Howell County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Adams Graveyard
Description:See White Church near Pottersville.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Adams Improvement
Description:A Mr. Adams took land at the present site of West Plains in 1839, but sold the next year to Josiah Howell. (See Town Spring)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Adams School
Description:One of the older schools, six miles southeast of West Plains, with which it was consolidated. Three brothers, James, Wesley, and George Adams, settled in the community probably before the Civil War, and the school site was given by James Adams. (T.J. Whitmire; H. Chapin; Mr. & Mrs. Ira May)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Albina
Description:An early post office kept by Albin Perkins in his home one and a half miles south of the site of Pomona. Named coined from Mr. Perkins' Christian name. Later a Mr. Harris kept it near Rudville School (q.v.) until Olden (q.v.) was established, when it was moved to that village. Mr. Kinion says the post office was established as early as 1867, for when her father, Newton C. Epps, moved to the community in that year, they got their mail at Albina once a week. (Campbell GAZ. MISSOURI (1873) 257; Polk (1876) 12; Polk (1883) 84; Mrs. Mary Wadley; Mrs. Nancy Kinion)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Alexander School
Description:In Myatt Township, six miles east of Lanton. A family of that name lived there. (T.J. Whitmire; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Alice Spring
Description:In Benton Township, southwest of Bly near the county line and Alice Mines, later Amyx Mines, in Ozark County from which it took its name. Two acres, including the spring, were purchased by the mining company to get water for the operation of the mines. (Dr. M.C. Amyx)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Amy [1 of 2]
Description:A post office moved to Hocamo (q.v.) in 1932, was established by Dr. James Black and kept in a store on his farm one and a half miles northeast of the present site of Amy until 1903, when it was removed to the home of Mrs. Rebecca Gill for a short time before the Carter Store of Amy took charge of the mail. Dr. Black, district postmaster, suggested the name for his daughter. (Postal Guide 1892-193; Mrs. Rebecca Gill; T.J. Whitmire)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Amy [2 of 2]
Description:A small village in Benton Township, named for the earlier post office (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Anderson Knob
Description:One of the highest elevations in the county, on land now owned by John T. Woodruff of Springfield, Missouri. Formerly owned by S.A. Anderson, a banker from Iowa who bought eighty acres of land just east of Siloam Springs. (Mr. & Mrs. J. Duffy)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Andrew Cave
Description:A small cave near the Turner School (q.v.). It took the name of Andrew Stubbs, who lived there and owned the small farm. (J. Collins; D.C. Turner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Andrews Branch
Description:Leads into Warm Fork, east of West Plains. Henry Andrews of Indiana homesteaded on the stream. (N.J. Andrews)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Annie Hollow
Description:"Aunt Annie" Clinton, whose maiden name was Collins, lived for some years after the Civil War, at the head of the hollow which leads into Dry Creek. (Mr. & Mrs. Levi Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Antioch Christian Church
Description:In western Sisson Township, built about 1894. Formerly services had been held in homes and brush arbors. Bitter controversy arose over the location of a site, and two factions developed with the names "Buck Snort" and "Dishrag." Eventually a compromies was effected, but "Buck Snort" remained for some time the nickname for Antioch Church. Antioch is a city of Syria, where the disciples were first called Christians. It is a stock name for churches. (Mrs. E.O. Bess; W.T. Modrel; J.N. Barnett; D.S. Goyer; ACTS 11:26)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Arditta
Description:A post office established in 1903 and kept first by Mr. John W. Cox in his store at the head of Vaughn Hollow, now on Highway 80. The store passed to various owners, but the post office was discontinued in 1934. Mr. Cox explains that several names were sent in by the community, but the postal authorities disregarded all of them and named it Arditta. No one seems to know why this name was chosen. (D.W. Epley; Wm. Harper; Jno. W. Cox; Postal Guide 1909-1932)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Arthur's Service Station
Description:On Highway 60, one and a half miles west of Mountain View. Built by William Arthur, manager of the Chevrolet and real estate business in Mountain View, in 1931. Now managed by his son Lyle Arthur. (William Arthur)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ashworth
Description:A discontinued post office northeast of Moody (q.v.). Named for Dr. James Ashworth, a landowner and resident of the community for over forty years. He came originally from England at the age of twenty. Found on 1895 map. (Postal Guide 1897; Mr. & Mrs. Ira May; H. Chapin; D.W. Epley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Aung Cindy Spring
Description:Near Lost Spring School, it is one source of Elkhorn Creek. Named for Mrs. Lucinda Matney, now (1934) ninety-one years of age, known in the community as "Aunt Cindy," whose husband Solomon Matney homesteaded the farm in 1870. (Mrs. Dora Hoglen; Mrs. Lucindy Matney)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Baker Community
Description:In northeastern Benton Township near South Fork. A famous place for sports some years after the Civil War. Smalley Baker, a lover of horses, had a large farm and race track. (C. Vaughn; D.W. Epley; Mrs. Rebecca Gill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Baldridge Serve Station
Description:Established in 1925, two and a half miles southeast of Willow Springs at the junction of highways 60 and 62, by Mrs. Stella Baldridge. Operated by Mrs. Wade Baldridge. The cafe and cabins were destroyed by a tornado in 1937 but soon rebuilt. (Mrs. Wade Baldridge)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ball Spring
Description:In South Fork Township, on land entered by Robert E. Ball of North Carolina before the Civil War. Now a prominent picnic ground for the community. The old grist mill nearby on Bay Creek was washed away about twenty-seven years ago. For several years Ed. Carr operated a saloon there, and the cotton gin was in operation for a few years. All is gone now. (Mrs. Dora Hoglen; C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ball's Mill
Description:See Ball Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barn Hollow
Description:In northwestern Goldsberry Township, leading into Jack's Fork. During the Civil War, a Mr. Roberts had the best farm, with several log barns, in the community. Mr. Thomas explains, as has been mentioned by others, that the valleys were practically barren of timber during the early days. "Barn" may have originated from the presence of the large buildings, but I judge the name is a mispronunciation of "Barren." "Uncle Dick" Smith lived in the hollow known by this name when Isaac Winningham came to Panther Hollow in 1852 or 1853, when it became known also as Winningham Hollow for Isaac Winningham who bought forty acres from Richard Smith and homesteaded 160 acres in 1869. (Geo. W. Winningham; L. Thomas; J.N. Barnett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barnett Cemetery
Description:See Barnett School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barnett Church
Description:See New Hope Church and Barnett School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barnett School
Description:In Sisson Township, four miles south of Peace Valley post office (q.v.). Established in 1874 in a small log building where subscription schools had previously been taught. The land was donated by Robert Sharp, and the name was given for a very highly respected citizen living half a mile away, Nathaniel Barnett, a pre-war pioneer of Gumter Valley, who was a Baptist minister. He represented the county in the legislature in 1876. Barnett Cemetery near the school was started during the Civil War. An unknown Union soldier became ill and died in the community. Mrs. Mary Cunningham, two other women, and "Uncle Buck" Gunter, then a boy of fourteen years, wrapped the body in blankets and buried it at night. (J.N. Barnett; D.W. Epley; R.F. Galloway)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barrett Branch
Description:Heads near the center of Benton Township; flows southeast into Bennetts River. A family name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bay Cave
Description:See Bay Crossing.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bay Creek
Description:Heads near Moody and flows into South Fork Creek in Arkansas. It is a family name in the county.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bay Crossing
Description:An old crossing on Eleven Points River, three miles down from Highway 17. "Uncle Billy" Bay, who died in the early 1920s, had owned the farm nearby for years. The hunters still meet here for their annual fox hunt. Also known as Bill Bay Crossing. Bay Cave, near, is now known as Mushroom Cave because a Kansas City man came about 1927 and attempted to start a mushroom culture, but he stayed only a short time. (Mrs. Anna Lassater; Mrs. Jesse Lee; Mrs. F.A. Elderinghoff; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bennett's Bayou
Description:A stream fed by springs in Benton Township, which flows into North Fork of White River near Henderson, Arkansas. A family name of early settlers in Baxter County, Arkansas. (Mrs. Dora Hunter; C. Vaughn; H. Chapin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bennett's Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church two and a half miles northwest of Fanchon (q.v.). Organized by Reverend Oliver Cox in the Hughlett School house in 1887 or 1888 with eight members, some of whom were "Uncle Frank" Bennett who gave the land, and his nephew Silas and wife who lived near. The Church house was dedicated May 30, 1890. The burial ground near is known as Bennett's Chapel Cemetery. (Mrs. Martha Gilliam; H.A. Smith; D.W. Epley; J.N. Barnett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bennett's Chapel Cemetery
Description:See Bennett's Chapel.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bennett's River
Description:The main stream in Benton Township, flowing into Spring River in Arkansas. An old family of Bennetts lived in Baxter County, Arkansas. George and William Bennett settled on the headwater of the river before the Civil War. (Mrs. Nancy Hunter; H. Chapin; C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Benson Mill
Description:A small mill village, now gone, on Dry Creek in Siloam Springs Township. During the 1880s M.E. Benson operated a good sized saw mill for a few years, cutting out the large pine timber. (D.C. Turner; J. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Benton Township
Description:One of the early divisions of the county, now including only the southwest corner. It took the name of an early family that lived in that section. (D.W. Epley; Mrs. S.T. Proffitt; Campbell, Atlas 1873)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Dipper Zinc Mine
Description:See G. and G. Mines.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Greasy Creek
Description:This stream and Little Greasy Creek are both northern branches of Warm Fork, in Howell Township, distinguished in size and length. "Greasy" is a descriptive term doubtless conferred with the usual local signification of "muddy." A current story accounts for the name by telling how a drunken man from near the stream threw a dog into a church during prayer service, saying, "Go there you son of a gun from Greasy Creek" thus starting the name. Big Greasy Creek is also known as Coffee Creek for William Coffee who lived there as early as 1875. (Stan Kenaga; Mr. & Mrs. N.J. Andrews)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Indian Creek
Description:The largest of the three Indian Creeks in Willow Springs Township. It heads northwest of Willow Springs and flows into North Fork of White River. The other two are Middle Indian Creek and Little Indian Creek, both flowing into Big Indian Creek. An old name dating back to Indian occupation, no doubt. The map of 1865 gives the name Indian Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Lick
Description:A post office shown on the 1879 map; about seven miles northwest of West Plains. It was used before Siloam Springs (q.v.) was established. Mr. Duffy explains the name as derived from a famous deer lick of pioneer days in that region. (Mrs. Nancy Hunter; C. Vaughn; J.A. Duffy)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Pine Creek
Description:In northern Hutton Valley Township. Flows into Jack's Fork in Texas County. Formerly there was much large pine timber in that region. (Miss Sarah Rowe)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring [1 of 2]
Description:See Big Spring School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring [2 of 2]
Description:See Big Spring Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring Cemetery
Description:See Big Spring School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring Church
Description:See Big Spring School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring Creek
Description:In northern Hutton Valley Township; it leads into Big Pine Creek (q.v.). The spring, known as Big Spring, is not unusually large, but it affords good water for most of the community. It is also called Little Pine Creek to distinguish it from Big Pine Creek into which it empties. (Miss Sarah Rowe)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring School
Description:One of the older schools in northeastern Benton Township. It acquired its name from the large, good spring near, generally known as Big Spring, which has taken names of landowners at various times. The old log building and spring were called Friend's for Elijah Jefferson Friend, a former school commissioner and Civil War Veteran who settled there before the Civil War. The spring and cemetery were later known for a time as "Martin" for "Grandma" Martin who had settled near, under the Squatter's Act. About 1880, Robert Wilcox acquired the Martin land and was, for many years, caretaker of the cemetery, being paid by the community. The burial ground took his name but the spring apparently refused it. Usually known as Big Spring Cemetery, for the spring, it is sometimes spoken of as Bly Cemetery for the village near. Big Springs Baptist Church, organized January 19, 1879 by the Reverends D.W. Epley, Zee Martin, and H. Forest, used this schoolhouse, but there have been no regular services since about 1930. The membership gradually declined, some going to Union Chapel (q.v.). The name was suggested by Reverend Epley. (Mrs. Rebecca Gill; D.C. Stephens; D.W. Epley; Geo. Callahan; Mrs. Nancy Hunter; T.J. Whitmire; C. Vaughn; MINUTES 1931)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring Valley
Description:Leads into Gunter's Creek; a good living spring in the lower part of the valley suggests the name. (J.N. Barnett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bill Bay Crossing
Description:See Bay Crossing.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bingaham Spring
Description:See Howell Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Hollow
Description:See Turner School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blankenship Cemetery
Description:See Hamilton Cemetery.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blowing Spring
Description:Near Eleven Points River, one mile southeast of the mouth of County Line Hollow. The ebb and flow of the stream making "queer noises" and the "blowing out" of cold air from the little cavity in the bluff caused the early settlers to believe it was haunted. The old spring has become filled, and the water comes from crevices in the rocks. A good picnicking place for camping and fishing. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Thomas; Jno. Old; J.N. Barnett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Hole
Description:See Blue Hole Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Hole Cave
Description:A small cave in Blue Hole Hollow. Also called Polly Cave because Miss Polly Collins, one of the few persons of this community to remain during the Civil War, lived in hiding there. Her father, Aaron Collins of North Carolina, settled here about 1830. (J.G. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Hole Hollow
Description:Also pronounced "holler" locally. A valley drained by a small stream flowing into Dry Creek in Siloam Springs Township. It took its name from the very deep portion of the stream, Blue Hole, always filled with plenty of water of a bluish color. A good fishing place. (J. Collins; Mr. & Mrs. D.G. Turner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Mound Cemetery
Description:See Blue Mound School, which name it acquired.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Mound School
Description:In Spring Creek Township, five miles northeast of Pottersville. In the valley are many mounds said to be Indian mounds. The heavy mist, often filling the valley here, makes a decidedly bluish color along the horizon. One informant explained that much of the soil is a bluish clay loam; another said there was an abundance of bluish moss in the early days. The original house, a long structure, used for school and church by Baptists, Methodists, and Christians, was situated about a mile from the present site, and was known as the Herron School for an old family. "Aunt" Polly Herron and sons--Thomas, Joseph, and Timothy, lived there during and after the Civil War, but none of the family remain. The burial ground of the community, now Blue Mound Cemetery, was known as the Herron Graveyard. The old nickname for the school was "Stump Suck," a name of contempt. (Mrs. Nancy Hunter; Mrs. Mary Long; Wm. F. Harper; Mr. & Mrs. ira May; G.F. Brown; T. Willis; D.W. Epley; G.W. Ford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bly
Description:A former village and post office near the center of Benton Township. Formerly it had a population of about 200, a sawmill, a small zinc mine near, and four stores; but in 1925 the whole village burned. When the post office was moved here from Yankee Doodle (q.v.) in the late 1870s or early 1880s, Nero Taylor, at the suggestion of another merchant, Warren Roberts, gave it the name of his black mare, a pet in the Taylor family. (Postal Guide 1889-1921; C. Vaughn; D.W. Epley; Mrs. Nancy Hunter)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bly Cemetery
Description:See Bly and Big Spring School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bly Creek
Description:A later name for Bennett's Bayou (q.v.), given for the mining village on the stream. (Mrs. Nancy Hunter; C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boatman School
Description:In Sisson Township. Named for Samuel Boatman who owned a big farm nearby. (D.W. Epley; T.J. Whitmire)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boiling Spring
Description:In Sims Valley, on land now (1937) owned by Frank Bryant. It is thought that the Indians, who had a camp nearby, gave the name. The water still bubbles from the ground (there is no heat) but not nearly so strongly as in former years. It is also known as Spears Spring, for Joseph Spears, who came from Illinois in 1870 and bought this land, where he lived for many years. (Miss Sarah Rowe)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bolerjack Community
Description:See Center Hill School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bolin School
Description:In Sisson Township. Named for Robert Bolin, a pioneer landowner, farmer, and prominent citizen of the community. (D.W. Epley; T.J. Whitmire)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bolin's Store
Description:Hercules W. Bolin operated a store one and a half miles northwest of Hutton Valley prior to 1873. He sold out to Kit Redden and Samuel Finley, who set up the second store in Hutton Valley. (H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bradford School
Description:In South Fork Township. John Bradford, who came from Tennessee before the Civil War, was a landowner and farmer living there. (D.W. Doley; H. Chapin; T.J. Whitmire)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brandsville
Description:A small town in Howell Township, laid out in 1883 by the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad, and named for Michael Brand, a brewer of Chicago who owned 17,000 acres of land in Howell County and gave the town site. Mr. Herman Wisch came with Mr. Branch, and they put in a store and many acres of apple, peach, and grape orchards, and started a large sheep ranch. During the construction of the railroad the place was known as Flag Pond because the large marsh plants grew in such abundance and the place was a shallow pond. (W. Heiskell; Herman Wisch; Postal Guide 1886 f.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brethern Church
Description:This denomination, generallty known as Dunkards, built their church at Peace Valley in 1904. (Mrs. Martha Gilliam)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bridges Creek
Description:A smaller stream in Benton Township, flowing into North Fork. Early pioneers of that name lived there long before the Civil War. (J. Collins; D.W. Epley; D.C. Stephens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bridges Mine
Description:See Morning Glory Mine.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bridges School
Description:One of the old schools, three miles southwest of Olden. Henry M. Bridges, a prominent citizen and landowner of the community, who had been an ambulance driver in the Federal Army, gave the site. The older and one of the earliest schools, three quarters of a mile away, was known as Clinton School, for Robert Clinton, who came from Kentucky as early as 1830; see New Central School. (Mr. & Mrs. D.C. Turner; L.T. Burgess; J. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Briscoe Creek
Description:See Briscoe School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Briscoe School
Description:One of the old log schools of the earlier day, later divided into Mott and Doty schools during the 1890s. It was built on land belonging to Thomas Briscoe. Briscoe Creek, flowing into Myatt Creek, took his name also. (E.M. Nale; N.J. Ramsey; T. Manz)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brooks Ridge
Description:During the 1880s Jacob Brooks lived on one of the longer elevations three miles southwest of Chapel Hill School. One of the Kenaga logging camps was there for a time. (Stan Kenaga)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brower School
Description:An old school two miles east of Olden, in Dry Creek Township. An early settler, Wesley Brower, owned land and lived near. (C.D. Reynolds; T.J. Whitmire)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown Springs
Description:An earlier name for Siloam Springs (q.v.). Johnathan Brown, M.D. entered land there about 1866. He made some developments for a health resort by putting in a small bath house and showers. He later sold the place to D.F. Martin who made considerable improvements and advertised the place. He laid out the town giving it the name of Martinsville, but Siloam Springs (q.v.) remained the name of the post office. The springs and a large tract of land now belong to John R. Woodruff of Springfield, Missouri, and his associates. After getting ownership in the early 1800s, they have made great improvements, and the place has been a great pleasure as well as a health resort. Electric lights and a modern sewer system were installed; the springs have been cleaned and walled; parks and playgrounds and a lake for swimming and boating were made; two hotels and cottages were erected. During very recent years it has been declining somewhat. (Wm. Fox; Mr. & Mrs. William McDaniel; Mr. & Mrs. J.A. Duffy; Woodruff Folder)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brush Town
Description:A descriptive name for Summers Addition, south and adjacent to the city limits of West Plains. After the death of Joseph Summers in 1929, his son Park divided the farm, then a brushy pastureland, into lots and sold them at auction September 9, 1930. (Mr. & Mrs. G. Kline)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brushy Creek
Description:A small branch of Noblett Creek. A descriptive name. (J.M. Spence)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buck Snort
Description:See Antioch Christian Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buff Graveyard
Description:See Fox Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buffalo Pond
Description:A barren basin, on land, now (1937) belonging to Mrs. Josie Vaughn, twelve miles north of West Plains. Originally a small lake of about ten acres, a watering place for buffaloes. As early as 1868 it was horse-swimming deep, and the clear water was used for baptizing. There were also plenty of fish and wild ducks. (W.T. Modrel; D.S. Goyer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Burk
Description:A discontinued post office in Chapel Township, about seven miles northeast of White Church. An elderly man by this name had a store and blacksmith shop; he kept the post office for a while. (S.J. Galloway; P.L. 1883, Polk, 85; Postal Guide 1886, 1887)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Burnham
Description:A small town in Willow Springs Township, established in 1882 by the railroad officials, and named by them for C.B. Burnham, vice- president of the old Kansas City and Memphis Railroad Company of Kansas City. It became a flourishing lumber town, one center of the Missouri Land and Lumber Company, during the 1880s and 1890s. It is in rapid decadence. (J.M. Spence; T.J. Whitmire; Mr. & Mrs. E. Dixon; Postal Guide 1886-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Burnham Cemetery
Description:See Emerson Cemetery, an earlier name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Burnham School
Description:In the village of Burnham from which it took its name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Burr Oaks
Description:A small house built in 1936, part of which is used for a store on Highway 80, five miles east of West Plains, on a part of the Brand land (see Brandsville). Mr. Meredith now (1937) owns the neat building. He explained that there were several kinds of oak trees, in the vicinity, but no burr oaks that he knew of; but that the name is that of a large estate in a book he read when a very young man; he believes it is one of E.P. Roe's books. Edward Payson Roe (1838-1888), was a prolific and popular American novelist of the 1870s and 1880s. One of his best sellers, OPENING A CHESTNUT BURR (1874) has its setting at a country place called Burr Oaks. (Mr. & Mrs. D.R. Meredith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bussell Branch
Description:Heads in southeastern Howell Township and flows into Warm Fork in Oregon County. Morton Bussell was an early settler on the stream near Brandsville. His sons James and John also lived in the vicinity. (E.M. Nale; Mrs. Laura Garrett; N.J. Ramsey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Butts School
Description:Two miles southeast of Hutton Valley. William Butts, an early landowner lived near. He was county surveyor, and during the late 1890s and early 1900, was county judge. (T.J. Whitmire; H.A. Smith; K. Ogle)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Campbell Town
