Knox County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Alexandria and Bloomington Railroad
Description:A railroad projected from Alexandria, Clark County, to Bloomington, county seat of Macon at that time. The company was chartered and the road surveyed around 1859, but no other work was done under this name owing to the Civil War. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 720; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 376)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen Township
Description:A township which included on its organization all the territory west of the Troublesome, and the greater part of Knox. It was organized in 1836, and named for the first settler, Samuel Allen. This township was very short lived. Scotland County, which included Knox, was organized in 1841, and Allen Township was broken up into three Lewis County townships. The name is no longer used. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 149; HIST. KNOX 1887, 564)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alred's Hill
Description:A hill south of Edina one and a half miles on the road to Novelty; noted during the Civil War for guerrilla warfare. It bore this name from an early period for a family who lived on the hill. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 687; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 54; Chas. Stauder; R.W. Haselwood; (F) Steve Stout)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch School
Description:A schoolhouse in Colony Township. So named by the "Disciples" who under Elder B. F. Northcurr organized a class here shortly after the Civil War. Cf. Antioch Church above. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; W.E. Cottey; Dr. J.R. Northcutt)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atchison and Topeka Railroad.
Description:See Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad
Description:This railroad enters Clark County midway in Sweet Home Township on the Des Moines River, crosses the county diagonally to Scotland County where it passes through the southeast corner a distance of about nine miles, then enters Knox County which it traverses in the northwest section. Ground was broken at Topeka, Kansas, for this road, chartered as the Atchison and Topeka Railroad, in 1868, and trains were running by 1869. In 1875 the road reached Kansas City, and now followed westward substantially the line of the old Santa Fe Trail (q.v.) whence the name Santa Fe Road as applied to the railroad. In 1876 the line was completed to Pueblo; in 1879 to Las Vegas. The Santa Fe System was organized in 1886 under the name Chicago, Santa Fe, and California Railroad. It is known as one of the most gigantic and best equipped railroad systems in America. The road now runs from Chicago to the Pacific Coast. It was completed in 1887, and the first run on the completed road made January 1, 1888. The road goes most frequently under the name of the Santa Fe. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 303, 304; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 490; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 611; Williams 1904, 361; Duffus 1930, 260-66; HANNIBAL COURIER- POST, Aug. 15, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baker School
Description:A schoolhouse in Lyon Township. So named for a family in the vicinity. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baker's Lane
Description:A roadway one mile southwest of what is now Edina. The pioneers indulged in horse-racing here. In the year 1837 there was a horse race here between Blackhawk, the Fox Indian, and a settler named John Haues. So known for a pioneer family as early as 1837. (ATLAS KNOX 1876, 53)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baring
Description:A post office from 1889; a station on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe, to the southeast in Greenburg Township, six miles north and west of Edina. The railroad was built in 1887, but there was no town at this point until the spring of 1888. The town was incorporated in 1889. It was named by the Santa Fe Town and Land Company for Baring Brothers, London, England, who advanced $70,000,000 for establishing the railroad. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 729; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI 83, 377; Atlas Knox, 1898, 1916; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1888; R.W. Haselwood; (F) James Delaney)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barnhill School
Description:A schoolhouse in Bee Ridge Township. It is a family name. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beal School
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township. So named for Judge Beal. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; Mrs. Orville M. Barnett)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bee Ford
Description:A ford on the South Fabius. (See "Bee Roads") (HIST. KNOX 1887, 666)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bee Ridge [1 of 2]
Description:A natural elevation of land in the form of a ridge in the south-central part of the county. Named by the hunters for its physical nature and for the abundance of bee trees found there in early days. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 742; (F) James Delaney; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bee Ridge [2 of 2]
Description:A post office in 1853, discontinued by 1879; to the extreme east and somewhat north in Bee Ridge Township near the township line nine miles southeast of Edina. Now extinct. So named for the elevation of land called Bee Ridge (q.v.). (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 294; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 54; Postal Guide; Polk 1876-1879; Maps Missouri 1861-1885; (F) Tom Shirkey; (F) J. Hazelwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bee Ridge Church
Description:A Basptist Church southeast of the center of the county on Bee Ridge (q.v.); hence the name. It was organized in 1860, disbanded in 1868, and organized the second time in 1869. The church is no longer in existence. (MIN. BETHEL BAPTIST ASSOC., 1934; Rev. Adolph Vollmer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bee Ridge School
Description:A schoolhouse on Bee Ridge (q.v.) in Bee Ridge Township; hence the name. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bee Ridge Township
Description:A township in the second tier from the county line to the south, with Liberty to the north, Jeddo to the east, Bourbon to the south, and Shelton to the west. It was organized in 1872. So named for the natural elevation within its limits known as Bee Ridge (q.v.). (HIST. KNOX, 1887, 741, 742; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916; (F) James Delaney; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Benner School
Description:A schoolhouse in Myrtle Township. So named for the family living by the school. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Benton Township
Description:A township of Lewis County set aside by the Lewis County Court for a separate county and organized for civil and military purposes. It originally included the present territory of Scotland County with a six-mile strip of Knox County. When in 1836 the Lewis County Court organized Mt. Pleasant Township (q.v.) out of Benton, the name Benton was retained for the eastern eleven miles from north to south. The township has undergone various changes. In 1844 that part of Benton that still lay in Knox was constituted a township and retained its name in that county. There is no township of this name today in Scotland County. Benton in Knox lies on the northern line of the county, with Colony to the east, Liberty to the south, and Greensburg to the west. Here it was one of the four original townships in 1845. So named for Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858). Democratic senator and representative to Congress from Missouri. He was elected to the 33rd Congress (1853-1855) as the Missouri Compromise delegate. (See "Bullion's Landing"). (HIST. KNOX 1887, 606, 740-742; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 417, 438, 439; COURT RECORD, SCOTLAND 1844; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 1898, 1916; (F) BIOG. DIREC. OF AMERICAN CONGRESS; (F: Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Branch
Description:A branch which rises in northern Knox County, flowing southeast into Lewis County, where it enters the Middle Fabius. So named for its relations to larger streams. Around 1878, it was known as the South Fork of the Middle Fabius, again for its location. The county history says that in time the South Fork was called "Little Faba" this for the same reason. A still earlier name, around 1858, was Taylor Fork, for an owner of land in the vicinity. Colton (1858) gives it as Taylor's Branch, the same as Middle Fabius or South Fork of the same. (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 23; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Colton 1858)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bishop School
Description:A schoolhouse in Bee Ridge Township. It bears a family name. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bitler School
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township. So named for several families in the vicinity. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Creek
Description:A creek which enters Shelby County east of the North Fork of Salt River from southwest Knox County where it rises. It flows diagonally through the center of Shelby County from the northwest corner to the southeast where it enters the North Fork of Salt River. So named by surveyors because of the blackness of the water when they first saw it. It was originally Jake's Creek, so called for the trapper named Jake who around 1820 built a cabin on the bank and lived there for some time trapping and fishing. Wetmore (1837) gives this name; Williams (1904), also, and a recent Cram Railroad Map of Missouri. Mitchell in his Map of Missouri Territory (1832) gives Jack's Creek, and Colton (1858) gives this name also. The name Black Creek is given by Rand McNally, 1935. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 621; HIST. SHELBY 1884, 652; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 30; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; Eaton, 66)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black School
Description:A schoolhouse in Greensburg Township. So named for people in the vicinity. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bourbon Township
Description:A township on the county line to the south, with Fabius to the east, Salt River Township to the west, and Bee Ridge to the north. Organized in 1872, and named for the number of "straight" Democratic voters it contained. The name of the deposed royal family of France, which became extinct with the death of Comte de Chambord in 1883, was used in American political slang, especially just before and after the Civil War, to signify a stubborn, conservative voter of the Democratic Party, with the implication that like the Bourbon family he was behind the times and untouchable. Cf. the OED, Bourbon 2. In United States politics: A nickname for "a Democrat behind the age and untouchable." 1884 (only ex.). In Thornton's AMERICAN GLOSSARY, the word is defined as "a dyed-in-the-wool Democracy," and several earlier exampleas are cited, the earliest being of 1859. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 742, 742; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916; OED, Thornton, STANDARD, etc.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bowen Brothers Mill
Description:A mill in Milltown (q.v.) in 1869. It stood near the railroad in what is now Edina. So named for its owners. (Mrs. Orville M. Barnett)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brick School
Description:A schoolhouse in Knox, serving a district lying in both counties. The building is of brick; hence the name. Formerly, the Ewing School, for a number of old families of that name in the vicinity. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridge Creek
Description:A creek which rises in the northwestern part of the county in northeast Greensburg Township, and flows in a southeasterly direction, traversing southwest Benton and northern Myrtle townships to join the Middle Fabius. The northeastern part of the county through which the stream flows is hilly with very few bridges. Though it enters the Middle Fabius at a distance from the old covered bridge at Millport, it takes its name from that bridge. (ATLAS KNOX 1876; Chas. Stauder; C.R. Fowler)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bruce's Creek
Description:See Plum Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brushy School
Description:A schoolhouse in Colony Township. The site is covered with brush; hence the name. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buttermilk
Description:A former stop on the Santa Fe Railroad about one and a half miles west of Knox City, used before the Knox City Station was established. When the trains stopped here, Mrs. Tim Barnes, living on a farm near the stop, gave the railroad men buttermilk. There was only a box to mark the train stop, but the point came to be called Buttermilk. After the rise of Knox City, the place was used no more, but the name persisted in Buttermilk School (q.v.). ((F) J. Hazelwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buttermilk School
