Hickory County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Almon
Description:A post office 1868, 1886-1922; in the eastern part of Stark Township. A family name. (HIST. HICKORY (1907) 50; Postal Guide; Eaton (1917) 173; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Antioch Christian Church
Description:Located one mile southwest of Pittsburg. The building was put up in 1875. Cf. above. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 256)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Antioch Church
Description:A Primitive Baptist church, on North Prairie, four miles northwest of Cross Timbers, now in Hickory County since the division of Benton; organized in 1833, the first church in what was then Benton County. Cf. above. (HIST. BENTON (1876) 68; HIST. HICKORY (1889) 255; Conrad (1901)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Avery
Description:A village on the border line between Benton and Hickory Counties, and partly in both counties. It has had a post office since 1891. Henry Avery was one of the commissioners appointed by the General Assembly of Missouri in 1837 to select a county seat for Benton County. (Postal Guide; HIST. BENTON (1889) 468; Polk's GAZ. (1891-92) 147; HIST. HICK. (1907) 50; R.M. (1939) 226; J.R. Boring; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Avery
Description:A village on the borderline between Benton and Hickory Counties, and partly in both counties. It has had a post office since 1891. Henry Avery was one of the commissioners appointed by the General Assembly of Missouri in 1837 to select a county seat for Benton County. (Postal Guide; HIST. BENTON (1889) 468; Polk's GAZ., (1891-92) 147; HIST. HICKORY (1907) 50; R.M. (1939) 226; J.R. Boring; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Deer Creek
Description:A creek which rises in Jordan Township in Hickory County, flowing north and east through Union Township in Benton County into the Osage River. Named for the animal, plentiful here in early days, and called "Big" to distinguish it from its tributary Little Deer Creek (q.v.). (Campbell (1873) 23)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Mill Creek
Description:See Mill Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Pomme de Terre River
Description:See Pomme de Terre River.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Black Oak
Description:See Preston.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bledsoe
Description:A post office in 1867-1868; in the southern part of Montgomery Township, three miles north of Wheatland. So called because the post office was kept in Bledsoe Montgomery's house. He was a son of Judge Joseph C. Montgomery, for whom Montgomery Township (q.v.) was named. Cf. Bledsoe in Benton County. (GAZ. (1867-68) 47, 5; HIST. HICKORY (1889) 253 & (1907) 29)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Browder School
Description:In the southern part of Stark Township. Named for an early landowner. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Center Township
Description:Located in the central part of the county. Bounded on the north by Wheatland and Cross Timbers Townships, on the east by Stark Township, on the south by Green, on the west by Wheatland and Tyler Townships. One of the five original townships, created in March, 1845. Named thus because it was the central territory of the county. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 230; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Childers
Description:A post office from 1886-1910; in the northeastern part of Jordan Township, near the Benton-Hickory and Camden-Hickory lines. This post office was first called Roney for George Roney, a postmaster. The county history lists a land entry for Thomas G. Roney in 1858. The name was changed in 1900 to Childers. The county history lists J.H. Childers as a charter member of the A.F. and A.M. Lodge in 1866. The post office is now discontinued. (Postal Guide; HIST. HICKORY (1889) 226, 246; J.P. Dennis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Concord School
Description:In the eastern part of Weaubleau Township. An ideal name. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cornersville
Description:A post office from 1867-1868, 1886-1896; four miles east of Weaubleau. The post office was kept in the farm home of John Gentry, and mail was supplied twice a week by horseback route to Wheatland. Probably a name of location; cf. the three villages so named in Maryland, Mississippi, and Tennessee, Cornerville in Arkansas, and Cornersburg in Ohio. (Postal Guide; GAZ., (1867-8) 47; J.P. Dennis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crane Creek
Description:Heads in Dallas County, flowing northwest into the Pomme de Terre, just below Hermitage. Cf. Cranehill School in Dallas County, named, according to Miss O'Brien, for Taylor Crane, a pioneer farmer. Many cranes used to be found here. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 205; J.O. Taylor; Miss O'Brien's thesis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cream Ridge School
Description:Three and a half miles east of Pittsburg. Possibly named for the coloring of the strata of rock found on the ridge. (E.I. Miller; J.P. Dennis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cross Lane School
Description:In Montgomery Township. Named for its location at a crossroads. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cross Timbers
