Franklin County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Acid
Description:A switch on the Frisco Railroad in Meramec Township that goes to the Ripley Mines. It is so named for the amount of acid found in the iron mines. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 188; Miss Johnson; Charles Ripley; E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Adams School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Lyon Township. It was named for a Mr. Adams, an early settler. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson; O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Albany
Description:A town by this name is said to have been platted in 1855 about one mile west of Newhaven (q.v.) in Boeuf Township. It did not survive, the name being taken over in 1857 by the county seat of Gentry County, previously called Athena. Doubtless, as in the case of Gentry County Albany, the name was borrowed from Albany, New York, the oldest of more than twenty American Albanys in as many states. The capital of New York, formerly the old Dutch settlement of Fort Osage, was renamed Albany in 1674 when the English took over the Dutch possesions, after the Duke of Albany, later James II. As a title of nobility, Albany is an ancient name for Scotland. (Lippincott's GAZ., 31; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 188; Miss Johnson: Mrs. Ewing's thesis; Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Anaconda
Description:See Morrellton.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Anaconda School
Description:See Morrellton School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Appleton Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southeast part of Meramec Township. It was named for Mr. Appleton, who owned the land where the mine was located. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Miss Johnson; Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Argo
Description:A small country community and post office now located in Crawford County, owing to the changing boundaries between Franklin and Crawford, but during most of its existence in the southwest part of Boone Township in Franklin. A post office was first established there on August 22, 1836, to be discontinued and then reopened no fewer than seven times; it was last discontinued November 30, 1906. The mythological name, taken from the ship in which Jason and the Argonauts sailed for the golden fleece, was perhaps inspired by hopes of mineral wealth. There are eight other Argos in the United States. (Postal Guide; HIST. FRANKLIN, 341; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 197 & map; Miss Johnson; J.E. Hulsey)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Argo Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Description:A church in the southwest part of Boone Township. The congregation was organized in 1861 at the home of James Braley and was named for the post office. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 358; Miss Johnson; J.E. Hulsey)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Argo School
Description:A school in the southwest part of Boone Township. It was so named for the post office. (Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson; O.E. Burks)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Atlantic and Pacific Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Augusta
Description:See Boles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Augusta Ferry
Description:On the Missouri River in the northwest part of Boles Township. It took its name from Augusta across the river in St. Charles County. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 31)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Augusta Station
Description:See Boles.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bachelor Creek
Description:A stream which runs northwest through the southern part of Union Township and flows into the Bourbeuse River. It was so named for some bachelors who lived near the creek. Earlier it was known as Roth Creek for a man whose land adjoined the stream. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 35; Miss Johnson; George Keller)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bacon Ridge School
Description:A rural elementary school in the western part of Meramec Township. It was so named for its location on a ridge and for John Bacon, who gave the land for its site. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Benton Dill; Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Baker Island
Description:See Labaddie Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Baltimore
Description:See Newhaven.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Baltimore School
Description:An elementary school in the eastern part of Boeuf Township. It was named for Baltimore Settlement. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: James McDonald)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Baltimore Settlement
Description:See Newhaven.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Barren Fork Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the northwest part of Lyon Township and flows a short distance southeast, where it enters Boeuf Creek in the western part of the township. The name was probably given by the early settlers because the soil here was so poor that the settlers living near the creek often lacked sufficient food. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Miss Johnson; S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bassora
Description:See Washington.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bat Cave
Description:A small cave one-half mile north of the Meramec River in Meramec Township. It is so named for the many bats found there, especially in the winter. (Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bauer Mine
Description:This mine, which is mentioned in the COUNTY ATLAS of 1878, has not been located. The name is probably personal in origin as there have been many Bauers in the county. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 59)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bavaria
Description:A vanished town that was platted on September 6, 1858, by Henry C. Cooper, near South Point in St. Johns Township. The name was obviously taken from the great German province that sent so many settlers to Missouri. (PLAT BOOK A, 17; INT. ENCY.; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bay Branch
Description:A tributary of Taney Creek, which rises in the southwest part of Calvey Township. It is so named for Robert Bay, a pioneer of Calvey Township. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 19; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bear Cave
Description:A cave one and a half miles east of Sullivan. It was so named for the bears found in the cave in early days. (Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beauford
Description:See Beaufort.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beaufort
Description:A village in the southeast part of Lyon Township. It was established in 1849, and has had a post office ever since. When the Rock Island Railroad came through shortly after 1887, the post office was moved south to it, and the town followed, without changing its name. Dr. Pierce Nugent Butler, a resident and the second postmaster, probably suggested the name for his former home at Beaufort, South Carolina. The South Carolina town is the county seat of Beaufort County, at the southern tip of the state. Its name was doubtless borrowed from one of the several French towns called Beaufort, the "fair fortress." The name of the Missouri village is spelled "Beauford" in the county atlas. (Goodwin; Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 203; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 197-8; Miss Johnson: H.J. Linstromberg)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beaufort School
Description:A school in the central part of Lyon Township. It was named for the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: H.J. Linstromberg)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Becker
Description:A post office in the northern part of Boles Township. The town was established on June 6, 1892; and on February 24, 1898, the name and probably the site where changed to Klondike, a post office and a station on the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad, about three miles up the Missouri River. Becker was probably named for Judge Francis Becker (1807-1886), who was born in Germany, came to America in 1832, settled in Franklin Couny in 1836, was appointed justice of the peace and served until 1850. He was also a circuit judge and a judge of the county court. The locality a little west of Becker is now the railroad station Oetters (q.v.) in the vicinity of Reeds Landing. This was one of four post offices moved out of the county and was the only one which changed its name when it was moved. A new Becker post office was established, or reestablished at the old site in Franklin County, in 1922 and still exists there. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 14, 56; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 198; Kiel ADDITIONS; Miss Johnson: H.J. Lindstromberg; Charles Becker; John Pfeiffer)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Becker School
Description:A school in the north central part of Boles Township. It was named for the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beckers Landing
Description:A boat landing on the Missouri River in the northeast part of Boles Township. Obviously named for the nearby town. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 23)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beef Island
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beef River
Description:See Boeuf Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beef Slough
Description:See Boeuf Slough.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beef Township
Description:See Boeuf Township.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beemont
Description:A post office in the western part of Lyon Township. Beemont was established in 1878 and discontinued in 1915. A pioneer, William Herhold, and Henry Schmidt, Sr., ran a saw, grist and flour mill here in 1870. The name is a coinage based on the words "bee" and "mont" which were united by local humorists to exaggerate "the business and altitude of the place. (Postal Guide; HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 198; Miss Johnson; Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beemont School
Description:A school in the western part of Lyon Township, so named for the post office. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson; Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Belew Mine
Description:A mine in Prairie Township. It was named for J.H. Belew, who owned the mine. (Miss Johnson; E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bend School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Calvey Township, so named for its location near a bend in the Meramec River. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson; O.E. Burke; G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beouf Creek
Description:See Boeuf Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beouf Slough
Description:See Boeuf Slough.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Berger
Description:A town located in the northwest part of Boeuf Township, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Eaton says it was laid out in 1870 by Charles Helmendach and named for Casper Berger, an old pioneer who founded a colony there. The town, however, was in existence much earlier. Kiel's BIOG. DIR. says it was established in 1856, and Goodwin lists it as a post office under the name Berger Station, in 1867. Probably it took its name from Berger Creek, said to have been named for Joseph Berger, a French trapper and hunter. The present pronunciation indicates that the name-father, whoever he was, was French rather than German. (Goodwin; Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 341, 347; Eaton, 167; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 198; Miss Johnson; S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Berger Bottom
Description:A lowland in the northwest part of Boeuf Township, near Berger Creek, for which it is named. Also known, for its size, as Big Bottom. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 16)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Berger Creek
Description:Rises in Boeuf Township, Gasconade County, and flows east into the adjoining Boeuf Township, Franklin County, emptying into the Missouri River just west of Newhaven. This is one of the oldest French names in the county. It appears on the newly discovered Evans (or Mackay) Map of 1795 or 1796, as "R. Berger," with the English translation just below of "Shepherd's River." The Perrin du Lac Map of 1802 enters it again as "R. Berger," and Pike's Map of about 1806 has it as "Shepherd River." When the Lewis and Clark Expedition passed its mouth on May 26, 1804, Clark called it in his journal (I.29) "Shepperds Creek;" and he lists it again in his "Summary Statement of Rivers and Creeks" (VI. 56) as "Shepherds Creek," noting that it comes from the southwest and enters the Missouri just eighty-three miles above its mouth. When Prince Maximilian passed the stream on May 25, 1834, he writes the name as "River a Berger." Berger Creek is the form subsequently used, although it is also known as Big Berger Creek, to distinguish it from a much smaller tributary called Little Berger Creek (q.v.). The early use of the translated form Shepherd or Shepherd's Creek would seem to indicate that it was understood as the French common noun "berger," shepherd. It is much more likely, however, to have been originally a personal name. Houck, in his SPANISH REGIME IN MISSOURI (II.196), conjectures that it was named either for the French hunter Joseph Berger or for Pierre Berger, who was a merchant of St. Louis and died there in 1787. In another place (II.188), Houck prints the roster of St. Louis militia companies in 1780, in which Joseph Berger's name appears as "Joseph Berge," forty-eight years old, born in Canada, a hunter. This conjecture, which is accepted by Kiel, seems altogether plausible. Another view, however, is taken by the editor of Pike's Expedition, Elliott Coues. In a footnote to Pike's name Shepherd River (II. 365), Coues says: "I am told by R.J. Holcombe that the word is not the French "berger" but a personal name, probably of the old German pioneer Casper Burger, a founder of the colony there." Eaton follows Coues, only altering the spelling of the German "founder of a colony" to Casper Berger. Holcombe's guess, for it can be nothing more, must surely be rejected. If there ever was a German pioneer named Casper Burger--and no trace of him has been discovered in any other authority--he could hardly have come to Missouri early enough to give his name to a stream already known as "River Berger" by 1795. The way the name is used by Perrin du Lac, Evans, Clark, and Pike show that it was understood from the beginning as French, not German, long before there could have been much, if any, German immigration. Furthermore, the still prevailing pronunciation of the name with a soft "g" is rather convincing demonstration that it was originally of French, not German, derivation. (Evans, or Mackay, Map; Perrin du Lac; L&C, and EWT, ed. Thwaites, & Pike, ed. Coues, pp. cited; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 59; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204-5; Houck, SPANISH REGIME II 188, 196; Eaton, 167; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 198; Miss Johnson; S.A. Hall; Mr. Weber's thesis, under "Big Berger Creek")
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Berger School
Description:An educational institution in the northwest part of Boeuf Township, at Berger, for which it is named. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson; S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Berger Settlement
Description:An early colony along the Missouri River. It was doubtless named for Berger Creek. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 217)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Berger Station
Description:See Berger.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Berthold Mine
Description:Once a well-known mine, mentioned by Barns, but not exactly located. The name is doubtless personal in origin as many Bertholds have been businessmen in the county. (Barns, 561; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 60)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethel Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Church in the northwest part of Boles Township. It was established about 1850. Cf. above. (Miss Johnson; J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethel Church [2 lof 2]
Description:A Baptist Church in Prairie Township. It was organized about 1888. Cf. above. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 188; Miss Johnson; E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethel School
Description:A rural elementary school in the northwest part of Boles Township. It was named for the church. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson; J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethlehem Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church in the northern part of Detmold Township, five miles northeast of Union. It is a familiar Bible name meaning "house of bread." The church no longer exists. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 58; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 183, 188; Miss Johnson; E.O. Griese)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethlehem Congregation
Description:A church at Union. The congregation was organized on December 1, 1845, by Reverend Joseph Fenton, John Gilbreath, and Elder David Bishop. Cf. above. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 361; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Berger
Description:A post office in the northwest part of Boeuf Township, which was established in 1874 and discontinued in 1876. Henry Rohlfink was its postmaster. It was named for its location near the stream. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 198; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Berger Creek
Description:See Berger Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Bottom
Description:See Berger Bottom.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Branch
Description:A tributary of Boeuf Creek which rises in the south-central part of Boeuf Township. It is so named because it is the largest tributary of Boeuf Creek in that section. (MAP OF FRANKLIN COUNTY 1919; Miss Johnson; S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Calvey Creek
Description:Rises in Jefferson County, then enters Franklin and flows northwest through Calvey Township till it unites with the Little Calvey to form Calvey Creek (q.v.). The two branches are named for their comparative size. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Creek
Description:A northern tributary of Bourbeuse River, which rises in the north central part of Boone Township. It is so named on account of its extensive size at flood time. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Miss Johnson; G.F. Duerr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Indian Creek
Description:A southeast tributary of the Meramec River, which flows north and northeast through the southwest part of Prairie Township and enters Meramec River in the northwest part of the township. It is named for the tribes of Indians that used to camp on its banks in early days. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; Miss Johnson: A.C. Beasley; Henry Hamilton; Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Tavern Creek
Description:The present name of a stream formerly known as Tavern Creek, or Tavern Rock Creek. It rises in St. Louis County, near its western border (see Miss Welty's thesis), and flows northwest into Franklin County, passing through the northeast corner of Boles Township, and emptying into the Missouri River about one mile above the famous Tavern Rock Cave (q.v.), from which it takes its name. Just at its mouth it is joined by the smaller stream called Little Tavern Creek (q.v.), from which it is distinguished by the present name. A self-contradictory and certainly mistaken statement in Wetmore's GAZETTEER of 1847 places Tavern Creek on the north or St. Charles side of the Missouri River. Wetmore says (p. 259): "Tavern Creek, a small stream of St. Charles County, falls into the Missouri three miles above the mouth of Femme Osage. A mile below this is a large cave on the right bank of the Missouri, at the foot of cliffs almost perpendicular. The cave is about 100 ft. in length..." This cave is, of course, the well known Tavern Rock Cave (q.v.), and Wetmore places it correctly on the right, i.e. the south bank. It must have been a momentary lapse of memory that made him put Tavern Creek on the St. Charles or left side; for surely the creek must be located on the same side of the river as the cave. Wetmore's mistake is followed by Stevens. Possibly it arose from a misreading of old maps; on the Evans (or Mackay?) Map of 1795, for example, the words "Taverne, a cave" appear written on the north side of the river, about halfway between the names of the Femme Osage and the River Charrette, but almost certainly the old map meant to locate the cave itself on the south side; it was merely a matter of finding a convenient place to write the name. The final proof that there has never been either a creek or a cave on the north side is afforded by the topography, relatively unchanging, of the eight-mile stretch of the Missouri River from the mouth of the Femme Osage on the north to Tavern Rock Cave on the south. This stretch of river is described by Coues as follows (in a note to his edition of the Pike Exp., p. 362): "the Femme Osage River falls into the lower end of Dozier's bend. The Missouri is here one and a half to two miles broad, and mostly filled with Howell's isl., two and a half miles long, some small islands, and various sandbars. Thence on the north or rather northwest is a bottom eight miles long and a mile or more deep; while on the southeast is a nearly unbroken line of bluffs which the river washes from Port Royal (in Franklin County, just over the border of St. Louis County) to St. Albans. At one place in these rocks is the cave formerly, and perhaps still, known as the Tavern: see Lewis and Clark, and Pike's map, place lettered "Cave." The small stream which makes in on the southeast at St. Albans is still called Tavern Creek." The contrast here depicted between the low northern bank forming a mile-wide and eight-mile-long bottom, and the precipitous southern bank, with bluffs three hundred feet high, must always have existed, and fixes the position of both Tavern Creek and Tavern Cave where all modern histories place them, on the south or Franklin County side. (Evans, or Mackay, Map; Pike Map, & note in Coue's ed. of the Pike Exp., 362; Wetmore, 259; Stevens II, 781; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 23; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 195; Miss Johnson: Charles Becker)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Wet Cave
Description:A cave in the Meramec State Park. It was so named for a long, deep valley in the cave which contained so much water that miners were unable to remove the lead there. (Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Binsbacker Mine
Description:A lead mine in the extreme northern part of Meramec Township. The vein was discovered about 1888. The name may be personal in origin as that name is found there with the spelling Binsbacher. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 210; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 60)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Birch Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the northeast part of Central Township and flows northeast into the Bourbeuse River. It is named for the birch timber that grows along the banks of the creek. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 27; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Miss Johnson: Wes Breckenridge)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bismark
Description:See Senate Grove.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blesse Pond
Description:A pool or stream, not exactly located, mentioned by Mr. Kiel. He says that about eighty-five years ago the stream was known as Blesse Pond or Pool Creek by the Germans because "an old bald faced horse with a blaze or white spot in the forehead was nicknamed "Bless" and was actually found there running at large." "Blesse" or "Blasse" is a German noun, derived from the adjecrtive "blass," pale, which signifies a "blaze," star, or white spot on a horse's forehead--commonly described by Americans as a "bald- faced" horse. (DRAINAGE SUPPLEMENT; Miss Johnson; Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blish's Mill
Description:A flour mill in the northeast part of Boeuf Township. It was named for Joseph Blish, who operated the mill. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 237; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 188, 198; Miss Johnson: S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blish's Mill or Mills