Description:A schoolhouse in Myrtle Township, about two miles west of Knox City. It is included in Knox City Consolidated School District. So named for Buttermilk (q.v.). (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; (F) J. Hazelwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buzzards Glory
Description:See Pleasant Ridge School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Campbell School
Description:A schoolhouse in Fabius Township. So named for a neighboring family. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carder School
Description:See Brick School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Center Ridge School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jeddo Township. The name is one of location. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Center Township
Description:A township set aside under this name in November, 1842, by the County Court of Scotland County. At that time it extended from the county line on the west to a line between Rock and Coon Creeks (q.v.). It would appear it was so named for Centerville. (See Colony). On the organization of Knox in 1845 the township lines were changed to a one-mile square taken out near the center of the county to be occupied by the county seat. It is thus with the county seat. The adjoing township are Lyon and Liberty. (Court Records (Scotland), Nov., 1842; HIST. KNOX 1887, 741, 742; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 1898, 1916; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Centerville
Description:See Colony.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chicago, Santa Fe and California Railroad
Description:See Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clancy School
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township. It bears the name of people living by the school. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark School
Description:See Mt. Tabor School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coburn School
Description:A schoolhouse in Shelton Township, so known for people of that name in the community. It is also known as Pleasant Run for the stream of that name in the immediate vicinity. Most people know it as the Coburn School. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coe School
Description:A schoolhouse in Bourbon Township. So named for a neighboring family. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Colony
Description:A post office from 1853-1904; in the northeastern part of the county, in Colony Township, eighteen miles north of Edina. Some of the first settlers in the county, a group of four or five families from Kentucky, around 1840 settled about two miles northeast of the present site of Colony. The settlement was known first as Kentucky Colony. A store had been established on the present site, the neighborhood name for which was Centerville, since it was halfway between Monticello in Lewis County and Sandhill in Scotland County. Kentucky Colony had in the meantime been appointed a post office, which was soon moved to Centerville because of the store, and the name of the post office, which had been shortened to Colony, took the place of the name of the store. One informant says that the group of Kentucky settlers were Dunkards. The village was laid out many years ago, but never regularly platted. It remains a farming center with its country store. (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; HIST. KNOX 1887, 739; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 83; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1860; R.W. Haselwood; (F) James Delaney; (F) M.J. Ammons; (F) J.P. Johnson; (F) Bud Rampey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Colony Township
Description:A township in the northeast corner of the county, with Myrtle and Liberty to the south and Benton to the west; organized in 1872. Named for the village of Colony (q.v.). (HIST. KNOX 1887, 741, 742; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Convent of the Sisters of Loretto
Description:See St. Joseph's Convent.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cook School
Description:A schoolhouse in Shelton Township. So named for several families in the vicinity. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coon Creek
Description:A creek which rises in the northwestern part of Bee Ridge Township flowing southeast into the South Fabius east of the center of that township. So named for the raccoons found by early hunters along its banks. (ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898; (F) J. Hazelwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cooper and Roberts' Mill
Description:See Cooper's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cooper Settlement
Description:Stephen Cooper emigrated from Howard County, Missouri, early in the fall of 1832 or 1833, and settled about one and a half miles northeast of Millport (q.v.). He was the first white settler in the county of Knox, coming to the vicinity when Knox was still a part of Scotland, and settling on land now included in the northeastern part of Knox and the southeastern part of Scotland. He himself never entered any land in Knox, but the Cooper Settlement to which he gave his name included land in both counties. Cooper Settlement became quite an important point to the settlers in the valleys of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. The settlement never developed into a town. (Campbell 1874, 591; HIST. KNOX 1887, 567, 568, 736; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 363; ATLAS KNOX 1876; R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cooper's Mill
Description:A mill established around 1839 at the place known as Millport (q.v.) by Stephen Cooper, from whom it took its name. (See Cooper Settlement). The mill was run by Cooper and Redding Roberts and was sometimes known as Cooper and Roberts' Mill. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 568; R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cottey Branch
Description:A stream in northeastern Bee Ridge Township, flowing northeast into Troublesome Creek in northwestern Jeddo Township. So named for a family who settled land on the creek. (ATLAS KNOX 1916, 7; R.W. Haselwood; (F) Steve Stout)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crim School
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township. It bears the name of several families in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cunningham's Switch
Description:See Fabius.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Daling School
Description:A schoolhouse in Benton Township. So named for people in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis School
Description:A schoolhouse in the northeastern corner of Colony Township. So named for a family. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Day School
Description:A schoolhouse in Fabius Township. It bears the name of a family. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deer Creek
Description:A creek rising in Adair County and flowing generally south through western Shelton Township into the North Fork of Salt River in southwest Salt River Township. It was so named for the number of deer which when hunted usually led the hunt to this creek. (ATLAS KNOX 1876; (F) James Delaney)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Delaney School
Description:A schoolhouse in Greensburg Township. So named for people in the district. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Democrat Creek
Description:A creek southwest of the center of Lyon Township, flowing southeast into Rock Creek about two miles from Edina. So named for the number of Democrats living in the vicinity. At an earlier period it was known as Taylor's Branch for George Taylor who located here in 1837. He became prominent in the community. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 571; ATLAS KNOX 1876; C.R. Fowler)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dennis Mill
Description:A mill on the Little Fabius, seven miles southeast of Hurdland; operated by a man by the name of Dennis, about 1866. ( (F) Thomas Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dixon School
Description:A school in Salt River Township, now consolidated with the Locust Hill School (q.v.). So named for people in the district. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Double-Cabin Bridge
Description:See Feltz's Bridge.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edina
Description:A post office since 1842; forty-seven miles from Quincy, in Center Township (q.v.). Edina was laid out in 1839, and was understood from the first to be the county seat though no official action was taken until May, 1845. Around 1842, the Irishman, Peter Early, came to the vicinity with a strong colony of his countrymen. (See St. Joseph Church). Up to 1851 Edina remained but a small stragling community. It was incorporated in 1851 and 1857. Then came the railroad, the Quincy, Missouri, and Pacific, now the Quincy, Omaha, and Kansas City, (q.v.) in 1871, and the village started growing. The town is known for its beautiful shade trees, and a public park whose elms rival those of New Haven, the "Elm City." Edina was laid out and named by Stephen Carnegie, a Canton surveyor and a Scotchman. He had surveyed a town in Scotland County which he had called Edinburg (q.v.) for his loved home-city in Scotland, and to this new village he gave the name Edina, the ancinet name and classic title of Edinburgh, Scotland. (Hayward 1853; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 293; HIST. KNOX 1887, 560, 592, 733, 735; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 374, 375; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916; Eaton, 182; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1844)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edina Methodist Episcopal Church South
Description:A church established in 1847 at Edina, whence the name. The church building was erected in 1856. During the Civil War, it was used as quarters for Federal troops. It was never used again as a church. The building was torn down after the war, and the church incorporated in 1870 to Mt. Carmel (q.v.). (HIST. KNOX 1887, 594; C.R. Fowler)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edina Roller Mill
Description:A flour mill at Edina, turning out the better grade of flour. The company was organized in 1883; but not meeting with the desired success, it was diminished in number, and a new charter obtained. The mill burned in 1902. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 730; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 374)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edina School of Music
Description:A school of music that was opened in Edina in 1895 by Anna Frost Ringer, a teacher of music that had been associated with the former Edina Seminary. After ten years the school went under a new management. It went out of existence in the early 1920s. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI 374; Mrs. Sue Krueger)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edina Seminary
Description:A seminary established in Edina as Knox Collegiate Institute in 1878 by Professor Edwin Fowler, who conducted the school in Winterbottom Hall. At this time it was also known as Fowler Seminary for the founder. In 1881, a commodius building was erected, now known as Maplehurst, and a fine school was established called Edina Seminary; named for the town as previously it had been named for the county. In 1886, the property was forfeited on account of financial embarassment. Later the school opened under new management with the name again of Knox Collegiate Institute, and was for some years conducted successfully. Still again under new ma nagement it became Edina Seminary and was successful for a number of years. In 1891 a school of muisic was incorporated with the seminary, the two sometimes going under the name Edina Seminay and School of Music. The seminary was finally closed, giving way to the modern high school in 1895. (See Edina School of Music). (HIST. KNOX, 1887, 670, 671; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 373, 374; C.R. Fowler; Mrs. Sue Krueger)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edina Seminary and School of Music
Description:See Edina Semianry.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Edina Woolen Factory
Description:See Winterbottom Woolen Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Euceba Church
