminary
Description:See Monticello Seminary
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Fabius
Description:See Big Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Midway
Description:A name given to a little community with its store, grange hall, school, and church, to the southeast in Reddish Township on the Middle Fabius. So named for its location on the old stage route halfway between Monticello and Deer Ridge. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Midway Chapel
Description:A Christian Church in the community of Midway (q.v.), whence the name. It was organized about the 1880s, and known as Noonan Chapel for the minister who organized the church. Later it became known as Turpin's Church for residents of the community. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Midway School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township, midway between La Grange and Monticello; hence the name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Million Branch
Description:See Spees Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Million Creek
Description:A creek that traverses the southern part of Jeddo Township in Knox County, flowing through northeast Fabius out of Knox County into Lewis County where it enters Spees Branch (q.v.). It takes its name from an old family in the vicinity. (ATLAS KNOX 1876; PLAT BOOK; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miss Bradley's School
Description:The first school in Monticello, 1835-1836; held in the courthouse. It was taught by a Miss Bradley, whence the name. In the course of the session, the County Court gave orders that as soon as the school was discontinued, the sheriff should lock the door and permit no school taught there in the future. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 217, 218)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missionary Baptist Church
Description:See Gilead Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mississippi and Western Railroad
Description:See Canton Bloomfield Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mitchell Cut-Off
Description:See Dade Bridge.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Monticello
Description:A post office from 1836; north of the center of Dickerson Township on the North Fabius, six miles northeast of Lewistown, its nearest railway station. It occupies a commanding position on the east bluffs of that river, overlooking the fertile river valley and the hills which stretch away in all directions. It was established as county seat by order of the court in 1833, and the site selected near the center of the county. A little log courthouse was built in 1834, and the present brick courthouse in 1867. The court selected as a name, suggested perhaps as appropriate by reason of its location, Monticello, "Little Mountain," for the country seat of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), third presdient of the United States, 1801-1809. It was surveyed in 1834, and its streets named for famous men of the state and nation. It became for a time a trading center, and quite a little business was transacted there; but owing to the upbuilding of the river towns, and the fact that Monticello was missed by the railroad, the population declined until today it numbers but 204. Monticello remains inaccessible to the outside world except for the fact that the county has recently laid very good gravel roadways. For a long time a struggle went on over the removal of the courthouse to either La Belle or Canton; but that has ceased, and the courthouse in 1936 was cleaned and refinished. The county officers live in one or another of the two places mentioned and the few lone buildings on the site of Monticello stand a tragedy out of the past. (Wetmore 1837; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 310; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 39, 60, 216, 219; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 389, 390; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Eaton, 185; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1842; Mrs. Merle Bradshaw; (F) Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Monticello Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Fabius, one-half mile south of Monticello, whence the name. There was a skirmish here during the Civil War. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 87)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Monticello Institute
Description:An early school established at Monticello by W. Hatch. It was succeeded by Monticello Seminary (q.v.). (Sutherland & McEvoy)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Monticello Seminary
Description:A seminary established at Monticello by the Methodist Episcopal Church South in 1872. It succeeded Monticello Institute (q.v.). The school was well patronized and in healthful condition in 1878 but was discontinued in 1883. The building was sold and converted into a residence. The school also went by the name Methodist Seminary. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Campbell 1874, 309; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 181; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moriah Church [1 of 2]
Description:See Mount Moriah Bear Creek Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moriah Church [2 of 2]
Description:See Mount Moriah Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morris School
Description:A schoolhouse in eastern La Belle Township. It bears the name of several families in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Moriah Bear Creek Church
Description:A Baptist Church close to Bear Creek (q.v.), in the extreme northwest corner on the county line; established in 1839. The church exists today, but holds services irregularly. It is also known as Moriah Church, Mount Moriah, and Bear Creek Church, the latter for its location. For name cf. above. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 389; MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934; W.B. Roberts; Judge James T. Lloyd; Mrs. Velma Williams; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Moriah Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Church organized in 1836 in Canton Township, six miles northwest of Canton. Services are held here irregularly. Though the membership is retained, it is regarded as really a part of the Canton Church. It is known as Moriah Church also. A Biblical name:--Mount Moriah was the site of the temple. (II Chr. 3:1) (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 188; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Moriah Church [2 of 2]
Description:See Mount Moriah Bear Creek Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Olivet [1 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church, the oldest Methodist church in the county, establishedd around 1844 on Cottonwood Prairie (q.v.), and known in that day as Cottonwood Church. For name cf. above. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 187; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Olivet [2 of 2]
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1880 about a mile west of La Grange. It still holds services. For name cf. above. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 186; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Pleasant
Description:A Baptist Church in southeastern Lewis County, close to the Shelby-Marion line; established in 1842. So named for its location. (MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Pleasant Church