Description:The original village or what is now a part of Mountain View. About 1878, possibly somewhat earlier, John J. and James Campbell put in a small store one-half mile east of the present town, at the present site of the Mountain View Cemetery. John J. Campbell had settled one hundred sixty acres there as early as 1860. About 1880 John Goldsberry, who had settled there in 1860, put up a store across the road west from the Campbell store. Bitter competition followed, and the name "Possum Trot" was invectively given to the west side settlement. (Stan. Kenega; Geo. W. Winningham; J.L. Bess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Creek
Description:A branch of Eleven Points River, in Willow Springs Township. This name, according to some informants, was recently given by the Highway Commission for a family of the name living on a ridge nearby. Another explains that a family of this name settled there before the Civil War. Also known as Godsey Branch for David Godsey, who homesteaded and bought land in the vicinity. An older name is King's Mountain Draw because its branches drain the east, west, and southern sides of King's Mountain. (R. Dunnivan; G.W. Yarnell; H.A. Smith; Mrs. Anna Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cannon Graveyard
Description:An old burial ground, two miles west of Lanton; still used occasionally. It was started during the Civil War on land belonging to James Cannon. (Mrs. Ada Nale; E.M. Hale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cantrell Cemetery
Description:See Cantrell School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cantrell School
Description:In southeastern Hutton Valley Township. The last log schoolhouse in Howell County, it was replaced by a frame building in 1913. It was built on land belonging to William Cantrell, a Baptist minister, who came from Georgia in 1868 or 1869. The burial ground nearby also bears his name. (W.C. McMillan; J.N. Barnett; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carmen Spring
Description:See Poison Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carmical School
Description:A grade school in West Plains. A committee, selected by the Board of Education, gave the name, in 1939, in honor of Mrs. Mary Carmical, who taught one of the first grades in West Plains for twenty-five years. (Supt. J.R. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carner Town
Description:About 1927, Henry Carner built a small store at his good farm home in Myatt Township, between Stone Branch and Hunt Creek, near the Arkansas boundary. (Mrs. Ada Nale; Mr. & Mrs. E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carson
Description:A discontinued post office and village two and a half miles southeast of West Plains, on the Frisco Railroad. Jack Carson, who had a store and kept a post office there, owned and operated mines in various sections of Missouri. About 1900 he opened up the iron mines in this vicinity and operated them successfully for a few years. The place was sometimes known as Carson Switch, as a track was extended out to the mines. A store and filling station remain. (T.J. Whitmire; H. Chapin; J.W. Briggs; Postal Guide 1909-1932)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carson Switch
Description:See Carson.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carter Store
Description:Benjamin Carter had a store and kept the post office one mile southeast of the present site of Willow Springs, before the town was laid out. (D.S. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Caulfield
Description:A village and post office, in Benton Township on Highway 80, near the Amyx Mines in Ozark County. John C. Harlin of Gainesville, who was at that time state senator, suggested the name for Governor Caulfield. Henry Stewart Caulfield, born in St. Louis in 1873, was governor of Missouri from 1929 to 1933. (W.N. Odell; Wm. Harper; Postal Guide 1931-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Grove Cemetery
Description:See Johnson School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Grove Church
Description:A name sometimes used for Pleasant Hill Church (q.v.) because it is near the school of this name. (Mr. & Mrs. H.L. Garrett; Mrs. Leona Long)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Grove School
Description:In Spring Creek Township, one mile west of Pleasant Hill Church. A few cedar trees are in the yard. (Mrs. E.O. Bess; Mr. & Mrs. H.L. Garrett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Center Grove Church
Description:The old building at Moody Spring, centrally located for the neighborhood, was used for school and for services by the Baptists and Methodists. The site, an acre of land set aside on the Zee Martin land, had a grove of trees, chiefly hickory. The Methodist Church was organized about the same time as the Baptists, which was in 1874. The present site at Moody, where the house was erected in 1884, was deeded to both denominations. (D.W. Epley; Mr. & Mrs. P. Gray; Minutes, 1936)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Center Hill Cemetery
Description:See Center Hill School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Center Hill Church [1 of 2]
Description:See Center Hill School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Center Hill Church [2 of 2]
Description:During the middle 1880s William J. Bess, a Baptist minister who lived in Center Hill School No. 2 community, organized a church, donated land for the site, and helped erect the house. The church was disbanded after about twenty years, as most of the membership moved away; and the house was sold and razed in 1915. (Stan Kenaga; J.L. Bess; Mrs. Clara Conner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Center Hill School
Description:The old school in West Chapel Township, in the Bolerjack Community, used for school and church, was situated upon the center part of an elevation. Three brothers--Thomas C., Henry, and Marion Bolerjack--all soldiers in the Federal army, came from Illinois in 1873 and homesteaded in the vicinity. About 1877, the Center Hill Methodist Church was organized, and later a house was built one quarter of a mile from the school. Marion Bolerjack donated two acres for the church and cemetery. Although they have no pastor a part of the time, the church continues its services. When the timber mills were causing new settlements, Center Hill School No. 2 was established southeast of the older school about 1882. Then the old school was known as Center Hill No. 1. Center Hill School No. 1 is now (1937) taking a new name, Chestnut Ridge, suggested by Mr. Christopher C. Thomas, who planted chestnuts about 1905. Several trees are now bearing bountifully and young trees are growing in various parts of the community. (Mr. & Mrs. D. Thomas; T. Proffitt; H.A. Smith; K. Ogle; J.L. Bess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Center Hill School No. 1
Description:See Center Hill School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Center Hill School No. 2
Description:See Center Hill School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Center School
Description:In Spring Creek Township, four miles southeast of Pottersville. The district was formed from the corners of Homeland, Davis Creek, Blue Mound, and South Fork districts, thus being in the center of the four. (Mr. & Mrs. Ira May)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Central School
Description:In West Plains. Named in 1904 because of its location near the center of the town. (Supt. J.R. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chalk Hole Valley
Description:Just west of Fanchon a white clay, used for making chinaware, was found several years ago (now 1937) but not in sufficient quantity for mining. (J.N. Barnett; N.J. Anderson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chapel
Description:A post office established June 26, 1860, one-half mile east of Chapel Hill Church, for which it was named. The first postmaster, Benjamin Holden, who had come from Tennessee during the 1850s, handled the mail in his home. Cambell describes it as a "village twenty miles northeast of West Plains." The office was kept by various persons in different places until it was moved to Mountain View (q.v.) in 1879. (Mrs. Clara Connor; Mr. & Mrs. A.S. Holden; Geo. W. Winningham; Mr. & Mrs. J. Lee; NEWS & LEADER; P.L. 1862; Postal Guide 1876; Campbell GAZ. of Missouri 257)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chapel Hill Cemetery
Description:At the church of this name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chapel Hill Church
Description:The present house in eastern Chapel Township, was erected in 1901 by the Methodists and Baptists on an elevation where the old Methodist Chapel Hill Church had stood. The first house, built during the 1850s for worship and for subscription schools, was of logs, with stick and mud chimneys, puncheon floor, and split log benches. Goodspeed gives the Methodist organization dates as 1873, which date is perhaps when the second house was erected (see Concord Church). The site was probably named for George Chapell, as was Chapel Township (q.v.), and the spelling changed under the impression it was named for the church. (Mr. & Mrs. A.S. Holden; Mr. & Mrs. L. Thomas; Goodspeed, 544; Mr. & Mrs. J. Lee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chapel Hill School
Description:In eastern Chapel Township. Named for the old church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chapel Township
Description:Formed before 1873, from the southern part of Goldsberry Township. The spelling in Campbell's ATLAS is "Chapell." Named for one of the earliest settlers in that region, George Chapell, who came from Georgia. He died in Mountain View in 1890. (D.W. Epley; Stan Kenaga; J.L. Bess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chapin
Description:A station and discontinued post office on the Frisco Railroad in Howell Township, established in 1883 and named by the railroad officials for Hugh Chapin (now 1942) dead, who deeded the right-of-way. The village, sometimes called Chapin Station, was also known as Chapinville because a brother, Jno. Chapin, and others of the name lived there. Hugh Chapin was a retired farmer and former county judge in 1937. (H. Chapin; C. Vaughn; D.C. Stephens; Postal Guide 1889-1917)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chapin Branch
Description:A small tributary of Warm Fork Creek in Howell Township. Mr. Hugh Chapin owned land along the stream. (H. Chapin; C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chapin Mines
Description:See Morrison Mines.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chapin Station
Description:See Chapin.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chapinville
Description:See Chapin.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chestnut Ridge School
Description:See Center Hill School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chicken Dinner Inn
Description:A small store, lunchroom, filling station, and cabins put up in 1928, on Highway 63, near Rudville School. At first they specialized in serving chicken dinners. (Geo. Halstead)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:China
Description:A discontinued post office, later replaced by Carson (q.v.), established in 1894 and kept by a Mr. Curry in his store, where the mail was delivered three times a week. Named for the church nearby. (H. Chapin; T. Proffitt; T.A. Manz; Mrs. Dora Hoglen; Postal Guide 1897)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:China Church
Description:A Union Church at Carson, originally built by the Methodists during the 1880s. Now used by Baptists and Methodists and for a community building. Mrs. Hoglen explained it was built near a thickly shaded, dark place in the road. Reverend Proffitt said someone remarked, "We live a way down in China; so we will call our church China." The Baptists organized a body called Grand View in 1920 and used the China Church. (T.A. Manz; T. Proffitt; Mrs. Dora Hoglen; D.W. Epley; Minutes, 1936)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Christy
Description:A post office named for the landowner. See Christy School. (Postal Guide 1891-1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Christy School
Description:In northeast Myatt Township, established about 1886. E.S. Christy operated a fruit farm there for a number of years. He also operated a small store in which he took care of the mail. (J.N. Barnett; W.C. McMillan; T.A. Manz; H.A. Smith; R.M. Hitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clifton Branch
Description:An eastern tributary of Myatt Creek; heads in southeast Howell Township. Reverend John Clifton lived there during the 1880s. (E.M. Nale; Mrs. Laura Garrett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clinton School
Description:See Bridges School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cloninger School
Description:See Homeland School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cobalt
Description:A post office in eastern Chapel Township. Chapel post office (q.v.), after having passed through various hands was taken over by Jasper P. Downing, who operated a grist mill, and the name was changed to Cobalt. It is a sort of tradition that during the prospecting and mining days some cobalt was found. According to some informants there was considerable excitement and advertising. A little village grew up, but all has vanished. (H.A. Smith; Mr. & Mrs. J. Lee; Mrs. Clara Conner; A. Hollenbeck; P.L. 1883; Postal Guide 1886-1903)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Coffee Creek
Description:See Big Greasy Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:College Hill School
Description:One of the newer district schools, four and a half miles northeast of Pomona, formed from Modrel district. It is situated upon a hill, but no explnation has been found for the other part of the name. It is an ambitious name adopted by many Missouri schools. (W.T. Modrel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Collins Cemetery
Description:In Siloam Springs Township, one mile northwest of Grimmett. Now a public burial ground but started as a family burial ground on land belonging to Aaron Collins from North Carolina, who settled there long before the Civil War. (H.A. Smith; J. Collins; Mr. & Mrs. L. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Columbia School
Description:In Goldsberry Township. It is one of the most modern rural school buildings in the county, since it has electric lights and a basement equipped with a furnace and cooking equipment for school lunches. At its present location (see Gill Branch), it was known as Winningham School (q.v.) and also as Dryden School for John Dryden, a farmer and landowner living near the school. In 1892 or 1893, the larger girls, wishing the school to have a non-personal name, gave it the stock name "Columbia" a word meaning freedom and representing America. (Mrs. Sadie Day; Geo. W. Winningham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Comer Hollow
Description:Leads into West Fork of South Fork from near Doty School. Name of a very early settler there. (E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Concord Church
Description:The old United Baptist Church which was built of logs three-quarters of a mile from the present Chapel Hill; a second house was erected in the late 1880s near the old site. The minutes give the date of organization as 1901, but old residents say it was very much older. By 1901 it had become a Missionary Baptist Church and in that year it united with the Methodist body in building the present Chapel Hill Church (q.v.). "Concord" is a stock name for churches, of course signifying the Christian ideal of peace and harmony. (MINUTES, 1936; Mr. & Mrs. J. Lee; Mr. & Mrs. A.S. Holden; Stan Kenaga)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cordz
Description:An abandoned sawmill town and post office, the terminus of a branch railroad extending southwest ten miles from Burnham. A later name for Horton (q.v.), given for Henry Cordz, manager of the timber mills there for the South Missouri Land and Lumber Company. The place was first known as Drew for W.E. Drew, who was superintendent of the mills for the Missouri Land and Lumber Company. (E. Dixon; H.A. Smith; J. T. Whitmire; D.S. Ferguson; Postal Guide 1887-1913)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cottbus
Description:A discontinued post office in Howell Township. Established through the efforts of Dr. Charles Ludwig from Germany and named for a town in Brandenburg, Prussia. Cottbus, or Kottbus, is an important manufacturing town sixty-eight miles southeast of Berlin. According to one informant the office was established before 1883 in the doctor's home, a log house; and his daughter Annie was Postmistress. He was a practicing physican as early as 1874. (Polk P.L. (1883) 86; Postal Guide 1886-1911; C. Vaughn; H. Chapin; MISSOURI HIST. REV. (Jan. 1917, 175)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cottonwood Hollow
Description:A branch of South Fork. There are many trees of this species in the valley. (T.A. Menz)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:County Line Hollow
Description:Heads near Peace Valley post office and leads into Eleven Points River, south of the mouth of Peace Valley Creek, near the Oregon-Howell county line. The old road and mail route from Eminence in Shannon County to West Plains followed this valley. (L. Thomas; D.S. Goyer; Mrs. Martha Gilliam)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cox Draw
Description:Heads west of Mountain View, and flows into Eleven Points River in Howell Township. Earlier known as Morgan Branch for George Morgan, who came from Georgia before the Civil War and settled on the headwaters. After the Civil War four brothers, Jesse, Everett, Wilbur, and William Cox, came with their widowed mother and bought the Morgan land, after which the valley took the name of Cox Draw. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Thomas; S. Weaver; Mrs. Anna Ferguson; Mrs. E.A. Bolerjack; D.S. Goyer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cozy Grove
Description:A well kept country inn at the junction of Highway 63 and Highway 14, two miles north of West Plains. Established in 1934 by Mr. Edward Seiberling of West Plains. The filling station, dance hall, lunchroom, and cabins--all of concrete--are situated in a beautiful grove of trees, chiefly red and white oak. A descrioptive name. (Edward Seiberling)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crane Ranch
Description:Albert Crane from Chicago entered and bought about 25,000 acres in 1875 in regions southeast of West Plains. Some of it was in Oregon County. He put in the first Herford cattle in that vicinity. Parts of it later composed Davis, Klice, and Tory ranches (q.v.). (E.M. Nale; H. Chapin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crass
Description:A post office but not located. Families of the name were in both Oregon and Howell counties, one near White Church, another near Byrd School. Unquestionably it is a family name. (Joe Kester; T.J. Whitmire; A. Hollenbeck; Postal Guide 1901)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crider
Description:A small village in Spring Creek Township. The post office was first kept in the home of R.L. Hollenshed, who gave the name for a merchant and landowner, Pierce Crider, who homesteaded the land on which the village grew up. (N.J. Ramsey; Mrs. Leona Long; Postal Guide 1900-1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crooked Branch
Description:Heads near Crider and flows into North Fork of White River in Douglas County. A descriptive name. (J. Collins; D.G. Turner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crooked Creek
Description:A tributary of Nobblett Creek in western Willow Springs Township. A descriptive name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cross Roads
Description:See Cross Roads School and South Fork post office.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cross Roads Church
Description:See Cross Roads School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cross Roads School
Description:One of the old schools one and a half miles northeast of Amy, southwest of Cross Roads, the early name for South Fork. The old pioneer roads from West Plains to Waterville (now Bakersfield in Ozark County) and from Pottersville to the early settlements in Myatt Township and northern Arkansas crossed in what is now South Fork in the northwestern part of South Fork Township. Cross Roads Church, now Hill Crest (q.v.), the first Congregational Methodist Church of the county, was organized in the home of William H. Howard, a captain in the Federal Army, who lived two miles south of Cross Roads where the house was later built. (T. Proffitt; Mrs. Nancy Hunter; J.A. Duffy; Mr. & Mrs. Ira May; D.C. Stephens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cull
Description:A village and post office in Howell Township, established in 1897 through the efforts of a prominent citizen, merchant, landowner, and Confederate soldier, David W. Cull, a native of Kentucky, who had come here from Mexico, Missouri. Refusing the names sent in by him, the postal department gave his name to the place. It is discontinued and a mail route from West Plains is established. (Postal Guide 1897-1939; Mrs. Anna Lassater; E. Bailey; T.J. Whitmire)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cureall
Description:A village and post office in Spring Creek Township. About 1875 Dr. J.C.B. Dixon of West Plains, Missouri, who came from Kentucky in 1867, started a health resort at the springs said to contain exceptional medicinal properties. There were several springs claimed to have various qualities, but all except one are now covered over and practically lost. Dr. Dixon built a hotel and bath house and got the post office established, which he named Cureall. Saw Mills, grist mills, and stores grew up; many came from St. Louis, Memphis, and other cities, and quite a little remain, and it is no longer considered a health resort. Dr. Dixon sold to John Adkins, who sold to John Fleece of Memphis. The spring and old home are now owned by Mr. Shelt Looney. The springs were originally known as Dixon Springs for the owner Dr. Dixon. (N.J. Ramsey; Mr. & Mrs. W.F. Harper; MISSOURI HIST. REV. (Jan. 1917) 175; Postal Guide 1883-1941; T.J. Whitmire; E. Dixon)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cureall Springs
Description:See Cureall.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Current River Branch
Description:A name locally applied to the Current River Railroad (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Current River Railroad
Description:A branch of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad constructed during the later 1880s. It extends from Willow Springs (q.v.) across Howell, Shannon, and Carter counties into Wayne County, where it connects with other lines at Williamsville. It took this name from Current River which it crosses. It provides transportation for a large area in the Current River country and made possible a large timber business and later settlements.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cynthia
Description:A post office of 1883, listed by Polk, p. 87, but I have been unable to find anyone who knows of it. It was doubtless a personal name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:D.W. Reese School
Description:A grade school in West Plains. A committee, selected by the Board of Education, gave the name, in 1939, in honor of D.W. Reese who was a member of the Board of Education for fifteen years, prior to 1914. (Supt. J.R. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dan's Fork
Description:See Davis Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis Creek
Description:A branch of Spring Creek in Spring Creek Township. In 1866 Solomon, George, Marion, and William Davis came from Oregon County and homesteaded along the stream. (N.J. Ramsey; Mrs. Ana Lasater)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis Creek School
Description:In Spring Creek Township. J.A. Cates, a large landowner, gave the site for the school, which was named for the stream nearby. (J.N. Ramsey; W.F. Harper; Mrs. Laura Garrett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis Graveyard
Description:See Koelling's Graveyard.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis School
Description:An older school in Willow Springs Township, near the junction of highways 60 and 63. Named for James Davis from Tennessee; who owned land and lived there. (D.S. Ferguson; D.C. Stephens; Mrs. Wade Baldridge)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Deaderick
Description:A post office at Old Horton (q.v.). It was named for Dan Deaderick, who kept the office in his store. (Mrs. Lillian Moore; Postal Guide 1886-1890)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Deep Water School
Description:Located near a pond, not so deep, three miles southeast of Mountain View. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Thomas)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Denton Creek
Description:A branch of Peace Valley Creek. Jacob Denton settled there before the Civil War. (J.N. Barnett; J.N. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dishrag
Description:See Antioch Christian Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dixon Springs
Description:See Cureall.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doty School
Description:Formed chiefly from the western part of the old Lamons District in 1897. Townsend W. Doty donated one acre for the site. (D.A. Manz; Mrs. Fred McKelvey; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dowling School
Description:In Sisson Township. On land formerly owned by Joseph Dowling, a farmer, living near. (C.D. Reynolds; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Drew
Description:See Cordz.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dripping Springs
Description:During the earlier days, this spring upon a bluff, about five miles southwest of White Church, kept a pond of two or three acres filled by its continuous dripping from the rocks ten feet above the pond. The stream grew weaker, and the pond is now dry. In 1882 a Methodist Church was built near the spring. The church and cemetery took the name of the spring. (J.L. House; D.S. Goyer; L. Thomas)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dripping Springs Cemetery
Description:See Dripping Springs.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dripping Springs Church
Description:See Dripping Springs.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Creek
Description:Formed by the junction of North Prong and South Prong of Dry Creek in Siloam Springs Township. The North Prong heads in Willow Springs Township and the South Prong heads in Dry Creek. It flows into North Fork of White River. The name was given because most of the stream is dry except during rainy seasons. (R.F. Holloway; D.W. Epley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Creek Cemetery
Description:See Dry Creek School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Creek Church
Description:See Dry Creek School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Creek School
Description:The original house of logs was about two miles east of the present site on North Prong of Dry Creek, and was used for both school and church. Dry Creek Baptist and Shiloh Methodist churches were organized in the old log house during thbe early 1870s or, possibly, earlier. In 1886, the union building, five miles west of Pomona, was erected three- quarters of a mile west of the old log house for the Methodist, General and Missionary Baptist, and Christian denominations. While the organization name is Shiloh (q.v.), the church is generally known as Dry Creek for the stream near. Dry Creek Cemetery, near, and the old log school were also known, during the early days, as Lovan School and Graveyard for Marion Lovan, who came from Kentucky long before the Civil War and entered land. (J. Byres; D.G. Turner; D.W. Epley; Mr. & Mrs. J.M. Spence; J. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Creek Township