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian Church built in 1875 about five miles southwest of Novelty. A county informant says that the church was built as a community church, and for some years congregations of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, the Methodist Episcopal Church, and the Cumberland Presbyterian held regular services there. Later the Methodist Episcopal Church group moved into town, and the Methodist Episcopal Church South discontinued services, leaving the Presbyterians congregation, which continued there until the union of the Cumberland with the United Presbyterian group. The congregation refused to go into the United Church, and the building was sold to the community. It is now undenominational, and is used very little except for funerals. The county history gives the church as Methodist Episcopal. The name Euceba, according to county informants, was for an old church on Patterson Creek in West Virginia. The county history (1887), p. 599, gives the name as Eucepa. Both "Eucepa" and "Euceba" are meaningless. The pronunication given in the county suggests, however, that the name was originally and more correctly spelled Eusebia, from the Greek word for piety or reverence. The only Eusebia Church mentioned in the Minutes of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, August, 1936, is one at Maryville, Tennessee. The Church in Tennessee was organized in 1786 by a young missionary from Virginia, named Archibald Scott, who was noted as an authority on Greek and who taught in a Theological School of that early day. The name, according to the present pastor, Reverend Edwin W. Hall, of the Tennessee church, was probably suggested by him, and as the records of the church show, means "Reverence to God." The Reverend Mr. Hall says he has never heard of another church of the name. In the minutes of the 78th meeting of the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church held at Corsicana, Texas, May 21-26, 1908, the name of the Novelty church was spelled Eusebia. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 599; Rev. Samuel Wilkerson; Rev. C.H. Werner; Rev. Joseph M. Garrison; Rev. Edwin W. Hall)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eusebia Church
Description:See Euceba Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius
Description:A post office from 1899; a village close to the northern county line, in Benton Township, on the Middle Fabius River, ten miles north of Edina. It was established about 1887 by the Santa Fe Railroad. Now a country community with a store and a post office. Originally it was locally known as Cunningham's Switch, since it was little more than a switch; so named for Ike Cunningham who managed community cattle shipments. The railroad named the place Motter for a man of that name who erected a boarding house there when the road was being built. When Ike Cunningham moved away from the neighborhood, the people changed the name to Fabius for the Fabius River, by which name it is now known. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 363; Eaton, 182; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1904; ATLAS KNOX 1916; (F) Tom Shirkey; (F) J.P. Johnson; (F) James Delaney; (F) W.J. Taylor; (F) M.J. Ammons)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius School
Description:A schoolhouse in Benton Township. So named for the community store and post office. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius Township
Description:A township in the southeastern corner of the county, with Jeddo to the north, and Bourbon to the west. It was one of the original townships on the organization of the county in 1845. So named for the South Fabius and the Little Fabius rivers which flow through it. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 741, 742; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Feltz's Bridge
Description:A bridge across the North Fork of Salt River in the southwestern part of the county where the State Road crossed the stream. It was built in 1845, the first bridge in the county. So named for the family of Kindred S. Feltz, who owned land at that point. The HISTORY OF N.E. MISSOURI gives the spelling as Phelps, a form which is said to be correct, though the name is found more often as Feltz. It is also known as the "Log Cabin Bridge" and as "Double-Cabin Bridge," for the fact that at the time of the use of the name there was a log cabin or a double cabin near the bridge. The name also occurs as Salt River Bridge for its location. The bridge was somewhat noted during the Civil War. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 666, 667, HIST. LEWIS 1887, 133; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 365, 369; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder; C.R. Fowler)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Forest Springs
Description:A post office from 1886-1899; in the northeastern part of the county in Myrtle Township, twelve miles north of Edina. The site was known for years as Sulphur Springs, for the springs believed to have been discovered around 1835, and regarded as medicinal by Dr. Polonza Conditt of Lewis County. The land was entered in 1838 by W.F. Morris. In April, 1882, it was oficially established as a village by William Johnson of nearby Colony. He started a health resort here, and named it Forest Springs for its location. Though the springs were regarded as of mineral value, the village remained undeveloped, and was later abandoned. (HIST. MARION 1884, 452; HIST. KNOX 1887, 739; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 115; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 83; ATLAS KNOX 1898; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; (F) W.D. Taylor)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fowler Seminary
Description:See Edina Seminary.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fox School
Description:A schoolhouse in Lyon Township. It bears the name of the people living by the school. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Free Cemetery
Description:A cemetery established in 1856 at Edina by the Methodist Episcopal Church South at the time of the erection of their building. It is so known today. The name siginified that people of whatever denomination might be buried there. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 594)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fresh's Mill
Description:A water- mill, saw and grist, on the South Fabius, one mile west of the site of Newark. Established by James Fresh in 1834, and known by his name. James Fresh entered land in what is now Knox in October of 1833, and is said to have been the second bona fide settler in the county, Stephen Cooper being the first. (See Cooper Settlement). The mill stood first upon the northern bank, but had to be removed further down stream as there was insufficient need of water. Never very successful, it was in time abandoned. Efforts were made to revive it by other parties. Later a distillery was operated there for some years. As Fresh's Mill it was said to have been largely responsible for the influx of people in that part of the county. Some of the old timbers of this mill are still there. (HIST. SHELBY 1884, 644; HIST. KNOX 1887, 569; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 362; Shelby 1884, 644; HIST. KNOX 569; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 362; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; MAP MISSOURI 1844, 362; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 362; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Map Missouri 1844; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder; Mrs. Orville Barnett)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fruit Hill School
Description:A schoolhouse in Fabius Township. So named for an orchard on a hill by the schoolhouse. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garnet Branch
Description:A branch which rises in Bourbon Township, Knox County; flowing generally east to join North River in northwestern Bethel Township, Shelby County. So named for the several families of Garnet's who owned the land at one time through which the branch flows. (ATLAS SHELBY 1878; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; (F) Will Turner)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goodland
Description:A post office in 1860, discontinued between 1870 and 1876; to the southwest in Salt River Township, eighteen miles southwest of Edina. Formerly a place of some trade, but extinct by 1887 save as a community name. The Map of Missouri, 1871, gives the spelling as Good Land. It was so named for an early settler of that name. (Sutherland & McEvoy1867; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; ATLAS KNOX 1876; HIST. KNOX 1887, 740; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1861-1878; R.W. Hazelwood; Chas Stauder; (F) Steve Stout)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Pond
Description:A pond in Salt River Township, about six miles west and south of Novelty. So named because of the wild geese sometimes seen there. (ATLAS KNOX 1916; (F) Steve Stout)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenfield
Description:This name is indicated to the north and west of the county. It is found only on the Coltom Map of 1861. Residents say that it was intended for Greensburg. There is a Greenfield given in the index of the New Traveller's Guide, Mitchell, 1850. It appears to have been in this vicinity. (Colton Map odf Missouri, 1861; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green's Mill
Description:A mill southeast of Edina about four and a half or five miles, on the South Fabius. It was so named for its owner. (R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greensburg
Description:A post office since 1860, on the northern county line to the northeast, in Greensburg Township, ten miles north of Edina. It was established by Marion County speculators, entered in 1852, and incorporated in 1859. It never rose much above its condition prior to the Civil War. It was named in honor of James S. Green (1817-1870) Democratic representative from Missouri (1847-1851), and later senator from the state (1857-1861), filling out a term beginning in 1855. The name is occasionally spelled Greensburgh, and occurs as Greenburg on some of the earlier maps. (Sutherland & McEvoy1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; HIST. KNOX 1887, 736; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 83; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1860 BIOG. DIR. AM. CONG.; R.W. Haselwood; (F) Cora Fetters; (F) Ida Wishart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greensburg Township
Description:A township situated in the northwest corner of the county with Benton Township to the east, and Lyon to the south; organized in 1859. It took its name from the village of Greensburg (q.v.). (HIST. KNOX 1887, 741, 742; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harmony Church
Description:Organized as Salem Church, a Methodist Church South, nine miles southeast of Edina. The church house was erected in 1872. The church is still existent. An ideal name. Salem--a Biblical name:--"First being by interpretation King of righteousness, and after that also King of Salem, which is King of Peace." (Heb. 7:2) (HIST. KNOX 1887, 595; R.W. Haselwood; Rev. Earl Woodard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harmony Grove Church
Description:A Baptist church which formerly stood three miles east of Sand Hill in Scotland County where it was known as Sand Hill Church. It was organized before 1842 and is known as the first church in that county. It was later moved into a grove across the line in Knox County and given the name Harmony Grove. An ideal name. (MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934; Mrs. Arla B. Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawkins Branch
Description:A branch in the northern part of Jeddo Township in Knox County, flowing east and south into Lewis County where it joins the Troublesome. So named for the Hawkins family who were large landholders in the vicinity. (ATLAS KNOX 1876; Plat of Monticello)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hazel Dell School
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township. A fanciful name for a location in a little valley. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hazel Springs
Description:Given by the HISTORY OF N.E. MISSOURI as in the northwestern part of the county. This is regarded as an error for Hazelville (q.v.). (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 83; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hazelville
Description:A post office in Knox County from 1898-1904; in the northwest corner on the Scotland-Knox line, in Greensburg Township. It was no more than a country store and post office which stood first in Scotland County where it was a post office from 1886-1897. It was then moved across the line into Knox. So named for the hazel brush that grew abundantly on the treeless plain all around the place. (ATLAS SCOTLAND 1898; ATLAS KNOX, 1898, 1916; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1904-1915; R.W. Haselwood; (F) James Delaney)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hedge City
Description:A post office from 1876-1904; southeast of the center of the county, in northern Bourbon Township, eleven miles from Edina. It was laid out in 1882. The map of 1879 gives Hodge City, but this is in error. So named for the fence of Osage orange, commonly called "hedge" or "bodoc" from the French "bois d' arc," i.e. bow-wood. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 739; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 83; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898; Eaton, 182; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1879; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hedge City School
Description:A country schoolhouse in Bourbon Township, in the little village of Hedge City (q.v.). (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Henry's Mill
Description:A mill on Deer Creek, about three miles southwest of Hurdland; operated by Hugh F. Henry, 1865-1868. ( (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickman Farm
Description:See Plevna.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Howerton School
Description:See Mt. Tabor School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Howerton's Mill
Description:A mill on the South Fabius near Edina; a horse mill, with a pair of buhr stone (mill stones), known as a "corn cracker." It was established soon after 1834, and named for its owner, Tage Howerton. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 666; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 369; 374; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hurdland