Description:See La Belle Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Pleasant School
Description:A school in the Ewing Consolidated School District (q.v.). The name is one of location. Since it is on a steep bluff, it is often called "Hard Scratch." (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Raymond Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Salem Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Reddish Township, north and west of LaBelle; established since 1850 and still active. For name cf. above. (W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Pleasant Township
Description:A township organized by the Lewis County Court, July 11, 1836. It included with Benton Township (q.v.) a part of Knox and all of Scotland County, Mt. Pleasant including the west side, ten miles in width, of the old township, and the entire length north and south. It has been reorganized at various times; on its reorganization in 1844 all the territory in Knox County that formerly constituted part of Mt. Pleasant Township was attached to Center Township in that county. It was otherwise changed in the same year when other townships were formed. The present Mt. Pleasant Township occupies the southwest corner of the county of Scotland, with Vest and Jefferson to the north and Tobin to the east. The name is one of location. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 417, 438, 439, 44; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 607; Court Record; PLAT BOOK; R. McN., 1935; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Zion Church
Description:A Christian Church two miles south of Monticello. It is now used only as a schoolhouse, the Overton. For name cf. above. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; W.B. McRoberts; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mud Slough
Description:A slough just above Quincy, Illinois; the outlet of Durgan Creek (q.v.). (John Lemmons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mustang School
Description:See Union School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Myers Branch
Description:See Spees Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Myers' Landing
Description:A landing on the Wyaconda between Canton and La Grange crossing to Monticello. So named for old residents who lived at the crossing. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 49; E.V. Overton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nall's Blockhouse
Description:A blockhouse built in 1832 on the bank of Bear Creek, three miles east and south of Monticello, near the North Fabius. A few of the old logs were still to be seen on the site as late as 1887. It stood on Martin Nall's claim, whence the name. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 53, 54; ATLAS LEWIS 1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nelson's Island
Description:See Big Island.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Lights
Description:See Durgan Creek Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Prospect Church
Description:A Baptist Church five or six miles northwest of Canton, between Christ Church and Moriah; organized a little time after 1844. It is now extinct. The name came about from a division in the church. (W.B. McRoberts; Judge James T. Lloyd; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Noonan's Chapel
Description:See Midway Chapel.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Troublesome
Description:The northern branch of the Troublesome which unites with the South Troublesome (q.v.), to form the larger stream of the same name. So named from its position. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Wyaconda
Description:See Wyaconda River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Wyaconda Creek
Description:See Wyaconda River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nunn Bridge
Description:A bridge over the North Fabius in the vicinity of Nunn's Mill, from which it took its name. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nunn's Mill
Description:A mill shown on the maps as located on the North Fabius southeast of Monticello. The county history locates it on the Middle Fabius. The first would appear correct. (See Nunn Bridge) The mill was built in 1829 as a corn cracker; enlarged in 1834, it began grinding wheat. The first buhr-stone was from a "lost rock," which the owner found near Canton. (See Hampton Boulder Site) It was named for its owner, John G. Nunn. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 48; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; MISSOURI HIST. REV., April, 1939; Maps Missouri, 1861, 1870)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nunnsville
Description:See Durham.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Bluff Cemetery
Description:An old cemetery at Canton to the south of Forest Grove Cemetery (q.v.). It is now the property of Culver-Stockton University. So named because it is situated on a hill or bluff which there is a growth of oak trees. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Dell School
Description:A schoolhouse in southern Highland Township; now a part of the Durham Consolidated School District. It is located in a little dell in the midst of oak brush. It was earlier known as Bostwick School for the chapel of that name close to the schoolhouse. (ATLAS MARION 1901; John Lemmons; Lous Sharp; Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Russell Allen)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Dell School District
Description:A school district partly in Marion County, now a part of the Durham Consolidated School District (q.v.). So named for its location in a little valley where there are a number of oak trees. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; Russell Allen)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove School District
Description:A school district in the northwest corner of Marion County on the Marion-Lewis line and the Marion Shelby line. Formerly known as the Carpenter District. The district is "cut at an angle" to take in portions of the three counties. (I am led to believe that the name Carpenter around 1901 was applied to the district for its peculiar shape. I can find otherwise no reason for the name). For the present name, see Oak Grove school. (ATLAS MARION, 1901)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakland School
Description:A schoolhouse in southern La Belle. It formerly stood in the midst of oak timber; hence the name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakley
Description:A post office in 1853, about which nothing could be learned. It is a stock name, found in at least a dozen other states. Doubtless suggested by the number of oak trees in the vicinity. (Hayward 1853)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oferral Lake
Description:See Offerrell Lake.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Offerrell Lake
Description:A name given to a slough in the northern part of Canton Township for Chas. Offerrell. The Offerrell family settled in this vicinity over eighty years ago. The ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, gives the spelling of Oferrall. (ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Judge James T. Lloyd; Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. McRoberts; (F) E.W. Lillard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Rooster Church
Description:See Salem Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old State Road of Northeast Missouri