Description:See Newhaven.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeuf Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A considerable stream which rises in Gasconade County and flows through northwest Franklin County, running through Lyon and Boeuf Townships to a point near the border of St. Johns Township, where it empties into the Missouri River. The stream was named by the early French settlers for the buffalo then found near it, the term "boeuf," cattle, being usually applied to buffalo by the French. The name was later Anglicized by American pioneers to Buffalo River (spelled Buffalow River by Lewis and Clark), or Buffaloe River; but the original French name prevailed and is the only form now used. However, it is more or less Americanized in pronunciation and sometimes erroneously spelled Beouf, Beouff, Boeuse, or Beef. It was called Beef River in Clark's Journal when the Lewis and Clark Expedition passed its mouth on May 26, 1804. McDermott says of the term "boeuf" in Mississippi Valley French: "A buffalo. The term "buffle" was in occasional use; precise travelers used the word "bisen." In the Mississippi Valley the common term was "boeuf sauvage," generally simplified to "boeuf." It is not to be translated "wild cattle." (Thwaites, L&C I, 5, 29; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205, 342, Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 188; McDermott; Miss Johnson: Lewis Hoemann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeuf Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A village on the stream called Boeuf Creek, from which it obviously derived its name, near the northern border of Lyon Township. It is listed as a post office under that name as early as 1867, by Goodwin (who spells it Bouff Creek), and is continued in the postal guides till 1915, when the post office was discontinued. An earlier name was Detmold, established, according to Kiel, in 1857. The PLAT BOOK OF FRANKLIN COUNTY says the village was laid off April 7, 1868, by Henry Stille and Henry Panhourst, and named Detmold for a place in Germany. Kiel says Detmold was a nickname for Boeuf Creek. Curiously enough, the German name seems to have prevailed in the end and is the name given for the place on the 1940 map of the Missouri State Highway Department. Detmold in Germany is the capital of the principality of Lippe, sometimes called Lippe-Detmold. It is situated on the Werre about forty-seven miles southwest of Hanover. According to Taylor, the name signifies a place of popular assembly: "The first portion of the name is "diet," people, which we have also in the name of Deutschland. The suffix is mal, a place of assembly, or a court of justice." (Goodwin; Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13-14; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; Eaton; INT. ENCYC.; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 199; Isaac Taylor, WORDS & PLACES, 278; PLAT BOOK A., 8; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeuf Island
Description:An island in the Missouri River, south of Peers. According to the present boundaries, all the island is in Warren County, in the southern part of Charrette Township, except the southwestern tip (about one-eighth), which belongs to Boeuf Township in Franklin County. The original French name appears on the newly discovered Evans, or Mackay, Map of 1795 or 1796 as "Isle au Boeuf," with the English form annexed of "Beef Island." When the Lewis and Clark explorers passed it on May 26, 1804, Clark writes (I. 29): "passed Beef Island and River on Lbd Side," but a correction in another hand adds "a large island called Buffaloe Island separated from the land by a small channel into which Buffaloe Creek empties itself." Buffalo Island, is of course, a better rendering of the French name (see under Beouf Creek). Later travelers, such as Brackenridge (EWT VI. 36) and Maximilian (EWT XXII. 239) revert to the French forms Isle au Boeuf, or Isle aux Boeufs (EWT V. 42); and today the compromise form Boeuf Island has prevailed, more or less anglicized in pronunciation. The original name was doubtless given for its position at the mouth of Boeuf Creek in Franklin County. Two other islands, Parke (or Park) and Red Top Island, are now merged with Boeuf Island. Parke Island was named for a Mr. Parke who lived south of the river. Red Top Island may have been named for its covering of reddish wild grass (Agrostis vulgaris), also called "English grass" or "herd's Grass," which is highly valued for pasture. (L&C, ed. Thwaites, and EWT, pp. cited; COUNTY MAP, 1908; Benj. Frick; E.C. Kehr; F.W. Kehr; H.J. Muench; A.W. Wehmeyer (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeuf Presbyterian Church
Description:Organized in 1859, by a committee appointed by the presbytery, in the west central part of Lyon Township. It was named for its location near Boeuf Creek. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 359; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeuf Settlement
Description:An early colony along the Missouri River, presumably at the mouth of Boeuf Creek, for which it was probably named. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 216-17)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeuf Slough
Description:A lowland near Dundee, off the mouth of Boeuf Creek, for which it is named. Originally it was a slough that extended from Newhaven to a mile or two below Dundee. It is no longer in existence because the creek has changed its course. Kiel spells the name Beef Slough, and the COUNTY ATLAS spells it Beouf Slough. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 47; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 201; Miss Johnson: Henry Steiner)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeuf Township
Description:The northwest township in Franklin County. It is bounded by the Missouri River on the north, St. Johns Township on the east, Lyon Township on the south, and Gasconade County on the west. The township seems to have been settled about 1805 by John and Charles Phillips. It was organized July 12, 1819 and named for the creek. The spellings Beef Township and Boeuff Township are also found. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 235, 273; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 232; Washington Library Rec.; Clark Brown, TRIBUNE, Apr. 30, 1920)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeuff Township
Description:See Boeuf Township.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeuse Creek
Description:See Boeuf Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bohnsack School
Description:See Grant School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boles
Description:A post office and station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the northwest part of Boles Township. The post office was first established under the name of Boles in 1862; it was discontinued in 1863, but reestablished in 1864. Earlier it was known as Augusta Station, or Augusta, because it served as a station for the town of Augusta, which was north of the river in St. Charles County. When the Missouri, Kansas, and Texas Railroad was completed along the northern bank, this was no longer the case, and the name was changed to avoid confusion. The new name was doubtless taken from Boles Township (q.v.), which had been organized forty years earlier. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13-14; HIST. FRANKLIN, 14, 224; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 73; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 199; Miss Johnson: J.W. Reynolds; Charles Becker)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boles Township
Description:The northeast township of Franklin County, bordered on the northwest by St. Johns Township, the west by Union Township, the southwest by Central Township, the south by Calvey Township, the north by the Missouri River, and the east by Jefferson and St. Louis Counties. Ambrose Boles (or Bowles), William Fullerton, and John Ridenhour were among the first settlers of the township. Boles came by 1803, and the others soon followed. The township was organized on April 23, 1821, and was named for Mr. Boles. He settled on a Spanish grant which contained the present site of Labadie. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 5, 12; HIST. FRANKLIN, 236, 297; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 73; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 199, 232; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone
Description:A village located in the southwest part of Boone Township, in the bend west of the Little Bourbeuse River. Kiel says the post office was established September 5, 1851, and discontinued in 1863, although it is listed by Goodwin in 1867. It was reestablished May 26, 1898, and again discontinued in 1907. The later post office was not on the identical site of the earlier one, but it has always been in Boone Township. In 1860 the place is said to have been probably the most important village in that part of Franklin County. It was probably named, as the dates indicate, for Boone Township, which in turn was named for Boone Creek, and it in course for Daniel Boone. (Goodwin; Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 199 & map; Miss Johnson: Mrs. Anna Cuneio)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone Copper Mine
Description:A copper mine in the south-central part of Boone Township, so named for its location on Boone Creek. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 207; Miss Johnson: F.L. Notting)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone Creek
Description:A stream which flows north through Boone Township till it is joined by Little Boone Creek, and then it continues north until it enters Bourbeuse River. It was named in honor of Daniel Boone (1735-1820), the famous pioneer, who is said to have lived in the southwest part of Franklin County, near the stream that bears his name, prior to his going to Warren County. The name also appears as Boone's Creek. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13-14; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205, 229; Kiel's BIOG. DIR. 199, 233, & map; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone Township
Description:This township occupies the southwest part of Franklin County. It is bounded on the south by Crawford County, on the west by Gasconade County, on the north by Lyon Township, and on the east by Union and Meramec Townships. It was organized on February 7, 1832, out of the western part of what had been Meramec Township, and took its name from its principal stream Boone Creek, which had been named for Daniel Boone. Ten years later, on February 12, 1842, there was a demand by some citizens of Boone Township for a further subdivision because, they said, it was inconveninet to reach voting places and also because there were enough householders to justify a new township. It was accordingly organized on that date under the name of Linn Township; but on May 3 of the same year the action was rescinded and Linn was receded to Boone Township. The short-lived township took its name from the popular Senator Linn, whose name is also commemorated by Linn County, served in the Upper House from 1833 until his death, and was a conspicuous and popular member. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 5, 12, 14; HIST. FRANKLIN, 229; DAB; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 233 & map; COURT RECORDS, BK. C., 18; Miss Johnson; Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone's Creek
Description:See Boone Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Booth Bank Mine
Description:A red hematite mine in the southwest part of Central Township, two and a half miles from Dry Branch. The mine was opened in 1882 and named for a Dr. Booth who owned it. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 210; Miss Johnson: Henry Hamilton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bottom School
Description:See Upper Bottom School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bouff Creek
Description:See Boeuf Creek (village)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bourbeuse River
Description:Rises in Gasconade County and enters Franklin County at the southwest corner of Boone Township, flowing northeast through the township; thence it pursues a winding, generally easterly course, forming the boundaries between Union and Meramec, Union and Central, and Boles and Central Townships, till it enters the Meramec River. The name is a very early one, conferred by the French pioneers: "bourbeux,-euse" means muddy, miry, sloughy, sloshy, and adjective derived from the noun "bourbe," mud. In Gasconade the name does not seem very appropriate, for there the Bourbeuse is a comparatively clear stream; but it fits better the lower part of the stream in Franklin County. Variants in spelling that occur are Bourbois, Bourboise, Burbois, Burbus, etc. (Davis & Durrie, 364; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204, 232, 235; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 199 & map; Cassell's NEW DICT.; WASHINGTON LIBRARY REC.; TRIBUNE, Apr. 4, 1930, 20; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bourbois
Description:See Burbois.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bourbois River
Description:See Bourbeuse River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bourboise River
Description:See Bourbeuse River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bowlen Bank
Description:A limonite deposit in the northern part of Prairie Township. The name is probably personal in origin. (GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 179)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Breitnbach's Store
Description:See Rengel.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brown's Branch
Description:A tributary of Dubois Creek which empties into the stream south of South Point. It was named for an early settler. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 189; Miss Johnson: Charles Cole)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brown's Station
Description:A town projected about 1855 on the Frisco Railroad, two miles east of Newhaven. The projector was William Joseph Brown, a slave-owner, for whom the proposed town was to be named. The place seems never to have been realized. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 189; Miss Johnson: Henry Steiner)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brush Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A small stream which rises in the southern part of Boles Township and flows east into the Meramec River. It was so named for a thick growth of hazel brush and blackberry tangle that grew along its banks. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; Miss Johnson: Julian Pickles)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brush Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A second Brush Creek, also a tributary of the Meramec River. It runs through the southern part of Central Township. Its name was doubtless acquired in the same way as the one in Boles Township. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 204)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brush Creek School
Description:A rural elementary school in the southeast part of Central Township. It was named for its location near the creek. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: A.C. Beasley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brush Lick Creek
Description:A stream that rises in the northeast part of Lyon Township and flows north into Boeuf Township, where it enters Boeuf Creek. It was named by the pioneers who saw buck licking salt there. The same stream, apparently, is called Bucklick Creek in the 1898 ATLAS, and Buck Lick Creek on the map of 1940. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 58; COUNTY ATLAS 1898, 7; HIGHWAY MAP, LINCOLN 1940; Miss Johnson: Milford Hockemeyer)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brushy Fork
Description:A tributary of St. Johns Creek, which rises in the eastern part of Lyon Township. It was named for the brush which grew along the edge of the stream. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Miss Johnson: F.W. Schroeder)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buck Lick Creek
Description:See Brush Lick Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buckhorn
Description:See Drain.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bucklick Creek
Description:See Brush Lick Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bucklick School
Description:A rural elementary school in the northeast part of Lyon Township. It was built in 1896 and named for its location near the stream. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Milford Rockemeyer)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buffalo Island
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buffalo Ridge School
Description:A rural elementary school in the west central part of Lyon Township. The name was suggested by Halcomb Watkins, an old Virginia gentleman, who said that the barren hill site had probably been denuded of trees by the buffalo in early days. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buffalo River
Description:See Boeuf Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buffaloe Island
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buffaloe River
Description:See Boeuf Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bull Island
Description:An island, originally waste land, in the Missouri River, near Labaddie. It is said to have been named for a bull fight Charles Laefler had while he was caring for John Warnebaldt's cattle in 1916. On January 13, 1926, the Point Prairie Fishing Club took control of the island. (PLAT BOOK C., 82; Miss Johnson: Charles Becker)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buncombe
Description:A post office by this name is said by Mr. Kiel to have been established in the southern part of Meramec Township on November 11, 1842, and discontinued on March 23, 1844. Mr. Kiel further states that the first postmaster was named Uriah Burns, followed by William Hall. No other record of this short-lived post office seems to exist. In as much as there are no postal guides between Wetmore's in 1837 and Hayward's in 1853, neither of which mention Buncombe, one may be excused for suspecting that Mr. Kiel is indulging in a bit of harmless "buncombe" in the latter sense of the word. It is possible, of course, that the name was transferred from Buncombe County, North Carolina, to Missouri, by some loyal North Carolina settlers, or in a spirit of jest. The immortal speech in Congress by the member from North Carolina who insisted that "he was talking for Buncombe," thereby adding a new word to the dictionary, is said to have been made in 1820. But one would like to see more evidence for the Missouri Buncombe. The earliest dates for the name as listed by DAE are: 1846, J.G. Saxe, PROGRESS; 1848, Bartlett; and 1849, L.J. Frazee, MEDICAL STUDENT. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 199; DAE; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Burbois
Description:A post office once existing near the western border of Boone Township. It was established on April 1, 1851, and took its name from the nearby Bourbeuse River, of which Burbois is one of the customary variant spellings. On June 6, 1870, the post office was moved across the border into Gasconade County to a site about one mile distant. For its subsequent history see Rosebud in Mr. Weber's thesis. The spelling was changed to the slightly more correct Bourbois in 1895 when Mrs. Emma Wortmann was postmaster, and in 1901 the name was changed to Rosebud. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 199, 200; Mr. Weber's thesis; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Burbois River
Description:See Bourbeuse River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Burbus River
Description:See Bourbeuse River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Busch's Creek
Description:See Dubois Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bush Park
Description:A park probably located in Washington. No explanation of the origin of the name could be found. (Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buskett Mine
Description:See Meramec Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buzzard's Roost
Description:The first tavern built at Franklin, now Pacific. The name is a good example of the quaint type of humor employed on the frontier. (MHR, Jan. 1921, 261)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Calvey [1 of 2]
Description:A small town in the southwest part of Calvey Township. The post office was established in 1854 and discontinued in 1894; reestablished in 1904 and discontinued in 1908. Locally the name is spelled Calvy, and some postal records also use this spelling. The town was probably named for the township. Robertsville, a Frisco Railroad station four miles north of Calvey, was also often known as Calvey or Calvey Station. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 200, 209; Eaton, 165, 167; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 200, 209; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff; Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Calvey [2 of 2]
Description:See Robertsville and Calvey.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Calvey Creek
Description:Rises in Jefferson County, then enters Franklin and traverses Calvey Township from southeast to northwest, emptying into the Meramec River. Named for some member of the Calve family, prominent in early St. Louis as settlers and fur-traders. Houck mentions Joseph Calve employed by Joseph Datchurut and Louis Vivait in the fur trade; he came to St. Louis in 1765 and married Therese, daughter of Nicholas Marechal at Fort Chartres. In 1768, on account of an offense he absconded from St. Louis and his house and lot were sold. Later he went to St. Ferdinand. Several other members of the family are mentioned in the St. Louis annals. The name is also spelled Calvy. Both Calvy and Calvey are of course attempts to represent the French pronunciation of Calve. Above its junction with Little Calvey Creek (q.v.), it is often known as Big Calvey (q.v.). (Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 3, 35, 40; SPANISH REGIME I, 90, 190; II, 384; HIST. FRANKLIN 164; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 16; Eaton, 167; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Calvey Station
Description:See Calvey and Robertsville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Calvey Township
Description:In the eastern part of Franklin County, bounded on the north by Boles Township, on the west by Central Township, on the south by Prairie Township, and on the east by Jefferson County. The name doubtless came from the creek. The township was organized April 23, 1821. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 16; HIST. FRANKLIN, 236; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 232 & map; Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Calvy
Description:See Calvey.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Calvy Creek
Description:See Calvey Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cambellton
Description:See Campbellton.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Franklin
Description:At Gray Summit. According to Kiel, this was an important rendezvous of Union soldiers in 1864. The name was probably given for the county. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 190, 202)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camp Herron
Description:An important Civil War military center at Pacific. A skirmish was fought here October 1, 1864. The post was so named for its commander, Lieutenant Colonel Frank J. Herron, of the Ninth Iowa Regiment, who was a hero at the Battle of Wilson's Creek. (WAR OF THE REBELLION, 261, 267, 459; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 208)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Campbellton
Description:A town in the northeast part of Lyon Township. A post office was established there on January 7, 1854, and named in honor of James Campbell of Pennsylvania, then Postmaster General of the United States. Campbell (1812-1893), was born in Southwark, Pennsylvania; he became School Commissioner in 1840, was made judge in the Court of Common Pleas in 1842, and was appointed Postmaster General by President Franklin Pierce in 1852. It is said that the post office at Campbellton was established on the same day as the one at Newport, now Dundee (q.v.), was discontinued, and took its place until the Newport post office was reestablished on February 27, 1854. Goodwin in 1867 spells the name Cambellton. (Goodwin; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; DAB; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 200; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Campbellton School
Description:In the northeast part of Lyon Township. It was named for the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Canaan Road
Description:A name given to the road running from Gasconade County into Newhaven, across the southern part of Lyon Township. The road doubtless took its name from Canaan Township in Gasconade where it started. According to Mr. Weber's thesis, the familiar Bible name was chosen by some settlers from Tennessee in the 1840s who considered Gasconade their "promised land." (HIST. FRANKLIN, 203; Mr. Weber's thesis under "Canaan"; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Casco
Description:A village in the southeast part of Lyon Township. A post office was established there on August 9, 1871, in the store of J.C. and H.A. Klenke. The Klenkes had built their store in 1868. J.C. Klenke is said to have found the name Casco in a book he had. It came doubtless from Casco, Maine, on Casco Bay about twenty-five miles northwest of Portland. One authority thinks the name may have been suggested by Postmaster General Gale, in office at the time, who happened to be a Maine man. The Italian word from which Casco is derived is said to mean "resting place." On some maps it is spelled Casko. The post office was discontinued on May 31, 1908. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; Lippincott's GAZ.; Gannett; Miss Johnson: George Klenke; Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Casewell Mine
Description:A lead mine in the south central part of Prairie Township. It was named for a man who owned and operated the mine. The name is spelled "Caswell" in the ATLAS. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8; HIST. FRANKLIN, 208; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Casko
Description:See Casco.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Caswell Mine
Description:See Casewell Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Catawissa