Description:In the north central part of the county, formed before 1873. Named for its chief stream. (Campbell, Atlas; R.F. Holloway)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dryden School
Description:See Columbia School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dryer School
Description:The old school west of Peace Valley was named for the landowner, C. Henry Dryer, who had a store at Peace Valley. It was discontinued about 1919 and consolidated with Peace Valley. (J.N. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dunnivan Branch
Description:A small stream flowing southwest into Myatt Creek, in the southeastern part of Myatt Township. Jack Dunnivan lived at the head of the stream during the 1880s or early 1890s. (E.M. Nale; Mrs. Ada Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dyestone Mountain
Description:Near the Douglas County line in Siloam Springs Township. The Indians and pioneers made fast color dyes, some a rich seal brown, by boiling the soft stone taken from the mountain. (Mrs. Anna Ferguson; D.S. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Easly Branch
Description:See Gentry Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:East Fork of South Fork of Spring River
Description:See South Fork of Spring River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ebenezer Church
Description:A Methodist Church, organized in the Pond School in 1893 or 1894. Mathias Kenega, a very liberal supporter, gave the site one- quarter of a mile from Forest Dell School. It is also known as Pond Church and Kenaga Church. The Biblical name, meaning stone of help, is that of a memorial stone set up by Samuel between Mizpeh and Shen to commemorate the victory of the Israelites over the Philistines. It is a favorite name for churches everywhere. (Sam. 7:12; Mr. & Mrs. F.A. Elderinghoff; J. Pierson; S. Kenega; Mr. & Mrs. L. Thomas)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Edom
Description:See Olden.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Egypt Grove Church
Description:A Congregational Methodist Church organized about 1897 by Reverend Riley M. Proffitt. The house was built in a grove, the present site of Ernie's Place, in the Egypt school district. Named for the settlement. As the house burned about 1928, the membership is now at Union Church at Amy. (Rev. S.T. Proffitt; Mr. & Mrs. W.F. Harper; Mrs. Ernie Kesler)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Egypt School
Description:About three miles west of Amy. See Egypt Settlement.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Egypt Settlement
Description:A name given to the region in what is now a part of Spring Creek in Benton Township, when that section was opened for homesteading in 1879. When John Hale, Monroe Cook, and Reverend D.W. Epley were driving through the region looking for a location, Mr. Epley, thinking of the wildness of the county and comparing themselves to the Israelites going into Egypt to get food, remarked, "We're goin' into Egypt to settle." Mr. Hale stopped the wagon, and scratching the bark from a large tree, wrote the word "Egypt." The name remained for the early settlements, and when the school was established in Benton Township, it was given this name. Mr. McDaniel explained that good corn was grown in that part of the county, and people came to buy corn, as the Israelites went to Egypt to get food, and that the name grew up some years after the Civil War. With the general significance of fertility, the Biblical name of Egypt has become a stock name in Missouri and Illinois; cf. theses by Miss Atchison and Miss Elliott. (D.W. Epley; Wm. McDaniel; A. Callahan; Geo. Callahan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eleven Points Creek
Description:That portion of Eleven Points River (q.v.) above the mouth of Peace Valley Creek has often been known by this name of "creek" because it is so small. (H.A. Smith; Mr. & Mrs. F.A. Elderinghoff)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elk Creek
Description:It heads in eastern Howell Township and flows into Warm Fork Creek in Big Apple Township. It is said that elk were uncommon in this section, but that a few were found in this vicinity during the early pioneer days. (C. Vaughn; Mrs. Anna Lassater)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elk Creek Cemetery
Description:See Elk Creek Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elk Creek Church
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian Church organized in an abandoned box dwelling house belonging to a Mr. Thatcher, two or three years befoere the church was built in 1893. Don Edgar gave the site for the church and cemetery about one mile from the school, from which it took its name. Still a thriving church. (Mr. & Mrs. N.J. Andrews; Mrs. J. Rountree)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elk Creek School
Description:In eastern Howell Township, one and a half miles south of Cull (q.v.). It was formed in 1888, chiefly from the Langston District, and was named for the stream. (Mrs. Anna Lassater; Mr. & Mrs. N.J. Andrews)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elk Horn Creek
Description:A western tributary of West Fork of South Fork of Spring River in South Fork Township. David Loy who had settled here before the Civil War and refugeed in Ironton during the war, came back to the old settlement and found large numbers of elk horns along the stream, which fact suggested to him the name for the stream. (C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elliott Spring
Description:In northern Benton Township on land formerly owned by Robert Elliott. Now often known as the Fare Spring for James Fare who owns land joining the other farm and lives near the spring. (Mrs. Ernie Kesler; G.W. Burden)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elm Spring
Description:See Perkins Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elva
Description:A post office first kept by John Hammond, who then lived in Fulton County, Arkansas, near the state line. Named for a neighbor girl, Elva Willett, who married Buford Skaggs now (1937) representative in the legislature. Mrs. Granville Locke, just over the state line in Myatt Township kept it in her home until the Lebo route was changed to care for the mail in this community. (Mrs. Dora Hoglen; Mrs. Monroe Cole; D.A. Manz; P.F. 1909-1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Emerson Cemetery
Description:An old burial ground one and a half miles northeast of Burnham. Lemuel Emerson, who came from Greene County, Missouri, soon after the Civil War, owned land and lived near. Later, upon the growth of the neighboring community of Burnham (q.v.), it became known as Burnham Cemetery. (Mrs. Nancy Kinion; Mrs. Ada Slater)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Epps Cemetery
Description:About three miles north of Pomona. A Baptist minister, Newton C. Epps, originally from Tennessee, came from Greene County, Missouri in 1867, and homesteaded 160 acres. His baby, Laura Melvina, who died in 1875, was the first person buried there. N.C. Epps died in 1917 at the age of seventy-eight. (Mrs. Nancy Kinion; H.A. Smith; D.S. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ernie's Place
Description:A store and filling station on Highway 80, one half mile east of Arditta, on the site of the Egypt Grove Church (q.v.). It was established in April, 1934 by Mr. and Mrs. Earnest Kesler, the former a World War veteran. He was familiarly known as Ernie. (Mrs. E. Kesler)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eula
Description:A post office kept by William Hester Collins in his store at the old Graham Spring (q.v.). He named it for Eula, the daughter of Alfred Downing, who had previously owned the store. (Wm. Fox; D.W. Epley; Mr. & Mrs. L. Collins; Postal Guide 1901-1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Evergreen Cemetery
Description:See Lamons Graveyard.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Evergreen Church
Description:See Evergreen School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Evergreen School
Description:When the Lamons school was re-located one and a half miles from Evergreen Cemetery, it was named for the burial ground. When a community church was built at the cemetery in 1920, it also took the name of the cemetery. (H. Chapin; S. Lambe)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fanchon
Description:A post office established in 1901 in Mr. Hugh Turner's store in southeastern Sisson Township. It grew to be a little village with two stores, a grist mill, a blacksmith shop, a shingle mill, and several dwelling houses. The Turners had the office for two or three years, until they sold out and went to St. Louis for the World's Fair of 1904-1905, subsequently removing to Los Angeles, California. The post office was discontinued in 1913, and now there is nothing there but a store. Mrs. Hugh Turner writes that her husband sent in a list of names, but the postal department rejected all of them and suggested Fanchon instead. She says: "The Department gave us the name." It seems unlikely, however, that so unusual a name would have been dictated by Washington unless some desire for it had been expressed by someone living at the place. One conjecture has been made that the name was taken from Fanchon-Marco, a team of nationally known theatrical artists. The stage-name "Fanchon-Marco" is that of a well-known pair of dancers and musicians whose real names are Fanny and Mike Wolff. "Fanchon," or Fanny Wolff (now Mrs. Fanchon Simon) was born in Los Angeles in 1895; her brother "Marco" is a year older. According to an article in the AMERICAN by J.B. Griswold, September, 1932 (vol. 114, p. 46), entitled "Let's be Ourselves: the Story of a Brother and Sister Who Licked the Big City by Going Back Home," they became known as the "Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Castle of the Pacific Coast" at an early period in their career. Later they acquired fame as producers of musical comedy, and according to a biographical sketch in TIME for May 10, 1937 (29.2.66), they are today the most important makers of stage shows in the country. It does not seem possible, however, that even so versatile a pair of artists as the Wolffs could have been famous enough in 1901, at the ages of six and seven respectively, to have had a town named for them. More probable both the town and Mrs. "Fanchon" Simon borrowed their names from a still more famous "Fanchon" of the preceding generation. The beloved American actress Margaret Julia Mitchell (1837-1918), was known as "Fanchon," her most popular role, from one end of the country to the other. The DICT. OF AMERICAN BIOG. says of her: "In 1860 she appeared in New Orleans in the title role of FANCHON THE CRICKET, a play adapted for her from George Sand's LA PETITE FADETTE, which was to bring her wealth and a unique place in the hearts of the people...During twenty succeeding years, the play never staled with the public...The actress was a little creature, winsome and piquant rather than beautiful, and animated with electric energy which followed Fanchon through her lightning changes of mood. The grace of her fantastic shadow-dances inspired verses by Emerson." The statement in the DAB about Emerson is declared to be incorrect by the recent editor of his letters. Professor Ralph L. Rusk states in his LETTERS OF RALPH WALDO EMERSON, 1939 (V.321), that the poems entitled "The Shadow Dancer" and "Maggie's Gone" inscribed to Maggie Mitchell and published in the BOSTON EVENING TRANSCRIPT on March 17, 1863, were really written, not by the philosopher, as has been alleged, but by a William R. Emerson of Boston, Massachusetts. But there is no doubt about another political tribute to Maggie Mitchell, written by Eugene Field, the father of the newspaper "column." In his famous "Sharps and Flats" in the CHICAGO DAILY NEWS, Field published, on September 26, 1884, a graceful little poem entitled "Fanchon the Cricket," in which Maggie Mitchell is described as the "most fascinating girl that ever romped the mimic stage." The play that made Maggie Mitchell so famous took its title and the name of its heroine from the equally popular romance of the best known woman novelist of France George Sand (1804-1876). Her LA PETITIE FADETTE, first published in 1849, is perhaps the most widely read of all the many stories that came from her prolific pen. Little Fadette, "le grelet," or cricket, as she is called, was christened Francoise; "c'est pourquoi sa grand'mere, qui n'aimait point a changer les noms, l'appelait tourjours Fanchon" (Chap. VIII). The diminutive is the French equivalent of the English Fanny, for our Frances. At least one other American town, Fanchon, Texas, bears the same name, doubtless taken from the same source. (Postal Guide 1901-1913; Mrs. Hugh Turner; Mrs. Martha Gilliam; J.N. Ferguson; W.C. McMillan; C. Newton; George Sand's LA PETITE FADETTE, ed. O.B. Super (1906) 28)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fancy Farm
Description:A post office for a short time during the 1870s, kept by Albin Perkins in his farm home one and a half miles south of Pomona. His daughter Sarah, later wife of Dr. Charles Palmer of Pomona, suggested that the farm was nicely kept, a "fancy" one, and that would be a good name for the office. Not found in Postal Guide but shown on an 1879 map. (Mrs. Nancy Kinion)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fare Spring
Description:See Elliott Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Featheringhill
Description:Andy Featheringhill, whose sons were Harry and Millard, owned land and kept a little store one mile south of the site of Willow Springs. Although I have been unable to find this name on maps or in postal guides, older informants say the post office was kept in his store about 1873. (J.M. Spence; W.T. Modrel; Mrs. G. Gaston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ferguson School
Description:Five miles east of White Church. The site was given during the late 1880s by John W. Ferguson, who came from Georgia in 1868. It was consolidated with Peace Valley in 1919, and the house was rebuilt as a ward school. (J.L. House; J.N. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fern Ridge School
Description:Six miles west of Willow Springs. A pretty name for a pretty place, explained Mr. Ferguson. There are several running streams with many ferns along their banks. (D.S. Ferguson; W.C. McMillan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ferndale Church
Description:A community building used by any denomination, two miles east of Columbia School. The first building, there as early as 1900, was a small, rough box building, known as Dunkard Church because a group of that denomination, who had built the house, worshipped there. Between 1907 and 1912, the Dunkards having moved away, the house was rebuilt by the community and given this descriptive name by a Mr. Showalter. (Stan Kenaga; Geo. W. Winningham; Mrs. Sadie Day)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fiat Hollow
Description:Heads southeast of Caulfield; flows south into Bennetts Bayou. Found on a late highway map; but those interviewed know nothing of the name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fisher Mill
Description:In the early 1880s, Joe Fisher owned and operated a sawmill near Sterling (q.v.). (H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Flag Pond
Description:See Brandsville.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fool's Hole
Description:See Fool's Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fool's Hollow
Description:An old name attached to Hurricane Hollow, now known as Kenaga Hollow. A widened portion of the stream, about thirty-five or forty yards long, filled with running water, was known as Fool's Hole. The story has been handed down from old pioneer days, long before the Kenagas came, that an insane person was found wandering in the wooded section. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Thomas)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Forest Dell School
Description:See Hurricane School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Forest Flower School
Description:North of Willow Springs four miles. Built on a hill in the forest. An idealistic name. (J.M. Spence; D.S. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Forest View School
Description:In northeastern Howell Township, formed since 1900 from Elk and Hughlett schools. Surrounded by a forest of various kinds of native trees. (J.N. Barnett; Mr. & Mrs. N.J. Andrews)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Forrest Branch
Description:In the vicinity of Blue Mound Cemetery. Leads into Spring Creek from the southeast. Hezekiah Forrest, a Baptist preacher, settled there before the Civil War. (S.T. Proffitt; Mr. & Mrs. G.W. Ford; R.M. Johns)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Foster School
Description:A grade school in West Plains. A committee, selected by the Board of Education, gave the name, in 1939, in honor of Margaret Foster, a second grade teacher of West Plains for fifteen years, from about 1900. (J.R. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fowler Graveyard
Description:In Benton Township one-quarter mile southeast of Oak Grove School (q.v.). The site was deeded before 1888 by George Fowler, who came from Bollinger County and homesteaded land here. Also called Oak Grove Cemetery for the school near. (W.N. Odell; Wm. Harper; Geo. Callahan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fox Den Hollow
Description:Leads into Wilson Hollow (q.v.). Habitat of many red and gray foxes in earlier years. (E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fox Graveyard
Description:See Fox Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fox Hollow
Description:Leads into Spring Creek northwest of Pottersville. Four brothers, Gatus, Essau, Jeff, and Sim Fox homesteaded in the vicinity after the Civil War. Fox Graveyard, a public burial ground three and a half miles northwest of Pottersville, was at first known by this name for Gatus Fox who lived near; his wife who died in 1871 was the first to be buried there. Later Henry H. Parker deeded the land and lived near there for some time after which it came to be known by his name. Mrs. Parker later married George Buff a landowner living nearby. More recently the cemetery is known as Buff Graveyard and Union Grove for the church nearby. (Mr. & Mrs. J.A. Duffy; L. Collins; Mrs. Leona Long)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Francis Cemetery
Description:One and a half miles northeast of Cull. It is the oldest burial ground of the Elk Creek community. It was started during the Civil War, when some soldiers were buried there. Oliver Francis from Bollinger County, Missouri, who bought the land in 1880, deeded the cemetery for public use. (Mr. & Mrs. N.J. Andrews; Mrs. B.A. Rose)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Frank Durham's Store
Description:See Frankville.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Frankville
Description:Frank Chapin owned a farm four miles southeast of West Plains and kept the post office Frankville in his home for a while before the railroad was built. He later moved to Chapin (q.v.). Later, Frank Durham and Frank Campbell, relatives of the Langstons, put in a general store and kept the post office, when the name was changed to New Franklin. Locally it was often spoke of as Frank Durham's Store. Nothing remains of the place but the burial ground, known as the Cemetery. Both names of the old post office, Frankville and New Franklin, were obviously selected by the Christian names of the proprietors. The later name, New Franklin, blends the name Frank with that of the statesman Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), a stock name for American towns. (Mrs. H.L. Garrett; H. Chapin; Mrs. J.F. Moore; Campbell, GAZ. of MISSOURI, 257; P.L. 1873)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Free Union School
Description:In southern Benton Township. The house, built in 1886, with three acres for a cemetery, was voted open for services by all denominations, for literary work, or any community gatherings. In the earlier day it was known as Union Hill, or Holman School for a landowner near. Later some called it Mount Confusion, in burlesque because of the confusion over religious matters. (D.P. Epley; C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Freemott's Place
Description:On Highway 60, four and a half miles west of Mt. View. In 1934 Mr. W.A. Freemott, from Minnesota, established on his farm, a grocery, cabins, and a service station. (W.A. Freemott)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Friend's School
Description:See Big Spring School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Friend's Spring
Description:See Big Spring School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fruitville
Description:A post office in Myatt Township. It was discontinued in 1930. See Tory's Place (q.v.), where much fruit was grown. (H. Chapin; Postal Guide 1910-1919)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fruitville Farms
Description:See Tory's Place.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fruitville School
Description:In northeastern Myatt Township. Named for the post office. (E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Full Gospel Church
Description:A Pentecost Church at Burnham. In 1927 Miss Martha Jones, formerly a school teacher, bought from the Ozark Presbytery the house and block previously used by the Presbyterians who had gradually moved away. She built the neat stone church in 1930 and the parsonage of the same material in 1933. These she deeded to the Assemby of God at Springfield, Missouri, but they deeded it back to her because they do not hold local property. She will deed it to the local organization. They explain that they accept the Bible in full, in its entirety, and apparently literally as in such instances as the apostles speaking in unknown tongues on the day of Pentecost. (Miss Martha Jones; Miss Islet L. Oaks; J.M. Spence; Acts 2:4)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:G. and G. Mine
Description:A zinc mine in northwestern Benton Township on a forty acre track owned by Frank Gregg and William Gordon of West Plains. It was quite a productive mine from 1898 to 1902, but has not been operated since that time. It was also known as Big Dipper Zinc Mine, which name was suggested by a later operator, Frank Cook, because of its shape. (D.W. Epley; W.N. Odell; J.S. Vaughn; C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Galloway School
Description:Three miles northwest of West Plains. One of the first schools; still an independent school. James Galloway, who bought land soon after the Civil War, gave the site. G. Washington Galloway, the informant's father, organized the Primitive Baptist Church which continued until the early 1920s and used the schoolhouse for services. (T.J. Whitmire; S.J. Galloway)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Garrett's Branch
Description:Heads west of Brandsville and flows into Warm Fork Creek. Jacob Garrett settled there when he came from Tennessee during the 1830s. (Mrs. H.L. Garrett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gentry Branch
Description:A small tributary of Bennett's River in western Benton Township. George Genry lived here long before the Civil War. Also called Easley Branch for Reuben Easley who came from Illinois and homesteaded land nearby. Sometimes known as Horn Branch, for Lon Horn, who came from Pennsylvania in 1872 and owned land there. (C. Vaughn; J.S. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gill
Description:A post office of north central Benton Township, established in 1898 in a country store belonging to William Gill from Tennessee. John Taylor, a bondsman for the postmaster D.C. Stephens, suggested the name for Mrs. Rebecca Gill, assistant postmistress. The post office was discontinued in 1902 when the Gill family moved to Amy. (Postal Guide 1901; Mrs. Rebecca Gill; D.C. Stephens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gill Branch
Description:Flows into Barn Hollow. Samuel K. Gill, a private soldier of the Federal Army, came from Illinois about 1872, bought a small farm and lived there until his death in 1912. The old school of hewed pine logs was also named for him. In 1890, the house was moved one mile northeast near Hellum Spring, where Isaac Winningham gave two acres for the site. It was known for some time as Winningham School, but the name was later changed to Columbia (q.v.). (Geo. W. Winningham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gill School
Description:See Gill Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Globe
Description:A post office southwest of Brandsville. Shown on 1907 map. (Postal Guide 1909-1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Godsey Branch
Description:See Cane Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Godsey Spring
Description:See Spout Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Goldsberry School
Description:The old pioneer school located in what is now the western part of Mountain View. William H. Goldsberry (see Goldsberry Township) owned the land.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Goldsberry Township
Description:The northeast division; but at the time of replatting after the Civil War, it included what is now Chapel Township also. Named for William H. Goldsberry, a pioneer Baptist minister and landowner who came from North Carolina in 1856 and settled at the present site of Mountain View. (H.A. Smith; H. Chapin; Sam Weaver; D.W. Epley; Geo. W. Winningham; Mrs. & Mrs. S. Holden)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Goldsberry's Church
Description:See Mount Olivet.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gospel Hill Church
Description:See Mount Pisgah Church. (Christian)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Goyer Spring
Description:See Moyer Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grace Church
Description:A Northern Methodist Church, west of Vaughn School in Goldsberry Township. Named for Miss Grace Coynor, whose father was the chief contributor to the building of the house in the 1890s. (Geo. W. Winningham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Graham Spring
Description:In Spring Creek Township, two and a half miles northeast of Pottersville. Harvey Graham homesteaded the land soon after the Civil War. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Collins; Wm. Fox)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grammer Creek
Description:Also known as North Branch, since it unites with South Branch in southern Howell Township to form East Fork of South Fork of Spring River. John Grammer settled there before the Civil War. (D.W. Epley; H. Chapin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grassy Hollow
Description:A tributary of Gunter's Creek, in eastern Howell Township. A descriptive name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gravel Ridge School
Description:In southwestern Goldsberry Township. Formed about 1917 from parts of Mountain View, Center Hill, and Pond schools. A descriptive name. (Mrs. E.O. Bess; S. Weaver; L. Thomas)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Greenwood School
Description:Three miles south of West Plains. One of the newer schools, in the old Lamons community. The site, a shallow valley, is in a forest. (T.J. Whitmire; Mrs. Ira May)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Griffith School
Description:See Trask School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grimmett