Description:A state road surveyed and laid out in 1833 by order of the legislature, connecting the county seats of the counties in a line from the mouth of the Des Moines River (q.v.) to Paris, Monroe County, by way of Waterloo (q.v.) in Clark, Monticello (q.v.) in Lewis County, Shelbyville (q.v.) in Shelby County. It crossed the Hannibal nd St. Joseph State Road (q.v.) in Shelbyville. The date of the establishment of the road is given in the Shelby County History as 1836 and 1837. (HIST SHELBY 1911, 35; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oneida
Description:A "paper town" given by the county history as on the Middle Fabius near Hall's Mill, by the plat as on the Mississippi River south of La Grange. It was laid off in March of 1870, and the plat filed. It remained a town on paper only. The source of the name could not be discovered. It is used in at least ten other states, and is derived, directly or indirectly, from the famous Indian tribe which was one of the "Six Nations." (ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 226; Plat)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Otter Branch of Middle Fabius
Description:A branch south of Monticello, flowing south and west into the Middle Fabius. So named for an old otter hole. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; E.V. Overton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Overton School
Description:A schoolhouse south of Monticello in the vicinity of Lewistown. So named for the Overton family who have lived in this locality for many years. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oyster
Description:A post office from 1860-1870; to the south and west about ten miles from Monticello. The Quincy, Omaha, and Kansas City Railroad went through the village when it was built in 1872. It does not appear on the map after 1873. So named for the Oyster family, large landowners in this part of the county. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1861-1873; W.B. McRoberts; (F) Mrs. Ethel Shackleford)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oyster Branch
Description:A branch which rises in northern Union Township, and flows southeast into Oyster Pond. So named for S.K. Oyster, who owned the land. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oyster Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River opposite Union Township, south of Long Island. It was the property of the Oyster family. (Mrs. J.O. Tatje)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oyster Lake
Description:A lake in Union Township, east and south of the center, along the Mississippi River, and north of Pin Oak Lake (q.v.). So named for the Oyster family, large landowners in this part of the county. D.K. Oyster formerly owned the land on which the lake is located; more recently it was held by Iola E. Oyster. (ATLAS LEWIS, 1897, 1916; (f Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oyster Prairie
Description:The name given to the Oyster land holdings in the south and southeast part of the county. (W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oyster's Planing Mill
Description:A mill in La Grange, operated for many years. It blew up about 1898. The property of the Oyster family who owned many hundred acres of land in southern and southeastern Lewis County. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; Mrs. J.O. Tatje)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pattee Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Wyaconda River; built around 1854. So named for "old Dr. Pattee," who lived at this point. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pigeon Roost
Description:See Buzzard Island.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pin Oak Lake
Description:A lake in southeastern Union Township, opening directly into the Snicarty (q.v.). The country surrounding it has an abundance of pin oak trees which accounts for the name of the lake. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; (F) E.W. Lillard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pink Prairie School
Description:A schoolhouse southwest of Canton. So named for its location on the prairie. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plano School
Description:A schoolhouse in eastern Lyon Township. It was originally known as the Billups School for one of the directors who gave land for the building. It retained this name for years. A good many years ago it is reported some of the older girls wrote with chalk on the blackboard or on the building itself the word Plano. It is supposed the present name was derived from this incident. The schoolhouse stands on rolling land; hence there is no significance in the name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in western Canton Township. So named for its location in a grove. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:A schoolhouse in northeastern Highland Township. So named for its location on a hill. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Ridge School
Description:A schoolhouse west of La Grange in Union Township. So named because it stands on a ridge. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Porter School
Description:A schoolhouse west and south of La Grange. So named for a family in the vicinity. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie
Description:A post office in 1853; seven or eight miles northwest of La Grange, on Ten Mile Prairie (q.v.), from which it took its name. (Hayward 1853; Mrs. Mary Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie View Church
Description:A Christian Church near Bunker Hill. It is still active. So named for its location. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prentiss Rope Walk
Description:A rope walk operated by the father of General Ben M. Prentiss, below La Grange. Here considerable quantities of hemp were grown in the bottom lands, and rope walks were established for the manufacture of hemp rope. The rope walks were so named because they were long covered walks or buildings where rope was made. (HIST. LEWIS, 1887, 65; WEBSTER DICT.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Primrose
Description:A post office in 1867 and 1870; south and west of Monticello. It is thought it was so named for the family of Gerry Primrose in that vicinity. (Goodwin 1867; Map Missouri 1871; Postal Guide; W.B. McRoberts; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Providence Baptist Church
Description:A church established in 1852, one and a half miles south of Williamstown. The first building was erected by the farmers belonging to the church, a mechanic being employed only for the windows and doors. The church has always been an active one. The name is ideal. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 184; MIN. WYACONDA BAPT. ASSOC., 1936; W.B. McRoberts; Mrs. Guy Hummel; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Providence School
Description:A school two miles east of Williamstown (q.v.), a part of the Williamstown Consolidated School District (q.v.). So named for Providence Church (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; E.L. Dorsey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Quaker Church
Description:A old church of the denomination calling themselves Friends that stood close to Gilead (q.v.) on the Middle Fabius. It no longer exists. The word, Quaker, comes from the spasmodic movements of the early Quakers. At a meeting of the Quaker Society, as they speak of themselves, there are often prolonged periods of silence. They have no regular ministers. Ther members speak as the spirit moves them. (ATLAS LEWIS 1879; WEBSTER DICT.; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Queen of the Prairie