Description:A village in the northeast part of Calvey Township, on the Frisco Railroad about thirty-nine miles west of St. Louis. It was platted and named in 1858 by James H. Morley, and a post office established in 1860, taking the place of one just discontinued at Robertsville three miles to the west. From 1859 to 1871 these two small communities had only one post office at a time, its posession alternating betweeen them: It was at Robertsville from December 27, 1859, to March 27, 1860, from then to April 17, 1861, at Catawissa, from then till June 27, 1872, at Robertsville, and from then till June 6, 1871, at Catawissa, after which the two places have enjoyed separate offices. The name Catawissa is undoubtledly of Indian origin, and seems to have been borrowed from Catawissa, Pennsylvania, on Catawissa Creek in Columbia County. The popular etymology of the word, according to Kiel, is "growing fat." This supposed meaning may have influenced the choice of the name as descriptive of the fertile new country in Missouri. It has, however, no authoritative support. According to Hodge, the Conoy Indians in Pennsylvania had a wigwam on the Catawese, now Catawissa Creek, and the name is probably derived from "Piscatawesa," a later name for the Conoy tribe. (Goodwin; Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 237, 340; Hodge; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 200; Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Catawissa School
Description:In the northeast part of Calvey Township. It is named for the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cave School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Central Township, so named for its location near where the river has washed out a cave in the bank. (Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: A.C. Beasley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cave Spring Church
Description:A Baptist organization in the central part of Boone Township. Cf. above. (Miss Johnson: Mrs. Alice B. Lockhart)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cave Spring School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Boone Township. It is named for the church. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Mrs. Alice B. Lockhart)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Bluffs
Description:A resort in the southwest part of Boles Township, on the Meramec River. It was opened by the Suburban Realty Company, December 2, 1925, and was named for its location on bluffs among cedar trees. (PLAT BK. C, 81; Miss Johnson: J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Crest
Description:A resort near St. Clair in Central Township, on land given by Mrs. C.T. Shewell. It was named for its location. (PLAT BOOK C, 32; Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Fork
Description:A post office located in the southwest part of Lyon Township. It was established in 1858 but has been discontinued since 1907. It was named for the creek. Kiel and others write the name Cedarfork. In late years it has been nicknamed Jaeger because William F. Jaeger owned a blacksmith shop at this place. (Goodwin; HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 191, 200; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Fork Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the southwest part of Lyon Township and flows north into Boeuf Creek near the northern edge of the township. It is named for the many cedars near it and for the fact that it is a fork or branch of Boeuf Creek. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 200; Miss Johnson; Oscar Pelstar)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Grove Missionary Baptist Church
Description:A church near Calvey, organized by the Reverend Thomas Hudson in February, 1879. It is named for its location in a cedar grove. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 351; Miss Johnson; G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Grove School [1 of 2]
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Boles Township. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: C.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Grove School [2 of 2]
Description:Another Cedar Grove School in the northwest part of Lyon Township. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: C.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Hill
Description:The location of this hill has not been found. The name is probably descriptive. (Washington Library Rec.)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedarfork
Description:See Cedar Fork.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Central
Description:See Strain.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Central School
Description:An elementary school so named for its location in the central part of Central Township. The school was organized about 1900. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Bob Beasley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Central Township
Description:So named because it lies in the center of the county, between the Bourbeuse and Meramec Rivers, surrounded by Union, Boles, Calvey, Prairie, and Meramec Townships. It was organized February 15, 1853, from a part of the earlier Galena Township. Galena Township was organized on August 9, 1839, from parts of the still earlier Calvey, Meramec, and St. Johns Townships. It was so named because galena, a lead ore or sulphide, was mined in this area in large quantities. When the name was changed to Central in 1853, the boundaries were altered considerably, and parts of the original Galena Township were transferred to Prairie, Meramec, and Calvey Townships. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 5, 14; HIST. FRANKLIN, 226; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 232-33 & Map; COURT RECORDS, BK. B., 429; SULLIVAN NEWS, Aug. 25, 1941; Miss Johnson: Joe Murphy; A.C. Beasley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Champion City
Description:A village in the central part of Boone Township. The post office was established on August 20, 1877, but has been discontinued since May 20, 1911. It was named for the Champion Flour Mill, operated there by Mr. Everhard Giebler, who suggested the name in 1872. Mr. Arthur Keller, in a letter, says that Mr. Giebler wanted to call the place Champion, but since there was already one Champion in Missouri added the word "City." If the story is true, the other place must since have changed its name, for there is no such place-name in the state at present. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 16; HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 200; Miss Johnson: Arthur Keller)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Champion City School
Description:At Champion City, for which it was named. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: F.L. Notting)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chapel Hill Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the southwest corner of Meramec Township. The original log building had no windows and stood on a hill. The gloomy character and bleak location of the church led the boys in the community to give it the ironic name, Chapel Hill. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 189; Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad
Description:This system extends from Chicago, Illinois, via Omaha, Nebraska, to Denver and Colorado Springs, also to Kansas City, etc. It connects with the Southern Pacific for Pacific coast service. A great many railroads are included in the Rock Island lines. In Franklin County the road angles across the county in a southwesterly direction from the northeast part of Boles to the northwest part of Boone Township, where it goes into Gasconade County. This road was built to Union in 1887 and to Kansas City in 1904. It was long known as the Colorado Railroad, or as the St. Louis, Kansas City & Colorado Railroad, but now it is usually called merely the Rock Island Railroad. All names were given for the terminal points of the railroads. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 207; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194 & map; R. & I. Compendium, May 29, 1941, 65)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Church of the Holy Martyrs
Description:See Church of the Holy Martyrs of Japan.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Church of the Holy Martyrs of Japan
Description:A Catholic institution at Japan (q.v.). Though the HISTORY OF FRANKLIN says the church was organized in 1872 by Father A. Bauhaus, Reverend John H. Lakebrink declares that it has been in existence for more than a century. It was so named for twenty-six Catholic priests and lay brethren of Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese nationality, who were crucified in Japan by Japanese fanatics, February 5, 1597. In the Catholic litany the holy martyrs stand next to the Apostles as objects of devotion. It is also known as the Church of the Holy Martyrs. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 377; MHR, April, 1942; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clark and Appleton Mine
Description:See Thomas Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clates Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the northwest part of Boone Township and flows south into the Bourbeuse River in the west central part of the township. It was named for an old settler. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Miss Johnson: John Biller)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cleve's Mill
Description:A flour mill in the central part of St. Johns Township, where early county elections were held until 1876, when the voting center was moved to Ziegenmeyer School. The mill was named for its operator, Ben Cleve, who was born in the Dukedom of Brunswick, Germany, in 1826, came to America in 1849 and to Franklin County in 1865, and served as a county judge. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 53; HIST. FRANKLIN, 237; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 189; Miss Johnson: George Klenke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clover Bottom
Description:A village in the extreme southwest part of St. Johns Township. The post office was established in 1869 and discontinued in 1908. John C. Althen, the first postmaster, also kept a general store there. It is named for its location. This level bottom was formerly used as a race track. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 200; Miss Johnson: George Klenke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Coe Mine
Description:See Thomas Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Colorado Railroad
Description:See Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific Railroad.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Conn
Description:A post office established on December 15, 1832, and discontinued on July 8, 1834. It was probably named for Samuel Conn, who was its only postmaster. Some records list the place as Conns. Since Samuel Conn homesteaded on the north or left bank of the Meramec River, Conn was probably located in what is now the southeast part of Central Township. It must, however, have been close to Rundlettville (q.v.), which was apparently south of the Meramec River, and at which a post office was established a year later. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 201, 209, 210 & map; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Conns
Description:See Conn.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Coon Den Cave
Description:A cave in the Meramec State Park. Cf. above. (Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cooper's Bottom
Description:A lowland mentioned but not definitely located in the HISTORY OF FRANKLIN. An early settlement was made here in 1810. The name is probably given for an early settler. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 63)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cotinay's Fork
Description:A fork in the Meramec River on the boundary line between Franklin and Washington Counties. The apostrophe indicates that the name is probably personal in origin. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 272)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cove Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southwest corner of Calvey Township, along the Meramec River. It is so named for its location in a cove that the river has washed out. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 208; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cove School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Central Township. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: A.C. Beasley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Craig Mine
Description:A mine which was in the same general region as Enterprise Mine (q.v.). No explanation for the name has been found. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Darby Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southwest part of Central Township. Also called Darby's Mine. Doubtless named for an owner. (Foster & Swallow, 7 & map; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8, 13)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Darby's Mine
Description:See Darby Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dead Man's Ford
Description:A crossing on the Meramec River, at the northeast part of Boles Township and the northwest part of Calvey Township, between Catswissa and Pacific. Probably it was so named because a man named Donnelly and one or more unknown Catholic priests are said to have been drowned here. Some authorities leave out Donnelly's name, but always mention one and usually two priests. Kiel was unable to find the names of the priests. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 7; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Deavels Race Ground
Description:See Devil's Race-Ground.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Denmark School
Description:In the northeast part of Central Township. It is said to have been named by Adam Kowick, an early settler and a carpenter, who volunteered to do part of the work on the schoolhouse; when it was finished, the choice of a name was left to him. Kowick was also a soldier, a private in the 3rd Missouri Infantry Regiment in the War with Mexico. The reason he chose the name Denmark is not known. One friend who knew him personally said that he was not himself from Denmark. Mr. Kiel suggested that it was a widely used name; as a matter of fact, there are fourteen towns named Denmark in other states. (83RD REPORT; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 108; Miss Johnson: Charles Cole; Wes Breckenridge; Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Detmold
Description:See Boeuf Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Detmold School
Description:In the northwest part of Lyon Township. It was named for the little hamlet. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Devils' Race-Ground
Description:A difficult rapid in the Missouri River along the south or Franklin County side, above the mouth of Tavern Creek. The Lewis and Clark Expedition had a good deal of trouble on May 24, 1804, described as follows by Captain Clark: "passed a verry bad part of the River called the Deavels race ground, this is where the Current Sets against some projecting rocks for half a Mile on the Larboard. Side, above this place is the Mouth of a Small Creek called queevere." It is obviously a humorous descriptive name. (L&C I, 27, ed. Thwaites)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dewey
Description:A railroad siding or switch on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, fifty-eight miles from St. Louis, between Washington and Kent. It was established about 1855 and named for a man who lived nearby. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 189; Miss Johnson: Dr. O.F. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Diamond School
Description:A rural school in the east central part of Prairie Township. The name is emblematic. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dina
Description:A post office in the southwest part of Boles Township. The office was established in 1901 and discontinued in 1904. Herman H. Finder was its only postmaster. His mother and oldest daughter were named Bernadina, so the last part of this name was used for the post office, after the name Agnes had been rejected because there was already a town of that name in Laclede County, Missouri. The Laclede County post office was establishedc in 1897 and discontinued in 1932. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 201 & map; Miss O'Brien's thesis; Miss Johnson: J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dissen
Description:A post office in the south central part of Boeuf Township. It was established in 1899 and discontinued in 1909. It was named for Dissen, Germany, a town in Hanover about thirteen miles southeast of Osnabruck, by early settlers who came from there. (Postal Guide; Lippincott's GAZ.; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 201 & map; Miss Johnson: A.H. Helling)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Doer School
Description:In the southern part of Union Township. Named for Andy Door, or Doer, a large landowner in the district. Miss Johnson reports the name of the school as spelled Door, but it is obviously a German name and more correctly spelled Doer. (83RD REPORT; Miss Johnson: E.O. Griese)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Door School
Description:See Doer School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Drain
Description:A post office in the western part of Lyon Township. It was established in 1894 and discontinued in 1908. Its only postmaster was Gottlieb Schuerkamp, who was a local farmer and merchant. The earliest name of the place was Buckhorn, conferred because a large antler was nailed over the door. When the post office was established, the place was called Drain. Drain was suggested by the people because Mr. Schuerkamp had put out tiling to drain a wet tract of land near the post office. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 201 & map; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Drake
Description:Nothing could be obtained about this place although it is listed in the Washington Library Records. There is a Drake School, however, near Robertsville. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 189; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Drake School
Description:A rural school in the south central part of Calvey Township. It was named for Will Drake, whose land adjoined the school. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Branch [1 of 4]
Description:A tributary of the Meramec River, which rises near Morrellton, formerly called Dry Branch, in the south central part of Central Township, and flows south. This is the stream from which Morellton took its original name. So called because there is water in it only when it rains. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Miss Johnson: Julian Pickles)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Branch [2 of 4]
Description:Another Dry Branch, a tributary of the Bourbeuse River, which rises in the western part of Central Township and flows northwest to join the Bourbeuse near the western boundary of the township. This is apparently the same stream as the one named Hamilton Branch (q.v.) in the 1878 Atlas. Cf. above. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, cf. 13 & 35; HIGHWAY MAP, FRANKLIN 1940)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Branch [3 of 4]
Description:A third Dry Branch, in the western part of Meramec Township, which flows north and empties into Spring Creek. Named for the same reason as the other two. (Miss Johnson: Henry Hamilton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Branch [4 of 4]
Description:See Morrellton.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Branch School
Description:See Old Morrellton School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Branch Station
Description:See Morrellton.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Fork Creek
Description:A tributary of Boeuf Creek. Cf. above. (Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Du Bois Creek
Description:See Dubois Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Du Bois Settlement
Description:A very early colony along the Missouri River, at the mouth of Dubois Creek (q.v.), from which it took its name. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 205, 217; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 73)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dubois Creek
Description:Rises in the northeast part of Union Township, and flows northeast through the eastern part of St. Johns Township into the Missouri River about a mile east of Washington. It appears as "R. Dubois," with the English form "Dubois's River," on the newly discovered Evans, or Mackay, Map of 1795 or 1796, and as "R. du Bois" on the Perrin du Lac Map of 1802. The Lewis and Clark explorers, who passed its mouth on May 25, 1804, called it "Wood River": so Clark's journal (I. 28), Sergeant Floyd (VII. 5), and Sergeant Gass (p. 15). It is not to be confused with the Wood River, also called River Dubois, in Illinois, which was the starting point of the great expedition. Also Du Bois Creek in Wetmore. The name was doubtless derived from an early French pioneer, said by Kiel to have been named Louis Dubois. An absurd popular story, reported by Mr. Amos Bienke, has it that it was originally called Wood River because some early Frenchman saw wood flowing in it. Mr. Beinke also reports that in later days it was often known as Busch's Creek, because John B. Busch had a brewery on its banks. The similarity in meaning between the French Dubois and the German Busch is doubtless mere coincidence. (Evans, or Mackay, Map; Perrin du Lac; L&C, ed. Thwaites, & Gass, pp. cited; Wetmore; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 30; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 190; Miss Johnson: Amos Bienke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dubois's River
Description:See Dubois Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Duemler School
Description:In the west-central part of Prairie Township. It was earlier known as Indian Creek School for its location near Indian Creek. When the schoolhouse was moved, and a new one was built, the school was named for August Duemler, because the new building was built on his land. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Duly School
Description:A rural elementary school in the southwest part of Central Township. It was named for a man who lived near the school. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dundee
Description:An old river port on the Missouri River, located on high bluffs near the mouth of Boeuf Creek and one end of Boeuf Slough, in the northwest corner of St. Johns Township. Its original name was New Port, later written Newport. It was the first county seat of Franklin County, and, according to Kiel, the first post office in the county, established January 4, 1820. It was discontined January 7, 1854, on the same day that a post office was established at Campbellton (q.v.), five miles to the southwest, but was reestablished later the same year. The significance of the name is obvious; nearly thirty other places in the United States have borne this name, all derived ultimately from Newport, England. On June 19, 1857, the name of the post office was changed to Dundee, at the time when the town was formerly laid out. Abraham Bailey, a farmer, who laid it out, chose it for his father's native seaport in Scotland. Dundee also is a stock name in the United States, being attached to eighteen other places. The post office at Dundee has been discontinued since July 31, 1908. (Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 16; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 201-2, 207 & map; PLAT BOOK A, 1b; Miss Johnson: Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dutch Hill Church
Description:A Lutheran Church between Elmont and Champion City in Boone Township. It was named for the many Germans who settled there and for the location of the church on a hill. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 190; Miss Johnson: Mrs. Alice B. Lockhart)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ebenezer Evangelical Church
Description:A Lutheran Church in the west central part of Lyon Township, not far from Drain. It was organized June 24, 1854. Cf. above. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 201; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eddy Cave
Description:In the southern part of Meramec Township. Named for a large pool of water which is an overflow from the Meramec River. (Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ellett Mine
Description:A lead mine in the northwest part of Central Township, five miles west of St. Clair. It was named for its operator, Sam Ellett, who came from England to the United States about 1840. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Miss Johnson: Henry Hamilton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elliot Mine
Description:A lead mine located in the western part of Central Township. The name is probably personal in origin. (Foster & Swallow, 7 & map; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elmo
Description:See Elmont.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elmont
Description:A village in the southeast part of Boone Township. The post office was established in a store owned by John D. Miller and C.E. Gehlauf. Mr. Gehlauf was interviewed and said he had picked the name out of a postal guide. His partner, Mr. Miller, wanted Bruno, but that name was rejected, probably because it was too much like Brunot in Wayne County. Mr. Gehlauf, who is a blacksmith, said he had always taken great pride in making the letter "E," and so was pleased when he found the name Elmont. There is an Elmont in New York, one in Texas, and one in California. The Missouri village is sometimes written Elmo, perhaps with the idea that -mo is short for -mount or -mont. There are seven Elmos in the United States. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; Lippincott's GAZ.; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 201 & map; Miss Johnson: C.E. Gehlauf; Mrs. Frank Erman)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elmwood Baptist Church
Description:In the southwest part of Prairie Township. It was named for the school. (Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elmwood School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Prairie Township. It was so named for its location in rough old elms. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Enloe Mine
Description:See Thomas Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Enloe Settlement
Description:An early colony in the southwest part of the county. The Indians, who had formerly lived in Shawneetown and near Prairie Church, resided here for a time. These friendly, wandering Indians are now chiefly remembered for their love of the horse race. The settlement may have been named for Felix Enloe, Jessie Enloe, John Enloe, and William Enloe, who lived in Boone Township in 1840. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 216; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 17)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Enoch Knob