Description:A post office from 1876; southwest of the center of Lyon Township, seven miles west of Edina. Established on the Q. M. and P. (Qunicy, Omaha and Kansas City) in 1874; incorporated in 1878. The land is generally classed as swamp land. So named for John Hurd, an Englishman, owner of the land, in June 1872, and surveyed for him by the engineer of the railroad company. The story goes that Mr. Hurd agreed to donate one-half of the township to the railroad company if a station would be established, and no other built within eight miles. The town was laid out on these terms. When the station of Brashear was built in Adair County in violation of the agreement the railroad deeded one-half of its interest back to Mr. Hurd in compensation. (Campbell, 1874; HIST. KNOX 1887, 737, 738; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 376; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916; Eaton, 182; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1877; R.W. Haselwood; (F) Bud Rampey; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hurdland Academy
Description:An academy established at Hurdland in 1882. It was conducted as a private school until the building burned in 1885. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 738)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ingles' Mill
Description:The mill operated by Charles Ingles on the site of Edina in the 1850s, suggesting the name Milltown (q.v.). (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI 365)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ireland
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township. So named for the Irish Settlement in which the building is located. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Island School
Description:A schoolhouse in Myrtle Township. Located on a high ridge surrounded by timber so that it had the appearance of an island rising from the trees. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jeddo
Description:A village on the township line, to the east and north in Jeddo Township; four miles southeast of Knox City (q.v.). In existence by 1836, and regularly laid out prior to the Civil War. By 1872 it was a little town of some inportance, but the railroad built to Edina that year missed Jeddo by two miles. It died rapidly, is long since extinct, and the site of a field. There is no record that it was ever a post office. No information that is authentic can be found concerning the name. One person has said that it was for an early settler in that part of the country, but there is no verification for that statement. It is probably to be condsidered as a stock name, being found also in New York, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Texas. Gannet says that the original Jeddo was the old name for Tokyo, the capital of Japan. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 739; ATLAS KNOX 1876; Gannett; R.W. Haselwood; Chas Stauder; Newton Scofield; (F) James Delaney)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jeddo School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jeddo Township on the site of the old village of Jeddo (q.v.) which long since disappeared; hence the name. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jeddo Township
Description:A township on the eastern boundary line, to the north of Fabius, with Myrtle to the north, and Bee Ridge to the west. Organized in 1859. So named for the village of Jeddo (q.v.). (HIST. KNOX 1887, 741, 742; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898; 1916; R.W. Haselwood; (F) James Delaney)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jesse James School
Description:See Woodland School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jett School
Description:A schoolhouse in Myrtle Township. So named for people in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson Branch
Description:A branch in the southern part of Myrtle Township, flowing generally southwest across the northwest corner of Jeddo Township into Hawkins Branch in northern Jeddo. So named for families living in this vicinity. (ATLAS KNOX 1876; Newton Scofield)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kentucky Colony
Description:See Colony.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kenwood
Description:A post office from 1891; a country store, at one time a village, in the western part of the county on the Santa Fe, north and west of the center of Lyon Township. A village farming center. So named in 1889 by the townsite people of the Santa Fe in honor of a Mr. Kenwood who was connected with the railroad. (ATLAS KNOX 1898, 1916; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1902; R.W. Haselwood; (F) James Delaney)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kiley School
Description:A schoolhouse in Greensburg Township. So named for a family in the district. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kirk School
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township. It bears the name of people by the school. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knox
Description:See Knox City.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knox City
Description:A post office under this name since 1876; a station on the Quincy, Omaha and Kansas City Railroad, in southern Myrtle Township, nine miles east of Edina. It was previously known as Myrtle, an emblem name, symbol of civic authority and victory (Century Dict.). Under this name it is given as a post office in 1870, and is thus indicated on the map as early as 1867. Campbell, 1874, and the Atlas of Knox, 1876, give both names, Knox and Myrtle. Myrtle was one of the most important centers in Knox County in 1872. In that year the town was laid out by agents for the railroad, and named Knox for the county. The town was at that time, and still is, the first station in the county, traveling west. The name Myrtle, however, appears again on the map of 1873. It also appears in 1878 as located on the railroad between Edina and Knox City, obviously a mistake as it occurs thus in no other place. There is further complication in the fact that though the name of Knox was not given the town, according to report, until 1872, Colton indicates it as Knox City in 1857-1861. The name Knox and Knox City continue to occur at various times. Knox recurs in 1877 and 1879, while Knox City seems to appear consistently from 1884. Rand McNally, 1935, gives both names, however, Knox as the name of the town and Knox City as the name of the post office. (Campbell 1874, HIST. KNOX 1887, 737; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 376; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1857; (F) Dr. Ed. Northcutt; (F) Tom Shirkey; (F) J. Hazelwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knox City Baptist Church
Description:A house of worship erected in 1873 at Knox City under the name of Union Church because it was used for services by Methodists, Baptists, Presbyterians, and some members of the Christian Church. The earlier frame building was replaced by stone about 1830. It is used now only by the Baptists. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 600, 602; Rev. Earl Woodard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knox City Consolidated School District
Description:A consolidated school district at Knox City, the only such district in the county. It is a consolidation of Knox City School, Buttermilk (q.v.), and Myrtle (q.v.), all in southern Myrtle Township. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knox Collegiate Institute
Description:See Edina Seminary.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knox County
Description:Knox County is about twenty-five miles south of the Iowa State line and the same distance west of the Mississippi River. It was framed from Scotland County in 1843, though it remained attached to the county "until such time as it should be fully organized." Until the organization of Scotland County in 1841, it had been a part of Lewis County. Knox completed its organization by 1845, at which time it had four townships. Today it has twelve. It is bounded on the north by Scotland County, on the east by Clark and Lewis, on the south by Shelby and Macon, and on the west by Macon and Adair. The first settlers came originally from Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, and counties farther south. The Norwegians had a considerable colony on the headwaters of Black Creek and the North Fork of Salt River. There was an early Irish colony, and a large number of Germans came in. The closest land-office was at Palmyra. Land was not open to government entry until 1840, and the settlers as a consequence resorted to "Tomahawk Claims" (q.v.). The county was settled with startling rapidity, owing to its well-watered, undulating prairie, with its luxuriant growth of grass and ready supply of timber, its water courses ranging from only four to six miles apart. Knox was one of a number of counties in the United States named in honor of General Henry Knox (1750-1806), a Boston book seller, who became Washington's chief of artillery during the Revolutionary War, and served as the first Secretary of War of the United States (1785- 1794). A doughty soldier he is said to have been the chroniclers tell us that he went about the night before the night before the battle of Trenton "tugging at his guns like a Trojan and swearing like a pirate." He was much admired for his prowess. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 555, 556, 570, 572, 740, 741; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 54; Eaton, 182; Davis & Durrie 1876, 387, 388; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Lyon Township, three miles northeast of Hurdland. It stands in a grove. Otherwise the name is ideal. Formerly Payne School for Charles Payne on whose land the building was erected. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; R.W. Haselwood; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Township
Description:A township to the north of Bee Ridge Township, with Benton and Colony to the north, Myrtle to the east, and Lyon to the west. It was organized in 1872. An ideal name. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 741, 742; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Bridge Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the northern part of Liberty Township, and flows generally east into Bridge Creek, joining the same northeast of the center of Myrtle Township. It takes its name from Bridge Creek. (ATLAS KNOX 1876)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Faba
Description:See Big Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Troublesome Creek
Description:A creek rising south of the center of Myrtle Township, leaving the county in the southeast corner of that township, and emptying into the Troublesome in Lewis County. It takes its name from Troublesome Creek. (ATLAS KNOX 1876)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Locust Hill
Description:A post office from 1867-1904; in the southwestern part of the county in northern Salt River Township, twelve miles southeast of Edina. In 1870 when the village was laid out, it was confidently expected the the Missouri and Mississippi Railroad (q.v.) would go through, and that the village would become an important station. It is now extinct though the name continues to be given on maps. So named for the groves of locust trees nearby, and the hill on which the village was located. (Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; ATLAS KNOX 1876; HIST. KNOX 1887, 737; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 83; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1861; (F) Tom Shirkey; (F) Steve Stout)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Locust Hill Church
Description:A Methodist Church five miles northwest of Novelty. So named for its location on a hill and its proximity to the village of the same name. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 599; R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Locust Hill School
Description:A consolidated school on the site of Locust Hill (q.v.), whence the name. A consolidation of Locust Hill School and Dixon School (q.v.). (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Log-cabin Bridge
Description:See Feltz's Bridge.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Branch [1 of 2]
Description:A branch in Bourbon Township, rising north of center, and flowing southeast into the Little Fabius in the same township. So named for early settlers in the vicinity. (ATLAS KNOX 1876; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long Branch [2 of 2]
Description:A short branch in Jeddo Township, flowing generally east into the Troublesome. So named for landowners in the vicinity. (PLAT BOOK; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lookett Lake
Description:A lake in northwestern Salt River Township, now under cultivation. So named for John Lockett who owned the land. (ATLAS KNOX 1916; R.W. Haselwood; (F) J. Hazelwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lost Branch or Lost Creek
Description:A branch which rises in Salt River Township, flowing southeast into North River in the southern part of Bourbon Township. The story goes that in an early day a lost child was found near this stream; hence the name. (ATLAS KNOX 1876; James Harris; W.E. Cottey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lower Church