Description:See La Belle.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rainbow School
Description:A schoolhouse in the southeast corner of the county on the river, in the drainage district with many streams about it. In such a location there is likely to be simultaneous rainbows for the moisture in the air; hence the name. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reddish Township
Description:A township in the northwest corner of the county, organized in 1841, with Lyon Township to the east, and La Belle to the south. It consists of much wooded ridge land and broken territory. Deer Ridge was the name applied first by the pioneers to the long and elevated ridge in the township for the conformation of the land as well as for the number of deer found there. For this reason the township was first named Deer Ridge, but the name was changed to Reddish for Silas Reddish, the first settler within its borders. The first settlers came in 1835, though entries of land were made as early as 1832. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 149, 167; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Map Missouri 1869; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reynolds School
Description:A schoolhouse northwest of Monticello in Dickerson Township. It bears the name of a family near the building. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rickards School
Description:A schoolhouse in western Salem Township. So named for a family in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Risk Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Wyaconda River, around 1880. So named for Ford Risk, landowner at this point. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rowe Schoolhouse
Description:A schoolhouse of Upper Sugar Creek, not far from Benjamin (q.v.). So named for several families. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 190, 191; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem
Description:A store and a little country community that grew up evidently about Old Salem Church (q.v.); hence its name. (W.B.Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem Church [1 of 2]
Description:A church mentioned in the county history as prominent in early days, but little information has been obtained about its history or even its denomination. We assume that it was not a Baptist Church since its name does not occur in the early church records, whereas we have records as early of other Baptist churches. We know that it was in the south or southwest part of the county in what is now Salem Township (q.v.). The name is a favorite Bible name for churches, the word Salem signifying peace. (Gen. 14:18) (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 149, 163, 164)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem Church [2 of 2]
Description:A Congregational Church at La Grange, known as the German Congregational Church for its constituents, and as the old "Rooster Church" for the old rooster weather vane on its steeple. The church was established in 1869. It cannot be mere coincidence that the First Congregational Church in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in an early day bore on its steeple a gilded rooster weather vane which gave it the name of the "Church of the Holy Rooster." They say in Cambridge that these weather cocks were made by the father of Paul Revere. Cf. above. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 191; Mrs. J.O. Tatje; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem School
Description:A schoolhouse in northwestern Salem Township. Doubtless so named for old Salem Church (q.v.) which gave its name to the township. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem Township
Description:A township in the southwest corner of the county, with La Belle to the north, and Highland to the east. It was organized in 1841 out of Allen Township (q.v.), and named Salem for a prominent church then in existence. The fact that Jerusalem, the "paper town," was laid out in 1840 in this part of the county leads one to think that there was some association intended in the names. (HIST. LEWIS, 1887, 148, 163, 164)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salter Cemetery
Description:A cemetery west of La Grange on the W. Salter place, whence the name. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Santuzza
Description:See Fenway.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Secession Camp
Description:A camp of the Missouri State Guards at Horseshoe Bend (q.v.) during the Civil War. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seeber Branch
Description:A branch to the west in Salem Township, flowing generally south into the South Fabius in the southwest part of the county. So named for the owner of the land. The Seeber family built a permanent home here about sixty years ago. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; W.B. McRoberts; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sellers
Description:A post office from 1891-1904; a store and post office, south and east of Monticello, near the North Fabius River west of La Grange. It is now extinct, but the name continues. So named for John Sellers, who started the store. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri (1904-1915); E.V. Overton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sellers School
Description:A schoolhouse in southern Dickerson Township. It bears the name of an extinct post office. People of this name also live in the vicinity. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sharp School
Description:A schoolhouse in northwest La Belle Township. The school bears the name of a pioneer family in northeast Missouri. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shiloh Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the northeast corner close to the county line. A Biblical name:--The name signifies peace (Josh 18:1). It also is used in Gen. 49:10 to indicate the Christ. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI 108; MIN. WYACONDA BAPT. ASSOC., 1936; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shrader School
Description:A schoolhouse in northern Salem Township. So named for a family living near the building. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Skinner's Landing
Description:See La Grange.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Small Prairie
Description:See Waconda Prairie.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Smoot's Landing
Description:A landing on the Mississippi River, about two miles south of Canton; around 1830. There was a store there also, kept by a Mr. Everett. Now extinct. So named for the farm on which it was located, owned by Middleton Smoot. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 47; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 387; ATLAS LEWIS 1878; W.B. McRoberts; (F) W. Henton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snicarty
Description:A name applied to a whole line of lesser sloughs; originally the old channel. The word is a perversion of the French "Chenal Ecarte" literally "cut-off channel." The word is spelled also Sny Carte. (See Sni Island). Coues on page 12 of Pike's EXPEDITION UP THE MISSISSIPPI says, "The lower outlet of a very extensive snicarty twelve or fifteen miles in length lies directly above Quincy, Illinois, and extends to Canton above "La Grange." At Canton another begins. (See Canton Chute) (Coues-Pike, Note, 6, 7, 12)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sniderville