Description:A post office from 1867-1868, 1886; in the west-central part of Cross Timbers Township on Stark's Creek. Platted February 24, 1871, by Ezekiel Kirby. A topographical name. The term "cross timbers" was used in the West in early days for a belt of forest land. First cited in the DAE in 1820; again in Washington Irving's TOUR OF THE PRAIRIES in 1835. (Postal Guide; GAZ., (1867-8) 47, 11; Eaton (1917) 173; R.M. (1939) 226; DAE; M. Wilson; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cross Timbers Township
Description:Located in the north-central part of the county. Bounded on the north by Benton County, on the east by Jordan Township, on the south by Stark and Center Townships, on the west by Wheatland Township. Formed by the county court in 1873. Mostly carved from the territory of Stark Township. In 1881, its western boundary line was reduced to run with the river north and south. In the last few years, it has been further reduced by the creation of Jordan Township (q.v.). Named for its chief settlement. (HIST. HICKORY (1889), 230; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Deepwater
Description:A post office in 1886 and 1887. Probably named for its location. (Postal Guide)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Deer Creek
Description:Rises in the northern part of Hickory County; flowing north into the Osage River. Large numbers of deer frequented this creek. (Williams (1904) 331; E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dooly Bend School
Description:Located southwest of Hermitage. A family name and also located in the bend of a creek. The county history lists a land entry in 1852 for James Dooley. This is probably a distorted form, by popular etymology, of the name. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 223; E.I. Miller; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Durnell Chapel
Description:A Baptist Church, east of Weaubleau. Named for several families of Durnell's who live near the church. (J.P. Dennis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elkton
Description:A post office from 1867-1868, 1886; in the central part of Tyler Township. First settled by Dr. Blue. Named from deer found in this region. (GAZ. (1867-8) 47, 13; Postal Guide, Eaton (1917) 173; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elkton School
Description:In the central part of Tyler Township. Named from the village. (E.I. Miller; M. Wilson)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:In the northern part of Weaubleau Township. Located on a prairie. Cf. above. (E.I. Miller; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Flint Springs School
Description:In the eastern part of Jordan Township. Named for an early settler, and its location near a spring. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Forest Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church, five miles east of Pittsburg, built in 1887. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 256)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fox Ridge School
Description:See Independence School.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Galmey
Description:A post office from 1888-1904; in the southwestern part of Center Township. Spelled Calmey on the Highway Map--an obvious error. (Postal Guide; Highway Map; J.P. Dennis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grand River
Description:Rises in eastern Kansas, flowing east through Polk, Hickory, and Benton Counties. It joins the Osage River in Benton County, northwest of Warsaw. An Americanization of the original French name Riviere Grande, the "big river," evidently conferred for its comparative size. It is the largest branch of the Osage, with the exception of the Niangua, and the largest stream in this part of Missouri. Also known as South Grand River, perhaps to distinguish it from the much larger northern tributary of the Missouri that flows through Gentry, Daviess, Livingston, and Carroll Counties to join the Missouri River at Brunswick. (Campbell (1873) 11; Conard (1901) V, 31; Pike Exp., ed. Coues, II. 379; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Greene Township
Description:Located in the southeast corner of the county. Bounded on the north by Center and Stark Townships, on the east by Dallas County, on the south by Polk County, and on the west by Tyler Township. One of the five original townships created in March, 1845. No information could be secured about the source of the name. In spite of the difference in spelling, the township was probably named, as was the nearby Greene County and twelve other American counties, for the Revolutionary War hero General Nathaniel Greene (1742-1786). (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 230; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hallico River
Description:See Hogle's Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hartville School
Description:In the western part of Cross Timbers Township. A family name. (E.I. Miller; M. Wilson)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hazel Valley School
Description:In the eastern part of Cross Timbers Township. Cf. above. (E.I. Miller; M. Wilson)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Heard's Spring
Description:North of where Wheatland now stands. It served as temporary county seat in 1845 and part of 1846, until the permanent selection was made of Hermitage (q.v.). The second meeting of the county court to decide the location of the county capital was held at this place. It was so named because it was located on a farm, owned by John Heard. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 230- 232)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hermitage