Description:A post office, now kept by Jesse R. Byers in his store in northeast Spring Creek Township, where there are a filling station, a canning factory, and a grist mill. Samuel Grimmett, a farmer and old resident, got the post office established as early as 1895 and kept it in his home about four miles southeast of the present location. After a few years, James L. House put a small store in his home two miles west and kept the office. Its name and location were later changed (see Shinkle). In 1917 Jesse R. Byers, who lived one and a half miles southeast of the present site of Grimmett, took the office and restored the old name. In 1919 he bought the store at the present location and moved the office there. Discontinued between 1937 and 1939 and supplied by West Plains Route. (J.A. Duffy; J.R. Byers; Mr. & Mrs. L. Collins; Mrs. Leona Long; Postal Guide 1897-1937)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grimmett School
Description:Built on land belonging to Samuel Grimmett. See Grimmett and New Central School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gunter Draw
Description:See Gunter Valley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gunter Valley
Description:Drained by Gunter's Creek. Also known as Gunter Draw. See Gunter's Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gunter's Creek
Description:In Howell and Sisson Townships. A branch of Eleven Points River, known as Middle Fork in Oregon County. It took the name of Samuel B. Gunter who came from East Tennessee in 1857 and settled near the center of the valley. (H. Chapin; H.A. Smith; J.N. Barnett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hade Spring
Description:See Turner School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hagenbuck Store
Description:Near County Line Garage in Oregon County (q.v.). F.E. Hagenbuck, former editor and publisher of THE KIOWA RECORD, of Kiowa, Kansas, set up a store in 1936 and plans a beautiful place there at his new home. (F.E. Hagenbuck)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Haigart
Description:A discontinued station on the Frisco Railroad, north of Brandsville. William R. Haight of Brandsville, later in Jefferson City where he served as attorney for the Highway Department, F.J. Stuart, a financier of St. Louis, and others developed the mines at Carson (q.v.) and set up a smelter during World War, No. 1, but the war closed before their planes were completed. The name is a coined word formed from the names of the two men, Haig-ht and Stu-art. (T.J. Whitmire; J.A. Duffy; A.T. Hollenbeck)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hainleys
Description:Found on an 1895 map, northwest of West Plains, but nowhere else. Informants know of the families Haney and Haynes who lived in that vicinity but nothing of this name could be found.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hale School
Description:An old school about two and a half miles southwest of the site of Burnham (q.v.), named from Monroe Hale, a landowner there. It is now a part of Burnham and Dry Creek districts. (J.G. Collins; Mrs. Anna Ferguson; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Half Way School
Description:Four miles southwest of Hutton Valley. It recieved its name because it is almost equidistant from Burnham and Lost Camp schools. (H.A. Smith; J.M. Spence; W.T. Modrel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hall Town School
Description:See Orchard Grove School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hamilton Cemetery
Description:A name by which New Salem Cemetery (q.v.) is sometimes known. In 1918 Christopher Baker Hamilton, a farmer and landowner, who had come to Howell County in 1888 (originally from Kentucky) was buried there. In 1890, his wife was the second person buried there. Soon after 1918 his son-in-law, a Mr. Day was influential in getting the grounds deeded for a public burial ground. It is sometimes known as Blankenship Cemetery because the one-half acre was deeded by Caleb Blankenship. (Geo. W. Winningham; Mrs. Sadie Day)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hard Scrabble School
Description:See Pleasant View School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harper Creek
Description:A northern tributary of Gunter's Creek, in Howell Township. Fate Harper owned land on the stream. (J. Ferguson; J.N. Barnett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harris Cemetery
Description:The old burial ground in the southern part of Willow Springs, no longer used. James W. Harris owned a large farm in what is now the southern part of town as early as 1858. (Mrs. Anna Ferguson; Mr. & Mrs. J. Kinion)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harrison School
Description:See Rudville School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hatfield Cemetery
Description:See Meredith Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hatfield Church
Description:See Meredith Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hatfield School
Description:See Meredith Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hawkins Cemetery
Description:About two and a half miles northeast of Moody, near Willow Grove School. Harrison Hawkins lived there during the Civil War and deeded one acre for the burial ground. Later known as McElmurry Cemetery for Andrew J. McElmurry who acquired the farm. (H. Chapin; Mrs. Dora Hoglen; P. Gray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hay Hollow Branch
Description:Locally pronounced "holler," also. Heads in Siloam Springs Township, fed by springs, and runs into Tabor Creek in Douglas County. Following the Civil War, people cut for hay the big blue grass that grew so abundantly in the valley. (Mr. & Mrs. J. Duffy)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hellum Spring
Description:In Barn Hollow. An early settler of this name lived there prior to 1852. This surname was probably the familiar family name Helm, here spelled Hellum on account of its local pronunciation; cf. Elm, locally pronounced as "ellum." Later known as Rushing Spring for Joel P. Rushing, who bought the land about 1872. About 1888 William McCollouck bought the place, and for some time, it was known by his name. As the farm changed hands several times later, the spring, a good one, now (1937) owned by J. Carl Turner who lives there, seems to have lost its names. (Geo. W. Winningham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Henry Mill
Description:Samuel Henry had a good-sized sawmill in Siloam Springs Township and furnished much of the lumber used in rebuilding West Plains after the Civil War. (Mr. & Mrs. J.A. Duffy)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Herron Graveyard
Description:See Blue Mound School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Herron School
Description:See Blue Mound School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Herron Spring
Description:Near Blue Mound School. Mrs. Polly ("Grandma") Herron's family lived there during the Civil War. The widow with her three sons and one daughter remained for some years after the war. See Blue Mound School. (Mrs. Leona Long; G. Callahan; T. Willis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hickory Top
Description:A post office kept by Ezekial Jones in his home before the Civil War located at the present site of Landers Lumber Yard in Willow Springs. The name was probably given for the three large hickory trees in his yard. (Mrs. Anna Ferguson; P.L. 1862-1867; Goodwin & West, 47)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Highland Park Church
Description:The Baptist Church in Lanton. Originally one mile southwest of the site of Lanton in a small park on a higher elevation. (D.W. Epley; H. Chapin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Highland School
Description:Built on higher elevation, four and a half miles south of Olden. (Mr. & Mrs. J.C. Cage; F.A. Elderinghoff)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hill Crest Church
Description:A union church at South Fork on Highway 80, one-half mile northwest from the old Cross Roads School where services were held by various denominations. This church, replacing Cross Roads Church (q.v.), was erected on the crest of a hill, and dedicated, on the first Sunday in June, 1923, to the Methodist Episcopal South and Congregational Methodist, Missionary Baptist, and Christian denominations. "Uncle" Stilly Garrett of Pottersville, gave the site, and Mrs. E.L. Knox suggested the name. (Mrs. Nancy Hunter; T. Proffitt; Mrs. J.L. Hovey; Mrs. Violet Richey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hill's Park
Description:A filling station and cabins established by B. Humphries on Highway 60, three miles west of Mountain View. Operated by William R. Hill, who bought it in 1935 from Richard M. Hutchinson. Formerly known as Hutchinson Heights. (Mr. & Mrs. William R. Hill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hines Hill
Description:In West Plains, now known as South Hill, where the Federal soldiers had headquarters after the town was destroyed. Captain B.F. Hines of the Federal Army bought the location and built a good home soon after the Civil War. The city water plant is now situated there. (Mr. & Mrs. E. Dixon)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hines School
Description:In northeastern Goldberry Township. The name of a landowner there, Louis Hines. (H.A. Smith; L. Thomas)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hocomo
Description:A post office established in 1931 in northeastern Benton Township when Russell McHan put in a store and filling station on Highway 80. The name was suggested by the merchant's father, B. McHan. Coined by combining the first two letters of Howell and the abbreviations of County and Missouri. (G. Callahan; Mrs. Joe L. Lair; Postal Guide 1935-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hoey School
Description:A discontinued older school southeast of Pomona in Dry Creek Township. Now a part of Olden School. Named for John P. Hoey, a farmer and stockdealer who deeded the site. (D.G. Turner; T.J. Whitmire)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Holman School
Description:See Free Union School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Homeland
Description:A discontinued post office six miles southwest of West Plains on Highway 80. Established after the Civil War and kept first by John Burnsworth in his farm home. He gave the name because they could not get their mail at home instead of going to West Plains for it. The office was kept later by John Spencer, who had a store there, and by some others. Joe Taylor had a store and filling station built there in 1934 and tried in vain to get the office re-established. The cemetery and school very near were named for the office. (J.J. Taylor; T. Proffitt; Mr. & Mrs. Ira May; P.L. Polk (1876) 16; Postal Guide 1887-1893)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Homeland Cemetery
Description:The burial ground at the Homeland Church and school. Formerly known as Hunt's Graveyard for Jesse Hunt who came before the Civil War and deeded the grounds. (J.J. Taylor; Geo. Callahan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Homeland Church
Description:A Congregational Methodist Church, organized in the old Cloninger School house by Reverend J.W. Mustion and Reverend S.T. Proffitt soon after the post office was established. The name was suggested by Reverend Riley Proffitt and soon a building was erected at the post office site. The Methodist organization had dwindled away by 1927, and the building is rented by the Baptist who completed their organization in 1936. (J.J. Taylor; Geo. Callahan; T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Homeland School
Description:At the site of the Homeland post office which name it had acquired before it was moved about 1920. The old log school one mile northwest of the present site was known as the Cloninger School for Thomas Cloninger, a farmer who gave the land. (Mr. & Mrs. Ira May; Mrs. Celia Dooley; J.J. Taylor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hopewell School
Description:In southwestern Myatt Township, three miles west of Lanton. The old log house was erected in 1931. An idealistic name. (Mrs. Ada Nale; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hopkins Church
Description:See New Hope Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hopkins Graveyard
Description:Now New Liberty Cemetery for the church near. Originally known as the Hopkins Graveyard on John Hopkins' land near the old Hopkins School (q.v.). Known later as the Johns Graveyard for John F. Johns who came from Franklin County, Missouri (originally from Tennessee) and bought the land there soon after the Civil War. (R.W. Johns; D.W. Epley; T. Proffitt; J.R. Byers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hopkins School
Description:Southwest of Grimmett three miles, built on land then owned by William Hopkins. The original log building, used for church and school, was on John Hopkins' land northeast of the present site about one and a half miles. The old district was divided into the new Hopkins and Grimmett schools. The Hopkins settlement was started by John Hopkins who came from Tennessee before the Civil War and reared his family here. (R.W. Johns; Mrs. Mary Long; G.T. Brown; Mrs. E.O. Bess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Horn Branch
Description:See Gentry Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Horton
Description:The same location as Cordz (q.v.). It was laid out in 1883 by the railroad officials and named by them for George Horton of Springfield, Missouri, a civil engineer who had surveyed for the road. A post office of the name was established. Soon Henry Cordz put in a store, his wife was made postmistress, and the name changed to Cordz. After the timber boom, as the population (during the 1880s and 1890s it reached 1500) decreased, and the town was almost gone it became known as Old Horton. Nothing remains except Horton Cemetery, also known as the Parrish Cemetery for Henry Parrish who lived there for some time. (J.C. Cage; A.T. Hollenbeck; J.A. Duffy; Postal Guide 1886)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Horton Cemetery
Description:See Parrish Cemetery.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Howell County
Description:Formed on March 2, 1857, from Oregon and Ozark counties. Thomas Jefferson Howell, early settler in Howell Valley, who represented Oregon County in the Legislature at the time was instrumental in getting the county organized. It was named for the early settlers in the valley. See Howell Valley. (H. Chapin; Jno. Perkins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Howell Creek
Description:See Howell Valley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Howell Spring
Description:In People's Park in West Plains. It was near this old spring that Wiley Howell settled in pioneer days. Later, when Peter Bingaham acquired the land, the spring took his name. (Mrs. Fidelis Willis; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Howell Township
Description:The division now includes the south central portion extending east to the county line; but included some parts of surrounding townships in Howell County, and a large portion of northwest Oregon County, formed by the court of Ripley County, prior to 1844. Mrs. Risley explains that in the election of 1844, the presidential vote of Howell Township was fourteen, all for James K. Polk. The name was given for the early settlers. See Howell County. (Mrs. A.C. Risley; R. Childers; T. Hofstedler)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Howell Valley
Description:A very shallow, wide valley, drained by the upper part of Warm Fork Creek (earlier known as Howell Creek for the settlers there) in the center of which is West Plains. Josiah Howell, who bought the Adams Improvement (see Town Spring), considered the first permanent settler in the present limits of the county, and his sons Thomas Jefferson, later in the Legislature, and Wiley came from Tennessee in the early 1840s. (Mrs. A.C. Risley; S.J. Galloway; H. Chapin; R. Childers; Mrs. Fidelis Willis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Howell Valley Cemetery
Description:Another name for Langston Cemetery in Howell Valley. In 1929, Ralph Morrison, oil capitalist of San Antonio, Texas, whose parents and brother were buried here, had a wall of native stone built around the grounds, and requested that its original name Howell Valley be restored. (Mrs. Wm. Clark; Miss Pauline Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Howell Valley Church
Description:The old Baptist Church, now defunct, later Langston Church (q.v.), where the Penningtons and Cordells were influential. The association met there as early as 1869 and as late as 1900. (T. Proffitt; D.W. Epley; MINUTES 1936)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hughlett School
Description:In southeastern Sisson Township. Named for Brown Hughlett, a good farmer and stock dealer of the community, who owns land. (D.G. Turner; Mrs. Martha Gilliam)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hunt's Creek
Description:Heads near Lanton and flows east into Myatt Creek. Henry Hunt lived on the upper part a short time. (Mrs. Ada Nale; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hunt's Graveyard
Description:See Homeland Cemetery.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hurricane Hollow
Description:Hurricane Hollow heads near Brandsville and leads into Warm Fork Creek. As the regions are hilly with some abrupt jagged slopes, the streams flow very rapidly during heavy rains. Name given, no doubt, because of the topographical and physical conditions. Another Hurricane Hollow in Chapel Township. It is an earlier name for Kenaga Hollow (q.v.). The earliest school of the community was located here. Cf. Hurricane School, Kenaga Mills, and Kenaga School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hurricane School
Description:The old pioneer log school in Hurricane Hollow (q.v.). During the 1870s a box house was erected and the school was known as Kenaga School for the mill and its owner. See Kenaga Mill. In the late 1880s, a frame house was built at the natural pond one-half mile west and the name changed to Pond School. When it was moved in 1930 one-half mile south and a much better house built, the poetical, descriptive name of Forest Dell was given because of its location on the forest covered low ridge and shallow valley near. (Stan Kenaga; S. Weaver; H.A. Smith; Mr. & Mrs. L. Thomas; Mrs. E.O. Bess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hutchinson Heights
Description:See Hill's Park.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hutton Draw
Description:See Hutton Valley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hutton Valley [1 of 2]
Description:A small town and post office in Hutton Valley Township, on the Current River Branch of the Frisco Railroad, laid out in 1873 by Richard Marion Smith and Hercules W. Bolin. R.M. Smith, who had come from Tennessee in 1870, and Pleasant N. Gulley put up the first store. Kit Redden and Samuel Finley put in a second store. Hercules W. Bolin, who prior to 1873 had kept a store and post office in his home one and a half miles northwest of present Hutton Valley, suggested the name, because the first settler of the valley, a Mr. Hutton who came about 1841 lived there for several years. (H.A. Smith; Miss Sarah Rowe; Mrs. A.E. Risley; P.L. 1860 Sutherland, 740; Campbell Gaz. (1873) 257; Postal Guide 1886-1941; Mrs. A.C. Risley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hutton Valley [2 of 2]
Description:Often called Hutton Draw, leads into Eleven Points Creek near Hutton Valley post office from the north. It took its name from the post office. (J.N. Barnett; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hutton Valley Township
Description:The central of the three northern border divisions. It originally included all the northern part of the county. Named for the post office. (H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Illinois Town
Description:In the earlier day, the northern part of West Plains was known by this name because the first residents, Samuel Risley, J.S. Paden, S.D. Foster and some others had come from Lebanon, Illinois. Now a large part of this section is known as Nigger Town because the negroes live there. (Mr. & Mrs. E. Dixon; Miss Ella Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:See Big Indian Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Iron Ore Hollow
Description:In the western part of Spring Creek Township. It is thought there is a considerable amount of iron ore there, but it has not been developed. (T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jamup Creek
Description:A small branch of Jack's Fork of Shannon County, that heads southeast of Mountain View. It flows through a canyon probably 200 ft. deep. Because a ridge, through which the water has worn an opening and formed a natural bridge, crosses the canyon the water during heavy rains fills the canyon making a jamming of the water; hence the name. (Samuel Weaver; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johns Graveyard
Description:See Hopkins Graveyard.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson Graveyard
Description:See Johnson School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson School
Description:An old log house, gone years ago, used for the early schools and church near the present site of Pleasant Hill Church. Later Cedar Grove School. The Johnson Graveyard, now Pleasant Hill Cemetery for the school one mile west. James Johnson, one of the first settlers of long before the Civil War, reared his family there. (Mr. & Mrs. Geo. W. Ford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jordan Pond
Description:A pond in western Sisson Township, on land owned by Thomas P. Modrel. It was made by the community for stock water, but sometimes it was used as a baptistry. About 1902, a Baptist preacher, giving his address at a baptismal service, made the statement among other expressions of his crude oratory, "Here we stand on the banks 'uv Jurden ( )," making reference, of course, to the River Jordan in Palestine. The boys of the community "took up the name and it stuck." The pronunciation "Jurden" is wide spread in Missouri even today among the uneducated and formerly was wellnigh universal. (W.T. Modrel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Julian Mines
Description:See Rex Mines.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jungle Ranch
Description:A part of the Tory Ranch, 900 acres in South Fork and Myatt townships, bought in 1918 by G.B. Nale, where he and his son set up sawmills. See Nale Mills. Mr. Nale gave the name because it was in a basin surrounded by hills with a thick growth of virgin timber. (Mrs. Ada Nale; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kansas City, Fort Scott and Memphis Railroad
Description:This road, named for the former terminal points, was constructed through this section during the very early 1880s. It is now a part of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kenaga Church
Description:See Kenaga Mills and Ebenezer Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kenaga Hollow
Description:A small stream, heading in Chapel Township, drains this valley into Eleven Points River in Sisson Township. Matthias Kenaga, who came from Ohio, was a farmer and sawmill man in the vicinity. He was a Republican Judge of the county for two terms in the 1890s. He had formerly lived in Indiana and was a Civil War veteran from that state. He was in Ohio before coming to Missouri. Cf. Kenaga Mills. (H.A. Smith; Stan Kenaga; S. Weaver)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kenaga Mills
Description:In 1870, Mathias Kenaga of Salisbury, Ohio came to Hurricane Hollow where he entered land at twenty-five cents an acre and began setting up timber mills. The first mill was at Blowing Spring (q.v.). It was small, a cross cut saw upon a scaffold, operated by two men, one below and one above the scaffold. A larger portable, the first steam mill in the county, was put in on Peace Valley one and a half miles from its mouth. A larger planing and sawmill was set up later in Hurricane Hollow. After operating here for a few years and then farming and serving as county judge during the 1890s, he moved to Oregon. (Stan Kenaga; H.A. Smith; J. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kenaga School
Description:See Hurricane School and Kenaga Mills.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kernz Graveyard
Description:About 1894, Mrs. Rebecca Kernz, formerly in Indiana, deeded one acre for a burial ground one and a half miles north of Oak Ridge School No. 3. (Mrs. Dora Hoglen; Mrs. L. Renner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kilman Hollow
Description:A southern tributary of Gunter's Creek in Sisson Township. Robert Kilman came from Tennessee in 1857 or 1858 and settled in the valley. (J.N. Barnett; J. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:King Mountain School
Description:About two and a half miles east of Willow Springs. It took the name of the mountain nearby. (Miss Pauline Smith; Mrs. Anna Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:King's Mountain
Description:Maps of 1850 and 1855 give it as King's Mount. Hardly a real mountain, it is, as Parker said, a high central point, or watershed from which streams run in every direction. Some informants say a man by that name lived there in the early days; others deny this and think the name grew up merely because it is the highest elevation in that region. The use of the apostrophe favors the personal origin of the name. It is also possible that the name was borrowed from the famous battle of the Revolutionary War, fought on October 7, 1780, at King's Mountain, South Carolina. Cf. the nearby and somewhat smaller Queen's Mountain. I think it is most probable that the true origin of the name is topographical. (MISSOURI AS IT WAS IN 1867, 275; Mrs. Anna Ferguson; J.N. Barnett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:King's Mountain Draw
Description:See Cane Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Klice Ranch
Description:A part, 9000 acres, of the Tory Ranch; a large part of it is virgin timber land in Myatt and South Fork townships. A.B. Klice of Grand Rapids, Michigan, died in 1935 leaving the lands to his heirs, the Klice Timber Company of Michigan. (E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Koelling's Graveyard
Description:A later name for Davis Graveyard, an old cemetery two miles southeast of Hatfield School, the old Meredith Graveyard (q.v.). William Koelling owned the land near during the 1880s. It was owned by William Davis some years before. (Mrs. Ada Nale; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:La Crone
Description:A later name for Haigart. A Mr. La Crone, one of the St. Louis stockholders, connected with the Carson Mine project (see Haigart) bought the mines which took his name. Later F.J. Stuart became the owner and the name was changed to Stuart. (J.T. Whitmire; Mrs. H.L. Garrett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lamons Creek
Description:A name given to East Fork of South Fork of Spring River, for Peter Lamons, who came from Alabama in the late 1850s, settled here and reared his family. The old Lamons School later formed parts of Doty, Mott, and Greenwood schools. (H. Chapin; T.J. Whitmire; Mr. & Mrs. Fred McKelvey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lamons Graveyard
Description:In southeastern Howell Township. Deeded by Henry Jefferson Lamons during the 1870s. Probably a family burial ground earlier. See Lamons Creek. It has acquired the name Evergreen because of the many large evergreen trees of various kinds set out years ago. (S. Lambe; H. Chapin; Mrs. E.O. Bess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lamons School