Description:A name given a gas station and bus stop on the new roadway shortly after leaving the Palmyra road on the way to La Belle (q.v.). It is the embryo of a town whereby the locality hopes to honor Gray Snider who located the road. (W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Fork Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1843 close to the Middle Fabius on the South Fork of that stream, hence the name. Its building was completed in 1849, and a new brick in 1860. It was used by all denominations. The church became disorganized in 1867; the building was deserted, and in 1887 lay in ruins in the midst of a dense forest. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 184; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Fork of North Fabius
Description:A name given around 1836 to the Middle Fabius, owing to the location of that river. (See Fabius River) (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 48)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Fork of the Middle Fabius
Description:See Big Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Grassy
Description:See Little Grassey Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Troublesome
Description:The south branch of the Troublesome which unites with the branch on the north, south and west of La Belle, to form the Troublesome. So named from its location. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Southern Methodist Seminary
Description:A seminary established at Canton, in the period before the Civil War, by the Southern Methodists, whence the name. Closed by the war, it passed into the hands of the school board, and is now used as a public school building. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 188)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Southern Presbyterian Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church organized at La Grange in 1866. A building was erected in 1869. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 192)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spees Branch
Description:A branch to the west in Salem Township, flowing generally south into the South Fabius, running parallel with the Seeber Branch. So named for J.C. Spees who owned the land through which the stream flows. In 1878 it was known as the Million Branch for the landowner, J.D. Million. Later it was called the Myers Branch for the same reason. It again indicated as the Spees Branch. (ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; PLAT BOOK; T.J. Sharp; (F) Mrs. Minnie Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph's Church
Description:A Catholic Church at Canton, established at an early date. For name cf. above. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 390)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph's School
Description:A Catholic School established at and early period "under the brow" of College Hill (q.v.) at Canton. There were not enough Catholics in this vicinity to support the school and St. Patrick's in Clark was too close to make possible another successful school. The building stood unused for a long period of time. The parish refused repeated offers from Culver-Stockton University for the building. Finally in 1935 it was converted into an apartment house. It belonged to St. Joseph Parish hence the name. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 390; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stallion Island
Description:See Long Island.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Staples Mill
Description:A mill on the North Fabius about a mile northwest of Monticello; established around 1834 by John Staples of Virginia, whence the name. Mr. Staples had here a carding machine as well as a grist mill and distillery. The mill was burned during the Civil War. Rebuilt around 1878, it was owned by Caldwell, and became known as Caldwell's Mill. (HIST. MARION 1884, 487; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 48, 91; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; Maps Missouri 1861)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Steele Bridge
Description:A bridge over the North Fabius by Ewing, completed, according to one authority, in 1838; in the list of bridges in the county history the date given is 1878. It was known formerly as Lay's Ford (q.v.), at which point it was built. Later the name was changed to Steele Bridge for the family living at this point. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 49, 203; E.V. Overton; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Steffanville
Description:See Steffenville.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Steffensville
Description:See Steffenville.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Steffenville
Description:A post office from 1874; eighteen miles southwest of Monticello, south to west in Salem Township. It lies in the heart of a rich farming community, the land of which is owned largely by members of the Steffens family, whence the name. Henry Steffens was the pioneer owner. The name was formerly written Steffensville, and also appeared as Steffanville until about 1889. (Campbell 1874, 310; HIST. LEWIS 1878, 1916; Polk (1879-1889); Postal Guide; Eaton, 185; Maps Missouri from 1877; Judge James T. Lloyd; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Steffenville Consolidated School District
Description:This consolidated district consists of two schools; Steffenville and Brush College (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; A.F. Scott)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sue Creek
Description:See Sugar Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Camp
Description:A camp on the Wyaconda; so known for the number of "sugar trees" there, where Indians and pioneers gathered and boiled down the sap for sugar. A few of these trees only are standing today. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 381; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Camp Ford
Description:A ford over the Wyaconda River by Sugar Camp (q.v.), from which it took its name. It was the site of a camp of Confederate troops during the Civil War. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 82; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 381)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Creek
Description:A creek which rises in southern Clark County, and flows generally southeast into the Wyaconda River in northeast Lewis County. The vicinity is known for its "sugar" trees; hence the name. Williams (1904) gives it as Sue Creek. No one could be found with any knowledge of this name, which is probably an error. (ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Colton Map (1861); Williams 1904; (F) E.W. Lillard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Creek Church
Description:See Christ Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sunnyside School
Description:A schoolhouse northwest of La Grange in Union Township. So named for its location overlooking a valley on the sunny side of a hill. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Branch
Description:See Big Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Fork
Description:See Big Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ten Mile