Description:A post office since 1867-1868, 1886; in the central part of Center Township. Platted in 1847. Made the county seat by a vote of the people on March 14, 1847, the title being acquired by purchase from Thomas Davis. The commissioners appointed to locate a permanent county seat chose the name on December 23, 1846, before they had decided on the site. Named for the residence of Andrew Jackson at Nashville, Tennessee, as the pioneers of this county were Democrats of the Andrew Jackson type. Cf. the name of the county itself. Later there was strenuous rivalry between the east and west sides of the county and several hard- fought elections over a change of the county seat, but the issue was decided each time in favor of Hermitage. (Postal Guide; GAZ. (1967-8) 47; 19; HIST. HICKORY (1889) 215; HIST. HICKORY (1907) 57; Eaton (1917) 173)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory County
Description:Located near the center of southwest Missouri. It is bounded on the north by Benton County, on the east by Camden and Dallas, on the south by Polk, and on the west by St. Clair County. Organized February 14, 1845, the year of President Jackson's death. Named in honor of President Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), who was known affectionately as "Old Hickory," because of the strength and toughness of his character. Jackson, victorious commander at the Battle of New Orleans, January 8, 1815, was the seventh president of the United States. (1828-1836). He died at the "Hermitage" on June 8, 1845. Gannett says this name, alone or with suffixes, is borne by forty-six places in the United States. At least two others, towns in Newton County, Mississippi, and Catawba County, North Carolina, are known to have been named for "Old Hickory." Doubtless the county would have been named Jackson if Jackson County, Missouri, organized in 1826, just after Jackson's first unsuccessful candidacy for President, had not been twenty years ahead of it. Cf. also Jackson Township in Camden County. (Eaton (1917) 172; Century Dict., Gannett; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Township
Description:It is what is now the northeastern corner of Hickory County, and was cut off with Hickory County, February 14, 1845. Named in honor of President Andrew Jackson, as was Hickory County (q.v.). (HIST. BENTON (1889) 476; HIST. BENTON (1912), 28, 29)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hogle Creek Prairie
Description:In the southern part of Montgomery Township. Named for the creek. (M. Wilson)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hogles Creek
Description:Rises in Hickory County, runs through eastern St. Clair County, flowing northeast into Be nton County, where it empties into the Osage River at a point in the northeastern part of Alexander Township. Named for John F. Hogle, German, who was a government Indian agent in Missouri prior to 1832. He established a trading post at the mouth of this stream, the first store and first white settlement on the creek. On Pike's map for the expedition of 1806, this stream is apparently chartered under the name of Hallico River, an obvious misspelling. Called Noyles Creek by Williams in 1904; the reason was undiscovered. (Parker (1865) map; Campbell (1873) 23, 26; HIST. BENTON (1889) 464; HIST. HICKORY (1889) 206, 215; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 380; Williams (1904) 331; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Huffman's Creek
Description:Rises in Stark Township, flowing northeast into the Little Niangua River, in the same Township. Named for an early settler who owned land along its banks. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 205; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Independence School
Description:Located west of Pittsburg. An ideal name. Called locally "Fox Ridge" school, for the many foxes in the neighborhood. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jordan
Description:A post office since 1910; in the western part of Jordan Township five miles east of Cross Timbers. Started in 1904 by the building of a steam flouring mill. Named for the man who ran the mill. (Postal Guide; HIST. HICKORY (1907) 61, 62; R.M. (1939) 226; M. Wilson)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jordan Township
Description:Shown on recent maps as the northeast township, evidently cut off in comparatively recent years from Cross Timbers Township. The exact date of its creation has not been ascertained. Obviously named from its chief settlement. (Highway Map; Hevenor Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Judy's Gap
Description:See Quincy.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Liberty Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church, two and a half miles south of Hermitage, erected in 1883. An ideal name. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 256)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lindley Creek
Description:Enters Hickory County at the southeast corner, and passes south into Polk County, reenters again, running northwest until it empties into the Pomme de Terre River. Spelled Lindsey Creek in the 1889 HISTORY OF HICKORY COUNTY, an obvious error. The county history lists a land entry for Abraham Lindsey in 1847. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 205, 222; Highway Map; J.P. Dennis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lindsey Creek