Description:See Lamons Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Langston Cemetery
Description:See Langston School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Langston Church
Description:See Langston School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Langston School
Description:The school, church, and cemetery are at the same place, three miles southeast of West Plains, on land owned as early as 1875 by Henry Mode Langston and his sons, Jefferson and Samuel, from Tennessee. The school is now consolidated with West Plains. The church, originally Baptist, later Methodist, is a union church now used chiefly by Baptists and Methodists. The two brothers put up a little store on the settlement, which business increased to become in after years the largest department store in West Plains. (H. Chapin; N.J. Ramsey; J.L. House; Mrs. H.L. Garrett; T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Langston Store
Description:See Langston School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lanton
Description:A village and post office in southwest Myatt Township. James Sutton and John Sloan settled what is now Lanton before the Civil War, during Lincoln's first administration. Later William and Joseph Sutton, brothers, were prominent farmers and landowners there. John Lancaster, a physician, came from southeast Missouri. The agreement was made between these two prominent families that the post office name should be a combination of their family names, Lan-caster and Nut-ton. (H. Chapin; E.M. Nale; Postal Guide 1883- 1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lanton School
Description:West of Lanton one and a quarter miles. Named for the post office. (E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Larly Spring
Description:See Turner School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lead Hollow
Description:Near Bly. Heads into Bennett's Bayou. Bert Taylor, a desperado and murderer, was hanged in Corning, Arkansas in the early 1880s. (L. Thomas; Mrs. Jesse Lee; C. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Leader
Description:A discontinued post office in northwest Myatt Township. The origin has not been found. (Postal Guide 1909-1910; Map 1907)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lebo
Description:A post office in southeast central South Fork Township, discontinued in 1933. Frank M. McCoy, landowner, farmer, and later County Judge, who helped to get the post office established in 1892 and kept it in his home (later kept in stores of the community), gave the name for his old home in Kansas. Lebo, Kansas (possibly for Lebeau) is a small town in Coffey County about twenty miles east of Emporia. (T.A. Manz; D.W. Epley; Postal Guide 1897-1932)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lebo School
Description:See Lost Spring School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ledbetter Graveyard
Description:A later name for Fox Graveyard (q.v.). James Ledbetter lived near and owned land, before Henry Parker. See Fox Hollow. (Mrs. H.L. Garrett; Mrs. Mary Long; Wm. F. Harper)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lee Hollow
Description:Heads in Chapel Township; flows southwest into Eleven Points River. Alfred Lee, from Tennessee, settled near the middle of the valley long before the Civil War. His three sons were Robert, William, and John. John later owned the old homestead and lived there for years. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Thomas; Mrs. Wm. Lee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Leo
Description:A discontinued post office in northeast South Fork Township on the old Lebo route. Some informants thought that Charles P. Harper, now (1937) of Los Angeles, California, was the first postmaster; but Mr. Many, who carried the mail at that time, on the route, explained that Andy A. Hinkle, who had a store, was the first custodian and gave the name for his nephew Leo Harper, a son of Charles P. Harper, who soon moved from Kansas to the vicinity, bought the store and kept the post office. (Mrs. F. McKelvey; Mrs. Dorris Farley; T.J. Whitmire; T.A. Manz; Postal Guide 1897-1901)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Leota
Description:A village and post office in Benton Township. When the office was established in 1900, Grant Thompson, who lived one and a half miles south of the present site, took care of the mail in his home for several years. The name was suggested by Mrs. Lizzie Vaughn for Leota, the daughter of Frank R. Cook who had opened up a little zinc mine near the present site of Leota. Zinc was not found in paying quantities, but Mrs. Cook laid out twenty acres in lots and named the village Pearl City for Mrs. Pearl Holman, a neighbor. When the post office was moved to the village in 1912, the village name was changed to the office name. (Postal Guide 1907- 1941; Mrs. Myrtle Burgess; Mrs. Nancy Hunter; D.P. Epley; W.N. Odell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Leyda Hill
Description:The present site of Christa Hogan Hospital in the southern part of West Plains. It was so called for Professor J.E. Leyda, a Presbyterian minister who was president of West Plains College, which operated as a business college and normal school for some years during the 1880s. Later it was operated by the Catholic sisters as Our Lady of the Ozarks. (Miss Ella Williams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Liberty Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church one and a half miles northeast of Pomona. Organized in the College Hill School, in 1888, by Reverend Daniel Shipman and named by Newton C. Epps for his old home church in Greene County, Missouri. It is a stock name for churches in many parts of Missouri. As other communities grew, the church was disbanded, and soon after 1905 the house was sold to John Webb for a dwelling. (Mrs. Nancy Kinion; D.W. Epley; D.C. Turner; MINUTES 1936)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Liberty Union Church
Description:Built at Pottersville early in the 1900s, to be used by all denominations. An ideal name. (S.T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lick Branch
Description:A northern branch of Tabor Creek. In the vicinity of the big deer licks of pioneer times. See Big Lick post office.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lilly School
Description:An old school later divided into Lost Camp and Half Way schools. The site was given by Frank Lilly, a farmer and landowner, who came to the vicinity soon after 1865. (Mrs. Nancy Kinion; H.A. Smith; W.T. Modrel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lincoln Nichols Hollow
Description:See Nichols Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lincoln School
Description:The school in West Plains for colored people. It was named in 1927 for Abraham Lincoln. (Supt. J.R. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Creek
Description:A small stream heading in Benton Township and flowing into Bennett's River in Arkansas. Also known as Middle Bayou to distinguish it from the two larger streams, Bennett's Bayou on the west and Bennett's River on the east. (C. Vaughn; T.P. Gray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Greasy Creek
Description:See Big Greasy Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Indian Creek
Description:See Big Indian Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Pine Creek
Description:See Big Pine Creek and Big Spring Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Spring Hollow
Description:In southwestern Dry Creek Township, leading into Dry Creek. An important place for the community, since so many haul water from the small living spring there. (J. Collins; Mr. & Mrs. L. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Vine Church
Description:A Baptist Church built of logs two miles north of Pottersville about 1870. Also used for the early schools. The school was moved to Pottersville and the church disbanded, the members going to Pottersville and Union Grove. For the name cf. above. (Wm. Fox)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Zion Church [1 of 2]
Description:The defunct Missionary Baptist Church at Trask, where the house was erected about 1902. The church, organized in 1894, was originally one and a half miles northwest and sometimes known as Uncle Johnny Smith Church, for John Smith, an influential member who lived near. Zion is used in the Bible literally to mean all of Jerusalem, but strictly it is the southwest and highest hill of the city where a Jebusite fortress was taken by David; figuratively it represents the spiritual city--the city of God. (MINUTES 1936; Mrs. Laura Gaston; H.A. Smith; II Sam. 5:7; Isa. 24:23; I Kings 1:8; Rev. 14:1)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Zion Church [2 of 2]
Description:A Primitive Baptist Church, organized in 1932. A small house was built at the Fox Graveyard. Cf. Little Zion Church at Trask. (Mr. & Mrs. J.E. Hopkins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Livingston Iron Mines
Description:Unprofitable iron mines opened up a few years ago southwest of Pomona, on land now owned by the heirs of A. Hayden Livingston, an attorney of West Plains. (T.J. Whitmire; D.C. Turner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Elm Ranch
Description:About 1912 R.W. Scott who owned one hundred sixty acres one and a half miles southwest of West Plains set out a considerable acreage of strawberries, peaches, and apples. The name was given because of the one elm tree left standing. (Mr. & Mrs. I. May; G.W. Ford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Pine Cemetery
Description:An old burial ground five miles northwest of West Plains, in Howell Township. Originally there was one pine tree on the grounds. Now several are scattered about. Lone Pine School, established before 1885, took the name of the cemetery. See New Central School. (L. Collins; Mr. & Mrs. G.W. Ford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Pine School
Description:See Lone Pine Cemetery.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Camp
Description:An old discontinued post office, evidently named for the creek. Campbell says, "A post office sixteen miles north and northwest of West Plains" which would put it south of Hutton Valley and on the headwaters of Lost Camp Creek. (P.L. 1860 Sutherland, 741; P.L. 1873 Campbell, Gaz. of Missouri, 257)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Camp Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church, organized in 1903, in a brush arbor near Lost Camp School from which it took its name. (J.N. Barnett; Mrs. Nancy Kinion; MINUTES 1936; M.B.G.A. 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Camp Creek
Description:A southern tributary of Eleven Points River, in Hutton Valley Township. Its origin appears lost in tradition--possibly adventurous, romantic, and tragic, for various stories are told. One, which sounds very plausible, is that when the government surveyors were sectionizing this region, one crew that had their camp in this vicinity became lost from their camp for a day or more, at least long enough that they gave the name for the creek. Another is that during the early days a man by the name of Camp was lost in the wilderness along the stream, thus the name. Another elderly informant relates that his mother had told him long before the Civil War some hunters were in the region, and found the dead body of a boy who had been lost there. Another old tale is that a pioneer hunter had made camp near the stream (very few settlers within miles). Once he was missing; his camp was found, but not the man. Old people who told Mr. Epley (now, 1937, very old) said they had no idea of what became of the hunter, but the incident gave the name for the stream. The story handed down to another old family is that before the Civil War, when the country was sparsely settled, "a bunch of hunters struck camp to hunt wild turkeys and other game." A young man became lost from the camp, and was surrounded by wolves, when he "shot off his gun." He was answered by the campers, after which he got back safely to the camp. Another, possibly the most tragic, is that two hunters, one a young man, the other, older and supposed to be a bachelor came to the region. "Back at home these two men loved the same girl." It is told that this elder killed the young man long, long before the Civil War. This tale further relates that when the surveyors were in the vicinity in 1840, they found the name for the stream had been given by the early pioneers. Another elderly informant says that long before 1858 some people were camping there and one was lost. Another relates that some early pioneers, who were moving, became lost and camped on the stream. Authentic history may never record the exact incident, but the story of camping and being lost in a wild wood as that must have been cannot be questioned for its truth. (D.W. Epley; H.A. Smith; W.T. Modrel; J.N. Barnett; Mrs. Mary Wadley; L. Thomas; S.D. Goyer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Camp School
Description:In southern Hutton Valley Township, three miles south of Hutton Valley village, near Lost Camp Creek from which it took its name. (G.F. Brown)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Spring Church
Description:See Stuart's Chapel.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Spring School
Description:In South Fork Township. Also called Lebo School for the post office of the community. The good living spring in a deep canyon, originally in a densely wooded section where the school was built suggests the name. The school house was used for church services until Stuart's Chapel (which is also called Lost Spring Church, for the school), was erected one mile away. Many other small springs and the wooded section near South Fork Creek make a good camping, hunting, and fishing place, which is known as Lost Springs. (Miss Ella Williams; Mr. & Mrs. P. Gray; Mrs. Nancy Hunter; Mrs. E.O. Bess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Springs
Description:See Lost Spring School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lovan Graveyard
Description:See Dry Creek School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lovan School
Description:See Dry Creek School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lover's Leap
Description:A picnicking place on Dry Creek one and a half miles northwest of Turner School. The precipice, about seventy-five feet high, was named about 1886 by Clara Greenwood when a group of girls were there for an outing. Clara, somewhat older than the other girls, and having reached the age for love dreams, found no difficulty in imagining this romantic name. It is a stock name for any abrupt elevation. (Mrs. D.G. Turner; Mr. & Mrs. L. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lower Fork
Description:See Spring Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mackey Church
Description:See Pleasant Valley Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mackey Graveyard
Description:See Pleasant Valley Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Malay Branch
Description:In Chapel Township. It flows into Eleven Points River. Milford Malay bought land there, known formerly as the Durnell farm. (L. Thomas; S. Weaver; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Maltebarger Graveyard
Description:An old burial ground west of Christy (q.v.). J.J. Maltebarger, a Union soldier owned the land and lived near for many years. (T.A. Manz)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mammoth Cave
Description:See McCammon Cave.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Martin Cemetery
Description:See Big Spring School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Martin Hill
Description:The hill just opposite Siloam Springs, where D.F. Martin had an unusually large and beautiful home for those days. See Martinsville.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Martin Spring
Description:See Big Spring School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Martinsville
Description:See Brown Springs and Siloam Springs.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Matna Hollow
Description:In eastern Howell Township, a southern branch of Gunter's Creek. Pioneers of the name settled near the mouth of the stream in the 1850s. (J.N. Barnett; J. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McCammon Cave
Description:A large cave, with several rooms, about six miles east of West Plains, on land now (1937) owned by Mr. Glenn Marshall. Nathan McCammon settled in the vicinity in 1841. Later Matthew McCammon homesteaded the land having the cave. It was earlier known also as Mammoth Cave because of its size. (J.L. House; Mr. & Mrs. H.L. Garrett; Mrs. A.C. Risley; E. Dix)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McCann Crossing
Description:The old road crossing of Eleven Points River near the mouth of Peace Valley Creek. Taint and Tolliver McCann, brothers, owned a large farm there and operated a still there for a few years during the 1870s. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Thomas)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McCullouck Spring
Description:See Hellum Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McElmurry Branch
Description:In western Howell Township. It flows into Davis Creek. Charley McElmurry, a farmer, owned land there. (T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McElmurry Cemetery
Description:See Hawkins Cemetery.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Meredith Cemetery
Description:See Meredith Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Meredith Church
Description:See Meredith Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Meredith Hollow
Description:In Myatt Township, leading into Myatt Creek from the west. Three brothers, Rice, James, and John Meredith, lived along Myatt Creek in that vicinity as early as 1875. The first house for school and church was built of hewed pine logs brought from Arkansas in 1878, on land given by James Meredith. The cemetery near is yet sometimes known as the old Meredith Cemetery, but generally as Hatfield for the school rebuilt in 1901, one-half mile from the old Meredith School, on the farm belonging to Francis M. Hatfield. During the 1920s, a new building was erected on the old Meredith school site for funerals and religious meetings of the community. It is generally known as Hatfield Church, for the school, but still often called Meredith Church. (H. Chapin; Mrs. Ada Nale; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Meredith School
Description:See Meredith Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Middle Bayou
Description:See Little Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Middle Indian Creek
Description:See Big Indian Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midt Creek
Description:Leads into Spring River in Arkansas. Found only on an 1850 map. Rev. Mr. Epley thinks it is a family name. I am inclined to believe it may be a misprint for Myatt Creek. (D.W. Epley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midway Park
Description:A store and filling station, halfway between Willow Springs and Mountain View, on Highway 60, was erected by Thomas J. Allen in 1929. Mr. Allen plans to make a beautiful place here for camping and parking priveleges. (T.J. Allen)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midway Tourist Camp
Description:At the junction of highways 60 and 14, halfway between Pomona and West Plains. Established and named in 1927 by Benjamin Letto from Chicago. Bought in 1929 by Mr. George W. Ford, and now (1937) operated by his son, Melvin D. Ford. The place consists of a service station, garage, cabins, and a cottage in a small, pretty park. (Mr. & Mrs. Geo. W. Ford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mine Hollow Branch
Description:A branch of Tabor Creek, northwest of Siloam Springs. Much prospecting for lead and zinc was done in the 1880s and later at various times, but no really paying developments were made. (Mr. & Mrs. J.A. Duffy; L. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Minson Branch
Description:Heads west of Arditta and flows into Setzer Branch southwest of Cureall. Thomas Minson, a Baptist minister, lived near the stream. (S.T. Proffitt; Mr. & Mrs. J.A. Duffy)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mint Spring
Description:See Mint Spring Graveyard.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mint Spring Graveyard
Description:One of the oldest public burial grounds in the county, four miles southeast of Lanton. It was started before the Civil War upon the hill above Mint Spring, which still is never dry. The mint plant grows profusely along the spring and its branch. (Mr. & Mrs. E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mitchell Spring
Description:See Moore Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Modrel School
Description:Now three miles northeast of Pomona. The old district was formed and the log house built in 1871 on land belonging to Henry W. Modrel who, during the Civil War, was a saddle and harness maker in Tennessee and came to this section in 1868. Later the district was divided to make College Hill School and Modrel, which was moved three-quarters of a mile on land deeded by William T. Modrel in 1900. (L. Thomas; W.T. Modrel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Moffett Graveyard
Description:West of Hutton Valley two miles near the first sight of Mount Pisgah Church, on land then belonging to Andrew J. Smith. It was named for a Mr. Moffett (Dr. James Moffett's father) an early settler there. (Mrs. Mary Kinion; E. Dixon; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Moody
Description:A post office in southwestern South Fork Township. Formerly it was quite a village with two cotton gins, five or six stores, and several residences; now there are only a store with the post office and homes near. The name was given for the spring there. (T.J. Whitmire; D.W. Epley; P.L., Polk (1883) 88; Postal Guide 1886-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Moody Creek
Description:An eastern branch of Bennett's River that heads south and east of Moody post office. An early pioneer of the name settled near the spring at Moody during the 1850s but left during the Civil War. (D.W. Epley; P. Gray; S.T. Proffitt; C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Moody School
Description:Near the post office for which it was named. The old log school of the community was one and a half miles southeast and known as Strange School for A.A. Strange who deeded the land. He came from Kentucky in 1857. (H. Chapin; D.W. Epley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Moody Spring
Description:See Moody Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Moore Spring
Description:About 1875, Dr. Smith B. Moore from Batesville, Arkansas, bought the William Peace place, two miles west of White Church; the good spring was long known by his name. Prior to that it was known as Goyer Spring for Daniel Goyer who purchased it from the Peace family in 1860. It is now (1937) known as Mitchell Spring for the owner George Mitchell. (L.T. Burgess; S.D. Goyer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Moore's Hollow
Description:In Hutton Valley Township. Flows into Big Pine Creek. Early settlers of the name lived there. Hugh and Thomas Moore, brothers, lived there as early as 1867. (H.A. Smith; Mrs. Wm. Lee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Morgan Branch
Description:See Cox Draw.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Morning Glory Mines
Description:A zinc mine, never very productive, opened about 1902 by Ed Dyer on J.R. Bridges' land one and a half miles north of Caulfield. It was then known as Bridges' Mines. Later Frank R. Cook bought the lease and gave the name Morning Glory for the vines growing there. (Wm. F. Harper; J.W. Briggs)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Morrison Mines
Description:Small zinc mines, opened in 1905 by Allen Rowden and operated for a short time only, on land owned by Gibbon Morrison. Also known as Chapin Mines for Chapin Station (q.v.). (J.W. Briggs; H. Chapin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mott
Description:A post office on the old mail route from West Plains to Lanton. Kept by William McGinty and named for Miss Martha Briscoe, later Mrs. Oscar Kelley of West Plains, who had been a teacher and was affectionately called Aunt Mott. (Mr. & Mrs. Fred McKelvey; T.J. Whitmire; Mrs. Ada Nale; H. Chapin; Postal Guide 1893-1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mott School
Description:Formed from the old Lamons and Briscoe schools. Named for the post office. Cf. Mott.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Confusion
Description:See Free Union School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Olivet Church
Description:The Missionary Baptist Church in Mountain View. The present house is on the site of the old log building in Old Town (q.v.), used for church and school, on land then belonging to William Goldsberry; the early church was sometimes known as Goldsberry's church. According to the MINUTES, it was organized in 1895, but old residents say it is older. Mrs. Holden explains that she attended school there as early as 1867. The present house was perhaps erected in 1895. Mount Olivet is a famous mountain east of Jerusalem, the scene of many events connected with the life of Christ. (Matt. 24:3; 26:31-45; Mr. & Mrs. S.A. Holden; G.W. Winningham; D.W. Epley; MINUTES 1936)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Pisgah Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Christian Church, a small box building, erected upon a hill about 1912, one and a half miles northeast of Cureall post office. The Bible name, for which see above, was suggested by Pierce Fox. Since it is of the non- progressive branch of the Christian Church it was often spoke of perhaps derisively as Gospel Hill Church because they claim to have the true Bible Church. Because there are so many seed ticks in the vicinity it is often called Seed Tick, no doubt, somewhat in ridicule. (T. Proffitt; Mrs. Mary Long; E. Williams; D.W. Epley; Num. 21:20; 23:14; Deut. 3:27; 34:1)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Pisgah Church [2 of 2]
Description:The first Missionary Baptist Church organized in the present limits of Howell County formed in 1857. The original house of pine hewed logs used by the Methodists and Baptists and for school was two miles west of its present location on the homestead of Andrew J. Smith, who came to Howell County in 1856. The present house, at Hutton Valley, was erected in 1877. Some of the leading character members, whose influence was of such great value to their own and other communities, were Reverend Daniel Shipman, Newton C. Epps, Daniel Lovan, and Judge Pleasant N. Gulley and their vices. When the old log church was torn down, Reverend "Dan" Shipman, the first Baptist minister ordained in Howell County, made a gavel from one of the logs and presented it to the Baptist Association in 1888. Mr. M.A. Widener of West Plains Church now (1937) has the gavel. The name is that of the mountain ridge on which was located Mount Nebo, from which Moses was permitted to see Canaan, the promised land. (H.A. Smith; D.W. Epley; MINUTES OF HOWELL COUNTY 1936; Num. 21:30; 23:14; Deut. 3:27; 34:1)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Pleasant Church
Description:The Missionary Baptist Church at Cureall. Organized in February, 1877 by Reverend D.W. Epley, Zee Martin, and Robert Wild in the old Williams Schoolhouse one-half mile northeast of the present site. The school was on a hill. The present house was erected in 1880. (D.W. Epley; Mrs. Mary Williams; MINUTES 1936)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Pleasant School
Description:The school for the Leader Community, one-half mile south of the post office. A term of approbation.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Zion Cemetery