Description:A hill in the eastern part of Boeuf Township, near Dundee, the former Newport. Enoch Knob is believed to have been named for Enoch Greenstreet, a pioneer, who arrived at Newport in 1818. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 47; Miss Johnson: Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Enon
Description:A former post office in the southeast part of Lyon Township. It was established in 1846 and discontinued in 1851. It was probably named for Enon Church (q.v.), which was on the farm of John L. Brandt, one of the village postmasters. A variant spelling Enow is also found. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 201; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Enon Church
Description:An old Methodist Church in the southeast part of Lyon Township. Enon, or Aenon, one of the places where John the Baptist baptized, is a favorite name for churches, especially those in a well watered countryside: cf. JOHN 3:23, "And John also was baptizing in Aenon near to Salim, because there was much water there." Enon Church was also known as the Middle Fork Methodist Episcopal Church, from its location near Middle Fork. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 201; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Enow
Description:See Enon.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Enterprise Mine
Description:A lead mine in the western part of Prairie Township, near Indian Creek. It was earlier known as Skinner Mine, for the man who first opened it. The name Enterprise Mine replaced Skinner Mine and was adopted when the Enterprise Mining and Developing Company bought the mine. It was so named for the company. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8, 26; HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Etlah
Description:A station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, in the northwest part of Boeuf Township, about three miles northeast of Keizer's Knob (q.v.). The place began as a railroad switch known as McMullen's Switch, named for a man who owned much land in the neighborhood. When a post office was established on March 17, 1864, a change of name was thought desireable to avoid confusion. Some German family, in whimsical spirit, suggested Etlah, interpreted as "halte" spelled backward: i.e., either the German noun "Halte" a halt, rest, or stop in a march, or the imperative of the verb "halten;" doubtless they felt that they had at least reached a halting or resting place in the long march that began with the great 1840 exodus of liberty-loving Germans from tyranny and oppression. As a parallel to this reversal of the spelling to disguise the meaning may be cited the case of Rolyat, Texas, which is Taylor in reverse. The first postmaster of Etlah was Morris D. Rees. The town was platted in 1874. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 203, 341; Miss Johnson: S.A. Hall; Mrs. W.B. Bagby)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Etlah School
Description:In the northwest part of Boeuf Township. It was named for the post office. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eureka Baptist Church
Description:A rural church, which was organized June 5, 1871, in the eastern part of Boone Township. The name is a familiar motto. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 349)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Evans Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southwest part of Calvey Township. The mine was not in operation as late as 1888. It was named for its operator, a Mr. Evans. (Foster & Swallow, map; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 27; HIST. FRANKLIN, 208-9; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Evergreen Church
Description:A church five miles south of Beaufort in Boone Township. It was named for its location among evergreens. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 190; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Evergreen School
Description:An elementary school in the western part of Boone Township, near Gerald. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Excelsior School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Boeuf Township. A familiar motto name. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fairview
Description:A resort near Sullivan, platted by W.L. Gillum, August 20, 1925, and now owned by William Jackson. The name is a stock term of description, found in at least thirty other states. (PLAT BOOK C, 79; Miss Johnson; Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Central Township. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Henry Hamilton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ferrar's Hill
Description:A high knob which commands a superb view of the Meramec River in the southwest part of Central Township. It was named for H. Ferrar, who mined 6,000 or 7,000 pounds of galena here in 1859-1860. (Swallow, Map IV, 28)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fiddle Creek
Description:A stream in Boles Township bwtween Labaddie and Reed's Landing. It is so named because there was not a man or woman living along the creek who could not play the fiddle. The people had many old time neighborhood dances. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 190; Miss Johnson: Charles Becker)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fisher's Cave
Description:A well- known cave in the Meramec State Park, about two and a half miles south and one mile east of Stanton. The cave opens into a bluff of the Meramec River. It is named for George Fisher, who came here from Kentucky in 1831 and homesteaded the land around the cave. He died in Moselle. (COUNTY ATLAS 1875, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 212; Miss Johnson: Henry Fisher; Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Five Points
Description:See Springbluff.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Flat Creek
Description:Rises in the central part of Union Township and flows southeast into Bourbeuse River. It is named for the flat limestone rock in the bottom of the creek bed. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Miss Johnson: E.O. Griese)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Flat Knob
Description:See Keizer's Knob.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Flint Hill
Description:See Roedderville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ford Mine
Description:See Northumberland Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fort San Juan del Misuri
Description:See Saint Johns.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fountain Cave
Description:A cave in the southern part of Meramec Township, on the Meramec River. Probably a descriptive name. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 9)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Four Mile House
Description:An edifice located in the southern part of St. Johns Township, about four miles south of Washington. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 39; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fox Creek
Description:Rises in the central part of Boles Township and flows east into St. Louis County, where it empties into the Meramec River. It is so named for the foxes found along the creek by early settlers. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Miss Johnson: E.O. Griese; Miss Welty's Thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Franklin
Description:See Pacific.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Franklin County
Description:A large county, bounded on the north by the Missouri River, on the northeast by St. Louis County, on the southeast by Jefferson County, on the south by Washington and Crawford Counties, and on the west by Gasconade County. It was organized on December 11, 1818, and thus separated from St. Louis County, of which it had previously formed a part. The area of Franklin County at first included large regions on the west and south. These areas are now outside the county. On November 25, 1820, Gasconade County, which then included much of Osage County, was formed from Franklin County. By subsequent changes including the formation of Crawford County, Franklin County was reduced to its present area of 866 square miles. The earliest record of American settlement in the county is that of William Hughes, who located on Du Bois Creek, not far from the site of the present Washington, in 1794. This was the extreme frontier of the time. One of the first American settlers was Kincaid Caldwell, who came to Franklin County in 1803. The earliest entry of land in the county was made by Samuel Cantley on July 13, 1818. Franklin County was named in honor of Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), the Philadelphia printer, inventor, philosopher, diplomat, and statesman. Americans have always been delighted to honor him in their choice of place names; there are more than twenty Franklin Counties in other states, and over fifty other places named for him. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8; HIST. FRANKLIN, 222; Switzler 543; MISSOURI SURVEY MAP; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 8; Schultz, 44-45, 52-54; Eaton; McClure, 5; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Frank's Bluff
Description:A cliff in the northwest part of Boeuf Township, east of Hermann, on the Missouri River. The name is a masculine Christian form, but no reason for its origin has been ascertained. (Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fray
Description:A railroad siding east of Newhaven and west of Kent on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, established about 1895. It was so named for a man who lived there. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 190; Miss Johnson: Dr. W.B. Bagby)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Frisco Heights
Description:See Meramec Hills.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Frisco Heights School
Description:An elementary school in the west central part of Calvey Township. It was so named for the switch. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff; G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Frisco Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Galena Township
Description:See Central Township.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gallagher Mills
Description:See Gallahers Mills.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gallagher Mines
Description:See Thomas Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gallahers Mills [1 of 2]
Description:A mill in the northwest corner of Central Township. It was established about 1835 by Michael Gallaher, who was the miller and also the postmaster. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 202; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gallahers Mills [2 of 2]
Description:A former post office in the northwest corner of Central Township, on the west bank of the Meramec River. The office was established in 1840 and discontinued in 1847. Named for the mills. Gallahers Mills is spelled "Gallagher Mills" in the Atlas of 1878. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 9, 17; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 68, 202 & map; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Galligher Furnace
Description:A furnace in the southwest part of Central Township. The name is doubtless personal in origin. (Foster & Swallow, map; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Garfield Park
Description:A park in Washington, named and dedicated July 4, 1881, just two days after President James A. Garfield (1831-1881) was assassinated. Julius Wolf delivered the address. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 266; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Garrett Cave
Description:See Mushroom Cave.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gasburg
Description:See Hemker.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Generelly's Mine
Description:A mine in the extreme southern part of Central Township. The name is evidently personal in origin, as it is found in the township, usually with the spelling Generally. (Swallow, Map V; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 68)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:George
Description:A former post office on Little Indian Creek, in the southwest part of Prairie Township. The office was established September 18, 1894, and discontinued April 15, 1905. It was named for the postmaster, Stephen H. George, who also kept a blacksmith shop. He came from Washington County about 1887-1888. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 202 & map; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gerald
Description:A village and station on the Rock Island Railroad, in the northwest part of Boone Township. The post office was established on May 15, 1901. It was named for the Fitzgerald family, prominent landowners and pioneers in the vicinity. Major Marvin, locating engineer for the Rock Island Railroad, suggested the name, but when Dr. W.P. Fitzgerald (born 186, still practicing medicine at Gerald), modestly objected, consented to shorten the name to Gerald. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 83; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 14, 29, 202 & map; Miss Johnson: Dr. W.P. Fitzgerald)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gerald School
Description:Located at Gerald and named for the town. (Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gerdin School
Description:See Gerding School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gerding School
Description:A rural school located in the south-central part of Bouef Township. It was named for William Gerding, an old settler. Also written Gerdin School. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:German Evangelical Lutheran Ebenezer Church
Description:A church which is mentioned but not located by the HISTORY OF FRANKLIN. Reverend J.C. Roaland organized the congregation in September, 1846. For the name cf. Ebenezer Evangelical Church, above. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 353)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:German Evangelical Protestant St. John's Church
Description:In the eastern part of Union Township, two and a half miles north of Union. The church was organized in 1843. Named for the Apostle. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 355)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:German St. Petrus Church
Description:In Newhaven. It was organized in 1879. Named for the Apostle. Petrus is the form used for St. Peter's name in Luther's German Bible. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 353)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gibson's Branch
Description:Rises in the west central part of Prairie Township and flows northwest into the Meramec River. It is named for William Gibson, an early settler on its banks. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 22; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gildehaus
Description:See Gildehouse.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gildehaus School
Description:In the eastern part of Union Township. It is named for the post office. It is also called St. Johns School, a name taken from St. Johns Church. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Charles Cole; O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gildehouse
Description:A post office in the northeast part of Union Township. The office was established in 1894 and discontinued in 1906. It was named for Henry Gildehaus; at first the correct German spelling of the name, Gildehaus, was preserved, but it is now commonly anglicized to Gildehouse. The 1940 Highway map has Oldehouse, obviously a misprint. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 196, 202; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Giles Ford Mine
Description:A mine located on the same lode as the Virginia Mine. The name may have been given for its location. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8; HIST. FRANKLIN, 209)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Giles Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southwest part of Prairie Township. It was named for the man who operated the mine. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Girard Branch
Description:See Girards Branch.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Girards Branch
Description:A small creek which rises in the central south part of Prairie Township and flows northwest into Big Indian Creek. Also written Girard Branch. It was named for a man who lived on its banks. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 26; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Glencoe
Description:An early milling center in the western or northwest part of Central Township, on Hamilton Creek. No reason for the origin of this name has been ascertained. It is a widespread name for American towns, found in eight other states. Originally, of course, the name comes from Glencoe, Scotland, scene of the famous "Massacre of Glencoe" of 1692. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 220)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Golconda Lead Mines
Description:In the northwest part of Union Township. It was once mined to a depth of 150 feet, but was not in operation in 1888. Golconda is a synonym for mineral wealth of any sort; it was the old name of Hyderabad, India, famous for diamonds. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Weekly's ETYM. DICT.)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Golconda Mine
Description:Another lead mine in Boles Township. It had closed by 1888 or earlier. Cf. above. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Miss Johnson: J.W. Powers)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Good Hope School [1 of 2]
Description:An elementary school in the southwest part of Boeuf Township. The name is ideal. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Good Hope School [1 of 2]
Description:Another school, in Dist. No. 60, in the northwest part of Boone Township. Earlier known as Senate Grove School, for the post office. The change of name probably came when Senate Grove post office was discontinued in 1903. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Goode Mill
Description:A flour mill in Union Township, on the Bourbeuse River. It was named for John Goode who built the mill. Mr. Goode, who was a native of Virginia, came to Franklin County in 1830. The mill no longer exists. The name was also written as Goode's Mill. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 220; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 191; Miss Johnson: Mrs. M.L. Wood)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Goode's Mill
Description:See Goode Mill.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Goosetown
Description:See Washington.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gopher Mine
Description:See Thomas Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grabbville
Description:See Grubville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grabville
Description:See Grubville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grand Vista
Description:A resort on the left side of a bend in the Meramec River, about two miles north of Robertsville. The name is descriptive of its magnificient view. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 191)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grange Store
Description:A store in the western part of Lyon Township. The establishment may have been so named because its customers were members of the Grange, an organization of farmers. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grant School
Description:An elementary school in the north central part of Boeuf Township. It was probably named in honor of President Ulysses S. Grant. It was earlier known as Bohnsack School, named for Frederick Bohnsack (1817-1896), who lived nearby. Mr. Bohnsack was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, and came to Missouri when he was a very young man. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Mrs. John Kindler)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gravelly Mine
Description:The location of this mine, which is listed by Barns is uncertain. The name may be descriptive. (Barns, 561)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gray Summit
Description:A small village and station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, in the south central part of Boles Township. It has been the site of a post office for nearly 120 years without interruption of service, but during that time has been listed under four different names. The earliest name was Point Labaddie (or Labadie), established June 19, 1824, with Henry Groff as its first postmaster. It was named for its location on a high point and its nearness to Labaddie Creek (q.v.). Possibly it was named directly for Sylvestre Labaddie, Jr., who once owned all the land in this part of the county, and who died in 1849 (not, as stated by Eaton and Kiel, for Sylvestre Labaddie, Sr., who died in 1794). On January 23, 1838, the name was changed to Port William, for William T. North, its first postmaster. Mr. North (1808-1865), a native of Charlotte, County, Virginia, came to Franklin County in 1832. Port William was one mile west of the present Gray Summit, across from the present Shaw's Garden. On September 24, 1858, a new town was platted, the land being given by E.P. Gray and others. The name of the post office was changed on January 25, 1859 to Gray's Summit. The new name was chosen in honor of Daniel Gray, who settled here and began to keep a hotel in 1845; the term "summit" was added because this is the highest place on the Missoufi Pacific Railroad between St. Louis and Jefferson City. James M. Ming was the first postmaster of Gray's Summit. Finally in 1892, the name was shortened to Gray Summit, under the postmastership of Henry F. Rees. The Missouri Pacific Railroad, however, has persistently retained the earlier form with the possessive. Gray's Summit was the site of Camp Franklin (q.v.) during the Civil War. One authority (McClure, p. 20) refers to the place as Gray's Gap, and says that it was so called in the St. Louis Daily MISSOURI DEMOCRAT of February 12, 1855. This was probably used tentatively before the name Gray's Summit was settled upon. (Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13- 14; HIST. FRANKLIN, 338; Eaton; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 202, 208-9; McClure, 6, 19, 20; PLAT BK. A, 12; Miss Johnson: J.W. Reynolds; Charles Becker; S.F. North; Miss Martha May Wood)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gray Summitt School
Description:A school in the central part of Boles Township at Gray Summit, for which it is named. (Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gray's Gap
Description:See Gray Summit.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gray's Summit
Description:See Gray Summit.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Griswold City
Description:A former post office and early rival of Newhaven, on the Missouri River in the northern part of Boeuf Township. A town was platted September 28, 1836, on land donated by Frederick Griswold, for whom the place was probably named. On March 27, 1838, a post office was established under the name of Griswold City; its first postmaster was Milton W. Griswold, who afterwards became postmaster at Blish's Mill, the earlier name of Newhaven (q.v.). Blish's Mill, just east of Griswold City, apparently won out in the race, for the Griswold City post office was discontinued in 1846, just four years before the first post office at Blish's Mill was established. A decade later an effort was made, but the new plat that had been made and acknowledged was not recorded until September, 1858, just two months after Blish's Mill had been more regularly laid out and renamed Newhaven. Apparently that was the end for Griswold. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 202-3 & map; PLAT BK. A, 21; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: Henry Steiner)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grube
Description:An early voting place in Lyon Township, later removed to Ritter, or Port Hudson (q.v.), and Jaeger. It was named for Frederick Grube, a German. Also known as Grube's Store. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 191, Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grube's Store
Description:See Grube.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grubville
Description:A small community on the eastern border of Prairie Township, apparently extending across the county line into Big River Township, Jefferson County. (cf. Miss Welty's thesis). Since its establishment on October 28, 1853, the post office has been listed at times in both counties. According to Kiel, the first postmaster, Edmund Franklin Frost, had his office in Jefferson County. When George B. Green became postmaster, March 16, 1857, he moved the office to Franklin County, and it remained there for thirty years. On November 21, 1887, David A. Perkins became postmaster and moved it back to Jefferson County, where it has been ever since. The name is a humorous epithet, said to have been suggested by Christopher Frost, brother of the first postmaster, in allusion to the condition of the land at that time. The ground was covered with small postoaks, known locally as "grubs," and the necessary process of digging them out is called "grubbing." The name is spelled "Grabville" or "Grabbville" in Davis & Durrie. (Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 203; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Guess School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Boone Township. When the school was built in 1897, it was named for Fritz W. Guess (1862- 1900), who gave the land for the instiution. He was born in Newhaven, Missouri, and came from that town to Boone Township in 1886. (83RD REPORT; Miss Johnson: Mrs. Sophia Guese)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Halligan Mines
Description:See Thomas Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hamilton Branch
Description:See Dry Branch and Hamilton Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hamilton Creek