Description:See Lindley Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Deer Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in Jordan Township in Hickory County, runs north into the southeastern part of Union Township, in Benton County, and then flows northwest into Big Deer Creek. So named to distinguish it from Big Deer Creek (q.v.). (Campbell (1873) 23; HIST. BENTON (1889) 454, 455)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Mills Creek
Description:Flows northwest, emptying into the Pomme de Terre . So named to distinguish it from Big Mill Creek (q.v.). (HIST. HICK. (1889) 206)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Niangua Baptist Church
Description:Organized in 1858; the first church was built about 1870. Now located one mile southwest of Almon. Named from its location near the Little Niangua River. (HIST. HICKORY (1907) 50; M. Wilson)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Niangua River
Description:A tributary of the Big Niangua River (q.v.), which rises in Grant Township, Dallas County, and flows north along the boundary between Hickory and Camden, which it crosses three times. It traverses Stark and Jordan Townships in Hickory County, and divides Russell from Adair Township in Camden County, to fall into the Big Niangua about six or eight miles above the mouth of the larger stream, in western Osage Township. So named to distinguish it from the Big Niangua. (Campbell (1873) 26; HIST. HICK (1889) 205; HIST. CAM. (1889) 280; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 376; R.M. (1940) 226; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Pomme de Terre River
Description:A branch of the Big Pomme de Terre River, rising in southern Wheatland Township in Hickory County, flowing north through Montgomery Township into Benton County, and joining the Pomme de Terre near Fairfield. (Campbell (1873) 26; HIST. BENTON (1876) 68; HIST. HICK. (1889) 206; Highway Map; E.I. Miller; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lone Spring
Description:A post office from 1886-1904; in the southeastern part of Hickory County, near the Dallas County line. The post office was kept in the farm home of Mrs. Elizabeth Franklin, who was the first postmaster. It is named for the only spring on her farm. (Postal Guide; J.P. Dennis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:M and P Church
Description:In the eastern part of Preston. Established in 1899. The initials stand for Methodist and Protestant. (E.I. Miller; J.P. Dennis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mabary School
Description:In the southeastern part of Stark Township. A family name. The county history lists a land entry for John Mabary in 1853. He was sheriff of the county in 1855. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 225, 241; E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Macedonia Baptist Church
Description:Near Wheatland. Built in 1880. A Biblical name, the place where Paul first began his missionary work in Europe (Acts 16:9). (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 255)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mill Creek
Description:Rises near Nemo in northern Green Township, and flows northwest to join Big Pomme de Terre River near Hermitage. Called Big Mill Creek in the county history. Possibly so named because the creek was the site of an early mill. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 205; Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Miller School
Description:In the central part of Montgomery Township. Named for an early settler in this locality. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Montgomery Branch
Description:Rises in the central part of Wheatland Township, flowing northwest into Montgomery Township, and emptying into the Little Pomme de Terre. Named from the Township. (HIST. HICK (1889) 206; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Morgan School
Description:In the east-central part of Stark Township. Named for an early family who settled here. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mulberry School
Description:In Cross Timbers Township, in the northeast corner of the county. Named from its location in a mulberry grove. (E.I. Miller; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Myers School
Description:In the northern part of Wheatland Township. Named for a land owner on whose land the school was built. Discontinued. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Nemo
Description:A post office 1895, 1896, 1900-1910; in the northern part of Greene Township, seven miles southeast of Hermitage, at the crossing of the Warsaw and Boliver Road. Three other American towns, in Illinois, South Dakota, and Texas, bear this mysterious name, which may have been borrowed from Captain Nemo, the hero of the enormously popular romance novel by Jules Verne, TWENTY THOUSAND LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA (1870). It is of course the Latin word for "nobody." Local people believe the name to be an outgrowth of the United States Postal Department's encouragement to choose short names, and they believe the name to mean "little." (Postal Guide; HIST. HICKORY (1907) 62; R.M. (1939) 226; J.P. Dennis; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Nemo School