Description:A store and country community south of Monticello. It is so named for Ten Mile Church (q.v.). (W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ten Mile Church
Description:A Baptist Church about eight miles south of Monticello. It is still holding services. James Lillard, a pioneer preacher at this church, named it for a church in Kentucky. (W.B. McRoberts; (F) Mrs. Minnie B. Minter)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ten Mile Grange
Description:A Grange organization meeting in the store at Ten Mile (q.v.), whence the name. For Grange cf. Fabius Grange. (W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ten Mile Prairie
Description:A reach of prairie a few miles northwest of La Grange. So named for Ten Mile Church (q.v.). (W.B.Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ten Mile School
Description:A schoolhouse in Dickerson Township, about ten miles from La Grange and Canton. It took its name from Ten Mile Church (q.v.), however. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Barn
Description:See La Grange.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Granary
Description:See La Grange.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Timber Grange
Description:A Grange organization formed in the 1870s, at Benjamin, and still meeting. The name was suggested by the location. For Grange cf. Fabius Grange. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 198; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tolona
Description:A post office from 1876; a station on the Quincy, Omaha, and Kansas City Railroad just within the north line of Highland Township, seventeen miles south to west of Monticello, and twenty-two miles northwest of Quincy, Illinois. Laid off and platted in 1872. It was originally called Blue Grass because of the blue grass region in which it is located. On the establishment of the post office the department assigned the name Tolona to the village, owing to the fact that there was another Blue Grass in the state. (Campbell 1874, 310; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 224; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Postal Guide; Polk 1876; Plat; Maps Missouri from 1872; (F) W.E. Hotchkiss)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trabue's Mill
Description:See Caldwell's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tracy Mill
Description:A mill on the Middle Fabius, six miles northwest of Monticello, around 1836. So named for its owner, Lewis Tracy. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 48)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Travis Schoolhouse
Description:A schoolhouse on Sugar Creek in an early day. So named for a pioneer family. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 191; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Troublesome Creek
Description:A stream which rises in Schyuler County in northern Missouri, and flows in a southeasterly direction through Knox and Lewis counties, entering Marion at the northwest corner, and emptying into South Fabius in the northern part of the county. Hunters gave it the name for the fact that when other streams were tranquil, this stream was raging after a shower and often out of its banks. Originally it was known as "Bridge Creek" for the reason that when raging it afforded hunters a rough crossing. Campbell in 1874 gives the name Troublesome. (Campbell 1874; HIST. MARION 1884, 748)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tucker Mill
Description:See Turner Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tully
Description:A post office from 1836-1860; established in 1834 on the Mississippi River, adjoining Canton on the north. Incorporated in 1842. Tully was a natural steamboat landing, and grew faster than its neighbor. At the close of the 1840s, it had become a town of considerable importance, but in the spring of 1851 the town was partially destroyed by an extraordinary overflow of the river. This marked the passage of the village; the part left standing became a part of Canton, and the name Tully does not appear on a map after 1872. In 1887, one or two of the houses of the old town were still standing. The older people of the county say the place was named for a man named Tully who had the first store there, the county history, however, gives this credit to one Thomas Gray. There may have been a family in the community for whom Tully was named, but the proof is unavailable. (Wetmore 1837; Hayward 1835; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 60, 224; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 383; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; Coues-Pike, Note, 12; Maps Missouri, 1842-1872; (F) E.W. Lillard; (F) W.W. Henton; (F) E. Hotchkiss)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tully's Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River three or four miles above Canton. At this point there is a stream flowing out from the Mississippi and after a short distance returning to the main channel. A dam was in the process of building at Canton in 1936. When it is in operation, this island will be submerged. So named for the town of Tully (q.v.). (Coues-Pike, Note, 12; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turner Mill
Description:A mill on the North Fabius between Monticello and Ewing, during the Civil War. When established it was owned by a Mr. Davis and known as Davis Mill. The later name was also for the owner. The histories of Marion and of Lewis give a Tucker Mill as in this vicinity. Residents differ as to the existence of this mill. It may have been an error in the name. (HIST. MARION 1884, 538; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 112; Lloyd's Map 1861; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn; T.J. Sharp)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turner School
Description:A schoolhouse in southwest Dickerson Township, established as early as 1866. It still exists under the same name. It took its name from a neighboring family. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 185; Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turpin's Church
Description:See Midway Chapel.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Chapel
Description:A chapel organized at the Turner Schoolhouse near Lewistown in 1866. In 1869 a union house was built, indicated as Union Chapel in the Atlas of 1878. The building in 1872 was moved to Lewistown where it became a Baptist Church. (See Lewistown Baptist Church). (ATLAS LEWIS 1878; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 185; Judge James T. Lloyd)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union School
Description:A schoolhouse in the northwest corner of the county. The name is an ideal name. It was formerly known as the Mustang School for the wildness of the scenery about it. This name is still used somewhat. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union School District
Description:The first school district organized in Union Township, and given its name; in 1837. The district no longer exists. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 50)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Township