Description:A southern tributary of the Bourbeuse River, which rises in the central part of Central Township near St. Clair and runs almost directly north to empty into the Bourbeuse River about two miles south of Union. This seems to have been confused with Dry Branch (q.v.), also a southern tributary of the Bourbeuse about five miles further west, which is called Hamilton Branch at one place in the 1878 Atlas. There could hardly have been two streams named Hamilton so close together. There is also a difference of opinion about the origin of the name, one source stating that it was named for Jeremiah Hamilton, who came to Lyon Township in 1820, and another that it was named for P.B. Hamilton, (1833-1892), who was born in St. Louis County, came to Franklin County in 1840, and became owner of the Hamilton Mine, now the Tamm Mine (q.v.). There is also a Ninian Hamilton who ran a mill on Hamilton Creek before 1840. Probably the little stream was named for the Hamilton family. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 35; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205, 220, 226; Miss Johnson: Henry Hamilton; F.W. Schroeder)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hamilton Mine
Description:See Tamm Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hardesty Mines
Description:See Peninsula Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Harrington Mine
Description:See Thomas Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hecht Branch
Description:A southern tributary of the Bourbeuse River, in Boone Township about halfway between Strain and Spring Bluff. It was named for William Hecht (1854-1916). Mr. Hecht was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, and came to this country with his parents when he was a small child. He settled near Strain in 1878. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 191; Miss Johnson: Leo Hecht)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hemker
Description:A former post office in the northwest part of Prairie Township, about two and a half miles east of Lonedell. The office was established in 1885 and has been discontinued since 1903. Kiel says it was named for Richard Hemaker, the first postmaster. Mr. E.H. Hoff told Miss Johnson that the postmaster's correct name was George Hemker or Hemmker; he was born in Franklin County in 1859, came to Hemker and started a blacksmith shop and also a store. Hemker was also known, according to Mr. Hoff, by the humorous nickname of Gasburg, given because old men came to the store to talk and to spin yarns. (Postal Guide; HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 203 & map; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Henrietta
Description:See Krakow.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Flat School
Description:A rural grade school in the northeast part of Prairie Township. It is so named for its location in a flat place surrounded by heavy hickory timber. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:High Hill
Description:A hill in the southwest part of Central Township. The name is doubtless descriptive. (Swallow, Map IV)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:High Point
Description:A high elevation in the northwest part of Boles Township. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 23)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Highland Mining Company Mine
Description:A lead mine in the northwest part of Central Township, on the boundary line between Central and Union Townships, on the Bourbeuse River, northwest of St. Clair. Named for the Highland Mining Company of St. Louis, which operated it. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 35; HIST. FRANKLIN, 210; Miss Johnson: Henry Hamilton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hillcrest Subdivision
Description:See Moselle.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hillsboro School
Description:A rural school in the central part of St. Johns Township. It is so named for its location on a hill. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Dr. O.F. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hinson School
Description:In the southern part of Prairie Township. It was named for an old settler, Isaac Hinson, on whose land the school was built. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Holy Family Church
Description:A Catholic Church in the central part of Lyon Township, near Port Hudson. It was organized in 1870 by Father M. Seisl and named for the family of Jesus. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 347; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hoosier Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the south central part of Central Township and flows south into the Meramec River. It was probably so named for the people who settled there. "Hoosier" is a nickname for the people of Indiana. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 34; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; Webster's NEW INT.; Miss Johnson: Mrs. Joe Murphy)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hudson Port
Description:See Port Hudson.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Huff
Description:A former post office in the south central part of Prairie Township, four miles south of Mounthope. The office was established in 1900 and discontinued in 1909. George B. Hull was its only postmaster. Huff was named for the Huff family, probably Andrew Huff, a local resident. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 203 & map; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hulsey School
Description:See Pea Ridge School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Illmo Mines
Description:Barium sulphate and lead mines in the western part of Central Township, four and a half miles west of St. Clair. They were formerly known as Shotwell Mines for William Shotwell, who opened them. Mr. Shotwell, who was born and reared in Manchester, St. Louis County, came to Franklin County in 1834. The industry was later owned by a Chicago firm known as the Illmo Products Company. "Illmo" is doubtless a coined word. "Ill.-Mo.," which stands for Illinois and Missouri. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 35; HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:A tributary of the Meramec River, which rises in the northwest part of Washington County. The stream is so named for a tribe of Indians, probably the Osage, that camped on the banks of the stream. Two branches, Little Indian and Big Indian Creeks unite to form the main stream. The names are descriptive of their comparative size. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 20; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Creek School
Description:See Duemler School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Paint Mine
Description:A prehistoric paint mine, near Leslie in the northeast part of Boone Township. This mine, which is said to be the only one ever found in the United States, was discovered about 1903 by Dr. Walter S. Cox, of Cuba, Missouri, who happened upon it while he was opening what he supposed was a new mine. He developed the first fire-clay pit at Owensville and later interested himself in iron mines along the Colorado River. Dr. Cox removed over 1200 primitive iron sledges and rock tools from the Indian Paint Mine. Evidently great numbers of Indian laborers had worked for many years to tunnel for long distances along the soft seams of red ungent intermingled with solid iron. Here the aborigines mined and mixed the glowing red mineral colors he used for so many purposes. Some of the ways he utilized the paint were: for personal adornment to discomfit his foe or to charm his admirer, for decorations of his habitation and pottery; for painted pictgographs on the walls of hills and caverns; for decorated altars; and for his protection from the sun and insects. The pigments were derived from many sources, but usually were of mineral origin, particularly the oxides of iron and carbonate of copper. These Indians were usually adept at mixing their colors, which were ground in small mortars or rubbed down on a flat stone, and in extracting the stains and dyes from vegetable substances. The colors were applied as dry paint with a piece of clay, chalk, or charcoal; or, when mixed with oil or water, with the hand or fingers, or a stick. Occasionally the colors were even sprayed with the mouth as was the case with the Pueblo mask painters. Several tribes prepared dry paints by mixing the pigments with sand, meal, or clay. Dry paints made in this manner were usually used to adorn ceremonial chambers or altars. (Hodge, "Painting"; MHR XXXI; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Prairie
Description:A prairie in the central part of Central Township. It was so named because tribes of Indians who were on reservations farther to the west used to come across this prairie when they went to St. Louis to trade. If the Bourbeuse River was up and they could not cross, the Indians camped on this prairie. (Miss Johnson: Henry Hamilton; A.C. Beasley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Prairie Baptist Church
Description:In the northern part of Central Township. It was organized in 1836 by William R. Robinson, William R. Ellette, and Vinson Cheatham. A church building was erected in 1836 or 1837. Named for the prairie. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 27; HIST. FRANKLIN, 349-50; Miss Johnson: Henry Hamilton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Prairie School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Central Township. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: A.C. Beasley; Henry Hamilton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Rock
Description:A well- known rock in the northwest part of Boles Township, on the Missouri River. It was doubtless so named for the Indians. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 23)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Inge and Generally Mine
Description:See Northumberland Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Iron Hill
Description:See Moselle.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Isle a Labadie
Description:See Labaddie Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Isle au Boeuf
Description:See Boeuf Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jack Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southwest part of Union Township. It is doubtless so named for one of the implements or contrivances used in the mine. The term "jack" in mining is employed for a wooden wedge used to split rocks after blasting in order to bring down masses of ore; also for the tin case in which the safety-lamp is carried. (See STANDARD & CENTURY dictionaries). (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 43; HIST. FRANKLIN, 210)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jacob's Well
Description:A strange, well-like curiosity, in the northwest part of Lyon Township about one and a half miles west of Detmold. The mouth of the well is in a slight depression, and at the bottom of this depression is an opening about fourteen inches wide and four feet long, down through the solid rock. After entering this rock, the well opens out to be ten or twelve feet square anmd descends about eighty feet to the water. This well was discovered and explored in 1863 by A.W. Maupin, John Maupin, and A.P. Foster. At that time the well was filled with snakes and other reptiles. Maupin and Foster, who though free thinkers, were familiar with the Bible, may have obtained the name from JOHN IV, 5:30. The Biblical Jacob's Well was made famous by the meeting of Jesus with the woman of Samaria at that place. It is located near Shechem, otherwise known as Sychar, the modern Nablus. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 213-214; BIB. ENCY.; Miss Johnson: Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jaeger
Description:See Cedar Fork.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Japan
Description:A village of ten inhabitants, in the southwest part of Boone Township, which has received considerable publicity since the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, in December, 1941. Since it had been ceded locally that the place had been named by its first postmaster, Absolam R. Dyson, for the country of Japan, patriotic enthusiasts suggested that the village be given a new name. Further investigation by Reverend John H. Lakebrink proved that such a procedure was unnecessary because the place had been named in honor of a church that has been here for more than a century, i.e., the Church of the Holy Martyrs of Japan, which was so named for twenty-six Catholic priests and lay brothers of Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese blood, who were crucified in Japan by Japanese fanatics, February 5, 1597. He maintains that the name is really patriotic because this heartless massacre only serves as a reminder of the cruelty of the Japanese. The post office was established here in 1860 and was discontinued about 1908. The name is sometimes found with the spelling Jepan. (Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 203; HIST. FRANKLIN, 237; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 203-4 & map; Roueches, ST. LOUIS GLOBE-DEMOCRAT, Dec. 25, 1941; MHR, April, 1942)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Japan School
Description:An elementary school in the southwest part of Boone Township, at Japan, from which it takes its name. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jeffries Hill
Description:A very high knob overlooking the Meramec Valley, in the southwest part of Central Township. The name is probably personal in origin; Charles Richard Jeffries resided in the township in 1860. (Swallow, Map IV; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 33)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jeffries Mine
Description:See Mount Hope Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jeffriesburg
Description:A town in the west central part of Union Township. The post office had been established since 1857. It was named for some members of the Jeffries family. According to Eaton, it was Elisha Betts Jeffries (1827-1855), a wealthy Virginian who held many offices in Franklin County. While serving as a member of the state legislature, he lost his life in the Gasconade Bridge disaster on November 1, 1855, and the Legislature appropriated $150 to mark his grave at Krakow (q.v.). Kiel declares, on the other hand, that the town is supposed to be named for Achilles Whitehead Jeffries, an early settler and a friend and neighbor of George Fink, the first postmaster. He came to Franklin County from Warren County, North Carolina, in 1819, and was county sheriff in 1834. A number of other people named Jeffries lived in the neighborhood. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN 225, 227; Eaton; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 204; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Griese)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jeffriesburg School
Description:In the western part of Union Township, at Jeffriesburg, for which it is named. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jepan
Description:See Japan.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Johnson Creek
Description:A tributary of the Meramec River, in the southern part of Calvey Township. Named for a family whose farm adjoined the creek. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 191; Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jordan Creek
Description:Rises in the southeast corner of Lyon Township, and flows north across the border of Union Township into St. Johns Creek. It is said to have received its Biblical name, for the Jordan River in Palestine, because of the camp meetings held on its banks. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 46; Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Judah Spring Mine
Description:Mentioned in the county history, but probably a misprint for Judith Spring Mines (q.v.). (HIST. FRANKLIN, 210)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Judith Spring
Description:A spring near Stanton in Meramec Township. It was named by Mr. Stanton for his daughter. There was an iron bank near the spring known as the Judith Spring Mine or Mines, to which the Frisco Railroad once ran a spur. This mine was running in 1915. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 191; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley; A.C. Beasley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Judith Spring Mine (or Mines)
Description:See Judith Spring.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Keizer's Knob
Description:The second highest point in the county, located in the western part of Boeuf Township, about three miles southwest of Etlah. Keizer's Knob was named in honor of an early settler who lived nearby. The elevation is also known as "Flat Knob" because it is flat across the top. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 203; Miss Johnson: James McDonald)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kelso
Description:A siding on the Frisco Railroad, 58.8 miles from St. Louis. It was built to facilitate the handling of red gravel. The name was given in honor of Mr. Kelso, who owned the land where the switch was built. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 191; Miss Johnson: J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kemper
Description:See Rengel.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kemper and Breitenback Store
Description:See Rengel.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kemper's Mill
Description:A flour mill on Big Berger Creek in the north central part of Boeuf Township. It was named for its operator, John Kemper, who was a native of Germany. (Miss Johnson: A.P. Roehlfing)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kent
Description:A siding on the Missouri Pacific Railroad between Fray and Dewey, west of Washington. It was built in 1855 and named for a man who lived there. Also known as Kent Station. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 47; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 191; Miss Johnson: Dr. O.F. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kent Station
Description:See Kent.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kerr Mines
Description:Lead mines in the western part of Central Township. The name is probably personal in origin. David M. and William Kerr lived in the township in 1870. (Swallow, Map VII, 33; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 30)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kiehl School
Description:See Pin Oak School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kiel
Description:A post office in the north-central part of Lyon Township. It was established in 1883 and discontinued in 1909. This region is nicknamed Schoeneberg (q.v.), from the hill nearby. Kiel was named for Kiel, Germany, because many of the early settlers in the region came from there. (Postal Guide; HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 204 & map; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kiel School
Description:See Pin Oak School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Knuckles Mine
Description:A lead mine in the central-west part of Prairie Township. Although the mine has been abandoned by 1888, it had reached a depth of twenty-five feet. The origin of the name has not been determined. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 209)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kohl
Description:A post office in the western part of Boeuf Township, established in 1892 and discontinued in 1903. John Henry von Behren was its only postmaster. The name was chosen in honor of the Kohlbusch family, shortened to Kohl. Herman and John Kohlbusch, both of whom died recently at the age of between sixty-five and seventy years, were honored citizens of the community. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 204 & map; Miss Johnson: S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Krakow
Description:A town located on the northern border of Union Township. It is the successor of Henrietta, which was only a short distance to the north, on the southern border of St. Johns Township. Henrietta was named by Peter Haeverle, the only postmaster, for his wife. The post office was established July 15, 1867, and discontinued November 8, 1869. Its place was taken by Krakow, where a post office was established August 11, 1870. The office was discontinued in 1867 or thereabouts to the star mail route between Union and Washington. Krakow, which had many Polish settlers, was named for Krakow, chief city of Galicia, Poland, formerly a province of Austria-Hungary. Krakow is the correct Polish spelling of the city, which usually appears as Krakau in German and Cracow in English. Both Krakow and Henrietta were and still often called St. Gertrude, from St. Gertrude Catholic Church (q.v.) and Cemetery in the same neighborhood. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS, 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN 342; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 203-5; Miss Johnson: Charles Cole; Miss Agnes Neider; Rev. R.B. Schuler; E.O. Griese)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Krakow School
Description:A school in the northern part of Union Township. It is so named for the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kratz Spring
Description:A spring mentioned by Schultz, but not otherwise located or identified. (Schultz, 15)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kurlbaum's Landing
Description:A boat landing in the northern part of Boles Township, on the Missouri River, near the mouth of Ridenhour Creek. It is also known as Kurlsaum Landing. The name is probably personal in origin, as Jacob D. Kurlbaum lived in the township in 1840. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 23; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 24, 191)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kurlsaum Landing
Description:See Kurlbaum's Landing.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:La Jolla Park
Description:A park located two miles southeast of Stanton in Meramec Township. It was opened as an amusement resort by Lester Dill. The name is Spanish and means "The Jewel;" "jolla" is a Spanish-American especially Mexican, variant spelling of the standard Spanish word "joya," jewel or precious gem. In Spanish, the two forms are given practically the same pronunciation: "la hoya;" but locally the spelling pronunciation "la dzala" is commonly used. The name may have been borrowed from California, where there is a small town on the Pacific coast a few miles north of San Diego known as La Jolly. The book on California place-names of Spanish and Indian origin by Nellie Van de Grift Sanchez discusses the name at length, considering it of doubtful, possibly Indian origin, with the supposed meaning "a pool;" but it is well authenticated as a variant of the Spanish "joya." Cf. La Joya Peak in Los Angeles County, California. Doubtless it was bestowed as an appropriate name for any beautiful place. (Sanchez, SPANISH & INDIAN PLACE-NAMES OF CALIFORNIA, 62, 239, 280; Miss Johnson: Denton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Labaddie
Description:A town in the northwest part of Boles Township, near the mouth of Labaddie Creek (q.v.). It is on land formerly belonging to Sylvestre Labaddie, Jr., who died in 1849, and was named for him (not for Sylvestre Labaddie, Sr., who died in 1794, and had nothing to do with Franklin County, so far as is known). The town was laid out in 1855 by the Missouri Pacific Railroad. The railroad and its express company persist in spelling the name as Labadie, as it is also done in the MISSOURI MANUAL for 1937 and 1938. Both spellings were used in the family history. (Postal Guide; HIST. FRANKLIN, 340; Eaton; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 204; Brown's MANUAL FOR MISSOURI; PLAT BK. A, 33; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Labaddie Creek
Description:Rises in the west central part of Boles Township, and flows north and northeast into the Missouri River. All authorities agree that it was named for Sylvestre Labaddie (or L'Abaddie), a prominent merchant of early French St. Louis. They have failed to notice, however, that there were two men of this name, father and son, and most of them ascribe the Franklin County names to the father, whereas they are much more likely to have been named for the son. The known facts about the life of Sylvestre Labaddie, Sr. are summarized in Billion's ANNALS OF ST. LOUIS IN ITS EARLY DAYS UNDER THE FRENCH & SPANISH DOMINATIONS, 1886. He was born in Tarbes, Bearne, France. His name first appears in the archives of St. Louis in 1769. In 1773 he was associated in business with J.M. Papin. On July 27, 1776, he was married to Pelagie, second daughter of Mrs. Marie Therese Bourgeois Chouteau, of the well known Chouteau family. After a successful business career of some twenty years, he died on June 19, 1794, leaving five children, one boy and four girls. Sylvestre Labaddie, Jr., was an even more important and successful man than his father. His life, as gathered from many references in Billion's ANNALS and from the biographical sketch by W.B. Douglas in his edition of Thomas James's THREE YEARS AMONG THE INDIANS, 1916, pp. 261-3, may be summarized as follows: He was born in St. Louis on February 19, 1779, and was fifteen years old when his father died. In the year 1800 he petitioned Governor de Lassus for a grant of land in what is now Franklin County. The grant was made, covering fourteen thousand acres of land on the south shore of the Missouri River; and what is still more remarkable, his title was afterwards confirmed to him by the United States. The tradition is, that, once when he was returning from a trading expedition, his further progress was prevented by ice forming on the river, and that he camped for the winter on the site of his subsequent grant. The present town of Labaddie (q.v.) is situated upon this land, as is also Point Labaddie, now Gray's Summit (q.v.). In the year 1809 he entered into partnership with General William Clark and Manuel Lisa to form the American Fur Company, later so famous in western history. He died in his seventieth year, on July 25, 1849, at his home in St. Louis on Olive Street between Fifth and Sixth Streets. For the apocryphal legend according to which one of the Labaddies lost his life in a struggle with a wounded bear in a Franklin County cave, see Labaddie's Cave, below. (Billon, ANNALS, 260, ST. LOUIS IN ITS TERRITORIAL DAYS, 33, 179; Thomas James, THREE YEARS AMONG THE INDIANS, ed. W.B. Douglas 261-3; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Eaton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Labaddie Island