Description:Located at Nemo. Named from the village. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Haven School
Description:In the central part of Stark Township, on the former location of Highway 65. Named as was the county and town by the same name in Connecticut because it was a "new haven" or safe place. (E.I. Miller; J.P. Dennis; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Olive Point School
Description:A Baptist church, in the eastern part of Stark Township. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Owsley School
Description:West of Mulberry School. Named for an early landowner. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ozark Mountains
Description:A mountain range that is very old as well as beautiful. The name is of Indian and French derivation and it is said that it is the result of a misunderstanding by the English. It means literally "at the (country, river, or place of the) Arkansas." The Quapaw Indians, belonging to the Siouan stock and after migrating westward, were called the Arkansas by the Illinois. Early eighteenth century maps by G. De. l'Isle show that both the Ohio and Wabash rivers were known as the Arkansas. It was customary for the French to abbreviate the difficult Indian place-names; hence les Arkansea became les Arcs. Miss O'Brien states that in the French archives "the phrase "aux arcs" appears many times, meaning on the river, at the post, or in the country of the Arkansas." The shortened phrase "aux arcs" was mistaken by the English for one word and they spelled it Ozark. (Miss O'Brien's thesis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Packard
Description:A post office 1892, 1901, 1902. Unidentified. (Postal Guide)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pittsburg
Description:A post office since 1867-1868, 1886; in the southern part of Green Township. Named for the Pitts family, early settlers. Doubtless the selection of the suffix was suggested by the city in Pennsylvania, whose name has been adopted by fourteen other American towns. Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, was named for Sir William Pitt (1708-1778), first Earl of Chatham, famous English statesman and friend of the American colonies. (GAZ. (1867-8) 47; Eaton (1917) 173; R.M. (1939) 226; Postal Guide; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pittsburg School
Description:In the center of Pittsburg. Named from the village. (J.O. Taylor; E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Hill
Description:In the northern edge of Wheatland Township. Named from its location on a hill. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Ridge School
Description:East of Pittsburg. Named from its location on a slight elevation. (M. Wilson; E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:Located northeast of Pittsburg. A name descriptive of its location. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pomme de Terre River
Description:Rises in Greene County, flowing north through Polk, Hickory, and Benton Counties, through the southern part of Fristoe Township, and into the Osage River. Coues says it was pronounced by the natives as "Pumly Tar." Pike charts it on his map for the Expedition of 1806 as "Potatoe River"--an obvious attempt at Anglicization that did not prevail. This stream formed the division line between the Indians and the whites until 1835. Named perhaps by the French fur traders. It is the French words for "Potato River." But cf. J.F. McDermott, A GLOSSARY OF MISSISSIPPI VALLEY FRENCH, 1941, under "pomme de terre:" "The cowberry, ground nut, or wild bean." McDermott quotes Bradbury and Owen as identifying the "pomme de terre" of the French voyagers with the root of the apios tuberosa or potato bean, also called "sagaban," used as food by the Indians of the Northwest and elsewhere. The stream was also known as Big Pomme de Terre to distinguish it from its tributary the Little Pomme de Terre (q.v.). (Pike's Exp., ed. Coues, II. 380; HIST. BENTON (1876) 7; HIST. BENTON (1889) 508; HIST. BENTON (1912) 3, 10; Conard (1901) v, 31; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Potato River
Description:See Pomme de Terre River.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Grove School
Description:In the western edge of Montgomery Township. Cf. above. Also called Wilson School for a prominent family in the district. Discontinued. The county history lists F. Marion Wilson as a prominent lawyer in 1889. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 239; E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Valley School
Description:In the southern part of Tyler Township. Located in a valley in a prairie region. (M. Wilson; E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Preston
Description:A post office since 1886; in the western part of Stark Township. Platted by S.C. Howard and R.I. Robinson, on December 8, 1857. Named possibly from the town of the same name in Wayne County, Pennsylvania. It was named, according to Gannett, for Judge Samuel Preston, an early settler. At the start of the Civil War, in 1861, the town was nearly deserted, as the citizens sympathized with the Confederacy, and went south. Formerly called Black Oak for the tree. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 250; HIST. HICKORY (1907) 65; Eaton (1917) 173; R.M. (1939) 226; Postal Guide; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Quincy