Description:A "Northern Methodist Church" on the old Newark Road near Jeddo (q.v.). So named because it was south of "Upper Church" (q.v.). (Newton Scofield)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lyon Academy
Description:An academy that opened at Edina in 1866, in the third story of the Pratt building. It lasted but a few years. It took the name of the adjoining township of which this side of Edina was really a part. (See Center Township). (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 373; R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lyon Township
Description:A township on the western border of the county to the south of Greensburg, with Liberty to the east and Shelton to the south. Organized in 1860 and named for Hezekiah Lyon, a former judge of the county court. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 741, 742; ATLAS KNOX. 1876, 1898, 1916)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maiden Kirk Township
Description:An early township in these counties, in existence in 1842 and still recognized in the Court Record of Scotland County in 1844 when judges were selected for the approaching election. The election was to be held in this township at Pratt's Mill (q.v.) which was three miles northwest of Newark in Knox. Fresh's Mill, one mile west of Newark was also in this township. Thus this township must have included the eastern part of Knox County, the latter remaining a part of Scotland County until 1845. There exists no record of the township lines nor reason for the name. The name occurs in the records as two words, but is given in the County History as one word. There is a Kirkmaiden in the southwestern corner of the county of Scotland, which may have suggested the name. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 439; Court Record; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maidenkirk Township
Description:See Maiden Kirk Township
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maple Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Shelton Township. So named for the grove of maple trees in which the building stands. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McQuoid Mill
Description:A water-powered grist and saw mill in 1876 at Millport. It was run by McQuoid and Brother, whence the name. (ATLAS KNOX 1876, 54; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McReynolds School
Description:See Progressive School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Meadow Brook
Description:A little stream in Greensburg Township that runs into the South Fork of the Fabius River. A pretty name given it for its location. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Meadow Brook School
Description:A schoolhouse in Greensburg Township, so named for its location on the little stream known as Meadow Brook (q.v.). It is an offshoot of Pleasant Ridge School (Old Buzzard) and goes by the name also of New Buzzard. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Fabius
Description:See Big Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Milford
Description:See Millport.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mill Town
Description:See Milltown.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller School
Description:A schoolhouse in Greensburg Township. So named for a family. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Million Creek
Description:A creek that traverses the southern part of Jeddo Township in Knox County, flowing through northeast Fabius out of Knox County into Lewis County where it enters Spees Branch (q.v.). It takes its name from an old family in the vicinity. (ATLAS KNOX 1876; PLAT BOOK; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Millport
Description:A post office from 1867-1895, reestablished in 1899-1901; nine miles northeast of Edina in Benton Township. Originally Milford for Cooper's Mill (q.v.), which stood on the site and a ford at this point. In 1858 it was incorporated as a village under the name of Millport for the mills--by that time a water mill and a sawmill. The town is now gone, having been moved over to Rutledge in Scotland County when the Santa Fe was built. Nothing now marks the site but the old Millport Bridge (q.v.). Milford appears on the map as early as 1844. After 1858 the name Milford appears from time to time on the maps. The spelling Milport also appears. From 1878 the name is given as Millport. (Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; HIST. KNOX 1887, 592, 736, 737; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 83, 363; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1844 -1915; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder; (F) W.J. Taylor; (F) James Delaney; (F) J. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Millport Bridge
Description:An old covered bridge built in 1872 over the Middle Fabius on the site of Millport (q.v.), whence the name. The bridge is in a remarkable state of preservation, and is still used. (Chas. Stauder; (F) W.J. Taylor; (F) James Delaney)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Millport School
Description:A schoolhouse in Benton Township. It keeps alive the name of the old town of Millport (q.v.) that moved over to Scotland County long since. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Milltown
Description:A former village; now a part of south Edina. Before the 1850s there was a mill there which gave it the name, "Mill Town." Later the name took the form given above. The first business houses in Edina were really in Milltown. It was the site of a camp during the Civil War. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 678; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 363, 365, 374)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri and Mississippi Railroad
Description:A railroad chartered by a local company in 1865 to run from Macon in the county of that name through Edina in Knox County to the northeast corner of the state. The route proposed was much the same as that proposed for the Alexandria and Bloomington (q.v.). Bonds were issued for the road in 1871, Clark County was surveyed and grading was begun at St. Francisville. Conditions for the building of the road were not fulfilled, the bonds were destroyed and litigation ensued, continuing for some time. The road which was to connect the two rivers, whence the name, was never built. The counties have but recently paid off the last of the indebtedness incurred. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 292-297, 303; HIST. KNOX 1887, 713 ff.; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 367, 368; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moss and Baker Mill
Description:A saw and grist mill at Milltown (q.v.), then known as "Mill Town;" around the 1850s. A successor to an earlier mill destroyed by fire. Known by the name of its owners. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 678; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 363, 374; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mote School
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township. It was known formerly as Pleasant View because of the location on the prairie. Today it is known most frequently as Mote School for the family owning land by the building. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Motter
Description:See Fabius.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Tabor
Description:A Methodist Church South, south of Hurdland by six miles. The church building was erected in 1880. Not operating. William Price gave the land and money for the church. He had been converted at a little church in Kentucky called Mt. Tabor Southern Methodist Church, and for that reason gave this church the same name. For name, cf. above. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 597; R.W. Haselwood; Rev. Earl Woodard; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Vernon School
Description:A schoolhouse in Shelton Township replacing the older Mt. Tabor School (q.v.). It was so named by a "Literary Society" for the home of our first president. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; T.E. Clark; W.E. Cottey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Carmel
Description:A Methodist Church South six miles northwest of Edina. Established around 1870 (See Edina Methodist Episcopal Church South). The church is still existent. A Biblical name:--"Here the prophets gathered, and here Elijah sacrificed unto the Lord, calling down fire from Heaven, and convincing Baal's prophets that the Lord is God." (I Kings 18) (HIST. KNOX 1887, 594; R.W. Haselwood; C.R. Fowler; Rev. Earl Woodard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Pleasant Township
Description:A township organized by the Lewis County Court, July 11, 1836. It included with Benton Township (q.v.) a part of Knox and all of Scotland County, Mt. Pleasant including the west side, ten miles in width, of the old township, and the entire length north and south. It has been reorganized at various times; on its reorganization in 1844 all the territory in Knox County that formerly constituted part of Mt. Pleasant Township was attached to Center Township in that county. It was otherwise changed in the same year when other townships were formed. The present Mt. Pleasant Township occupies the southwest corner of the county of Scotland, with Vest and Jefferson to the north and Tobin to the east. The name is one of location. (HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 417, 438, 439, 44; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 607; Court Record; PLAT BOOK; R. McN., 1935; Lewis C. Moore)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Salem Church
Description:A Baptist Church east of Plevna; organized in 1852. Still existent. For name cf. above. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 91; R.W. Haselwood; Rev. Earl Woodard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Tabor Church
Description:A "Hardshell" Baptist Church, one mile west of the Methodist Mt. Tabor (q.v.), for which it was named. Established in about 1890. It holds services occasionally. (R.W. Haselwood; Rev. Earl Woodard; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Tabor School
Description:A former school six miles southwest of Hurdland. So named for the Mt. Tabor churches in the vicinity. Originally known as the Howerton School for Tage Howerton on whose land the school was built. It was later known as the Clark School for Patrick Clark who at one time lived at the school on the same land. (W.E. Cottey; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Muddy Fork [1 of 2]
Description:A stream in Shelton Township, traversing the western part of the township, flowing south into the North Fork of Salt River in Salt River Township. It is so named for the muddy nature of the water. (ATLAS KNOX 1876; (F) Bud Rampey; (F) Steve Stout)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Muddy Fork [2 of 2]
Description:A post office from 1860-1867; in west central Shelton Township on the Muddy Fork, for which it was named. Now extinct. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Map Missouri 1871; Campbell 1873, 13; (F) Bud Rampey; (F) Steve Stout)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Musser School
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township. So named for Henry Musser on whose farm the building was erected. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Myrtle
Description:See Knox City.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Myrtle School
Description:A schoolhouse in Myrtle Township, about three or four miles north of Knox City. It is in the Knox City Consolidated School District. So named, no doubt, for the township in which it is located. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; (F) Dr. Ed. Northcutt)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Myrtle Township
Description:The township to the north of Jeddo on the eastern boundary line, with Colony to the north and Liberty to the west. It was organized in 1872. Myrtle is an emblem name. The county history says that there is no special reason for bestowing the name on the township; however, since the village of Knox City (q.v.) was known as Myrtle as early as 1867, it seems probable that the township was named for the town. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 741, 742; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 1898, 1916; (F) Tom Shirkey; (F) James Delaney)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nelson School
Description:A schoolhouse in Fabius Township. So named for people in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Buzzard School
Description:See Meadow Brook School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Newark