Description:An island in the Missouri River near the mouth of Labaddie Creek, for which it was doubtless named. The original French name was "Isle a Labadie," preserved on the newly discovered Evans (or Mackay) Map of 1795 or 1796, which adds the English version "Labadie's Island." For Sylvestre Labadie or Labbadie, who may have once owned it, see under Labaddie Creek. It was later known as Baker Island, for a subsequent owner. But the original name evidently never went entirely out of use; and when the river changed its course and the island was built in by the town of Labaddie (q.v.), it was resumed. (Evans, or Mackay, Map; Miss Johnson: J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Labaddie Settlement
Description:An early settlement along the Missouri River, probably at the mouth of Labaddie Creek (q.v.), for which it was doubtless named. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 217)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Labaddie's Cave
Description:In the northwest part of Boles Township, on the main road leading from Union to the farm of C.S. Jeffreis, not far from Labaddie on the Chicago, Rhode Island and Pacific Railroad. This is one of the most remarkable caves in Franklin County, and it has an equally remarkable legend attached to it. It is said to have received its name as the scene of the death of Sylvester Labaddie, the well known French merchant of St. Louis for whom Labaddie Creek (q.v.) is still named. According to one version, Labaddie and his son, a boy twelve years old, trailed a wounded bear into the cave and in the ensuing struggle both were killed; years later the skeletons of the two were found, together with that of the bear. Another version has it that Labaddie entered the cave alone to get the bear, being under the impression that it was already dead. He never came out alive again, and his son, after waiting outside for several hours became alarmed and returned to St. Louis to tell the story. The apocryphal character of the story is evident from an examination of the early records, none of which mention this dramatic incident. As explained above, under Labaddie Creek (q.v.) there were two Sylvestre Labaddies, but neither one of them could possibly have died in this fashion. The elder Labaddie, who died on June 19, 1794, left his will on file, printed in Billion's ANNALS (p. 260), and this document is expressly stated to have been executed in St. Louis on the day before his death. The younger Labaddie is recorded to have died on July 25, 1849, at his St. Louis home on Olive Street. The bear story, if it ever happened at all, must have happened to somebody else. But it is accepted as gospel truth by all the old-timers, and it certainly is a good story. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 211, 212; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 9; Miss Johnson: Charles Becker; J.W. Reynolds. See also ref. under Labaddie Creek.)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Labadie School
Description:See Labaddie School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Labadie's Island
Description:See Labaddie Island.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lead Run
Description:A tributary of the Bourbeuse River, in the northwest part of Central Township. It was named for the mineral deposits in the stream. (Swallow, Map XI, 21, 40-41)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Leslie
Description:A village and station on the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad, in the northeast part of Boone Township. The post office has been established since 1901. According to one informant, the Christian name of Leslie Wood (1836-1893), Recorder of Deeds at Union from 1882 to 1896, was used to name the place. Another said it was the first name of one of the civil engineers on the Rock Island Railroad who helped to extend the line through the village. (Postal Guide; BIOG. DIR., 204 & map; Miss Johnson: Dr. W.F. Fitzgerald; Charles Cole)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Leslie School
Description:In the northeast part of Boone Township. Named for the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:An elementary school in the east central part of Lyon Township. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Line Creek
Description:A small stream which empties into Berger Creek. The creek is so named because it runs for a short distance on the dividing line between Franklin and Gasconade Counties. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 192; Miss Johnson: S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Linn Township
Description:See Boone Township.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Berger Creek
Description:See Berger Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Boeuf Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in the northwest part of St. Johns Township. A tributary of Boeuf Creek, for which it is named. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878; 47; Miss Johnson: Henry Steiner)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Boone Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in the southeast part of Boone Township and flows northwest almost to the center part of the township, where it combines with Boone Creek, for which it is named. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Miss Johnson: Benton Dill; Dan Spindler)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Bourbeuse River
Description:Rises in the southwest part of Boone Township and runs north where it empties into the Bourbeuse River, for which it is named. Goodwin calls it Little Burlow's River, an obvious error. (Goodwin; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Miss Johnson: Henry Rewey)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Burlow's River
Description:See Little Bourbeuse River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Calvey Church
Description:See Mount Olive Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Calvey Creek
Description:Rises in the southern part of Calvey Township and flows northeast to the north central part of the township, where it enters Big Calvey Creek, for which it is named. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Creek
Description:A northern tributary of the Bourbeuse River in Boone Township. It is so named because it is a very small stream. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 192; Miss Johnson: G.F. Duerr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Creek School
Description:A rural elementary school in the northeast part of Boone Township. It is named for its location near Little Creek. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Fox Creek
Description:A tributary of the Meramec River, which rises north of Pacific in Boles Township. It is so named because it is a small stream along which many foxes were formerly found. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 192; Miss Johnson: J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Indian Creek
Description:A small stream which flows northwest through the southwest part of Prairie Township and enters Big Indian Creek, for which it is named. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Maramac
Description:See Little Marriack.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Marriack
Description:A former post office in the northeast part of Prairie Township, near the present site of Lone Dell. It was established in 1871 and discontinued in 1873. Iley N. Oliver, a merchant, was its first and only postmaster. The name was probably a corruption of Little Meramec River, since the place was on this stream. It is probably the same place as Little Maramec, listed by Campbell in 1874 as ten miles south of Robertsville. (Campbell, 204; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 205; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Meramec Creek
Description:See Little Meramec River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Meramec Missionary Baptist Church
Description:Located in the northeast part of Prairie Township. The Reverend Simeon B. Lewis organized the church in 1849. It is named for its position near Little Meramec River. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 351; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Meramec River
Description:A southeast tributary of Meramec River, which rises in the southeast part of Prairie Township and flows northward into the southwest part of Calvey Township, where it enters the Meramec River. Also known as Little Meramec Creek. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 205; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Merameig
Description:See Meramec River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Tavern Creek
Description:See Big Tavern Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Logan Branch
Description:A tributary of the Bourbeuse River. It is named for an early settler who used to live on the banks of this stream. (Miss Johnson: Henry Rewey)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lollar Branch
Description:A creek which rises in the central part of Meramec Township, and flows north-northwest into Spring Creek. The source of the name could not be ascertained. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 42)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lone Dell
Description:See Lonedell.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lonedell
Description:A village in the northeast part of Prairie Township, on the Little Meramec River. A post office has been established there since 1879. Alvin Hoff named the place Lone Dell, because it was "in a somewhat solitary little valley." In 1881 the post office was moved several miles to a new location. Since 1895 the name has been written by the postal authorities as Lonedell. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 205; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Long Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Meramec Township. It was so named for its location on a long ridge. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Longview
Description:A resort near St. Clair. The land was given by James Booth on July 27, 1925. It is so named because from it a long view may be had of the surrounding country. (PLAT BK. C, 76; Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lost Hill Mine
Description:A mine which was in the general vicinity of the Virginia Mine, and it was developed on the same lode. No doubt the name was descriptive of its setting. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lower Bottom School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Boeuf Township. Named for its location; cf. Upper Bottom School. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 504; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: A.P. Roehlfing; S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Luebbering
Description:A town in the eastern part of Prairie Township. It was named for John Frederick Luebbering, who was a merchant and the first postmaster of the town. He came here from St. Louis. The post office was established in 1888. The place is listed as Luebbering and Company's Store in the Atlas of 1878. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 18; Eaton; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 205; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Luebbering and Company's Store
Description:See Luebbering.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Luther
Description:See Noser Mill.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lyon
Description:A former post office in the eastern part of Lyon Township. It was established in 1879 and discontinued in 1913. It was probably named for the township. (Postal Guide; HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 205 & map; Miss Johnson: F.W. Schroeder)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lyon School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Boeuf Township. Mr. Strautmann says the school was named for a farmer who came to the vicinity about the time of the Civil War and lived there only a short time. It seems more likely, in view of the date and proximity to Lyon Township, that the school, like Lyon Township, (q.v.), was named for General Nathaniel Lyon. (83RD REPORT; Supt's Records; Miss Johnson: William F. Strautmann)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lyon Township
Description:On the western border of the county, surrounded by Boeuf Township on the north, St. Johns and Union Townships on the west. Organized from Bouef Township on June 28, 1866. Named for General Nathaniel Lyon, who was killed August 10, 1861, in the Battle of Wilson Creek at Springfield, Missouri. General Lyon was born at Ashford, Connecticut, July 14, 1818. He served in the Mexican War, and at the beginning of the Civil War rendered distinguished service to the Union cause as commander of the U.S. arsenal at St. Louis. In May, 1861, he seized Camp Jackson from the Southern sympathizers; in June, 1861, he was appointed Commander of the Union forces in the Department of Missouri; on June 17, he defeated the Confederates under General Marmaduke at Booneville, Missouri; but was defeated and killed at Wilson Creek by the Confederates under General Sterling Price. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 14; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 205, 232; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mackie
Description:See Meramec Hills.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mannes Store
Description:See Maune's Store.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maple Grove School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Meramec Township. It is so named for its location in a grove of maple trees. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson; Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Massey Mine
Description:A mine mentioned by Barns but not located or otherwise identified. (Barns, 56)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Massey's Fork
Description:A tributary of Dubois Creek, which rises in Washington Township. Informants agree that it was named for an early pioneer, but are uncertain of his identity. Probably it was the same man as the one for whom Masse's Creek (q.v.), in Warren County was named. (COUNTY ATLAS 1899, 31; Miss Johnson: Charles Cole)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maune's Store [1 of 2]
Description:A former post office in the northwest part of Union Township. It was established in 1870 and discontinued in 1903. Henry Maune was the only postmaster, and the office was probably named for his store there. Mr. Maune was born in France. The name is spelled Mannes Store on the PROSPECTUS, Map I. (Postal Guide; PROSPECTUS Map I; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 12; HIST. FRANKLIN, 203; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 205; Miss Johnson: C.B. Maune)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maune's Store [2 of 2]
Description:Another store that served as a voting place in Boone Township about 1898 to 1902, located one-half mile south of the present Japan. It was named for Bill Maune who operated the store. He came from Jeffriesburg in Union Township. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 192; Miss Johnson; Dan Spindler)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maupin
Description:A village in the southeast part of Prairie Township, on Maupin Creek, for which it was obviously named. It has had a post office since 1896. The dates make it quite unlikely that the place was, as some authorities affirm, named directly for the old French settler who gave his name to Maupin Creek (a.v.). (Postal Guide; HIST. FRANKLIN, 88, 223; Eaton; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 205 & map; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maupin Creek
Description:Rises in the southeast part of Prairie Township in Franklin County and empties into Ditch Creek in Jefferson County. It was named for an early settler whose identity is disputed. According to the county history, it was named for Mosias Maupin, who came to the county in 1806 and died in 1816; but according to Kiel, it was named for William Maupin. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 223, 786; Eaton; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 205; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maupin Lead Mines
Description:In the western part of Central Township. They were probably named for Amos W. Maupin, whose occupation was lead mining from 1865 to 1878. He also discovered a valuable marble and granite mine in this county. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 35; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 79; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maupin School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Lyon Township. It was named for John Maupin who owned the land on which the school was built. He was born in Madison County, Kentucky, and came to Franklin County in 1806. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 53; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McCallister Burying Grounds
Description:A family cemetery in St. John's Township, near Washington. The name is doubtless given for the McCallister family. Andrew K. McCallister and Samuel McCallister lived in the township in 1840. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 24; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meramec Cavern
Description:A cave in the southern part of Meramec Township, near Meramec River. Earlier known as Saltpeter Cave. Gunpowder was made here during the Civil War from saltpetre found in this cave. In 1933 Mr. Dill adopted the name Meramec Cavern because the cave was near the Meramec River. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 212-13; Miss Johnson; Charles Ripley; Benton Dill; Stephen Sullivan)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meramec Hills
Description:A resort and former post office in the northwest part of Calvey Township. It was established as a post office during 1887 under the name Mackie and discontinued in 1896. It was probably named for James Mackie, a Scotchman, who was its only postmaster. The place was also called Frisco Heights, as it was located on the Frisco Railroad between Robertsville and Moselle, south of the Meramec River. Morley was the earliest name of the switch on the Frisco Railroad at this place. Morley was named for a man in St. Louis who tried to build a town here. The name Shewell replaced Frisco Heights when Mrs. C.F. Shewell bought the land on the hill after the post office had been discontinued. The new name was given in her honor. The name Meramec Hills replaced the name Shewell when Charles Halsworth bought the land from Mrs. Shewell and made the resort. Cf. above. It no longer exists. However, in 1925, Kiel says the switch was still called Shewell. (Postal Guide; HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194, 205 & map; Miss Johnson: Miss Martha May Wood; G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meramec Mine
Description:A mine north of Silver Lead Mine in Prairie Township. The earliest name was Buskett Mine, for John Buskett, who operated it. The later name Meramec Mine, or the Meramec Mines, was given for its location on the Meramec River. According to the Washington Library Records, a disastrous fire occurred at the mines on July 1, 1901, causing a loss of about $50,000. (Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meramec Mines
Description:See Meramec Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meramec River
Description:This "large, crooked, and beautiful stream," as it has been called, is the most important river in Franklin County, and is also one of the oldest names in the region. It rises in the northeast part of Crawford County, enters Franklin near the center of the southern border of Meramec Township, and flows in a generally northeast direction across the county, continuing as the boundary line between St. Louis and Jefferson Counties till it empties into the Mississippi River. The name is usually interpreted as an Indian word meaning "catfish," and this etymology is supported by Hodge and Gannett. Mr. Bert Lowenstein, however, writing in the St. Louis POST-DISPATCH for September 10, 1938, disagrees, and gives by far the best and most detailed history of the name Meramec. He writes that Joliet and Marquette were probably the first Europeans to pass the mouth of the Meramec; for although they make no mention of the river in their account of the voyage down the Mississippi River to the mouth of the Arkansas River, Father Marquette notes the location of the "Maroa" tribe in the country of the Illinois. The Recollect missionary, Father Membre, who accompanied the La Salle and De Tonty expedition, writes of "the village of the Tamaroas on the east bank, about six leagues below the River of the Osages." La Salle, De Tonty, Fathers Joutel, Marest, Pinet, and other missionaries mention the "Tamaroas" or "Maroas" and their villages, which they locate "ten leagues below the River of Illinois," or six miles below the mouth of the Pekitanoui," the river of the "Missouries." The first historical notice of the river is found in the account of a voyage by Father James Gravier in the year 1700. He wrote: "We discovered the river Mearamigoua where a rich lead mine is situated." Penicaut, a member of Le Seur's mineralogical expedition mentions it in 1700, "one finds a small stream called the Meramecsipy." In 1702 De Iberville applied to the French Government for the exclusive privilege to work the lead mines on the Riviere Maramecquisipi. The Sieur La Renaudiere explored the region in 1723 and wrote an "Account of the mines of M. de la Motte and M. de Maramet." In May, 1723, Dixon D' Artaguiette wrote, "About one o'clock M. Renault, director of the mines, arrived here from the Meramec Mines." On June 14, 1723, Pierre Duque de Boisbriant and Marc Antoine de La Laire des Ursin, Intendant, granted to Renault a league and a half of ground upon the "Little Merameig" and in the "river Mearmeig." The "Maroa," the Indian tribe whose villages were nearest to the river's mouth, seems to be the origin of the word according to Mr. Lowenstein. The second syllable "mec," "mac," "meg," or "meq" is a term common among the Algonquin tribes. It apparently signifies a branch river or small stream as opposed to "missi," "mitche" meaning great. The name also appears as Merramec River. The many spellings would naturally result from the difficulty of settlers with the original name. (Wetmore; Gannett, 205; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI I, 281; COM. ATLAS, 229; John E. Rothensteines, MHR XX, 200, EARLIEST HISTORY OF MINE LA MOTTE"; Bert Lowenstein, St. Louis POST DISPATCH, Sept. 10, 1938; Miss O'Brien's thesis; Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meramec State Park
Description:A famous area of great natural beauty in the southern part of Meramec Township. In 1928 the state bought this 7,124-acre tract for the fish and game department, made it into a state park and named it for the Meramec River, which flows through the park. There are more than twenty caverns in this park. A CCC camp is now located here. (Schultz, 14; Miss Johnson: Benton Dill; Stephen Sullivan)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meramec Terrace
Description:A resort one mile west of Robertsville. It was opened by G.B. Zumwaldt in 1915 on land owned by Mr. Hiram Lynch. It is so named for its location on a terraced hill overlooking the Meramec River. (Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meramec Township
Description:In the south-central part of Franklin County, bounded on the north by Union and Central Townships, on the east by Prairie Township, on the south by Washington and Crawford Counties, and on the west by Boone Township. The township was organized July 12, 1819. At that time it was one of the four original townships in the county and included most all of the southern part of the county. Later parts of this township were placed in other townships. Jacob Clark, Bartlett Martin, Garrison P. Hardy and Malcolm Wheeler were early settlers and probably came as early as 1825. It is named for the river. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 16; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 232, 428; SULLIVAN NEWS, Aug. 25, 1921; COURT RECORD BK. B, 428; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meramecispy
Description:See Meramec River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Merramec River
Description:See Meramec River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meyers Store
Description:See Senate Grove.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meyer's Store
Description:See Senate Grove.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meyers' Store
Description:See Senate Grove.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Middle Fork
Description:A tributary of Cedar Fork, which rises in the center part of Lyon Township. So named because it lies between Cedar Fork and Dry Fork Creeks. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 55; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Middle Fork Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:See Enon Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mill Race
Description:Located between the two parts of the bend in the Meramec River, in the southwest part of Calvey Township. The name is doubtless descriptive. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 27)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mill Spring Mills
Description:In the northwest part of Central Township on the Meramec River. The name is probably descriptive. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Miller School
Description:In the south central part of Boone Township. It was named in honor of John Miller, an early settler. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke; Mrs. Alice B. Lockhart)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Miller's Bend
Description:See Newhaven (Franklin).