Description:A township in the southeast corner of the county, having an extended river front, and running far enough west to include the majestic bluffs of the Mississippi River at this point. The first township to be settled in the county, it was already a township when the county was organized in 1833; and on the reorganization of the townships, it was left politically as when attached to Marion. (See Lewis County). The township is bordered on the north by Canton Township, and on the west by Dickerson and Highland. The name is an ideal one. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 148, 152; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Map Missouri, 1869)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Waconda
Description:About 1822 some St. Louis speculators projected a village to be known by this name at the former site of Le Seur's Port (q.v.). But no town was ever built. Coues says the original settlement Wyaconda or Waconda, was so known from the river, Wyaconda. He adds that Nicollet's Map marks Wiyakonda, preserving the Indian name of the place. (Nicollet made the maps that Pike used). Weaucandah was the spelling used in the records at St. Louis. The Lincole Map (1822) indicated the village as Wahkondah. The name appears to follow the spelling used for the Wyaconda River (q.v.). Beck (1823) said of the town that "it possessed many local advantages and was probably destined to become a considerable commercial town."About 1822, there were a sawmill and a grist mill in operation, and other improvements were in progress. But the settlement never developed into a town, and appears on the map only from 1822 to 1834. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 226, 227; Coues-Pike, Note, 12; (F) Beck 1823, 334, 335)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Waconda Creek
Description:See Wyaconda River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Waconda Prairie
Description:A small prairie below La Grange. Indicated as "Small Prairie" by Pike. Spelled "Wacondaw" by Major Thomas Forsyth, a citation made by Coues. It took its name from the river. (Coues-Pike, Note, 12, Pike's Map 1805)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Waconda River
Description:See Wyaconda River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wacondaw Prairie
Description:See Waconda Prairie.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wahkondah
Description:See Waconda.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wahkondah River
Description:See Wyaconda River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wakenda River
Description:See Wyaconda River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walker School
Description:A schoolhouse in southern Reddish Township, the foundation of which was laid around 1840 by the organization of the Mount Moriah Bear Creek Church (q.v.). It still exists under this name. It bore the name of a neighboring family. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 188; Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in southern Union Township. It stands in a walnut grove; hence the present name. It was formerly known as Frog Pond School, for the two frog ponds back of it and the fact that the schoolhouse was painted green. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Washington School (Colored)
Description:A school for colored children at La Grange. For name cf. above. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wash's Mill
Description:An old water mill on the North Fabius near Maywood. So named for its owner. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; E.V. Overton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Watkins' Schoolhouse
Description:The first schoolhouse in Reddish Township; as early as 1845. It no longer exists. So named for a family. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 149; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wayside Inn
Description:The first inn erected in northeast Missouri in pioneer days and the only one remaining so far as known; about four miles northwest of La Grange. It was erected on the old Memphis-La Grange Road (q.v.), in 1835, and used extensively by pioneer settlers until the coming of railroads. Writing in January of 1935, the CLARK COUNTY COURIER said that the old landmark was tenantless for the first time for any length of time in its entire existence. After passing of the old inn, it was kept in repair and used as a farmhouse. The owner of the farm on which the inn is located had moved (1935) recently to another farm. The inn, still fairly well preserved, is patterned after the style of the old time hostelries, a plain building, large and long, with a porch on one side running its entire length. There are twelve rooms, two stairways, and three large fireplaces, the only means, no doubt, of heating the large building in its early existence. Some of the original weatherboarding is still doing duty on one end. Old teamsters would put up at the inn, sometimes lined up three blocks long on Main Street in La Grange waiting to unload their produce. Stock was driven on foot to market, droves of hogs often numbering as many as five or six hundred. The drivers would stop at the inn to rest and feed their stock before delivering it to market. Large pens were built for the stock and quarters provided for the negro drivers. There is an old fashioned "style block" said to be the original one at the inn, a silent reminder of the days that are gone when women, riding horseback in their long, flowing skirts, had to use a style block almost as high as the horse from which to mount. When the old inn acquired its present name has not been ascertained. If the title was not conferred till after it had become a historic landmark, it may have been suggested by Longfellow's popular "Tales of a Wayside Inn," published in 1863. (MISSOURI HIST. REV., Jan. 1936, 221; Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Weaucandah
Description:See Waconda.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Weber
Description:A post office from 1886-1904; a store and post office in the southeast part of the county, near North Fabius, five miles southwest of La Grange. Now abandoned. So named for William Weber who started the first store there previous to 1880 and conducted the post office. (ATLAS LEWIS 1916; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1904-1915; Judge James T. Lloyd; W.B. McRoberts; (F) H.L. Loudermilk; (F) Mrs. Mildred Long Lillard; (F) Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Quincy and Alexandria Railroad
Description:See Canton Bloomfield Railroad
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Western Academy
Description:An academy opened at La Belle in 1880 by Henry Richards. It offered a thorough academic education, and was operated by different parties until 1900 when the public high school was organized. It averaged 150 in attendance. In 1890 it was known as Western College. So named from the location of La Belle (q.v.). (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 181; W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Western College
Description:See Western Academy.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Weston Bridge
Description:A bridge over the North Fabius about ten miles west of La Grange; built around 1876. It was first known as the Jordan Bridge, for an old family. The present name is that of a family living at this point. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; E.V. Overton)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whaley's Mill