Description:A post office since 1867-1868, 1886; in the central part of Montgomery Township. Settled near 1833. Platted by Isaac M. Cruce, in 1848. Probably named for President John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), who died on February 23 of that year. Eighteen other places bear the sixth president's middle name, doubtless favored by his admirers to distinguish him from his father, President John Adams. Before the place was platted, it was called "Judy's Gap," because Samuel Judy had set up a blacksmith shop there. There was also a gap or opening near this place between two prairies, Twenty-five Mile Prairie and Hogle Creek Prairie. (Postal Guide; GAZ. (1867-8) 34, 47; HIST. HICKORY (1907) 68; Eaton (1917) 173; R.M. (1939) 226; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Quincy School
Description:In the central part of Montgomery Township. Named from a town located here. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rankin's Mill
Description:A water mill, built on the Pomme de Terre River, about six miles below Hermitage, by Amos Paxton. Named for the first owner, on whose land the mill was run. (HIST. HICKORY (1907) 24; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Roney
Description:See Childers. (Postal Guide)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Royal School
Description:In the eastern part of Tyler Township. A family name. (E.I. Miller; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Salem School
Description:Located in the western part of Wheatland Township. Cf. above. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shady Grove School
Description:In the western part of Tyler Township. Named from the grove of trees here, being descriptive of the setting. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spout Springs Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church seven miles east of Cross Timbers. Named from its location near some forceful springs. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 255; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad
Description:A railroad that passes from St. Clair County through the southwest corner of Hickory County, through Weaubleau Township into Polk County. This railroad had its origin in the southwest branch of the Pacific Railroad of Missouri, which became the St. Louis-San Francisco Company in 1876. It used the Missouri Pacific line to the Pacific until a line which is nearly parallel to the Missouri Pacific could be built. The name is an ambitious one for the company hoped to make San Francisco its western terminus. It is named for its distant termini. (R.M. (1939) 226; Enc. Brit.; Miss Welty's thesis; E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stafford
Description:A post office since 1899; a stock name, borne by thirteen other towns and a county in Virginia, taken over originally from the county in England. (Postal Guide; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Star Hill School
Description:Southwest of Pittsburg. An emblematic name. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stark Township
Description:Located on the eastern boundary of Hickory County. Bounded on the north by Cross Timbers Township, on the east by Camden County, on the south by Dallas County and Green Township, and on the west by Center Township. One of the five original townships created in March, 1845. Until 1873 it included also the present Cross Timbers Township. (q.v.). Named from Stark's Creek. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 230; R.M. (1939) 226; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stark's Creek
Description:Rises in the northwestern part of Stark Township, flows northeast a short distance, then turns southeast and empties into the Little Niangua River. Named for an early settler, John Stark, who settled there. (HIST. HICK (1889) 205, 218)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sunny Slope School
Description:In the southern part of Weaubleau Township. Named from its location. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tisco School
Description:In the northeastern part of Stark Township. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Trinity Branch
Description:Rises in the northern part of Wheatland Township, flowing northwest into Benton County. Named from the Trinity, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, as was the Trinity River in Texas. Less likely it was named because it helped to form a triangular shaped piece of land. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 206; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Turkey Creek
Description:Heads in Weaubleau Township, flows northwest into St. Clair County, where it empties into the Osage River. Named for the wild turkeys found along its banks. So named because it was much frequented by wild turkeys. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 205; Miss Johnson's thesis; E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Twenty-five Mile Prairie
Description:Possibly so named because twenty-five miles is the length of the prairie. Numbers are frequently used for place-names, as is exemplified in a city. Fifty Eight, in South Carolina, listed by Gannett and so named because it is fifty-eight miles from Charleston. (Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tyler Township