Description:A post office since 1837; in the southeastern part of the county in eastern Fabius Township, on the Fabius River, twenty miles southeast of Edina. It was founded in 1836 as a business venture, since there was no trading point nearer than Palmyra, and is the oldest town in Knox County. It was incorporated as a village in 1872. When the Quincy, Omaha and Kansas City Railroad did not build Newark way in 1870, the town was left isolated. It was the first important milling town (See Fresh's Mill), but the water failed, and industry declined. As a consequence, Newark never has grown beyond a small village. The name was doubtless borrowed from one of the sixteen other Newarks in the United States, the largest being Newark, New Jersey, settled in 1666; the ultimate source is of course the town of Newark in Nottinghamshire, England. (We may note here that there were New Jersey people in the neighboring county of Shelby, though none in Newark so far as could be ascertained). Formerly the name was often written "New Ark," as it is still pronounced. (Wetmore 1837; Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; HIST. KNOX 1887, 731, 733; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 83, 376; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916, Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD- WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935; Maps Missouri from 1844; (F) Dr. Ed. Northcutt; (F) Al Barnes)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Newark Academy
Description:An academy established at Newark in 1850. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Newark Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church at Newark organized in 1835. It was formerly known as Pleasant Run Church for the branch of that name. (q.v.) (MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder; Rev. Adolph Vollmer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Fork North River
Description:A stream that rises south and east over the border in Shelton Township; it joins the South Fork in northeastern Salt River Township to form North River, for which it is named. (ATLAS KNOX 1876)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Fork Salt River
Description:A stream which, rising in southern Schuyler County, flows southeast through eastern Adair County, across the southwest corner of Knox County, and enters Shelby on the northwest. It traverses the county somewhat southwest of center to the southeastern corner. Thence it enters Monroe County and finally Ralls County where it joins the main stream of Salt River, whence it takes its name. The names Salt River and North Fork of Salt River seem both to be used for the stream. (Mitchell Map 1832; Hutawa 1844; Colton 1858-1861; SOIL SURVEY, Shelby 1904; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North River
Description:A river formed by the union of North and South Forks of North River between Warren Township and Union Township, near their eastern boundaries. It flows east and slightly north to enter the Mississippi River between Fabius and Liberty Township, less than one- half mile above the mouth of South River (q.v.), and about ten miles north of Hannibal. The North Fork of North River rises Knox County, in northeastern Salt River Township, flowing southeast to enter Shelby County in Behtel Township and on through Black Creek and Tiger Fork Townships into Marion County till it unites with the South Fork. The South Fork of North River is much shorter, rising in southwestern Warren Township of Marion County, from the confluence of three short branches known as East Branch, Middle Branch, and West Branch, and flowing northeast to unite with the North Fork. North River with its two forks is named North Two Rivers, in distinction from South Two Rivers, used for the present South River, on the maps for 1832, 1866, 1867, 1869, and 1870, but the present simpler names appear as early as 1861 and after 1870 becomes fixed. At an earlier period, first on the map for 1822, North and South Rivers appear merely as Two Rivers, the country lying in between them being known as the Two River Country. The original name of the stream was probably the Jefferon River, although the identification is not absolutely certain. The Jefferon was a well-known river of northeast Missouri before the war of 1812. It was used as the boundary between the United States and the Sac and Fox Indians in the treaty made at St. Louis on November 3, 1804, the line being traced in the following words: "Beginning at a point in the Missouri River opposite to the mouth of the Gasconade River; thence on a direct course so as to strike the River Jeffreon, at a distance of thirty miles from its mouth, and down said Jeffreon to the Mississippi River" (See American State Papers, Indian Affairs, Vol. I, No. 107, p. 693). The treaty was reestablished after the War, on September 13, 1815, in the same terms. With the spelling Jeffrion, it appears in the legal records of the Bouvet-Gratiot litigation (Am. State Papers, Vol. V, pp. 791-2), and again in an Act passed by the General Assembly of the Territory of Missouri in 1814, in which the "river Jeffrion" is used as the boundary of the newly constituted county of St. Charles. As Jeffrion it appears in Morse's UNIVERSAL GAZETTEER in 1821. Beck refers to it in his Gazetteer (1823) as Geoffrions, and in the HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND (1887) it appears for the last time under the spelling Geoffrions, and in the HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX and Scotland, (1887) it appears for the last time under the spelling Geoffrion. Meanwhile a very disturbing element in the chequered orthographical history of the name was introduced by Pike. In the published journals of his Expedition of 1805, he mentions what is obviously the same river several times, but with three different and much distorted spellings. It what is known as the "Early Text" or preliminary publication of 1807 it appears (p. 4) as the Jauflione, and the same spelling is used on the map included with the "regular edition" of 1810. But in the text of the 1810 edition it appears as the "river Jaustioni, which is our boundary between the Sac nation, and the United states on the west side of the Mississippi" (App. to Part I, Document No. 18) (See Coues ed. of 1895, I.290). On the next page Pike adds a remark which helps to locate the stream: "About seven miles below the Jaustioni a Frenchman is settled on the west shore. He is married to a woman of the Sac nation, and lives by a little cultivation and the Indian trade." This Frenchman is mentioned in the Journal for August16, 1805, in a way that enables us to fix his home as about one mile below the present site of Hannibal (q.v.). On a still later page in "Document No. 18" (Coues ed., I.339), the boundary river takes on the spelling Jauflioni. All students of Pike's famous Journal have remarked upon the utter confusion of his spellings of Indian, French, and Spanish names. The publisher of the original edition prefaced it with a note of apology, declaring that "he very much doubts whether any book ever went to press under so many disadvantages as this one;" and his latest editor Coues sums it up in the words (I.xxxvii): "Pike's pen proved mightier than his sword in putting bookmaking to confusion and editors to despair...He seems never to have spelled the same name twice in the same way." Some excuses may be found in the many vicissitudes which the precious manuscript underwent during its 4000 miles of travel. In the first letter written by Pike after he has escaped from his Spanish captivity to United States territory, he says: "My papers being in such a mutilated and deranged state, it will require some time to arrange them..at Washington I can obtain some necessary assistance, as it would take one person a great length of time to make copies." It would seem from this that what finally reached the printer was a copy of a copy, perhaps made by some ignorant or careless transcriber; Pike never corrected the proofs, and the original manuscripts have disappeared. It is therefore quite fair to assume that what the brave explorer originally wrote down as the name of the little Missouri stream was a good deal nearer to the original Jeffreon than appears in the published work. Such a spelling as "Jeofrions" for example, in Pike's exeorable handwriting, might very easily have been interpreted as "Jauflioni" or "Jaustioni." This mare's nest of military orthography produced by Pike would be unimportant if it were not for its after-effects. To it was probably due the disuse of a good old French river name, and even an uncertainty of its identification,. No such result would have been produced, in all likelihood,, if it had not been for the break in tradition cause by the War of 1812. During the struggle, white Americans were practically driven out of northeast Missouri altogether. When they returned, the living tie between the original names and the places they denoted had been interrupted, and the old names had largely been forgotten. But Pike was the hero of the day, and his EXPEDITION was enormously popular throughout the Middle West. His bizarre versions of the old river name actually began to be adopted. Beck in his Gazetteer (1823), though he knows the old form Geoffrione, gives also the form Jaufflione, and even adds to the confusion by suggesting that the river ought to be called Javelot, for etymological reasons. Beck's work is full of wild etymologies, and his curious argument here deserves to be quoted: "Javelot is a French word, signifying war-club, and doubtless the Indian word was of the same signification." Fortunately his suggestion did not find favor. Pike's other invention, Jaustioni, was preferred in Brown's GAZETTEER in 1817, and was passed on to Cramer's widely NAVIGATOR (p. 221) in 1824. In the form Justioni it was even continued in to later steamboat manuals, the WATER PILOT (1837) of Cummings (p. 129) and the RIVER GUIDE (1871) of James (p. 9). But Pike's names are clumsy and uncouth, and it is not surprising that the incoherent state of things was finally remedied by discarding all the forms of the old names and replacing them by the colorless Two Rivers, North Two Rivers, or North River. Even the identity of the old Geffreon with the modern North River has been doubted, but the argument for it given by Coues (Footnote 14 in his ed. of Pike, I. 10) seems conclusive. Coues admits that from Pike's references alone it would be impossible to decide whether his "Jaustioni" or "Jauflione" was North River or South River just below it, or the Fabius just above it. But the terms of the treaty of 1804 seem to rule out South River, which is hardly thirty miles long, whereas the treaty describes the Geffreon as over thirty miles. Identification with the Fabius, though supported by Holcombe in his HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX AND SCOTLAND, is excluded by the fact that Beck, Cummings, and Cramer give them as separate streams. For the same reason the identification made by Violette of the boundary stream as "the river Jeffron or Salt River" is clearly impossible. Finally Coues affirms that a map in the Bureau of Indian Affairs at Washington in connection with the treaty makes the identity of Geffreon and North River absolutely certain. The recent names Two Rivers, North Two Rivers, and North River, as well as North Fork and South Fork, East, Middle, and West Branch, are obviously names of position and direction. The origin of the old name Geoffreon is unknown, but it seems likely that it was one of the large group of Missouri River names derived from forgotten French hunters or voyageurs (cf. under Fabius River above). It is just possible that the Frenchman who gave his name to the stream was the well known Godfrey Le Seur, who Holcombe asserts (p. 226) was trading near the present site of La Grange in 1795, and whom he thinks (p. 25) perhaps the same as the Frenchman mentioned by Pike in 1805 as living near the present site of Hannibal (q.v.). His last name has certainly survived in the name Le Seur (q.v.) in Lewis County. Conceivably his first name in the French form Geoffreon or Jeffreon may have become attached to the principal stream of the county in which he operated. For a similar use of the first name cf. Riviere Xenon, named for Governor Xenon Trudeau, Mine a Joe, etc. Professor John Francis McDermott has suggested in his edition of Brackenridge that the James River, frequently written Riviere a Jacques, was named for Jacques d'Eglise. But the identification must remain a mere conjecture until more and better documentary evidence about Godfrey Le Seur becomes available. (HIST. MARION, 1884; HIST. LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, and SCOTLAND, 1887; Atlas Marion, 1913, Shelby, 1878, Knox, 1876 and 1898; Maps Missouri 1822 ff.; Gazetteers and River Guides, Beck, 1823, Cummings, 1837,and James, 1871; Pike's Expedition, ed. Coues, 1898; Acts Passed by the General Assembly of the Territory of Missouri, 1817; Am. State Papers)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Two Rivers
Description:See North River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Union Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the southwest part of the county, 1857-1867. There is no record of its ever having a meeting house. It may have received its name from the fact that it was north of the well-known Little Union Baptist Church in Marion County. (MIN. BETHEL, BAPT. ASSOC, 1934; Rev. Adolph Vollmer)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Novelty
Description:A post office from 1860; to the northeast in Salt River Township, twelve miles south of Edina. It was laid out in 1857. Long a well-known trading point. So named by the owner of the first store, a Dr. Pendry, a very eccentric man, who as a whim named the place for the assortment of merchandise with which his store was stocked. The place is on a hill, and the first store had a flag pole on it to serve as a guide to the store. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; HIST. KNOX 1887, 672, 739; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 83, 376; ATLAS KNOX, 1874, 1898, 1916; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1861; R.W. Haselwood; (F) Steve Stout; (F) Bud Rampay)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Ridge