Description:A mill on the north bank of the South Fabius, six or eight miles east of Newark, close to the Lewis-Marion line. It was the scene of a battle during the Civil War, and was burned in the course of the war. So named for its owner, Captain Whaley. (HIST. MARION 1884, 455, 467; HIST. KNOX 1887, 692; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 92, 119, 140; Map Missouri, 1844; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Halsey and Hewitt Mill
Description:See Bozarth's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wiaconda River
Description:See Wyaconda River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wiconda River
Description:See Wyaconda River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williamstown
Description:A post office from 1860; on the old Canton, Monticello, and Memphis State Road (q.v.), twelve miles north-northwest of Monticello in the northeast corner of Reddish Township. It is located on rich, rolling praire land. Following the Civil War, Williamstown for a time tended to prosper, but since has declined until it is of little importance. It was laid off in 1856 and the plat filed by Minus Williams, a Universalist preacher of some note, for whom the village was named. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 219; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 391; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Postal Guide; Eaton, 185; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1860; W.B. McRoberts; (F) Duke Lemon)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williamstown Consolidated School District
Description:This consolidated school district consists of three schools besides the village school at Williamstown: Providence, Cross Roads School, and Buck Branch School (q.v.). (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; E.L. Dorsey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wiyakonda
Description:See Waconda.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyacona
Description:See Waconda.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda Baptist Association
Description:An association of Baptist churches in Clark, Lewis, and the eastern part of Knox Counties. (See Bethel Baptist Association). The association was ninety-two years old in 1937 and met in the Providence Baptist Church (q.v.) in Williamstown, Lewis County. The association on organization took the name of the Wyaconda Rivers that traverse the two counties of Clark and Lewis. (MIN. WYACONDA BAPT. ASSOC., 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda Bottoms
Description:Bottom lands along the Wyaconda River. This vicinity was visited regularly by the Indians who encamped here during the "sugar" season. Maple trees in 1874 were still plentiful here. (Campbell 1874, 306)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda Church
Description:A Baptist Church some two and a half miles southwest of Canton, on the south road to Monticello. It was one of the first churches in the county, perhaps constituted as early as 1829. It still holds services. It took its name from its location on the Wyaconda. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 183; ATLAS LEWIS 1916; MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934; Judge James T. Lloyd; T.J. Sharp; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda Church Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Wyaconda River, east of Wyaconda Church (q.v.). Built around 1871. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 203; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda Creek
Description:A creek in Union Township, flowing into the Wyaconda, from which it takes its name. (ATLAS LEWIS 1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda River
Description:This river is formed by the union of two long streams known as the North and South Wyaconda, both of which rise in Iowa and flow southeast through Scotland County, uniting in northern Clark to form the main stream. This follows a southeastern course through southwest Clark, joined on the way by the Little Wyaconda, enters Lewis by way of Lyon Township, traverses the latter county through the northeast and east, joining the Mississippi a short distance above La Grange. It is one of the largest rivers between the Des Moines and the Salt rivers. Pike speaks of its mouth as being 100 yards wide, and bearing due west from the Mississippi. Beck (1823) speaks of it as the Waconda Creek. It is known by an Indian name which goes back to an old Indian tradition of two Sioux Indians who died on its banks in the night with no marks of violence upon them. Their death was thus ascribed to the supernatural; hence the place of their death became known as the Waconda--residence of the Master of Life or the Great Spirit, whom they knew as Wakonda. The latter is a term applied by tribes of the Siouan family when the power believed to animate all natural forms is spoken to or spoken of in supplication or in rituals. (Spelled Wakanda by Riggs in the Dakota Dictionary, where it is given as a verb signifying to reckon as holy or sacred--to worship). The noun Wakan signifies a spirit, something consecrated. To the Omaha nothing is without life; the rock lives, as do the cloud and the tree as well as the animal. He projects his own consciousness upon things. The power which brings to pass and holds all things in their living form he designates as Wakonda. All power is of the Wakonda, which is invisible and therefore of the spirit, to which is ascribed all that is mysterious or beyond ordinary experience. The name is pronounced usually as written--properly_____the common pronunciation in the vicinity of the river is_____Pike (1805) spelled it as at present, as did also Peck (1851). The Lincole Map (1822) indicates it as Wahkondah. Beck (1823) spelled it Waconda, and it was so indicated on the Map of Missouri, 1824. Other early writers spelled the name Wakenda (Map Illinois and Missouri, 1834). In 1832 Wyaconda again appears, in 1844 Wiaconda, in 1850 Wiconda, in 1858 Wyaconda again. The name continues to vary in form until about 1878 when it becomes somewhat consistently Wyaconda. The stream is also known as the Big Wyaconda, and the North Wyaconda Creek, because of its relation to the other stream of the same name. (See Little Wyaconda). (HIST. LEWIS (1887), 152; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; ATLAS CLARK (1878); Pike (1805), 291; Beck (1823); Peck (1851); Eaton, 275; Hodge; Maps Missouri from 1822)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda Spring
Description:A mineral spring just outside La Grange near the Wyaconda River, whence the name. It was being exploited in the early 1900s by a man from Chicago. At that time quite an extensive business was carried on here in shipping bottled water by carloads to Chicago, under the name of Wyaconda Diuretic Mineral Water. This spring is now converted into a fountain in a little park outside the town. (Mrs. J.O. Tatje)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Yates' Mill
Description:A mill in or close to La Grange, burned during the Civil War. Known by its owner's name. (Mrs. Mary E. Vaughn)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Young School
Description:See Garnett School
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Hill Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church in Lyon Township in the vicinity of Sugar Creek. It took the name of Zion Hill because of its location on a hill. For name cf. above. (W.B. Anderson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Hill High
Description:See Lyon High Seminary.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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