Description:See Mount Zion Methodist Church and Mount Zion Baptist Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Zion Church
Description:An active Missionary Baptist Church, two and a half miles west of Olden, in Dry Creek Township. Although the old records were lost, informants agree that it was organized about 1875 in the old Bridges Schoolhouse, by the ministers William Hade Turner, J.W. Jackson, and George W. Byers. Some of the charter members were James Bridges, Henry M. Bridges and wife Sarah, Savila A., and Francis Burgess. The cemetery near took the name of the church. See Little Zion Church for Bible reference. (D.W. Epley; L.T. Burgess; D.G. Turner; J. Collins; MINUTES 1936)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Zion Freewill Baptist Church
Description:See Mount Zion Union Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Zion Methodist Church
Description:An active church four miles north of Moody in southwestern South Fork Township. Informants do not agree on the date of organization. Some say it was organized before 1873; others, before the Civil War. All agree it was one of the oldest in the county and that it was in the leading neighborhood of the county. The old log house was used for school, church, and the Masonic Lodge. The Masonic Lodge of West Plains was organized here. See Little Zion Church for Bible reference. The old burial ground of the name is near the church. (S.T. Proffitt; D.W. Epley; Mr. & Mrs. Grover Klain; P. Gray; Mrs. Rebecca Gill; D.C. Stephens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Zion School
Description:In southwestern South Fork Township. Named for the old church of the community one-half mile east. (S.T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Zion Union Church
Description:The present house was built about 1907 by the community four miles north of White Church post office. There are Baptist, Methodist and Pentecost congregations there. The first building, a box house, was erected about 1877 by the Freewill Baptists and the name of Mount Zion given. In Burlesque this house was called Slop-Bucket. See Little Zion Church for Bible reference. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Thomas; Mr. & Mrs. F.A. Elderinghoff; S.D. Goyer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mountain View
Description:A town in Goldsberry Township on the Current River Railroad. Laid out in 1888 by the railroad but the village was named when the post office was established December 22, 1879, with John C. Campbell as postmaster. Frank Pollock gave the right of way and set up a store near the depot site. During the earlier days, large timber was scarce, and one could see over the hills, plains, and valleys for a long distance. The Campbell and Goldsberry stores and village, now known, locally, as Old Town, was on a small elevation; thus the name Mountain View. (Geo. W. Winningham; Stan Kenaga; Sam Weaver; H.A. Smith; NEWS & LEADER; P.L. Polk (1883) 88; Postal Guide 1886-1942)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mud Hollow
Description:See Turner School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mulaney Draw
Description:Heads southwest of Mountain View and leads into Eleven Points River. Michael Mulaney was an early settler in the lower part of the valley. (S.D. Goyer; J.N. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mushroom Cave
Description:See Bay Crossing.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mustion Draught
Description:A pioneer settler of this name came from Kentucky as early as the 1840s and entered a large tract of land. It heads southwest of West Plains and leads south and east into Warm Fork. (Mr. & Mrs. Ira May)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mustion Hollow
Description:Heads northeast of West Plains and leads northeast into Gunter's Creek. Earlier known as Owens Hollow for William Owens who settled there very soon after the Civil War. Later Pone Mustion bought the land and Alfred Mustion settled near. (Mr. & Mrs. F.A. Elderinghoff; J. Ferguson; J.N. Barnett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Myatt Creek
Description:Heads in Howell Township and flows across Myatt Township into Spring River in Arkansas. Various spellings are shown: "Myatts," on 1842 map; "Miatt," on 1855; "Myattee," on 1865. The story has been handed down that an old settler and landowner of this name was buried near the mouth of the creek long before 1851, explains Mr. Chapin. Israel Stevens, who came to the vicinity of Salem, Arkansas, soon after 1812, related to Mr. Nale that "old man Myatt" was buried among a few graves, out in the field one mile from Stevens Graveyard near Salem. (H. Chapin; McCanse, 40; A. Hollenbeck; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Myatt Township
Description:The southeastern division of the county. The name is taken from its main stream.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nale Branch
Description:In Myatt Township. Flows southwest into Myatt Creek. It traverses the farm homesteaded in the lower part of the valley, by Hezekiah Nale who came from Illinois in 1870. (Mrs. Ada Nale; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nale Mills
Description:Lumber mills now (1937) operated in southwestern Myatt Township, east of Lanton, by G.T. Nale, and earlier, by his father (son of Hezekiah Nale) G.B. Nale. (Mrs. Ada Nale; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nale's Creek
Description:A later name for Hunt's Creek (q.v.). It took the name from the lumber mills there. See Nale Mills. The old name is Sullivan Creek for an early settler. (Mrs. Ada Nale; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Need More
Description:Formerly a sawmill village. Now only a small store kept by Mrs. Eva Womack. In Spring Creek Township, three miles northwest of Pottersville on R.F.D. No. 1. Formerly R. Jesse Byers had a store there. A mocking name imputing poverty; a typical specimen of pioneer humor. (J.R. Byers; J.A. Duffy; L. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Bethel Church
Description:The Missionary Baptist Church at Bakersfield, in Ozark County. The old Bayou Church in Ozark County was dissolved and New Bethel was organized about 1877 on Bennett's Bayou in southwestern Benton Township. The church was moved to Bakersfield about 1888. Bethel, meaning house of God, is the name of a town north of Jerusalem, where Jacob had his dream. (D.W. Epley; Gen. 28:12-22)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Central School
Description:A newer school six and a half miles east of Siloam Springs, formed by the consolidation of Bridges, Grimmett, Lone Pine, and Rudville schools. Its location gives the name. (J.R. Byers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Franklin
Description:See Frankville.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Hope Cemetery
Description:See Pickard Chapel.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Hope Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Baptist Church organized on September 30, 1866, in a little log building, Pickard Chapel, with dirt floor and split log benches, used for the gathering place of the community. The present building is near Peace Valley post office about one mile northeast of the original site. It was organized by Reverend Jacob Smith of Hutton Valley and the idealistic name given at that time. Reverend Nathaniel Barnett and wife where charter members, and others of the Barnett family became members later; so the church became generally known as Barnett church, but still retains its original name. (J.N. Barnett; May Barnett; Mrs. Martha Gilliam; MINUTES 1936)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Hope Church [2 of 2]
Description:A defunct Primitive Baptist Church, organized in 1866 in the old Hopkins Schoolhouse. About 1885 a building was erected near the old school on the Hopkins land. Often known earlier as Hopkins Church for those families were strong supporters. The organization dwindled away gradually and the house was torn down in 1932. The few members left went to New Liberty Church near. See above. (J.R. Byers; T. Profitt; MINUTES HOWELL COUNTY 1931; R.W. Johns)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Liberty Cemetery
Description:See Hopkins Graveyard.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Liberty Church
Description:Erected as a Union Church in 1891, south of Grimmett, about one and a half miles east of the old Hopkins School. Although the house is open for all denominations, the Missionary Baptist, organized in 1893, is the only organized body there. The name "New" was prefixed to distinguish it from Liberty Church, near Pomona; "Liberty" promised freedom to all in the use of the house. (J. Collins; J.A. Duffy; J.R. Byers; MINUTES HOWELL COUNTY, 1936)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Salem Cemetery
Description:See New Salem Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Salem Church
Description:A Baptist Church, built in 1888, about one and a half miles west of Columbia School. Some years after 1890, but before 1918, the house burned. It was not rebuilt. The New Salem Cemetery for the church is also known as Hamilton Cemetery (q.v.). Salem, a Hebrew word meaning peace, is the original name for Jerusalem. It is a stock name for churches. (Heb. 7:1.2; Mrs. Sadie Day)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nichols Branch
Description:A small stream in southwestern Benton Township. Emptying into Middle Bayou. A pioneer, Lincoln Nichols, who came from Tennessee long before the Civil War, settled here and entered land. (C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nicks Graveyard
Description:In Benton Township, begun as a family burial ground during the Civil War, when a negro woman, a Nicks slave, died. Ples Nicks, who came from Tennessee before the Civil War, entered land now owned by the Strong heirs. (Mrs. Nancy Hunter; C. Vaughn; Mrs. Myrtle Burgess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nigger Town
Description:See Illinois Town.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nobblett Creek
Description:Heads southwest of Willow Springs and flows into Upper Spring Creek in Douglas County. In 1839 a man of this name, a hunter and squatter, settled near a little spring near the stream. (D. Ferguson; Mrs. Anna Ferguson; D.W. Epley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nobblett Mill
Description:The South Missouri Land and Lumber Company operated a large mill during the 1880s and 1890s near the present site of Noblet School which took the name of the mill and stream. Both spellings are found on different maps. (D. Ferguson; H.A. Smith; Carl Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Noblet School
Description:See Nobblet Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Noel's Knob
Description:The school highest elevation in the county, between Siloam Springs and Payne Knob. Jacob Noel, who came from Illinois, bought the land in 1895. He was a farmer and stock raiser. Now owned by Bert Noel of Siloam Springs. (Miss Ida Noel; Bert Noel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Branch
Description:Two smaller streams, North Branch and South Branch, join in southern Howell Township, forming the East Fork of South Fork of Spring River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Fork
Description:See Spring Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Prong
Description:See Dry Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove Cemetery
Description:See Fowler Graveyard and Oak Grove School No. 87.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Spring Creek Township northwest of Pottersville near the Fox Graveyard, which is often known as Oak Grove Cemetery for the church. The church was organized about 1910 and received its name because of the forest of white oak timber nearby. (G.T. Brown; S.T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove School No. 59
Description:In northeastern Howell Township. Formerly one-half mile west in a grove of oak timber. Used for church until Smith Chapel was built. (E. Bissett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove School No. 87
Description:Originally in a grove of oak trees in northwest Benton Township; now on Highway 80 one- quarter of a mile from the original location. Used by the Baptists who later moved membership to Cureall about 1910. (W.F. Harper; W.N. Odell; D.W. Epley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Lawn Cemetery
Description:A descriptive name given the city cemetery of West Plains. The grassy, well-kept grounds are shaded by oak trees.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Mound School
Description:In Benton Township two miles south of Caulfield (q.v.). Originally on the highest elevation in the community, in an oak forest. (W.N. Odell; D.W. Epley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Ridge School No. 1
Description:In Sisson Township. Chiefly red oak grows on the ridge. (Mrs. Martha Gilliam; Mr. & Mrs. F.A. Elderinghoff)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Ridge School No. 2
Description:In Howell Township, northwest of West Plains. Topographical and descriptive. (J.M. Spence)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Ridge School No. 3
Description:Established about 1902, four miles southeast of Moody. Several varieties of oak are found on the small elevation. (Mr. & Mrs. F. McKelvey; P. Gray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old Horton
Description:See Horton.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old Mud Spring
Description:Still a fairly good spring, in the vicinity of Cedar Grove School (q.v.), on the old Rock Bridge Road of the pioneer days. At first it was a muddy mass in the hollow, but was dug out and walled up to make a good spring. It became a community center for picnics and political gatherings, and was a noted camping place for the freighters; occasionally a number of wagons were there at one time for a night's rest. (T. Willis; D.G. Turner; S.T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old Tom Tabor School
Description:See Tabor Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old Town
Description:See Mountain View.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Olden
Description:A small town on Highway 60 and the Frisco Railroad in Dry Creek Township. Established in 1882 by the railroad and named for Benjamin F. Olden, an early lawyer and influential citizen of West Plains, who at the time was attorney for the Kansas City, Fort Scott, and Memphis Railroad Company (later the Frisco Railroad). He came from Illinois during the late 1860s. During the construction of the road, the camp here was known as Edom for Edom Dixon of West Plains, one of the contractors. (T.J. Whitmire; Mr. & Mrs. E. Dixon; A. Hollenbeck; P.L. Polk (1883) 91; Postal Guide 1886-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Onyx Cave
Description:A small cave about two miles north of Peace Valley. The land is owned by a Kansas City man. It is claimed that onyx was found in the cave but not considered profitable until better roads are built. (Mr. & Mrs. F.A. Elderinghoff)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Orchard Grove School
Description:In South Fork Township south of West Plains. The house burned in 1935 and a neat cobblestone building was erected. Originally a large orchard was near the school on land now owned by Ray Rogers. It was also known as Hall Town School for the Henderson Hall family of Portugese descent that lived near, and had owned land there as early as 1856. (D.C. Stephens; E.M. Nale; T.A. Manz)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ottomen
Description:Found on an 1889 map in the northwestern part of the county, but no information has been found.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Our Lady of the Ozarks
Description:See Leyda Hill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Owens Hollow
Description:See Mustion Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ozark School
Description:In the northwestern part of Willow Springs Township in a very hilly section. The Ozark Land and Lumber Company of Winona cut out the timber in this section. Very likely named for the company. (J.M. Spence; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Padgett Cemetery
Description:About two miles southwest of Mountain View. William Padgett, a pioneer from Tennessee, owned land there before the Civil War. (H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Panther Hollow
Description:A gulch in northeastern Goldsberry Township, joining Jack's Fork in Texas County. Habitat of panthers in early days. (T.J. Whitmire; L. Thomas)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Park View
Description:A small stone filling station and cabins, established in January, 1935 by William Farley of West Plains, who still owns it. It is on Highway 60, three-quarters of a mile north of West Plains, situated upon a small hill overlooking People's Park. (Oran Griffith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Parker Graveyard
Description:See Fox Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Parrish Cemetery
Description:See Horton.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Payne Knob
Description:One mile northeast of Siloam Springs. According to the Geological Survey made in 1929, it is 1200 ft. above sea level, the highest elevation in Howell County. P.S. Payne, a former merchant at Siloam Springs, bought the land in 1894. A government tower is on the hill. (Mr. & Mrs. J.A. Duffy; L. Collins; Mr. & Mrs. Homer Young)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Peace Valley
Description:A village and post office in Sisson Township, two and a half miles south of the stream of this name. The post office was first at what is now White Church established about 1874 and kept by a Mr. Layne in his store, who gave the name for William and Elgin Peace, early families of the community. C. Henry Dryer then bought the store and took the office. After a few years he moved the office to his land at the present location and laid out the town which he named for the post office. (J.N. Barnett; S.D. Goyer; G.F. Burroughs; P.L. Polk (1883) 91; Postal Guide 1886-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Peace Valley Creek
Description:The stream that drains Peace Valley Draw (q.v.) into Eleven Points River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Peace Valley Draw
Description:Heads north and east of West Plains and leads into Eleven Points River in Sisson Township. Very early pioneers of the name came from Tennessee long before the Civil War and settled west of White Church. Some informants believe the name was Felix Peace, who was known as Grand-Daddy Peace; he reared a large family before 1860, on the large farm in the valley that was named for him. (T.J. Whitmire; S.D. Goyer; D.G. Turner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Peace Valley High School
Description:It was formed about 1919 by the consolidation of Ferguson, Dryer, and Walnut Sink schools. Located near the post office for which it was named. (J.N. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pearl City
Description:See Leota.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pease Mill
Description:A large saw and planing mill one-half mile south of Siloam Springs, operated for a few years during the 1890s and early 1900s by two brothers, Myron and Orlando Pease, who were also large landowners. (S.T. Proffitt; Mr. & Mrs. J.A. Duffy)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:People's Park
Description:In the northwestern part of West Plains. It is now owned by the county, and, as the name indicates, is intended for general or popular use.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Perkins Branch
Description:A tributary of North Prong of Dry Creek, in Dry Creek Township. Perkins Spring, about two miles west of Olden, one of the best in the vicinity, is also known as Elm Spring for the elm trees growing near. James B. Perkins came from Tennessee in 1858 and entered the land. (Mrs. Mary Wadley; D.G. Turner; J. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Perkins Spring
Description:See Perkins Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pettit and Goldsberry Mill
Description:D.S. Pettit and John Goldsberry operated a sawmill in east Chapel Township during the early 1880s. (Mr. & Mrs. J. Pierson; Mrs. Clara Conner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pickard Chapel
Description:The old pioneer log building for church and school, near the present location of New Hope Church (q.v.). The very old burial ground Pickard Graveyard is now known as New Hope Cemetery. Dr. Pickard lived here before the Civil War. (J. Ferguson; S.D. Goyer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pickard Graveyard
Description:See Pickard Chapel.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pigeon Roost
Description:Formerly a heavily wooded region, south of Egypt School, on the old Mountain Home and West Plains Road, the habitat of wild pigeons. During the Civil War some people in this vicinity almost lived on pigeon meat. The pigeons were often so numerous that at night their weight broke large branches from the trees. (Mrs. Nancy Hunter; Mrs. Dora Hoglen; Mrs. Lucindy Matney)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pinch Misery
Description:An old logging camp about six miles west of Willow Springs, where the South Missouri Land and Lumber Company operated in the 1880s and 1890s. The women of the camp gave the name because their only way of getting to town was by the narrow gauge railroad, where they were so crowded and miserably uncomfortable. (Mrs. Anna Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Creek
Description:The stream heads near Sterling (q.v.) in Willow Springs Township and flows into Jack's Fork in Texas County. Much pine along the ridge gave the name. (R.T. Holloway; Mrs. Anna Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Grove Church
Description:See Pine Grove School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Grove School
Description:The old log house for school and church was built in 1873, three and a half miles west of Willow Springs. Charles Ferguson, later a merchanrt in Willow Springs, gave the name for his childhood school in Greene County, Tennessee. It is an appropriate name, for there was much pine timber in the vicinity. The Methodist Church was organized here in 1878 by Reverend Riley M. Proffitt. Later new buildings were erected for the school and the church. The Methodist organization disbanded about 1907 and the church, named for the school, is used by the community and various denominations. (S.T. Proffitt; D. Ferguson; J.M. Spence)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pinebrook Inn
Description:In the edge of Siloam Springs, it is an excellent hotel for a small place where one may rest and enjoy beautiful scenery. On the hills are many pine trees and the narrow valleys drained by small spring-fed streamlets are shaded by the pines. It was built in 1924 by N.O. Tate of Wichita, Kansas. John T. Woodruff of Springfield, Missouri now owns the 1000 acre tract. (Mr. & Mrs. J.A. Duffy)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pitts Grove School
Description:South of South Fork four and a half miles. Mrs. Hattie B. Pitts of West Plains gave the site and gave much material aid for a number of years. It was situated in a forest. The name Warner School was sometimes used because Chris Warner who lived near had a large family of progressive children in the school. (T.A. Manz; Mrs. H.B. Pitts; H. Chapin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Dell
Description:A post office, named for Pleasant Dell Farm (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Dell Farm
Description:James and David Estes, brothers, owned a good farm about seven miles south of Willow Springs and gave it this complimentary name. Peter Kemp of the community kept a post office of the name in his home for only a short time about 1878. His place now belongs to the Powell heirs. (Mr. & Mrs. Jno. Kinion; S.T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Cemetery
Description:See Johnson School and Pleasant Hill Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church seven miles west of West Plains. It was organized in the old Herron School in 1870 by Reverend H. Forrest and Reverend B.H. Lanham. The name, Reverend Epley thinks, is probably that of the old home church in Tennessee, whence came the Herrons, the Forrests, and the Epleys who were charter members. It was often generally known in the earlier days as Spring Creek Church for the stream nearby. The cemetery at the church is now known by the church name and as Cedar Grove Cemetery (q.v.). (Rev. D.W. Epley; M.B.G.A., 1934; MINUTES 1931, 1936)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:Southwest of Pottersville three and a half miles. Not an old school. The local name is Rosin Ridge, generally pronounced "Rosum," because the long elevation was formerly well wooded with pine trees. (Mr. & Mrs. J.A. Duffy; Mr. & Mrs. L. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Point School
Description:It is located upon a pointed hill, three and a half miles southeast of Siloam Springs. (H.L. Garrett; J. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Valley Church
Description:A defunct Cumberland Presbyterian Church two and a half miles east of Pomona. The original building, erected in 1873, is used for Sunday School, funerals and other religious services of any denomination. The location, in a pretty valley with much beautiful grass and very little timber, suggested the name to Henry W. Modrel and John A. Mackey, two leading members and elders in the church which was organizxed in 1873, with seventeen members, in the home of John A. Mackey, a prosperous farmer who gave the land for the house and cemetery. After the division in 1906, the organization soon dwindled and was disbanded, and the building was deeded to W.T. Modrel and his successors. For many years the church and cemetery were known as Mackey for John A. Mackey. The first burial was that of the informant's brother, Lewis J. Modrel in January, 1874. (W.T. Modrel; T.J. Whitmire; C.D. Reynolds)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:In Willow Springs Township, two and a half miles southwest of Burnham. A topographical and complimentary name. Also known earlier as Hale School (q.v.) for a farmer of that name who owned land and lived there during the 1880s. (Mrs. Nancy Kinion)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant View Church
Description:A Church of Christ north of West Plains, established about 1892. The site was given by Adolphus A. Cage who gave the name for the location. Forest fires destroyed the building about 1917 after which the church disbanded. (Mr. & Mrs. J.C. Cage)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant View School
Description:In Howell Township northeast of West Plains. It acquired the name of Hard Scrabble because the ridge soil is so thin and rocky that making a living is difficult. A descriptive name. (N.J. Ramsey; Mr. & Mrs. G. Kline; S.D. Goyer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poe Graveyard
Description:See Poe Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poe Hill
Description:See Poe Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poe Spring
Description:A good living spring just below the Highway 17 bridge on Eleven Points River. Poe Hill, the highest in the community is near. The old burial ground of the name, now seldom used, is upon the hill. Jesse Poe lived there during the Civil War, possibly earlier. He was a farmer and operated a distillery there during the early 1870s. He was buried in the old cemetery. James Fisher, who now owns the place, has a hydraulic rod to pump the spring water up into his improved pond. (Mr. & Mrs. Lum Thomas; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poison Spring