Description:An elevation in the northeastern part of the county, in the southwest corner of Colony Township. So named for the white oak trees in the elevation. (Maps Missouri 1857-1861; R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oaklawn College
Description:A college started in the village of Novelty in 1876, in the upper hall of the public school building. It was later moved to Hurdland, where buildings were erected, consisting of a boarding house, two dormitories, and the main college building. It went out of existence in the 1890s. So named for its rolling blue grass lawn, and the large forest oaks which shaded it. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 672; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 374; (F) Steve Stout)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oklahoma School
Description:A schoolhouse in Bee Ridge Township. It was located on the day of the race for land in Oklahoma, April 22, 1889; hence the name. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; R.W. Haselwood; INTERN. CYC)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Brick Church
Description:See St. Joseph Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Buzzard
Description:See Pleasant Ridge School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Buzzard Glory
Description:See Pleasant Ridge School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Log Church
Description:See St. Joseph Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old St. Joseph's
Description:See St. Joseph Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Owl Creek [1 of 2]
Description:See Plevna.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Owl Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A creek that traverses Bourbon Township, rising near the northwest corner and flowing into North River in the southeast. So named for the number of owls heard by early settlers along the stream. (ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898; (F) Tom Shirkey; (F) Steve Stout)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Payne School
Description:See Liberty Grove School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perry School
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township. It is so known for many people of that name in the vicinity. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pinkston School
Description:A schoolhouse in Shelton Township, three miles southwest of Hurdland. So named for the family on whose land the schoolhouse is built. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Ridge Cemetery
Description:A cemetery so named for its location near Pleasant Ridge Church (q.v.). Formerly known as the Slocum Cemetery for the man who donated land for the purpose. (Mrs. Orville M. Barnett; W.E. Cottey; Judge F.N. Slocum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Ridge Church
Description:A Christian Church formerly meeting in Pleasant Ridge Schoolhouse, whence the name. (Mrs. Orville M. Barnett; W.E. Cottey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Ridge School
Description:A schoolhouse in Greenberg Township so named for its location on a hill. Church services and Sunday School were held here for years by the Christians, Methodists, and Baptists. The schoolhouse is still known as "Old Buzzard," a humorus name given it because the location was frequented by buzzards in the past. It was given the name "Buzzards Glory" by a change remark made on the completion of the building when a name was sought, and an onlooker saw a buzzard in the sky, and was known in the past for miles under the name of "Old Buzzard Glory." (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; Mrs. Orville M. Barnett; W.E. Cottey; Jdge F.M. Slocum)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Run
Description:A small branch south of Bee Ridge in the southern part of the county. A name given for its location. (R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Run Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Church group, South, holding meetings in the 1880s, in Pleasant Run Schoolhouse, whence the name, three miles north of Novelty. It no longer exists. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 597;R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Run Church [2 of 2]
Description:See Newark Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Run School
Description:See Coburn School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:A schoolhouse in Lyon Township. It is so named for its location in a little valley. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant View School
Description:See Mote School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plevna
Description:A post office under this name from 1886; previous to 1877, the village was known as Owl Creek for the stream nearby, and appears under this name as a post office in 1874 and 1876. The name Owl Creek appears on the 1877 map; both names are given on the map of 1879, but on later maps only Plevna appears. In 1879 Plevna was locally known as Hickman Farm for the postmaster who was both postmaster and farmer. The village is in the southern part of Edina. In was laid out in 1877, and Eaton says was named for the Bulgarian town of Plevina where the Russians defeated the Turks in that year after a siege of 143 days. People in the county ascribe the name to John Taylor, nicknamed "Plevna," who started the village from Owl Creek Post Office. Both statements may be correct; the nickname may for some reason have been given first to the name and then through him to his town. (Campell 1874; Postal Guide; Polk 1879; Eaton, 182; Maps Missouri from 1877; R.W. Haselwood; (F) Tom Shirkey; (F) Steve Stout)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plevna Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:A Methodist Church that originally went by the name of Walnut Grove. At that time it stood seven miles southeast of Novelty in a grove of walnut trees; hence the name. It has since been moved into Plevna (q.v.). (HIST. KNOX 1887, 599; R.W. Haselwood; Rev. Earl Woodard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plum Branch
Description:A branch which rises in northern Greenburg Township, flowing south into the North Fork of the South Fabius. So named for the many wild plums in the vicinity. Formerly known as Bruce's Creek for an early settler. (Maps Missouri, 1858-1861; ATLAS KNOX 1916; PLAT BOOK; C.E. Watkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Possum Run
Description:A little stream that runs into Coon Branch (q.v.) five miles south of Edina. So named for the possums found in the vicinity. (C.R. Fowler)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie View School
Description:A schoolhouse in Shelton Township. It stands on a wide prairie; hence the name. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pratt's Mill
Description:A mill on the South Fabius in Bee Ridge Township, three miles northwest of Newark; owned and operated by Judge Virgil Pratt, a New Yorker and one of the first judges of the county court of Knox. In operation by 1840. (HIST SHELBY 1884, 660; HIST. SHELBY 1911, 34; HIST. KNOX 1887, 557, 572; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 361; Map Missouri, 1844)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Progressive School
Description:A schoolhouse in Colony Township. Formerly known as the McReynolds School for the owner of the land on which the building stood. It was then moved to the center of the district and the present name was given it. The name is ideal. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reddish Branch
Description:A branch which rises southeast of the center of Myrtle Township, Knox County, flowing generally easterly into Lewis County, where it enters Grassy Creek. For name cf. Reddish Township. (ATLAS KNOX 1876; ATLAS LEWIS 1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rhoades School
Description:A schoolhouse in Bourbon Township. So named for people in the neighborhhod. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rimer School
Description:A schoolhouse in Shelton Township. So named for people living by the school. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Creek
Description:A creek that lies in the southern part of Lyon Township, flowing southeast into Liberty Township, where it joins the South Fabius, just south of Edina. So named for its rocky bottom. (ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898; (F) James Delaney)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Creek Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Baptist Church on Rock Creek, about two or three miles east of Hurdland; now extinct. It took its name from the creek. ( (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Creek Church [2 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Church South on Rock Creek, three miles east of Hurdland. It was organized about 1877; the church building was dedicated in 1880. It took its name from the Rock Creek Baptist Church, near the site of which it stands. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 595; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Creek School
Description:A schoolhouse in Lyon Township, two and a half miles east of Hurdland. A very old school. So named for Rock Creek on which it is located. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ross School
Description:A schoolhouse in Fabius Township. So named for a family in the district. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rourke School
Description:A schoolhouse in Bee Ridge Township. So named for people in the district. The pronunication is distinctly in two syllables. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rule School
Description:A schoolhouse in Benton Township. It is a familiar name in the neighborhood, borne by several families. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sailing Branch
Description:A branch which rises in the western part of Salt River Township somewhat south of the center, and flows southeast into the North Fork of Salt River. The Knox Atlas 1916, gives Saling, an incorrect spelling. So named for a family living along the branch. (ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916; R.W. Haselwood; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem Church
Description:See Harmony Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salt River Bridge
Description:See Feltz's Bridge.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salt River Township
Description:The township in the lower southwest corner of the county, with Shelton Township to the north and Bourbon to the east, one of the four original townships in 1845. So named for the North Fork of Salt River which flows through the township. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 741, 742; ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898, 1916; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Creek
Description:A creek which rises in the vicinity of Sand Hill, Scotland County, whence the name. It flows into the South Fabius in the southeastern part of the county. (Map Missouri 1859; J.W. Ennis; Orville M. Barnett)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Hill Church
Description:See Harmony Grove Church, Knox.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sharp School
Description:A schoolhouse in Shelton Township. So named for people in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelbyville Northwestern
Description:A extension of the Shelby County Railroad from Shelbyville to the northwest through Keller Switch, Leonard, and Cherry Box, to Novelty in Knox County; hence the name. The road is in operation today, used only, however, to carry the mail. It is in the hands of the reciever. It is owned by the county. (SHELBY COUNTY HERALD July 31, 1935; David Morgan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shelton Township
Description:A township on the western county line, with Lyon Township to the north, Bee Ridge to the east, and Salt River Township to the south. Organized in 1845, as one of the original townships. So named for Medley Shelton, an old-time county judge. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 740-742; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 1898, 1916; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Short's Well
Description:A camping ground north of Sulphur Springs (q.v.) noted during the Civil War as the site of Confederate troops. So named for "old man Short's," a local character. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 115, 125; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 82; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slocum Cemetery
Description:See Pleasant Ridge Cemetery.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Branch Coon Creek
Description:A branch in Shelton Township, rising east of center and somewhat north and flowing northeast into Coon Creek from which it takes its name. (ATLAS KNOX 1876)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Fabius Bridge
Description:The first bridge in the county, built in 1845 across the South Fabius near Fresh's Mill (q.v.). It took its name from the stream. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 666; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 369; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Fork of North Fabius
Description:A name given around 1836 to the Middle Fabius, owing to the location of that river. (See Fabius River) (HIST. LEWIS 1887, 48)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Fork of the Middle Fabius