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Miller's Landing
Description:See Newhaven.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Millers Station
Description:See Newhaven.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Millersburg
Description:See Newhaven.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mineral School
Description:Mentioned in the county history, but not otherwise identified. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 26)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mings School
Description:In the northeast part of St. John's Township. It was named for J.D. Ming (1824-?), county judge who lived near the school. Judge Ming was a native of Virginia and came to Franklin County when he was thirteen. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 57; HIST. FRANKLIN, 789; 83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: George Klenke; Amos Bienke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mint Spring
Description:In the northeast part of Central Township, northwest of Moselle. The name is probably descriptive. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 27)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Railroad
Description:This great railroad runs from St. Louis to Omaha, Nebraska via Kansas City, and also to Texarkana, Arkansas, Lake Charles, Louisiana, and Johnson City, Illinois. It enters Franklin County from St. Louis County at Pacific (q.v.) and there diverges from the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad (q.v.) to follow the Missouri River along the northern border of the county. This part of the Missouri Pacific is called the Washington Branch, for Washington, its largest station in the county. The railroad was originally chartered as the Pacific Railroad on March 12, 1849, to construct a road from St. Louis to Jefferson City and then westward to Van Buren (now Cass) County, Missouri. It was so named because its promoters ambitiously hoped to reach the Pacific Ocean. Construction on the road commenced at St. Louis on July 4, 1850, and work went well for a time due largely, no doubt, to the fact that the State Legislature granted two million dollars worth of bonds to the company in 1851. The railroad was opened to Franklin, now called Pacific, on July 19, 1853; to Washington on July 11, 1855; and to Hermann, just across the line in Gasconade County, on August 6, 1855. The first division of the railroad from St. Louis to Pacific cost about $47,000 a mile, or approximately twice the estimated amount. By the autumn of 1855 the railroad was almost completed to Jefferson City. On November 1, 1855 it experienced one of the greatest tragedies in the state when an excursion train bound for Jefferson City, loaded with several hundred of the most distinguished citizens of the state, was thrown into the Gasconade River. Thirty-one of the passengers were killed, including the chief engineer, Thomas O'Sullivan. By 1861, the railroad was completed to Sedalia, but operations were suspended for two years, probably on account of the Civil War. By 1865 the road reached Kansas City. The Pacific Railroad from St. Louis to Kansas City was sold under the Act of March 31, 1868 to the Pacific Railroad Company, and thus were evolved the main lines of the present St. Louis-San Francisco and the Missouri Pacific Railroads. The Pacific Railroad was incorporated in 1876 as the Missouri Pacific and was so named for the state it traversed and its intended destination. It has now absorbed several lines, one of which runs southwest through Franklin County and which was known as the Southwest Branch Railroad (q.v.) about the time of the Civil War. The Missouri Pacific Railroad owns about 6,598 miles of first line track. About June 1, 1917, it took over the properties of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railway. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 294; MHR, Oct. 1920, 145-153; Schultz, 109-11; R. & I. COMPENDIUM, May 29, 1941, 129; Washington Library Records; Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri River
Description:This mighty stream forms the northern boundary of Franklin County, the southern boundary of Warren County, and the south and southeastern boundary of St. Charles County. Eminent authorities are convinced that had this river been discovered before the Mississippi, the latter would have been considerd the tributary of the former and consequently the name "Missouri" would have been applied to both streams. The erroneous popular conception that the name means "muddy water" arose from the fact that Marquette gave the Indian name "Pekitanoui" ("muddy") to the stream. Early white explorers first called the river Missouri after a tribe of Indians who lived on its banks. "Missouri," in the Indian language, means "People with wooden canoes." These Indians who paddled up and down the Missouri in their canoes were the first of many who used the long river for their thoroughfare. Though this word has been pronounced in various ways, the pronunciations listed in the appendix are taken from Mr. Read's summary of the defensible pronunciations based upon Missouri usage. The Spanish form is Rio Missouri. Early names for the river were also River St. Philip and River St. Louis, given in honor of patron saints. (COUNTY MAP 1908; Hevenor, ST. CHARLES COUNTY; SHOW ME, 11-12; Chappell, HIST. MISSOURI RIVERS, 1, 6-7; Read PRONUN. OF THE WORD MISSOURI, 22FF.; MHR XVII, 377-8; IBID. XII, 81; Conard IV, 412, 432; Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mitler School
Description:In the southern part of Boeuf Township. It was named for March Mitler, on whose land the school was built. (Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Henry Steiner)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Moeslien Rock Quarry
Description:Mentioned but located in the Washington Library Records. The name is probably personal in origin, but is usually spelled Moselein in St. Clair. (Washington Library Records; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 81)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Molino
Description:See Youngs Mills.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Monday
Description:A post office once located in the southeast part of Meramec Township. It was established in 1900 and discontinued in 1908. It was named, with a slight change of spelling, for C.M. Munday, the first postmaster. Munday was a negro and had once been a slave of Stephen Roussin. After he was freed he homesteaded a large tract of land and kept a store and post office till Postmaster Daniel C. Saunders succeeded him. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 206 & map; Miss Johnson: Stephen Sullivan; Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Morley
Description:See Meramec Hills.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Morrellton
Description:A post office in the southwest part of Central Township. It was established in 1858 as Dry Branch and discontinued in 1860. Dry Branch was reestablished in 1862, discontinued in 1865,and established a third time in 1869. The place was called Dry Branch until 1892, and this name is still used in the making of deeds. It seems also to have been known as Dry Branch Station. Named for the nearby stream. Dry Branch was changed to Anaconda in 1892 and to Morrellton in 1893. The Frisco Railroad has maintained the name Anaconda. A local news article of 1893 said that the government changed the name Anaconda to Morrellton, but that the people did not desire the change. Anaconda probably alluded to the copper mines in Anaconda, Montana, the richest in the world. The Montana mines opened in 1884, produce about 10% of the world's supply of copper. About 1892 mines were opened at Dry Branch which it was hoped for a while would equal the famous strike in Montana. The Missouri Anaconda was probably changed because the mail was sometimes mixed with that of the Montana town, hence the name Morrellton. Morrellton was named in honor of Mr. Morrell who was president of the St. Louis, San Francisco Railroad. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 14-15; HIST. FRANKLIN, 31, 342; INT. ENCYC.; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 197, 200, 206; Miss Johnson: Miss Martha May Wood; Julian Pickles; Henry Jamilton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Morrellton School
Description:A school at Morrellton (q.v.) in the southern part of Central Township. It was formerly known as Anaconda School for the station. It changed its name with the place. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson; Julian Pickles)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Morris School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Union Township. It was named for an old settler, Jacob Morris, who owned land here in 1899. (COUNTY ATLAS 1899, 21; 83RD REPORT; ROAD MAP OF LINCOLN COUNTY; Charles S. Huckstep; John G. Gibson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Moselle
Description:A village in the eastern part of Central Township, on the Frisco Railroad. It is a mining community, and has had several changes of name. The original nucleus of the place was the Moselle Iron Furnace. The furnace was built in 1849, about three-quarters of a mile from the present Moselle station, by F.A. Evans and George L. Huckles, for persons living in Kentucky. Iron ore was smelted in it and pig iron was made. In 1850 it started to use the cold blast process of making iron. It continued to operate, with several changes of ownership and management, as late as 1874. A post office was established under the name of Moselle Furnace on April 30, 1851, but was discontinued on October 6 of the same year. George L. Nuckolls was the only postmaster. The name was doubtless borrowed from Moselle, France. The Moselle River region and Moselle Department in Lorraine have alwys been famous for iron mines, and the Franklin County community is chiefly French in origin. On July 25, 1856, a post office was established at Iron Hill, which is about one mile west of Moselle. The new name was given of course, for the many iron mines in the neighborhood. Isaiah T. Murphy was the only postmaster, and the office was discontinued on July 24, 1860. On the same day a new post office was established at Moselle, under which name it has continued, with a few interruptions, ever since. This was of course a shortened form from Moselle Iron Furnace, for which the town has always served as a shipping point. On the old site of the furnace, disused since 1874, Mr. F.P. Weatherford on August 15, 1925 decided to make a resort which he named Hillcrest Subdivision. The new name was suitable topographically, and was thought to have more allure for a resort than the old Moselle Furnace. (Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204, 210-211, 340; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 203, 206; PLAT BK. C, 77; Johnson: J.A. Higginbotham; W.M. Cheathm)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Moselle Banks
Description:Limonite banks near Moselle Furnace, for which they were doubtless named. (GEOLOGICAL SURVEY)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Moselle Furnace
Description:See Moselle.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Moselle Iron Furnace
Description:See Moselle.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Moselle School
Description:A school in the east central part of Central Township, at Moselle, for which it is named. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Halleck
Description:See Rengel.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Halleck Store
Description:See Rengel.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Helicon
Description:See Sullivan.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Hope Mine [1 of 2]
Description:A lead mine known as Mount Hope, in the eastern part of Central Township and the northwest part of Prairie Township. This mine ran so far into the bluff that the ore was difficult to obtain. Consequently, miners often exhausted their resources in its operation and then went across to Poor Man Diggings. After they had thus obtained more money, they returned to the deeper Mount Hope Mine with the expectation of reaching more and richer ore. (Foster & Swallow, map; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 27; HIST. FRANKLIN, 208; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Hope Mine [2 of 2]
Description:Another lead mine in the northwest part of Prairie Township. It was also known as Jeffries Mine, for Edwin Jeffries who opened it. It is a part of the famous Virginia lode, which is about eighteen miles long and nine miles wide. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8; HIST. FRANKLIN, 208, 209; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff; Omer Jeffries)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Olive Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:Located in the southern part of Calvey Township, on Little Calvey Creek, for which it was originally named. The present name is a variant of the familiar Biblical Mount of Olives, or Mount Olivet, the site of Christ's Ascension (ACTS 1:12). (HIST. FRANKLIN, 356; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Pleasant School
Description:In the southeast part of Calvey Township. It was named for its location on a hill. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mounthope
Description:A post office once located in the northwest part of Prairie Township. It was established in 1903, discontinued in 1909, and named for the Mount Hope Mine. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 207; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mt. Hope School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Prairie Township. It was named for the mine. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mud Lick
Description:See Port Hudson.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mushroom Cave
Description:A large cave in the southwest part of Meramec Township, about one and a half miles east of Sullivan. It was originally named Garrett Cave for George Garrett, who discovered it when he tracked a bear into it. It was renamed Mushroom Cave in 1922 when it was commercialized for the growing of mushrooms. The cave, which was very beautiful until it was defaced by vandals, is now a part of the Meramec State Park (q.v.). (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 213; Miss Johnson: Benton Dill; Stephen Sullivan)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Natural Bridge
Description:A sandstone formation over a branch, in the northwest part of Central Township. The name is descriptive. (Swallow, Map XI, 40)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Neier
Description:A post office in the southwest part of Union Township. It was established in 1884; discontinued in 1909. It was probably named, according to Kiel, for Peter Neier, its first postmaster. Eaton says, however, that the office was named for Franz Nier, once a civil engineer on the railroad from St. Louis to Union, now a part of the Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific Railroad. One point against Eaton's candidate is the spelling of his name as Nier; for the citizens of the place declare Neier is the only spelling they have ever known. Neier as a name replaced Pevelingsville on March 4, 1884. Pevelingsville was established in 1848 and was named for Henry Peveling, who gave forty acres of land as a site in 1848 for the establishing of St. Joseph's Catholic Church (q.v.) (Postal Guide; Eaton; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193 & map; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Neier School
Description:Located in Neier, for which it is named. Also called St. Joseph School, a name taken from the church. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Germany
Description:A former post office in the northwest part of Union Township. It was established in 1854 and discontinued in 1855. William P. Springgate and Thomas H. Baker were its only postmasters. The place was probably named in honor of the great number of German settlers who had recently come to the community. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 46; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 207)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Haven
Description:See Newhaven.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Haven School
Description:A school at Newhaven, for which it is named. (Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson; Henry Steiner)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Haven Township
Description:The site of the town of Newhaven in the northwest part of the county. Organized as a separate township, out of Boeuf Township, on August 7, 1873. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 16; HIST. FRANKLIN, 237; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 232; Miss Johnson: Dr. W.F. Eimbeck)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Hope Missionary Baptist Church
Description:In the west-central part of Lyon Township. Elder Peter Williams organized the church in June, 1858. The organization was made as a part of Big Creek Church, and was first called Providence, with its place of worship in a schoolhouse on St. Johns Creek. Afterward they moved to Liberty Schoolhouse, it being a more central point. New Hope Church was a branch of Providence Church, and took its present name upon its becoming a separate organization. A log church was built in 1860. Both Providence and New Hope are ideal names. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 350-51)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Port
Description:See Dundee.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Washington
Description:See Washington.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Newell Mine
Description:A mine north of the Thomas Mines on the same ridge as the latter. No explanation of the name has been found. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Newhaven
Description:A town on the Missouri River, in the northeast part of Boeuf Township. It's earliest name was Blish's Mill or Mills, under which name a post office was established on April 9, 1850. This name was taken from Blish's Mill (q.v.), a flour mill about three miles from what is now the business section of Newhaven, named for its owner, Joseph Blish. The Blish's Mill post office was discontinued on September 5, 1855. A boat landing on the river had been established by Philip Miller, a wealthy planter and early settler, on what is now the northern edge of Newhaven, and it became the center of the community. On September 18, 1855, a town was laid off there by S.C. Miller and E.B. Hammond and named Miller's Landing. Other names applied to the place were Miller's Bend, Miller's Station, and Millersburg, all in honor of Philip Miller. When the town was more regularly laid out, in 1858, the name New Haven was suggested by William O. Ming, possibly because it was a new town and a port of haven for boats on the Missouri River. The name is widely used, being found in no less than twelve other states. It was adopted in place of Miller's Landing for both post office and railway station, although the old name was used unofficially for more than a quarter of a century. In the earlier postal guides, from 1867 to 1893, it appears as New Haven, later usually as Newhaven. The west part of Newhaven is often known as Baltimore, possibly for its proximity to the negro community one mile away known as Baltimore Settlement. Mr. Kiel writes that he was under the impression that this name was conferred by a Maryland slave-owner who had come out to Franklin County. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 14, 16; HIST. FRANKLIN, 229, 331; Lippincott's GAZ.; Eagon; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 206-7 & map; McClure, 26; COURT RECORD, BK. C, 29; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: Dr. W.F. Eimbeck; James McDonald; Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Newport
Description:See Dundee.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Newport School
Description:In the northwest part of St. John's Township. It was named for the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Newport Settlement
Description:An early colony along the Missouri River, probably near the former New Port (Newport), which later became Dundee (q.v.). It is doubtless so named for the early town. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 217)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Nier
Description:See Neier.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:North Bend School
Description:In the northern part of Central Township, so named for its location, in the north bend of the Bourbeuse River. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: A.C. Beasley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:North Virginia Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southeast part of Central Township, in a southeast bend of the Meramec River. It was so named for its location north of the Virginia Mines (q.v.). (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 26; HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Miss Johnson: Joe Murphy)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Northumberland Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southeast part of Central Township, two and a half miles west of St. Clair. It ranked second to the Virginia Mine and reached a depth of at least 100 ft. It was formerly known as the Ford Mine and also as the Inge and Generally Mines. Although no positive identification of these names has been made, they were probably personal. The name Northumberland Mine was doubtless borrowed from the rich mining section of Northumberland, England. This choice was evidently made when J.B. Champion, an Englishman with many years mining experience in his own and foreign lands, became Captain of the Northumberland Mine. (PROSPECTUS, 4, 5, 9, & map; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8; HIST. FRANKLIN, 208; INT. ENCYC.)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Noser Mill [1 of 2]
Description:Located in the northwest part of Meramec Township, on the Bourbeuse River. Dietrich Voss built the first mill here, near Beaufort, and it was known as Voss Mill. It was later replaced by Noser Mill, operated by John J. Noser. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 195, 207; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Noser Mill [2 of 2]
Description:A village in the northwest part of Meramec Township, on the Bourbeuse River. The post office was first established as Luther, just north of the river, in the southwest part of Union Township, in 1872 and discontinued in 1878. The only postmaster during that time was Martin Luther, Green Crowe, and Luther was named for one of his given names. Luther Crowe, as he was generally called, was born in 1818 in Boles Township. He was elected justice of the peace in 1848, and county clerk from 1860 to 1870. In 1896 the post office, still named Luther, was reestablished south of the river at the site of Noser Mill (q.v.), and in 1901 or 1902 was renamed for the mill, a name which it still bears. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 7, 56; HIST. FRANKLIN, 225; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 205, 207 & map; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove Missionary Baptist Church
Description:In the central part of Prairie Township. It was organized by the Reverend Marion Pierce in 1885. The church was built about 1887. Cf. above. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 351; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove School [1 of 3]
Description:In the northeast part of Meramec Township. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove School [2 of 3]
Description:Another Oak Grove School in the northern part of Union Township. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove School [3 of 3]
Description:A third Oak Grove School, in the central part of Boone Township. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oakfield
Description:A village in the northwest part of Boles Township, four miles north of Pacific. It was so named for the great number of oak trees on the site. Frederick Steines, who built the first house here in 1842, later served as its first postmaster. The post office was established in 1847 and discontinued in 1895. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 341; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 207-8; Miss Johnson: J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oakfield School
Description:At Oakfield, for which it is named. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oetters
Description:A station on the Rock Island Railroad, forty-two miles from St. Louis. It was probably so named for Henry Oeters, who owned large deposits of white silica there. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oetters Station
Description:This is a "boosting station" on the pipe line that carries oil and gasoline from the Panhandle in Texas to St. Louis. It was esteablished in 1926 and named for Henry Oetters (or Oeters), who owned the land where the station was built. In the pipeline industry a "boosting station" is a post or camp along the pipeline where the flow of oil is reinforced by additional pumping machinery. This Franklin County camp is quite a large and important one. (Miss Johnson, Charles Becker)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oklahoma School
Description:In the northeast part of Meramec Township. When this district was divided from that of Salem School, the name Oklahoma was selected for the new school. Mr. Roussin thinks that it was chosen because just at that time Oklahoma became a state (i.e., in 1907) and hence was in the "news." Mr. Thurman and Mr. Tilley, on the other hand, declare it was named for a man who owned land nearby and was nicknamed "Oklahoma Bill," because he had recently come from that state. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: S.E. Roussin; Irving Tilley; Gus Thurman)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Argo School
Description:An elementary school in District No. 107. Probably so called to distinguish it from Argo School (q.v.). (83RD REPORT)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Beaufort School
Description:In the south-central part of Lyon Township. It is so named to distinguish it from the present Beaufort School, built at Beaufort when the town moved to the railroad site. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: H.J. Linstromberg)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Meramec Baptist Church
Description:A rural church in Prairie Township, about two miles south of Lonedell. It was organized as early as 1850. Named for its location near the Little Meramec River. (Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Morrellton School
Description:In the western part of Meramec Township. It was originally called Dry Branch School for the town; but when the name of that village was changed to Morrellton, the name of the school was changed to Old Morrellton to distinguish it from the present Morrellton School, which is in the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Julian Pickles)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Parrent Diggings
Description:An old mine north of Mineral Hill. The name is probably personal in origin. (Swallow, 42)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oldehouse
Description:See Gildehouse.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Omohundro Creek
Description:A tributary of Labaddie Creek in Boles Township. It was named for John Omohundro (1848-1932) whose land was near the creek. He was a native of Franklin County. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193; Miss Johnson: J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Onyx Cave
Description:Located in Meramec State Park. Benton Dill discovered it in 1913 and named it for the onyx he found there. (Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Onyx Mines
Description:Marble mines in the southern part of the county, seven miles from Dry Branch. Onyx, or onyx marble, was mined in considerable quantities in the region between Moselle and Stanton about 1889 to 1892. A Mr. Daris of Cuba, Missouri, looked after his interests in the mines in 1889. (Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Otten Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southwest bend of the Bourbeuse River in Boles Township. It was a new mine in 1888. It was named for George Otten on whose land it was located. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Miss Johnson: G.H. Merten)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Owensville
Description:See Washington.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pacific
Description:A town and station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, on the eastern border of Boles Township and extending partly into St. Louis County. When it was first laid off, in November, 1852, by William C. Inks for the Atlantic and Pacific (now Missouri Pacific) Railroad, the town was called Franklin, for Franklin County. The story goes that when the railroad was begun at St. Louis in 1851 and given its ambitious title, the hope was that it would soon reach the Pacific Ocean. But progress was slow, and it was 1853 before thirty- seven miles of track were completed and a train ran all the way across St. Louis County to the border of Franklin County. For two more years it stopped there, for the people of Franklin County were unwilling to grant a right of way or to buy stock. Hence the people of St. Louis began to refer to the station at the end of the line as Franklin. When application for a post office was made, however, it was found that there was already a town of Franklin in Howard County, Missouri, founded in 1816 (now New Franklin), and another name had to be selected. The name Pacific City was thought of, but a town of that name (now called Syracuse) had already been platted in Morgan County. Finally the name Pacific was chosen, in honor of the hoped for terminus of the new railroad. A post office by that name was established July 15, 1854, with William C. Inks as first postmaster. The new name was confirmed by a resolution passed by the Franklin town board on January 29, 1859. Slightly different dates are given by the 1878 Atlas: 1856 for the year when Franklin was laid off by William C. Inks and Augustus A. Blumenthal, and 1858 for the change to Pacific. (PLAT BK. A, 14; Eaton; Davis & Durrie, 364; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 208; HIST. FRANKLIN, 307; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13-14; McClure, 20; Washington Library Records; theses by Miss Adams & Miss Welty; Miss Johnson: Raymond McGuire; J.W. Powers)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pacific City