Description:The old name for Carmen Spring, a good living spring that furnishes water for a large community during droughts. Poison ivy grows abundantly near the spring and along the branch leading into Spring Creek. It is described as a lovely spring four miles west and one mile south of Burnham. Dr. Charles Carmen, a physician for the earlier settlers bought the land and lived there. (J.M. Spence; L. Collins; Mrs. Anna Ferguson; Mrs. Mary C. Farmer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Polly Cave
Description:See Blue Hole Cave.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pomona
Description:A small town in Dry Creek Township, on Highway 60 and the Frisco Railroad. The land had been homesteaded by William White who sold it to William Pitts who started a large fruit farm. H.D. Mackay owned a 400 acre farm of apples, peaches, pears, and berries; others owned large orchards near. Through the influence of H.D. Mackay and George H. Nettleton, then president of the railroad company, and William Pitts, the town was laid out between 1894 and 1896. Jacob E. Kreybill, originally from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, suggested the name for Pomona, the goddess of fruits, because it was situated in a good fruit section. (T.J. Whitmire; H.A. Smith; Mrs. H.D. Mackay; A. Hollenbeck; Postal Guide 1897-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pond Church
Description:See Ebenezer Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pond School
Description:See Hurricane School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Possum Trot
Description:See Mountain View and Campbell Town.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pottersville
Description:A village and post office near the center of Spring Creek Township. Earlier it was a village of considerable size, but now there are only two stores and a few dwelling houses. Josian Carrico and Joel M. Potter came to the vicinity long before the Civil War. Josephus Carrico, son of Josiah, was the first postmaster and named it for the elderly man Joel M. Potter who had several descendants and owned 160 acres of land nearby, now the Norman Webster place. (W.S. Davis; Mrs. Mary J. Long; J. Collins; R.W. Johns; P.L. Sutherland (1860) 742; Postal Guide 1886-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pottersville Cemetery
Description:See White Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pottersville School
Description:One mile northwest of the village.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Potts School
Description:One of the older present day schools, west of White Church. William Potts, an early settler and farmer owned land and lived there when the school was established. (J.N. Barnett; Mr. & Mrs. F.A. Elderinghoff)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Prairie Grove School
Description:In northern Benton Township. A descriptive name. When the school was established during the 1870s there were only occasional patches of timber in that region. The house is used for community and religious meetings. (Wm. F. Harper; Mrs. Nancy Hunter; Mrs. Margaret Gill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Prairie Hollow
Description:Leads into Nale Branch. Nothing but grass grew there in the earlier days. Now it is grown up with brush and timber. (Mr. & Mrs. E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Presley Branch
Description:An eastern tributary of Myatt Creek in Myatt Township. Pinkney Presley settled there about Civil War times. (Mr. & Mrs. E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Proffitt Spring
Description:This spring one mile north of Taylor's Store marks the settlement made by John Proffitt, father of the informant, who came from North Carolina in 1857 and entered 160 acres of land where he lived for forty years, the remainder of his life. (T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Punkin Center
Description:A county store, filling station, and small grist mill on Highway 14 in Siloam Springs Township established in 1925 by Levi Collins and R. Jesse Byers. A group at the place were joking when someone mentioned "Uncle Josh of Punkin Center" a comic phonograph record, to which Mr. Collins answered, "Well Punkin Center is all right;" so the name stuck. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Collins; Mrs. Wm. Fox)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Puritan
Description:A post office established in March, 1910, in the home (Walnut Grove) of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Moore two miles north of the site of Horton (q.v.) It was discontinued in June, 1918, when the rural route was established from Willow Springs. Mrs. Moore gave the name for the Puritans, who she said had always appealed to her because "they seemed so pure of soul, mind, and body." Hence it is an idealistic name. (Mrs. Lillian Moore)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Queen's Mountain
Description:About one mile east of King's Mountain is a smaller elevation more recently given the name Queen's as a sister mountain to the larger King's Mountain. (H.A. Smith; Miss Sarah Rowe)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Race Track Hollow
Description:Drains into Spring Creek northeast of Pottersville. The old horse race track, furnishing community entertainment in the earlier days, was on land now owned by Walter Rowlett. (G.T. Brown; J. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rainbow Springs
Description:Two beautiful springs on the headwaters of North Fork, owned by Birch O. Mahaffey, capitalist of St. Louis, Missouri, who has spent large sums making it a fishing and pleasure resort. (J.A. Duffy; clipping from 1936 newspaper)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rainey
Description:A post office kept for a short time during the late 1870s or early 1880s by Ira N. Rainey, M.D., who lived north of Moody. The office was discontinued and Moody (q.v.) was established. Not found in Postal Guide or on a map. (C. Vaughn; F. McKelvey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rattlesnake Branch
Description:A small stream flowing into Dry Creek, fed by Rattlesnake Spring about four miles northeast of Siloam Springs. Many rattlesnake dens were found in the earlier days. Also known today by cattlemen as Snake den "Holler." (Mr. & Mrs. L. Collins; J. Collins; Mr. & Mrs. J.A. Duffy)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rattlesnake Draw
Description:A small branch of Warm Fork between Elk and Big Greasy creeks. A rough rocky section where many large rattlesankes were found during the earlier days. (Mr. & Mrs. N.J. Andrews)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rattlesnake Spring
Description:See Rattlesnake Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Red Ranch
Description:See Red Ranch School. The name grew up because the buildings on the ranch were painted red.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Red Ranch School
Description:One and a half miles north of Globe (q.v.). It took the name from the stock ranch of several hundred acres established about 1900 by T.J. Rittenhouse of Kansas City. (H. Chapin; T.J. Whitmire)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Renfro School
Description:One of the elder schools two miles southwest of West Plains named for William Renfro who came from Kentucky. Farmer and landowner, he gave the school site. (T.J. Whitmire; Mr. & Mrs. Ira May)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rex Mines
Description:At first known as Julian Mines for William Julian, a farmer who owned eighty acres of land northwest of Arditta. In 1898 Allen Rowden bought the land and made further developments, after which it was known as Rowden Mines. About 1901 he sold to J.B. Ross of Independence, Kansas. A company known as the Rex Company, composed of George, Thomas, and Joseph Parkman, J.C. Kingsburg, and W.M. Atkinson worked the mine successfully for a few years. "Rex," by which the mine is known, is a Latin word, meaning king. It was claimed that this mine, having the best quality of zinc in that mining section, was the king of the mines. The name was given by George Parkman. For its significance compare one explanation of the name King's Mountain, above. In 1937 some mining was done here by Arch and Paul Wemman, on the land now owned by L.A. Gibbons. (Wm. F. Harper; J.W. Briggs; A. Hollenbeck)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Riggs School
Description:In southeastern Sisson Township. Named for James Riggs, a landowner and farmer near. (T.J. Whitmire; Mr. & Mrs. F.A. Elderinghoff)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Robbins Draw
Description:A northern branch of Eleven Points River in Hutton Valley Township. John Robbins from Tennessee was a settler in the valley soon after the Civil War. (L. Thomas; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rock Church
Description:See Victoria Mission.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rock Valley Church
Description:See Rock Valley School
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rock Valley School
Description:Established about forty years ago, four and a half miles northeast of Pottersville. A small valley near the very rocky ridge on which the house was built. Rock Valley Church was organized there in 1930, but never erected a house, and soon dissolved. (J. Johnson; Mrs. E.O. Bess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rockhouse Creek
Description:A small branch of Big Indian Creek. During the Civil War, an elderly man, hiding from service, constructed a small cave here out of rocks in which to live. (Mrs. Anna Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rose
Description:A post office in existence only a short time, three miles east of Moody on the State Line Road. Mrs. Jennie Reed from Denver, Colorado, who kept the office in her home, suggested the name for her daughter Rose. (Postal Guide 1915; Mrs. Monroe Cole; Mrs. Nellie Bean)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rosin Ridge School
Description:See Pleasant Hill School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ross Alley Mill
Description:An early settler named Ross Alley built a grist mill on Bennett's Bayou, near Bly, immediately following the Civil War. It was owned by various persons. Under the ownership of Daniel Killian, it was washed away in 1878, and never rebuilt. (C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rowden Mines
Description:See Rex Mines.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rowe Spring
Description:A large spring about nine miles east of Willow Springs, the town on Highway 60. Only very recently has it acquired the name of Rowe, for George Rowe, a Union soldier who lived there for many years. The place was homesteaded by James F. Gaston in 1875. It soon passed to George Rowe, by purchase from the Hood family, but it still retained the name Willow Springs for the fine one large and some smaller springs there with many willow trees growing near. See Willow Springs. (Miss Sarah Rowe; G.W. Winningham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rudville School
Description:In Dry Creek Township, south of Olden. James Rudd and others of the name lived in the community. It was earlier known as Harrison School for a Mr. Harrison (Mr. Turner thinks his name was Benjamin), an early post Civil War settler. It is now a part of New Central School. (H.A. Smith; D.G. Turner; C.D. Reynolds)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rushing Spring
Description:See Hellum Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Saratoga Park
Description:See Saratoga Springs.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Saratoga Springs
Description:Two good springs near the head of Big Indian Creek three miles northwest of Willow Springs. Some hunters who came into that vicinity remarked that the water tasted like that of Saratoga Springs of New York. In 1887 F.F. Teeter laid out a few lots for a town and attempted to make a health resort, giving this name. In 1926 Harve Littrel, Ford Pyatt, Barton Messler of Springfield, Missouri, and others started a pleasure resort by putting in cabins, a swimming pool, a club house, and a dance pavillion where much of the native stone was used. They gave the name Saratoga Park. Now, 1937, not much is there. The famous New York watering place has become a stock American place name, being adopted by at least a dozen localities in as many different states. (Mrs. Anna Ferguson; J.M. Spence)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Satterfield Hollow
Description:See Wilson Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sawyer Hollow
Description:Near Doty School, leading into South Fork Creek. Early settlers of the name lived there, but none are left in the vicinity. (T.A. Manz)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Scales Valley
Description:Leads into Sims Valley from the northeast. M.W. Scales, a squatter, set up a cabin and cleared a few acres in early pioneer days. The place is now owned by Joe Godsey. (H.A. Smith; Miss Sarah Rowe)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Schneider School
Description:Northeast of West Plains four and a half miles. The school was built on land belonging to Frank Schneider, a Civil War veteran, who came from Franklin County, Missouri, and became a prominent farmer and landowner. (Mr. & Mrs. F.A. Elderinghoff; Mr. & Mrs. G. Kline; T.J. Whitmire)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Scott Valley
Description:See Tice Valley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Seed Tick Church
Description:See Pisgah Church (near Cureall). See Mount Pisgah Church (near Cureall).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Setzer Branch
Description:Heads northeast of Arditta and flows northwest into Spring Creek. James Setzer was an early settler there. (S.T. Proffitt; Wm. Fox; Wm. McDaniel)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shady Grove Church
Description:A Baptist Church, established southeast of Christy, in the late 1880s or early 1890s. The organization was later moved to Brandsville. (D.W. Epley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shady Grove School No. 116
Description:In southwestern Benton Township. It was built in a grove of Black Jack timber. The schoolhouse is used for church also. (C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shady Grove School No. 16
Description:In southwestern Goldsberry Township. Originally in a grove of native black oak and black jack timber. The house is also used for church services by the Methodists and United Brethren. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Thomas; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sharp Hollow
Description:A southern tributary of Gunter's Creek, in Howell Township. Robert Sharp settled there in 1859. (J.N. Barnett; J.C. Cage)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shaver Hollow
Description:Leads into Myatt Creek from the east. Marion Shaver lived there as early as 1875, perhaps earlier. (E.M. Nale; Mrs. H.L. Garrett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh Church
Description:See Dry Creek School. A favorite Bible name, for the city on the highway between Bethel and Shechem, where the Tabernacle and Ark remained from the days of Joshua through the ministry of the Judges. Here Joshua divided among the Israelites the new lands of Canaan. (Jos. 18:1-28; 22:9)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shinkle
Description:A post office established about 1907 at the present location of Grimmett (q.v.) and named for Harvey M. Shinkle, who with Charles Duckett, kept a store and grist mill there. It was the post office name for the Grimmett neighborhood for about eight years. (J.A. Duffy; J.R. Byers; Mr. & Mrs. L. Collins; Postal Guide 1907-1915)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sigler School
Description:Praire Grove School (q.v.) was sometimes known by this name for Jacob Sigler, a progressive farmer and landowner who lived near. (Mr. & Mrs. P. Gray; Mrs. Florence Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Siloam Springs
Description:A village and post office beautifully situated in the Ozark Hills in southwestern Siloam Springs Township. It reached a population of about six hundred persons during the timber days of the 1880s and 1890s, and for many years it has been noted as a health resort. It is said that originally there were ten or twelve springs; now there are three good springs, all claimed to have various medicinal properties. It is related that as early as 1817 Elijah Fenton, living at the old French trading post near Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, having heard of the springs through Indian traders, took his invalid wife there where her health was restored. Another report is that of Dr. I.A. Norman of Illinois who came and regained his health at the springs in 1859. In 1913 Dr. W.E. Eckles, a physician of Howell County, explained that these spring waters are classed as Chalybeate and derive their virtues from the ferrous and manganese bicarbonates in conjunction with earthy salts and ferrous sulphate. The Bible name (see John 9:1-26) was suggested by Mrs. Ellen Woodworth, Jonathan Brown's daughter (see Brown Springs) as the name for the springs and post office. (G.T. Brown; Woodruff Folder; P.L. Polk (1883) 93; Postal Guide 1886-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Siloam Springs Hollow
Description:Leads through Siloam Springs into Tabor Creek. Pinebrook Hotel is in the little valley. (L. Collins; J.A. Duffy)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Siloam Springs School
Description:In Siloam Springs Township southwest of the springs.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Siloam Springs Township
Description:One of the western border central divisions. No doubt it was named for the springs.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sims Valley
Description:Also spelled Simms. It leads from the north into Eleven Points River east of Hutton Valley. A family of this name from Tennessee settled in the valley about 1856. Sims Valley School was established about 1878 and took the name of the valley in which it was located. (Miss Sarah Rowe; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sims Valley School
Description:See Sims Valley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sink Ins School
Description:A name often used for Christy School because there are so many sink holes in the vicinity. A topographical name. (Mrs. Ada Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sisson Creek
Description:See Sisson Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sisson Township
Description:One of the eastern border central divisions made before 1873. An early pioneer of this name owned a good farm and slaves in Peace Valley long before the Civil War. The family had come from Tennessee. Peace Valley Creek was also known earlier as Sisson Creek for the family. The township and named for this early settler. (Stan Kenaga; H.A. Smith; S.D. Goyer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Skunk Hollow
Description:Leads into Eleven Points River southeast of the mouth of Webb Hollow (q.v.). Habitat of many of these animals in earlier days. (Stan Kenaga)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Skunk Town
Description:An old timber camp of the South Missouri Land and Lumber Company, six miles southwest of Willow Springs on Noblett Creek. It is a habitat of these animals, but the name was probably conferred in a spirit of mockery. (D. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Slop Bucket
Description:See Mount Zion Union Chuch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Smith Chapel
Description:On Highway 80, three miles northeast of West Plains, built in 1906 or 1907, and named for "Grandpa" Smith who owned land and lived near. A community building used by any denomination. (J.N. Barnett; E. Bissett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Smith Draw
Description:See Smith Valley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Smith Valley
Description:What is now Hutton Draw was earlier known by this name for Richard, Marion, and Andrew Smith, brothers, who came from Tennessee in 1870 and became large landowners along Eleven Points River and in Hutton Draw, then known as Scott Valley (q.v.). A small valley west of Hutton Draw is also known as Smith Draw for the early landowners and for Henry A. Smith of Hutton Valley, who owns land there. (H.A. Smith; R. Dunnivan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Snake Den Hollow
Description:See Rattlesnake Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Branch
Description:See North Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Fork [1 of 2]
Description:The post office and later name for Cross Roads, a very early name for the community. It is located on the headwaters of West Fork of South Fork of Spring River, from which it took its name. William Black, father of Dr. James Black (see Amy), who had a store two miles west of the road crossing was the first postmaster. The log cabin store was still standing in 1937. Now owned by Thomas Divine. (N.J. Ramsey; T. Proffitt; P.L. 1862, 1867, 1883; Postal Guide 1886- 1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Fork [2 of 2]
Description:See Spring Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Fork of Spring River
Description:This stream, which flows into Spring River at Hardy, Arkansas, is formed by the junction, in southeast South Fork Township, of West Fork and East Fork of South Fork, which streams drain the south-central part of the county.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Fork Township
Description:The central south border division of the county, named for its main stream.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Hill
Description:See Hines Hill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Park
Description:Found on Cram's map 1879 in the southwestern part of the county, but no other information could be found. I think it is a misprint for "South Fork" (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Prong
Description:See Dry Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spears Graveyard
Description:An old burial ground, no longer used, upon a hill one-half mile south of Homeland post office site. Deeded by Joseph Spears who came from the south before the Civil War. (J.J. Taylor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spears Mill
Description:Joseph Spears had a water grist mill on Spring Creek about seven miles southwest of Pottersville before the Civil War. He lived in Illinois during the war. (Mrs. Mary Williams; Wm. Fox)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spears Spring
Description:See Boiling Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spout Spring
Description:A good- sized spring bubbling in a strong stream from the side of a hill north of King's Mountain. Its waters are carried through Spout Spring Hollow into Jack's Fork in Shannon County. Harrison Godsey, who now owns the land, has put in pipes for carrying the water up the hill into his home. The spring is sometimes known by his name. (Miss Sarah Rowe; R. Dunnivan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spout Spring Hollow
Description:See Spout Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spradling Draw
Description:Leads into Warm Fork southeast of West Plains. C. Ruff Spradling was an influential farmer and landowner there. He was county judge about 1922. (J.N. Barnett; S.D. Goyer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring Creek
Description:Heads in western Howell Township and flows into North Fork in Ozark County. Fed by springs along its course. Maps of 1844 and 1865 give names North Fork of Spring Creek, now considered the main stream, and South Fork of Spring Creek, later called Davis Creek (q.v.), joining to form Spring Creek. North Fork was also known as Upper Fork, and South Fork as Lower Fork. (N.J. Ramsey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring Creek Baptist Church
Description:See Pleasant Hill Baptist Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring Creek Cemetery
Description:See Spring Creek Methodist Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring Creek Church
Description:A defunct Congregational Methodist Church one mile northeast of Blue Mound School, organized about 1892 by Reverend Daniel Boles. The church took the name of the stream near, and the small burial ground, more recently started, took the church name. As there are no regular services the house is used for community gatherings. (Mrs. Fidelis Willis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spring Creek Township
Description:One of the border townships on the west, shown on 1873 map. Named for the stream (q.v.). (N.J. Ramsey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Joseph's Church
Description:A small frame Catholic church building, painted white, erected at White Church in 1886. In 1934 it was replaced by a beautiful cobblestone building. Named for Christ's foster father. (Mrs. C.H. Dotson; Rev. A. Stumpf)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railway
Description:The St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company now owns all the roads in these five counties except the "Cairo Branch" and the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Hence the present name, locally known as "The Frisco." It was taken, of course, from the terminal cities.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stalactite Cavern
Description:A recent name given for McCammon Cave (q.v.) because of the stalactite and stalagmites formed there.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Star Cemetery
Description:See Star School in Willow Springs Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Star School
Description:In Siloam Springs Township, three miles northeast of Siloam Springs. It was formed from part of the Turner School about 1893. The house was built by John Bridges and William Collins who gave the name and placed the wooden emblem above the door. (J. Collins; Mr. & Mrs. L. Collins; J.A. Duffy)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Star Schoolhouse
Description:The house was erected in 1872 in what is now the southern part of Willow Springs. It was used for school and for services by the Methodists, Presbyterians, Baptists, and Christians who came in the early day in oxen drawn carts from miles away. An elderly carpenter, "Uncle" Christopher Harkey, named it and made a large wooden star which was placed over the door. The cemetery near was known as the Harris Cemetery for James Harris who owned the land long before the town was established. The building has been removed and the burial ground no longer used. (D.S. Ferguson; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sterling
Description:A railroad station on the Frisco in the northern part of Willow Springs Township. When the railroad was under construction, the railroad officials gave the name of the camp there for John Sterling, who had come from Illinois, entered land there, and built a cabin. A post office was soon established and the place became a sawmill village during the timber days. (D.S. Ferguson; A. Hollenbeck; Postal Guide 1886-1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sterling School
Description:About two miles west and north of Sterling for which it was named.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stone Branch
Description:Heads in Arkansas and flows northeast into Myatt Creek. George Hill settled at the head of the stream but soon sold his claim during the 1880s to William Stone who came from North Carolina. (Mr. & Mrs. F.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stoney Point School