Description:See Big Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Andrew's School
Description:At Clover Bottom in the southwest part of St. John's Township. Doubtless named, directly or indirectly, for the Apostle. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 343; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., map)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph Church
Description:St. Joseph Parish is one of the oldest Catholic congregations in northeast Missouri. The first church of logs, known as the "Old Log Church," was commenced in 1843. Two-thirds of all the men in the county assisted in the raising, with no attention to religious preference. Peter Early, the first Treasurer of the county and later Senator Early, went on foot through Kentucky and Ohio begging money enough to put in a floor and glass in the building. The church was completed in 1844. "The Old Log Church" was succeeded in 1857 by the "Old Brick Church," for which they burned their own brick. Then it became known as "Old St. Joseph's." The present St. Joseph Church was built in 1873. It is known as one the largest Catholic churches in northeast Missouri, and one of the most beautiful. The parish is proud of the pulpit, all native land, hand hewn, and beautifully carved. For name cf. above. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 54, 375, 615; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 375; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 53)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph's Academy
Description:An academy at Edina for young ladies; controlled by the Sisters of Loretto (See St. Joseph's Convent). It was established by 1865 by the building of the convent. It was known as a first class boading school, but it gave way about twenty years ago to the modern parochial school. (See St. Joseph's School). (HIST. KNOX 1887, 615; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 53)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph's College
Description:A college established at Edina in 1883 by St. Joseph Church (q.v.). It was hoped on its establishment that the Christian Brothers would take charge of the college, but this did not materialize, and the college gave way to the parochial school. (See St. Joseph's School). (HIST. KNOX 1887, 615, 616)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph's Convent
Description:A Convent of the Sisters of Loretto, formerly so known at Edina; under the tutelage of St. Joseph of St. Joseph Chuch. (q.v.). The convent was built in 1860 by Peter Early out of his own means. The Sisters conduct the parochial school. Sisters of Lorreto; a congregation of nuns founded by May Teresa Ball, near Dublin, Ireland, in 1822. Called also Ladies of Lorreto; sisters who devote themselves to the cause of education and the care of destitute orphans. Lorreto, from Loretto, a city in Italy famous for its Holy House, said to be that in which Jesus lived, brought by angels from Nazareth. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 615; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 375; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 53; MURRAY DICT.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph's Parish School for Boys
Description:A parochial school for boys established at Edina from 1876. It gave way about years ago to the modern parochial school. (See St. Joseph's School) (ATLAS KNOX 1876, 53)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Joseph's School
Description:A parochial school at Edina named for the parish; a grade school and a first-class high school with college standing. It has been established for about twenty years. Instruction is given by the Sister's of St. Joseph's Convent (q.v.). (R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sulphur Springs
Description:See Forest Springs.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sweet Oak Branch
Description:A branch rising in southeastern Jeddo Township, flowing northeast, and entering Troublesome Creek on the eastern border of Jeddo Township a little south of center. So named for the sweet oak trees along its banks. (ATLAS KNOX, 1876; (F) J. Hazelwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sweet Oak Christian Church
Description:A Christian Church on Sweet Oak Branch (q.v.), whence its name. It does not exist today. (HIST. KNOX (1887), 601; C.R. Fowler)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sweet Oak School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jeddo Township. So named for the sweet oak trees in the vicinity. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor School
Description:A schoolhouse in Bourbon Township. It bears a family name. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Branch
Description:See Democrat Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Branch
Description:See Big Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Fork
Description:See Big Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Store
Description:A post office from 1853-1867 102 miles north by east of Jefferson City, as given by Sutherland and McEvoy. Nothing was discovered concerning the name except that the Taylor family were early settlers prominent in the county. (See Democrat Creek) (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; C.R. Fowler)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Lord's Bottom
Description:A common name given by old settlers to the beautiful expanse of bottom land adjoining Edina on the west. From the height of which Edina stands one can look over the country to the west for miles. It is a rich as well as a beautiful reach of countryside, whence the name. (Mrs. Orville M. Barnett)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Santa Fe Railroad
Description:See Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thrasher's Mill
Description:A mill established on the South Fabius near the site of the older Fresh's Mill (q.v.). It was in operation during the Civil War. So named for its owner. (Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tomahawk Claims
Description:Previous to 1840, the natives, pledging mutual protection, formed an association, with constitution and by-laws recording the boundary of each claim in a book kept by John Black. They blazed on the trees the limits of their land with an axe or tomahawk; hence the name. There is no record of "claim jumping." (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 363)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Troublesome Creek
Description:A stream which rises in Schyuler County in northern Missouri, and flows in a southeasterly direction through Knox and Lewis counties, entering Marion at the northwest corner, and emptying into South Fabius in the northern part of the county. Hunters gave it the name for the fact that when other streams were tranquil, this stream was raging after a shower and often out of its banks. Originally it was known as "Bridge Creek" for the reason that when raging it afforded hunters a rough crossing. Campbell in 1874 gives the name Troublesome. (Campbell 1874; HIST. MARION 1884, 748)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Two Mile Branch
Description:A branch to the northwest in Salt River Township, flowing southeast to join the North Fork of Salt River somewhat southwest of the center of the township. It may have been so named because it was two miles from Locust Hill (q.v.). (ATLAS KNOX (1876); C.E. Fowler)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Church
Description:See Knox City Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upper Church
Description:A Southern Methodist Church on the old Newark Road near Jeddo (q.v.). So named because it was north of "Lower Church" (q.v.). (Newton Scofield)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Van Horn School
Description:A schoolhouse in Shelton Township. It bears the name of people in the district. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Van Norman Mill
Description:First carding mill in the vicinity, at Edina, around the 1850s; operated by tread wheels. It was succeeded by the Winterbottom Woolen Mill (q.v.). So named for its owner. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 374; Chas. Stauder)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vice School
Description:A schoolhouse in Liberty Township. It bears a family name. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walnut Grove Christian Church
Description:A Christian Church that stood close to Walnut Grove Methodist Episcopal Church in the same grove; hence the name. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 601; R.W. Haselwood)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walnut Grove Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:See Plevna Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Washington School (Colored) [2 of 2]
Description:A school at Edina under the charge of the city superintendent of schools. It has been established for a long period. In 1935-1936, there were but seven in attendance. Schools for negroes are named frequently for Lincoln, Douglas, or Washington. (ATLAS KNOX (1876), 54; Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Washington School [1 of 2]
Description:A schoolhouse in Salt River Township. Perhaps named for George Washington. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wesley Chapel
Description:The First Methodist Church South in the county; near Colony around 1846 or 1847. The first church building was erected in 1847, of logs, and given the name as indicated. It is now extinct. So named for John Wesley (1703-1791), founder of Methodism. An English divine, he came to this country as a young man, and here laid, as he wrote in 1781, the first rudiments of the Methodist societies. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 592, 593, 598; INTERN CYC.; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wheeler's Mill
Description:A mill on the Little Fabius near Dennis Mill (q.v.); operated by Chas. Wheeler about 1867 or 1868. ( (F) Thomas Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Oak School
Description:A schoolhouse in Myrtle Township. So named for the white oak trees close to the building. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wiley Log
Description:The first Methodist Church in the county, established in 1851 in the Wiley Settlement (q.v.). It was also used as a schoolhouse. It is customarily referred to merely as the "Wiley Log." The first church house was of logs; hence the name. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 597; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 53; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wiley Settlement
Description:A family settlement seven miles southwest of Edina, in Shelton Township; established in 1851. Named for the family. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 597; ATLAS KNOX 1876, 53; (F) Tom Shirkey)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Winterbottom Woolen Mill
Description:A successor to the Van Norman Mill (q.v.), at Edina, operating there during the Civil War. It was moved to Denver about 1880. So named for its owner. It went also under the name of Edina Woolen Factory. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 374; Chas. Stauder; Mrs. Orville M. Barnett)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wolf Branch
Description:A branch on the western border of Myrtle Township, flowing to the northeast to join Little Bridge Creek. So named for the wolves in that part of the county in early days. (ATLAS KNOX, 1876, 1898; (F) Dr. Ed. Northcutt)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Woodland School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jeddo Township, so named for its location. It is still a wild place, suggestive of outlaws, and for this reason is sometimes humorously referred to as the Jesse James School. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Woodville
Description:A name occurring in the southwestern part of Salt River Township on the county line to the south. Probably topographical. (Maps Missouri, 1857-1861)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda Baptist Association
Description:An association of Baptist churches in Clark, Lewis, and the eastern part of Knox Counties. (See Bethel Baptist Association). The association was ninety-two years old in 1937 and met in the Providence Baptist Church (q.v.) in Williamstown, Lewis County. The association on organization took the name of the Wyaconda Rivers that traverse the two counties of Clark and Lewis. (MIN. WYACONDA BAPT. ASSOC., 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Yankee Street
Description:A road in Jeddo Township, two miles east of the Bee Ridge Schoolhouse (q.v.), along which lives a straggling community. It resembles a country village street in early days. It gained its name of "Yankee" from the fact that three sisters with their families came in from Connecticut, and settled in this neighborhood on this road. All three had married Yankees, each of whom was known familiarly by this title. (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz; Newton Scofield)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Yankee Street School
Description:A schoolhouse in northern Jeddo Township. So named for its location on Yankee Street, (q.v.). (Mrs. Anna L. Swartz)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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