Description:Located on the southern border of the county. Bounded on the north by Montgomery and Wheatland Townships, on the east by Center and Green Townships, on the south by Polk County, and on the west by Weaubleau Township. It was one of the five original townships created in March, 1845. Until 1881, it included also the present Weaubleau Township. (q.v.). Being formed just at the close of his administration, it was appropriately named for President John Tyler (1790-1862), tenth president (1841-1844), whose name is borne by six towns and two counties in the United States. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 230; R.M. (1939) 226; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union School
Description:In the northwest corner of Montgomery Township and Benton County. An ideal name. Named from the fact that the school is located in two counties. Discontinued. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Walker Spring
Description:Unidentified. Possibly a family name. The county history gives James Walker as a member of the Primitive Baptist Church, organized in 1833 and meetings held in the home of Washington Young. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 216; HIST. HICKORY (1907)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Weaubleau
Description:A post office since 1886; located in the northern part of Weaubleau Township. Platted by the Reverend Emmerson Barber, a minister of the Christian Church there, and also the first postmaster. He first called the village Haran, a Bible name, doubtless conferred in memory of the Mesopotamian City where Abraham sojourned for a generation on his migration from Ur of the Chaldees to Canaan (Genesis 11:31). Later it was named for the stream (q.v.). (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 206; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 383; J.O. Taylor; Miss Johnson's thesis; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Weaubleau Creek
Description:Enters from Polk County into Tyler Township, flowing northwest across the southwest corner of Montgomery Township into St. Clair County, where it joins the Osage River. An Indian name of undetermined origin . Coues identifies it with Lime River on Pike's Map of 1806, and gives the variant spellings Wablo and Weablo. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 206; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 383; Miss Johnson's thesis; J.O. Taylor; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Weaubleau Institute
Description:A male and female academy under the auspices of the Christian denomination, was built in Weaubleau in 1871. The Reverend Emmerson Barber was the president of the institute. Named from the town. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 251, 254-55; J.O. Taylor)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Weaubleau Township
Description:Located in the southwestern part of the county. Bounded on the north by St. Clair County and Montgomery Township, on the east by Tyler Township, on the south by Polk County, and on the west by St. Clair County. It was created in 1881, out of the west side of Tyler Township. Named for the creek. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 230; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wheatland
Description:A post office since 1886; in the southern part of Wheatland Township. Platted December 7, 1869, by M.H. Cooper. It took the place of Bledsoe (q.vc.), which was three miles to the north. Probably named, like eight other American towns, for "Wheatland," near Lancaster, Pennsylvania, the home of President James Buchanan (1791-1868), since it was platted just the year after his death there, on June 1, 1868. Cf. Hermitage. (Postal Guide; HIST. HICKORY (1889) 253; Eaton (1917) 173; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wheatland Township
Description:Located in the northern part of the county. Bounded on the north by Benton County, on the east by Cross Timbers and Center Townships, on the south by Tyler Township, and on the west by Montgomery Township. Carved from Montgomery and Cross Timbers Townships in 1881. Named from the post office. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 230; R.M. (1939) 226; M. Wilson)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:White Cloud
Description:In the northern part of Wheatland Township. An Indian name. The Indian chief Mahuska, whose name is translated as White Cloud, or "The Prophet," has five other places named for him, in Alabama, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, and Michigan. Hodge gives his name as Wabokieshiek. Born about 1794, he was friend and adviser of Black Hawk, and largely responsible for the Black Hawk War of 1832. He presided over an Indian settlement known as the "Prophet's Village," on the site of the present Prophetstown, Illinois. In 1832 he and Black Hawk were captured and imprisoned at Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, and while there his portrait, which now hangs in the National Museum, was painted by Catlin. He died about 1841. His personality and that of later famous Indian "medicine men" inspired the Missouri poet John G. Neihardt to write his "Song of the Messiah" (1935). (Hodge; Gannett; E.I. Miller; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wild Cat Cave
Description:South of Hermitage. One hundred yards in length with two branches. Wild cats inhabited this region. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 208; E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wilson School
Description:See Prairie Grove School.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Go back to the top of the page | View other place names