Description:About four miles south of Hocomo. A considerable valley on either side makes a high, rugged, stony point of land on which the house stands. (D.W. Epley; Mrs. Nancy Hunter)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stony Lonesome
Description:A timber camp during the 1880s, fourteen miles southwest of Willow Springs. The country was rough and rocky, and it was an immense pinery. The women were so very lonely and homesick there. (Mrs. Anna Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stout Hollow
Description:In Myatt Township. It leads southeast into Myatt Creek. Very early settlers of the name lived there. (Mr. & Mrs. E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Strange School
Description:See Moody School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stuart
Description:See La Crone.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stuart's Cemetery
Description:See Stuart's Chapel.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stuart's Chapel
Description:A cobblestone, community church house to be used by any denomination. The building was started in September, 1921 at the old Stuart family burial ground. John W. Stuart gave one and a half acre for the building and a public cemetery. The church is sometimes known as Lost Spring Church for the school one mile away. (Mrs. Nellie Bean; Mrs. Louise Renner; T.A. Manz; Mrs. Nancy Hunter)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Studdard Branch
Description:A small tributary of Dry Creek in Siloam Springs Township. John Studdard, from Franklin County, Missouri, homesteaded 160 acres there soon after the Civil War. (D.G. Turner; J. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stump Suck
Description:See Blue Mound School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sullivan Creek
Description:See Nale's Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Summers Addition
Description:See Brush Town.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Summers School
Description:Now consolidated with West Plains. The school was named for George Summers who was a farmer and landowner south and east of West Plains. (S.T. Proffitt; Mrs. H.L. Garrett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sycamore Hollow
Description:A small western branch of Myatt Creek that heads north of Lanton (q.v.). Sycamore timber grows in the hollow. (E.M. Nale; Mrs. Ada Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sylvan School
Description:About four miles south of West Plains. One informant thinks pioneers of the name lived there, but I have been unable to find the name. I rather believe it was named for the location in the forest, as the word means woody, pertaining to the forest, or rustic. (Mrs. Ira May; D.W. Epley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Table Cave
Description:Near Onyx Cave (q.v.). The old story is told of a man who lived there during the Civil War. The old table and some other articles were found there later. It is a descriptive name, for the water, very deep farther in the cave, has worn a natural table of rock just within the entrance. (J.N. Barnett; S.D. Goyer; L. Thomas)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tabor Creek
Description:A tributary of North Fork of White River. Heads in Howell Township and flows across Spring Creek Township. Eli L. Tabor from Kentucky settled in the vicinity of Spring Creek in 1840. A son, Andy V. Tabor, a hunter and farmer settled on Tabor Creek, south of Siloam Springs, before the Civil War, and after the war he homesteaded north of Pottersville. Another son, Thomas Tabor, bought land west of Pottersville. The old log school, known as Tabor School (also as Old Tom Tabor School) was built one and a half miles west of Pottersville immediately following the war. It was later made a part of Pottersville School. (Wm. Fox; Mrs. A.C. Risley; T.J. Whitmire; B.B. Tabor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tabor School
Description:See Tabor Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Talcott
Description:A man of this name from Illinois kept the post office for a short time in his home east of Willow Springs. (D. Ferguson; P.L. Polk (1883) 93)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tank Pond
Description:Formerly a good fishing pond, now pretty well filled and dry, six miles northwest of West Plains, where the railroad had dug a well and put in a watering tank. The pond covering about four acres was formed by the railroad bed's damming a small shallow valley. (Ray Halstead)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tater Hill
Description:A name more recently given to Dyestone Mountain (q.v.) because its shape resembled that of a potato. (Mrs. Anna Ferguson; D. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Taylor's Store
Description:See Homeland.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Frisco
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railway.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tice Valley
Description:Immediately after the Civil War, Reuben Tice settled at the head of what is now Hutton Draw (q.v.). Later Samuel Scott bought the place and the valley assumed his name. It later was known as Smith Valley (q.v.). (R. Dunnivan; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tory's Place
Description:The headquarters (Fruitville post office) of the Tory ranches and farms, chiefly in Myatt Township. Colonel Jay L. Tory of the Spanish American War came to West Plains in 1904 or 1905 and traded his Nebraska ranch for 20,000 acres of the Crane ranch, where he soon got the post office established. His half brother, R.A. Tory, a veteran of the Federal Army, and a captain in the Spanish American War, came in 1907. Captain Tory had organized Roosevelt's Rough Riders. The brothers put various kinds of fruits, chiefly peaches and apples, and had herds of cattle, goats, horses, and some other domestic animals on their farms. The farms were known as Fruitville Farms, for the post office. Tory's place or Fruitville became a great gathering place. One informant explained that "they didn't care much for money and spent lots for blowouts." Walter Williams, then dean of the School of Journalism of Missouri University, was more than once a visitor at Tory's Place, and Colonel Tory gave large donations to the Journalism School. As the Captain died first, Colonel Tory, his only heir, later willed the whole of the estate to his wife, J.L. Tory, formerly Miss Fannie Lamons, and his secretary W.B. Hodge. The land and farms have been sold to various persons, one tract of which is the Klice Ranch (q.v.). (H. Chapin; H.A. Smith; W.B. Hodge; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Town Spring
Description:The old spring of West Plains of the early days, marking the first settlement, that made by a Mr. Adams who came during the summer of 1839 and, in the early 1940s sold his improvement to Josiah Howell. West Plains post office is over the old spring. (Clippings; Mrs. A.C. Risley; Mrs. H.B. Pitts)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Township Line School
Description:About two and a half miles northwest of Mott. Named for its location on the line between South Fork and Myatt townships. (Mrs. Ira May; H. Chapin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Trask
Description:A station and one store now, formerly a little village and post office, on the Current River Branch of the Frisco Railroad, in Hutton Valley Township. Lee Bolin bought three acres of land, laid out the town in 1888 or 1889, and got the office established. It was discontinued in 1935. A family of this name, old settlers living near, had charge of the first office. (Miss Sarah Rowe; H.A. Smith; H. Sollars; Mrs. Mattie Phipps; Postal Guide 1897-1935)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Trask School
Description:Near the village and post office for which it was named. During the early 1880s, and until it was moved to its present location in 1901, it was known as the Griffith School, established about 1775, because it was one mile east on land belonging to John Griffith. (H.A. Smith; Mrs. Laura Gaston; Mrs. Mattie Phipps)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Triangle Store
Description:A small store and filling station, built in 1931 by David Meredith on his farm, at the junction of Highway 80 and Buffalo Shoals Road. The name originated from the triangular plot, the site of the building, made by the Highway Department in constructing the road. Mr. Meredith sold this farm in 1935 and built Burr Oaks (q.v.) about one mile east on Highway 80. (Mr. & Mrs. D.R. Meredith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turner Mine
Description:Small lead and zinc mines on the David Turner land in Siloam Springs Township. Considerable prospecting has been done for fifty years, but minerals have not been found in paying quantities. (D.G. Turner; J. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turner School
Description:Five miles northeast of Siloam Springs. One-half mile northeast of Hade Spring, the site of the old log schoolhouse. William Hade Turner, a pioneer Baptist preacher who lived near the spring, gave the site for the house, which was used for school and church. Reverend Mr. Turner, was born in east Tennessee in 1842, came with his brother D.G. Turner to this locality in 1872. The school took the family name while the spring was known by the Christian name of Reverend Mr. Turner. The valley in which the spring is located is known as Mud Hollow and Black Hollow because of the soil, a kind of dark gumbo. The spring was earlier known as Larly Spring for Marion Larly, who came before the Civil War and lived for a time in a sod house. (J.G. Collins; D.G. Turner; D.W. Epley; Geo. Callahan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Twin Mountains
Description:Two small mountains one mile south of Dyestone Mountain.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Uncle Johnny Smith Church
Description:See Little Zion Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Undine
Description:A post office kept for a time by John A. Mackey in his home three miles southeast of the site of Pomona during the 1870s and early 1880s. On the old freight and mail route from Rolla, Missouri. The name is mythological, like Pomona. "Undine" was a very popular story, by the German novelist Baron de la Motte Fouque, published in German in 1811, and translated into many languages. Undine was a water-spirit who was endowed with a soul by her marriage with a mortal. (S.D. Goyer; W.T. Modrel; Mrs. Nancy Kinion; C.D. Reynolds)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Chapel
Description:A neat building of native stone at Amy (q.v.). It was erected in 1928 by the Methodist, Christian, and Baptist denominations, the last having organized in 1930. (Mrs. Rebecca Gill; D.W. Epley; MINUTES 1936)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Grove Cemetery
Description:See Fox Hollow and Union Grove Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Grove Church
Description:The old General Baptist Church at the Fox Graveyard (q.v.), built about 1890. The new organiation was composed chiefly of members from the Vienna and Little Vine churches that had disbanded. Much of the country was cleared at this time, but a grove of oak and hickory trees shaded the building. (Wm. Fox; D.W. Epley; Mr. & Mrs. J.R. Byers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Hill Church
Description:About four miles northwest of Christy in Myatt Township, situated on a hill, are the church for any denomination, and an older cemetery of the name. (T.A. Manz)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Hill School
Description:See Free Union School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Upper Fork
Description:See Spring Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Valley Star School
Description:In South Fork Township. Earlier much used for church services; it is now also the balloting place for this precinct. The original house was in a small valley; later it was moved out near the old Buffalo Shoals road. A descriptive and idealistic name. (T.A. Manz; H. Chapin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Valley View Church
Description:See Valley View School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Valley View School
Description:In Howell Township southeast of West Plains with which it consolidated in 1919. A descriptive and topographical name. Valley View Church, named for the school 3/4 mile away, was built in 1931 for all denominations. Disagreements arose and the house was torn down in 1933. (Mr. & Mrs. Ira May; Mrs. H.L. Garrett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Van Dousen Branch
Description:Heads near Cabool, Missouri, and flows into Indian Creek (q.v.). It took the name of an old squatter and hunter who lived there long before the Civil War. (D. Ferguson; H.A. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vaughn Hollow [1 of 2]
Description:Heads near Arditta (q.v.) and leads into Bennett's Bayou. A prominent farmer and former County Judge Clell Vaughn owns land and lives there. (C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vaughn Hollow [2 of 2]
Description:The small stream of the valley flows into Bennett's Bayou in the western part of Benton Township. Named for an early settler, Richard Vaughn. (Mrs. Nancy Hunter; C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vaughn Mill
Description:See Williams Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vaughn School
Description:Now a part of the Trask School District. The site, one mile northeast of Trask, was given by John H. Vaughn. (H.A. Smith; Geo. W. Winningham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vaughn Springs
Description:In southwestern Benton Township on land belonging to Sherwood Vaughn; formerly homesteaded by a Mr. Lee. Since the water was said to have medicinal properties, an attempt was made to develop a health resort. Some advertising was done and a few cabins were built in 1878, but it never proved worthwhile. (C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Victoria Mission
Description:A Pentecost Church, built one mile northeast of Elk School, in 1931. The name was suggested by Oscar Kelley, for Victoria Hall in Los Angeles, where the Pentecostal movement started in 1906. Because the building is of native stone, it is often known as the Rock Church. (Mrs. Ben Rose; Mr. & Mrs. N.J. Anderson; Miss Islet Oakes)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Virginia Warrior Path
Description:Houck's map shows it extending westward from Poplar Bluff from the Natchitoches Path through Butler, across Carter and Current River south of Van Buren, across Shannon and Howell counties. Nothing has been found about the origin of the name, but very likely it is from the state of this name. (Houck I.226)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Virginia Warrior's Path
Description:See Warrior's Path.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wadley Branch
Description:It leads into Spring Creek north of Pottersville. John Wadley was an early settler there. (S.T. Proffitt; R.M. Johns)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walker's Chapel
Description:A Southern Methodist Church one and a half miles south of Trask (q.v.). It was built about 1886 and named for Reverend Helton Rethford Walker, who owned a farm near the church. Reverend Walker was a Confederate veteran from Tennessee and a pioneer teacher and minister. (L. Thomas; Mrs. Mattie Phipps)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walnut Creek
Description:See Walnut Sink Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walnut Sink Creek
Description:Rises near Peace Valley and flows into Gunter's Creek. Walnut trees grow along the stream. Some of the many sinks in that part of the county are near. Also known as Walnut Creek. (J.N. Barnett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walnut Sink School
Description:Located southeast of Peace Valley, on the rather flat region near Walnut Creek. In the region of small sinks. It was discontinued and the house sold to Mr. James N. Barnett about 1900. (J.N. Barnett; J. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Warm Fork Creek
Description:It heads east of West Plains (q.v.), flows across Thayer Township (q.v.), and into Spring River in Arkansas. The name came from its water's being of a higher temperature than Spring River. Its average is about 60 to 65 degrees, while that of Mammoth Spring is about 58 degrees. (N.B. Allen)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Warner School
Description:See Pitts Grove School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Watered Branch
Description:A northern tributary of Elk Creek (q.v.). Springs along the stream make it a good living stream, whereas the other small branches are dry a part of the time. (Mr. & Mrs. N.J. Andrews)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Webb Hollow
Description:A northern tributary of Eleven Points River, in Chapel and Sisson townships. John H. Webb homesteaded near the stream in the early 1870s. (J.N. Barnett; L. Thomas)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West Fork of South Fork of Spring River
Description:See South Fork of Spring River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West Lake
Description:A post office in 1867, but very little information has been found. Mr. McDaniel explains that there was a lake of that name seven miles west of West Plains and doubtless named for its position. Others say there were lakes in the vicinity of Homeland (q.v.). Mrs. Wadley mentions West Lake Valley southwest of Pomona, but no one knows of the post office. Doubtless the post office and valley took the name of the lake. (Wm. McDaniel; Geo. Moore; Mrs. Nancy Hunter; Mrs. Mary Wadley; P.L. 1862; P.L. Goodwin & West (1867) 47)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West Lake Valley
Description:See West Lake post office.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West Liberty School
Description:It is located west of Willow Springs. (J.M. Spence)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West Plains
Description:The county seat of Howell County, located on Highway 63 and the Frisco Railroad. In 1849 or 1850 the town was surveyed, and named by John R. Woodside because it was in a westerly direction from Thomasville of Oregon County, the nearest town, and because its site was in the rolling grassy plains where very little timber grew. In 1850 it was the only post office within the present limits of the county and was kept by Josephus Howell in his home. The town with its records were burned during the Civil War, but it has grown rapidly since the war. (H. Chapin; S. Galloway; Mrs. A.C. Risley; Mrs. H.B. Pitts; Clippings; WEST PLAINS QUILL, Sept. 12, 1912; P.L. Hayward (1853) 824 ff.; Postal Guide 1886-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White Church [1 of 2]
Description:A village, post office, and community in the west-central part of Sisson Township, known by this name because of the churches established there. The Cumberland Presbyterians finished their church here in 1864; one informant said it was begun before the Civil War. The St. Louis Board furnished the money and the leaders of the community did the work, so it was possible to have a better house than was usually built at the time; because the house was plastered and painted white it was known as White Church. As the members died or moved away the organization was disbanded, and the house was sold to the Methodist M.E. Church about 1880. Eventually this body too dwindled and the house was sold in 1931 to James M. Ferguson who tore it down and made it into his dwelling house nearby. White Church stood about 125 yards southeast of the present Catholic Church. The Catholics, too, had erected a small white church, recently replaced by the new cobblestone house (see St. Joseph's Church). Sometime after Peace Valley post office was moved to the present location, White Church post office, named for the church, was established by J.M. Robinson in his store, informants say earlier than 1901. During the late 1890s the Catholics of the community established the Parochial School in the village. It was a two-story building, plastered and painted white, with classrooms, dormitory, and dining room. For a few years it was successful, having local and boarding students. The activites of the church were retarded as members moved, and for a time no services were held, but in 1930 a priest came, and plans are made to repair the old school for use. (Mrs. C.H. Dotson; G.F. Burroughs; S.D. Goyer; J.M. Ferguson; T.J. Whitmire; Postal Guide 1901-1915)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White Church [2 of 2]
Description:A small box house, painted white, built one mile east of Pottersville by the Congregational Methodists soon after the Civil War. After the house burned at least forty years ago, the membership united with Liberty Union Church at Pottersville. The burial ground at the little church was known as Adams Graveyard for Benjamin Adams who lived there; it is now called Pottersville Cemetery for the village. (S.T. Proffitt; R.W. Johns; D.W. Epley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White Ranch
Description:A named applied to Crane Ranch (q.v.) because the buildings were painted white. (H. Chapin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wilcox Cemetery
Description:See Big Spring School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Williams Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill in southeastern Benton Township on Bennett's River operated by a family of this name long before the Civil War. In 1867, Sheerwood Vaughn, born in Tennessee, pioneer of Benton Township a war refugee in Maries County, Missouri, returned to Howell County, and bought the old mill which he operated until 1878 when it was washed away. (C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Williams School
Description:The old school, one and a half miles north of Dixon Springs (q.v.) named for Joseph Williams, a farmer and landowner there who came from Ohio soon after the Civil War. The old log house burned during the early 1880s and a frame building was erected nearer the springs and named for the village and post office, Cureall (q.v.). (E. Williams; D.W. Epley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Williams Service Station
Description:On Highway 63, five miles north of West Plains, where some cabins have been built, and Skelley gas, lunches, and soft drinks are sold. Built by Talley Hughes of West Plains in 1934. Now owned and operated by James R. Williams. (Mr. & Mrs. Geo. W. Ford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Williams Store
Description:Near the present site of Shady Grove School, William Williams from Tennessee kept a little store in his home soon after the Civil War. He later moved to West Plains and put in a store. (Mrs. Wm. Lee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Willis Spring
Description:On the old road about halfway between West Plains and Pottersville on land owned by Fidelis Willis during the 1890s. Now owned by his son Thomas Willis. (Mr. & Mrs. Geo. W. Ford; T. Willis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Willow Fork
Description:The old name for Setzer Branch (q.v.). (Mr. & Mrs. Wm. F. Harper)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Willow Grove School
Description:In South Fork Township two and a half miles northeast of Moody. A grove of willow grows about the spring near the school. (Mr. & Mrs. P. Gray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Willow Spring
Description:See Rowe Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Willow Springs
Description:A town on highway 60 and 63 at the junction of the Frisco and Current River Railroad. It was named for the post office first established at what is now Rowe Spring (q.v.) nine miles east of the town site. In January, 1868, the office was moved from the springs to the Ben Carter Store (q.v.) and James W. Harris was made postmaster. (R.F. Holloway; Mrs. Anna Ferguson; P.L. Campbell Gaz. (1874) 257; Postal Guide 1886-1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Willow Springs Township
Description:The northwestern part of Howell County, formed before 1873. No doubt it was named for the springs, now known as Rowe Spring (q.v.). (Campbell, Atlas)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wilson Creek
Description:A southern prong of Davis Creek in Spring Creek Township. Thomas F. Wilson came from Illinois and homesteaded 160 acres there about 1884. He bought adjoining land and established a 440 acre ranch. (N.J. Ramsey; D.C. Stephens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wilson Hollow
Description:Leads into East Fork of South Fork in southwestern Myatt Township. James and Goodrich Wilson, brothers, owned a farm and lands of 500 acres after the Civil War. A man by the name of Satterfield was the first settler there. The land is now owned by G.B. Nale. (Mrs. Ada Nale; E.M. Nale)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wilson School
Description:The old school one half mile southeast of the site of Burnham. Israel Wilson lived there. During the late 1880s or early 1890s it was divided to make Burnham and Pleasant Valley schools. (Mrs. Nancy Kinion)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Winningham Hollow
Description:See Barn Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Winningham School
Description:See Gill Branch and Columbia School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wolf Creek
Description:A tributary of Jack's Fork, rising in northeastern Hutton Valley Township. Habitat of numerous packs of wolves in the early days. Even now, wolf hunting in the vicinity is good sport. (L. Thomas; Mrs. Anna Lassater)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Womack's Store
Description:See Need More.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wooden Station
Description:A store and filling station one mile southwest of West Plains on Highway 80. Established in 1930, by Reece Wooden, who still operates the place. (Reece Wooden)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Woodrom Branch
Description:A branch of Spring Creek; heads in northwestern Howell Township. Barton C. Woodrom, formerly of Tennessee, came from Camden County, Missouri and homesteaded 160 acres at the head of the stream in 1867. He lived there for many years, but later moved to Oklahoma. (Mr. & Mrs. Geo. W. Ford)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Woody School
Description:A name often used locally for Riggs School because it was built on land owned by Elijah Woody. (Mr. & Mrs. N.J. Andrews)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wright's Mill
Description:One of the old grist mills, set up on Moody Creek as early as 1872, perhaps earlier, by William Wright. Only three-quarters of a mile northwest of Moody (q.v.), it has not been used for twenty years or more. (Mrs. Nancy Hunter; C. Vaughn)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Yankee Doodle
Description:An early post office kept by E. Jefferson Friend (see Big Spring School) in his home near Bly, to which place the post office was moved during the 1880s. He was born of Tennessee pioneers in Ozark County. The name chosen is that of the old Revolutionary War song. (D.W. Epley; D.C. Stephens; C. Vaughn; P.L. Campbell, Gaz. (1873); Campbell, Gaz. (1874) 257; Polk (1876) 21; Postal Guide 1876)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Youngblood Cemetery
Description:Near Oak Grove School in Benton Township. Jonathan Youngblood, one of the first settlers there in the early 1880s, owned the land. (Wm. Harper; S.T. Proffitt)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

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