Description:See Pacific.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pacific Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pacific School
Description:Located at Pacific and named for the town. (Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Paine's Mines
Description:A mine in the northwest part of Central Township. The name is evidently personal in origin. (Swallow, Map XI)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Park Mine
Description:A copper mine located partly in Washington County and in the southern part of Prairie Township in Franklin County. It was named for Andrew Park, who lived in St. Louis and opened the mine. It is no longer operated. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 207; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Patton Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southern part of Union Township about three miles west of St. Clair, in the bend of the Bourbeuse River. It was named for the man upon whose land it was located. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pea Ridge School
Description:A rural school in District no. 64, in the southern part of Meramec Township, and also extending south into Washington County. Its earliest name was Hulsey School, for Bill Hulsey, on whose land it was built. Later the school was moved south of the border to a ridge and renamed Pea Ridge School. The name was a satirical one, suggested by Mr. Charley Collins because, as he said, the soil was so poor it would not grow cow peas.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peninsula Mine
Description:Lead mines in the peninsula-like bend of the Meramec River, in the southwest part of Union Township. The dates as to when they were opened vary from 1824 to 1825 until about 1848. Great amounts of lead were removed by private enterprise. Alexander Chambers, who successfully operated the mines for a time, erected a furnace and other necessary works. The Peninsula Lead Mining Company later bought the property. Although the company paid high prices for the mineral lands, it did little mining. The financial difficulties which ensued caused the company to suspend operations. The mines were known as the Hardesty Mines in 1826. The name was probably personal in origin. The name Peninsula Mine doubtless came from the company which in turn took its name from the peninsula like location of the mines. (Foster & Swallow, Map; Swallow, 42; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8, 13; COUNTY HIST., 209)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Persimmon Gap [1 of 2]
Description:A gap in Meramec Township, about three miles directly south of Stanton. It is named for a large number of persimmon trees there at a break in the hills. (Swallow, 44; HIST. FRANKLIN, 213; Miss Johnson: Stephen Sullivan)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Persimmon Gap [2 of 2]
Description:At Persimmon Gap (q.v.) and named for it. (Swallow, Map III; HIST. FRANKLIN, 213; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., map)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pevelingsville
Description:See Neier.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Phillips Mine
Description:A mine in the same locality as the Enterprise Mine. No explanation has been found for the origin of the name. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pikes Peak School
Description:In the northeast part of Union Township. It was so named because it was erected on the highest point in this section. Pike's Peak, Colorado, over 14,000 ft. high is a synonym for altitude in the American mind. (83RD REPORT; Supt's Records; Miss Johnson: Charles Cole; O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pin Oak Creek
Description:Rises near Gerald in the northwest part of Boone Township and flows north into Lyon Township, emptying into Boeuf Creek. Named for the pin oak timber found along the edge of the stream. (COUNTY ATLAS, 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Miss Johnson: Dr. W.P. Fitzgerald)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pin Oak School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Lyon Township. It was earlier known as Kiel (or Kiehl) School. Mr. Kiel thinks it was named for Henry John Kiel, a resident there, or for a county school commissioner named Kiel or Kiehl. Both spellings of the name are found. The name was later changed to Pin Oak School, for its location near Pin Oak Creek (q.v.). (83RD REPORT; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 191; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster; O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Piney Bluff Park
Description:A pleasure resort of considerable beauty on the Meramec River, near St. Clair in Central Township. The name is descriptive and often spelled "Piny." (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193; PLAT BK. C, 64; Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Piney Bluff School
Description:In the southwest part of Central Township. It is so named for its location on a pine-covered bluff. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: A.C. Beasley; Henry Hamilton)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Piney Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southeast part of Central Township, south of the Northumberland Mine. It was once mined to a depth of forty feet but was out of operation by 1888. The name is doubtless descriptive of its setting, which is in the same locality as Piney Bluff School (q.v.). (HIST. FRANKLIN, 209)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Piny Bluff Park
Description:See Piney Bluff Park.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:In the central part of Lyon Township. Cf. above. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:In the east-central part of Calvey Township. A descriptive name. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: G.B Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Plum Ford
Description:A crossing on the Meramec River, south of Morrellton. It is probably so named for the trees. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Point Labaddie
Description:See Gray Summit.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Point Labadie
Description:See Gray Summit.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Point Look Off
Description:An elevation in the southern part of Boles Township. Obviously descriptive. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 23)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pond Bottom
Description:A lowland near the Meramec River, probably near Pond Ford (q.v.). The name may have been borrowed from the ford. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pond Ford
Description:A crossing on the Meramec River between the northwest part of Prairie Township and the southwest part of Union Township. The name may be descriptive. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pool Creek
Description:See Blesse Pond.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Poor Man Diggings
Description:A shallow mine in the northwest part of Prairie Township, on the south end of the lead float. It was so named because it did not require much money to mine here. Cf. Mount Hope Mine, above. (Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Port Hudson
Description:A village and former post office in the south central part of Lyon Township. There was a voting place here from 1853 to 1858 known by the homely name of Mud Lick, doubtless a specimen of pioneer humor. In 1859 a post office was established at a farmhouse near the Catholic Church, and given the more high flown name of Port Hudson. Kiel thinks the name was suggested by Dr. Pierce Nugent Butler, who took it from Port Hudson, Louisiana, a well known river port on the Mississippi River ninety-one miles northwest of New Orleans, just as he named the nearby Beaufort (q.v.) and also perhaps Casco (q.v.), one from his old home at Beaufort, South Carolina, the other from Casco, Maine. What basis he has for this conjecture Kiel does not state. The Port Hudson post office was discontinued in 1909. The voting place at Port Hudson does not seem to have used the name of the post office. In 1884 and 1886 it was called Ritter, or Ritter's Store, named for John Ritter, who had a store there. Ritter was born in Germany in 1839 and came to Franklin County in 1875. In the 1878 County Atlas the name appears as Hudson Port. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 55; HIST. FRANKLIN, 237, 807; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194, 208; Miss Johnson: F.W. Schroeder; Oscar Pelster; Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Port Royal
Description:A former post office in the extreme northeast part of Boles Township, established in 1889 and discontinued in 1900. Kiel thinks it was named for one of the eastern Port Royals; the name occurs in Virginia, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Kentucky and Tennessee. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 208; Miss Johnson: Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Port Royal Landing
Description:At Port Royal (q.v.) on the Missouri River. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 23)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Port Royal School
Description:Located in District no. 1. Named for the town. (83RD REPORT)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Port William
Description:See Gray Summit.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Porter's Ford
Description:A crossing on the Bourbeuse River, south of Union. John Porter and his son John J. Porter, a deputy, lived in the county in the early days, and the former owned a farm near Porter's Ford. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 230)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Possum Creek
Description:Rises in the north central part of Boone Township and empties into Big Creek. So named by early settlers because it was good possum country. (Miss Johnson: G.F. Duerr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Church
Description:An early church which is mentioned in the HISTORY OF FRANKLIN but not definitely located. The friendly Indians, formerly established at Shawneetown, later settled here temporarily. The name is probably descriptive. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 214)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Prairie Township, west of Luebbering. It is so named for its location on Ruckers Prairie. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Township
Description:This township in the southeast corner of Franklin County is surrounded by Meramec and Central Townships on the west, Calvey Township on the north, Jefferson County on the east, and Washington County on the south. A level prairie region, it takes its name from Rucker's Prairie (q.v.). Settlers came here as early as 1820, among them being Thomas Boyd, John King, William and Jesse Woodcock, and others; but at that time it was merely a part of Meramec Township. It was organized as a separate township on April 4, 1853. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 14; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204, 206; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 232; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Progress School
Description:A rural school in the east-central part of Boone Township. An ideal name. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prospect Church
Description:A church in Meramec Township, near St. Clair. Probably a descriptive name, for there are fine views or prospects of the surrounding countryside. Mr. Dill, however, thought the name referred to the "prospects" of mineral wealth in the many lead mines in the neighborhood. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193; Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Providence Church
Description:See New Hope Missionary Baptist Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pryor's Branch
Description:A small stream in the northwest corner of Boeuf Township, which runs into Berger Creek near Berger. It was named for a pioneer who settled on its banks in an early day. It has been suggested that this man was Sergeant Nathaniel Pryor, a prominent member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804-1806. The account of Sergeant Pryor's life, however, in the DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY makes it improbable that he ever lived in this part of Franklin County. After the return of the great expedition, he entered the regular army in February, 1807; resigned April 1, 1810, to keep a trading post near Galena, Illinois, til 1812; reenlisted August 30, 1813, as 1st Lieutenant; became a captain on October 1, 1814, and served with distinction in the Battle of New Orleans; was honorably discharged October 15, 1815, and started another trading post at Arkansas Post, Arkansas; moved upstream to Verdigris in 1819, married an Osage woman, and lived with the tribe until his death on May 7, 1831. There seems no room here for a settlement on Pryor's Creek. Another Nathaniel Pryor, possibly a nephew of the famous sergeant, and sometimes confused with him, was a member of Jacob Fowler's expedition of 1821-1822. But we have no means of identifying the Franklin County settler with either of them. It seems more probable that the stream was named for William Pryor, who filed for a homestead here on September 19, 1818. (DAB, under Nathaniel Pryor; JOURNAL OF JACOB FOWLER, ed. Coues, 4-5; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193, 15; Miss Johnson: S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Read Hill Mine
Description:See Thomas Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Red Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Bourbeuse River, near Union, destroyed by a tornado. A ferry was used later. The span of rthe Red Bridge destroyed by the storm was two-hundred feet long. Contracts were let to have a new bridge completed by August 1, 1920. The name was probably descriptive. (TRIBUNE, Apr. 20, 1920; IBID., May 14, 1920; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Red Oak Creek
Description:Rises in the northwest part of Boone Township and flows southeast into the Bourbeuse River. It is so named for the red oak trees that grow along the edge of the stream. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193; Miss Johnson: G.F. Duerr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Reed Mine
Description:See Thomas Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Reed's Defeat School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Boone Township. This district was created in 1874 out of the old Boone Creek District that also included what are now Oak Grove and Seminary Districts (q.v.), as well as Bailey District in Crawford County. The school was built in 1874, and its first teacher was named Reed. The big boys made life so hard for him that his work was a failure. The directors discharged him. The people of the district called the school Reed's Defeat, and it has borne that name ever since. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: T.E. Dotter; Jim Dotter; John Elderidge)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Reed's Landing
Description:A boat landing in the northern part of Boles Township along the Missouri River not far from the mouth of Ridenhour Creek. The name is doubtless personal as it is found in the county as early as 1820. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 23; HIST. FRANKLIN, 207; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 15, 193)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Reedville
Description:See Stanton.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Reedville Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church at Reedville, for which it is named. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Reedville School
Description:In the south-central part of Meramec Township. Named for the old town of Reedville, or its founder, Dr. Silas Reed. (83RD REPORT; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 209; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Reliance Diggings
Description:An old mine in the southwest part of Central Township. It is so named because a Mr. Usher obtained considerable lead here with little work. (Swallow, Map IV, 30)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Reliance Hill
Description:A hill in the southwest part of Central Township, near Reliance Diggings, from which it takes its name. (Swallow, Map IV)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rengel
Description:A former post office in the east central part of Union Township, on an elevation near the State road between Gildehaus and Villa Ridge. Its earliest name was Mount Halleck, or Mount Halleck Store, given for a man who was a soldier and a surveyor. The post office under these names was established on May 30, 1862, and discontinued March 17, 1863. Later it was known as Breitenback (or Brietenback's) Store, for John Breitenback, who had been its only postmaster. Then for a while it became the Kemper and Breitenback Store. A new post office was established on the same site on April 2, 1884, under the name of Rengel, for John Rengel, its first postmaster. This was discontinued on December 16, 1895, when Mr. Rengel removed to St. Louis. (Miss Johnson: Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 206; Postal Guide; Miss Hattie Stierberger; Charles Cole)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Renick School
Description:See Sneed School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Renick Store
Description:See Renickville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Renickville
Description:A settlement in the west-central part of Boone Township. The name was bestowed for Jake and Jim Renick, storekeepers there, and for Frank, George, and Charley Renick. When the post office was established at Japan, the Renick Store was abandoned. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 193; Miss Johnson: Mrs. Alice B. Lockhart; Dan Spindler)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ridenhour Creek
Description:Rises in the east-central part of Boles Township and flows northwest into the Missouri River. It was so named for John Ridenhour, who came to Franklin County about the beginning of the nineteenth century. He was killed by the Indians on April 3, 1803, on the bluffs of the Missouri River near the mouth of Ridenhour Creek, in a skirmish over some stolen horses. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205, 222; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI II, 73; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rio Missouri
Description:See Missouri River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ripley Iron Mines
Description:Located in the eastern part of Meramec Township, near Sullivan. The mines were discovered by Charles Ripley for whom they were named. (Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley; E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ritter
Description:See Port Hudson.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ritter's Store
Description:See Port Hudson.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River Berger
Description:See Berger Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River du Bois
Description:See Dubois Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River Dubois
Description:See Dubois Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River Merameig
Description:See Meramec River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River St. John
Description:See St. Johns Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River St. Louis
Description:See Missouri River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:River St. Philip
Description:See Missouri River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riverview
Description:A resort on the Rock Island Railroad, five miles east of Union, in Union Township, . It was opened in 1922 by F.E. Hall and so named for its view overlooking the Meramec River. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194; Miss Johnson: F.E. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere a Berger
Description:See Berger Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere Maramecquisipi
Description:See Meramec River.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere St. Jean
Description:See St. Johns Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Roaring Springs
Description:Located in the southern part of Central Township near the Meramec River, south of Morrellton. It is so named for the noise the water makes where it issues from a cave. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194; Miss Johnson: Henry Hamilton; Julian Pickles)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Robertsville
Description:A village and station on the Frisco Railroad, in the northwest part of Calvey Township. A post office was established there on December 27, 1859. For the twelve year rivalry between Robertsville and Catawissa, three miles to the east, over the possession of the post office, each village enjoying it alternately, see under Catawissa above. Since June 6, 1871, Robertsville has had its own post office without interruption. The town was named for its founder, Edward James Roberts. Eaton gives his name incorrectly as W.J. Roberts, but the other was his right name, as is confirmed by the 1878 Atlas and also by his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Eliza Roberts. Mrs. E.J. Roberts (1817-1899), was a native of Virginia, and came to Franklin County in 1831, when he was fourteen. He became a merchant and the largest taxpayer in Franklin County. Robertsville is sometimes referred to as Calvey or Calvey Station, names that properly apply to the small neighboring community named for its location on Calvey Creek a mile to the east. The name of another close neighbor, Warrenville (q.v.) or Warrensville, has also been used for Robertsville, probably because for a time they were served by the same post office. (Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 165; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 16; HIST. FRANKLIN, 340; 807-8; Eaton; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 94, 195, 209; LANDS & HOMES, 5; PLAT BK. A, 46; Miss Johnson: Mrs. Eliza Roberts; Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Robertsville School
Description:A school at Robertsville, for which it is named. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rock Creek
Description:A tributary of Cedar Fork Creek, which rises in the south-central part of Lyon Township. It is so named for the large rocks found in the creek bed. (Miss Johnson: F.W. Schroeder)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rock Hill School
Description:See Rockhill School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rock Island Railroad
Description:See Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rock Ridge School
Description:In the southern part of Lyon Township. It is so named for its location on a rocky ridge. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rockford School
Description:In the west central part of Prairie Township. It is so named for its location near a rocky ford on Big Indian Creek. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rockhill School
Description:A rural school in the west-central part of St. John's Township. It is so named for its location on a rocky hill. The name is sometimes written Rock Hill School. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: George Klenke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Roedderville
Description:A settlement between Beaufort and Leslie in Lyon Township. Named for Fritz Roedder (1858-?), a native of Franklin County. The firm of Roedder and Femme, who called themselves "wheelwrights of destinction," has been located there since 1865. The place was formerly known as Flint Hill, so named for the flint rocks in that vicinity. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 204, 810; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 190; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster; F.W. Schroeder)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Roth Creek
Description:See Bachelor Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Round Hill
Description:A hill in the southwest part of Central Township. It is doubtless so named for its shape. (Swallow, Map IV)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rucker's Prairie
Description:See Ruckers Prairie.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ruckers Prairie [1 of 2]
Description:A former post office in the eastern part of Prairie Township, established in 1853 and discontinued in 1861. It was named for its first postmaster, Ambrose L. Rucker, who lived in a prairie region. Goodwin in 1867 writes it Rucker's Prairie, but the apostrophe is usually ommitted. (Goodwin; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 12; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 209 & map; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ruckers Prairie [2 of 2]
Description:An extensive prairie region in the southeast part of the county, which gave its name to Prairie Township. Named for Ambrose L. Rucker and his family, early settlers. (Miss Johnson; E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rundlettsville
Description:See Rundlettville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rundlettville
Description:A post office established on November 27, 1835, and discontinued on October 14, 1836. It was probably named for William Rundlett, who was its only postmaster. Rundlett came from St. Louis. Some records list the place as Rundlettsville. Since Rundless homesteaded on the south or right bank of the Meramec River, Rundlettville was probably located in what is now the northwest part of Prairie Township. It is said to have been one mile south of Virginia Mine (q.v.), and must have been close to Conn (q.v.) just north of the river, at which the post office was discontinued the year before. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 201, 209, 210, & Map; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rye Creek
Description:Rises in the central part of Prairie Township and flows northwest into the Meramec River. It is so named for the wild rye that grows along its banks. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 26; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rye Creek School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Prairie Township. It is so named for its location near Rye Creek. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Saint Albans
Description:A former town on the Missouri River, in the northeast part of Boles Township. It was laid off in 1837 (Kiel says 1836) by Dr. Peter Kincaid, Sr. a Scotch pyhsician who had served under Napoleon Bonaparte. He settled on the Missouri River in 1818. The town was washed away by the flood of 1844; but fifty-five years later, in 1899, a post office by the same name was established near its former site. The post office was discontinued in 1907. Saint Albans is said to have been named after the ancient town of St. Albans in England, a municipal borough in Hertfordshire, twenty miles northeast of London. The English city grew up about the early abbey of St. Albans, founded in 793 by King Offa of Mercia in memory of St. Alban, the protomartyr of Britain, a Roman soldier who underwent martyrdom for his faith at the end of the third or beginning of the fourth century. The Missouri village may have taken its name directly from St. Albans in Franklin County, Vermont. There is also a St. Albans in Maine, and one in West Virginia. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 14; HIST. FRANKLIN, 225; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 210 & map; INT. ENCYC.; PLAT BK. A, 24; Miss Johnson; Charles Becker)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Salem Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the southern part of Central Township. Cf. above. (Miss Johnson: S.E. Roussin)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Salem Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:In the central east part of Lyon Township. The Reverend John Meyer organized the church in 1871. Cf. above. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 46; HIST. FRANKLIN, 358; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Salem School
Description:In the north-central part of Central Township. Named for Salem Baptist Church. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: S.E. Roussin)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Saltpeter Cave
Description:See Meramec Cavern.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:San Juan del Misuri
Description:See Saint Johns.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sand Hill School
Description:In the eastern part of Union Township. It was so named for its location on a sandy hill. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.O. Griese)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sand Spring
Description:In the northeast part of Central Township, northwest of Moselle. The name is doubtless descriptive as much sand is found in this country. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 27; HIST. FRANKLIN, 9)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sauer's Ford
Description:On Berger Creek, two miles northeast of Kemper's Mill. It was named for Tony Sauer, who lived on a farm near the stream. (Miss Johnson: A.P. Roehlfing)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schiller Creek
Description:A northern tributary of the Bourbeuse River. It was so named for an early settler who lived on its banks. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schmidt Cemetery
Description:Near Strain in Boone Township. The name is probably given for a Schmidt family as the name is very common in the county. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 180; SULLIVAN NEWS, Mar. 15 & 22, 1934; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schoeneberg
Description:A settlement in the central part of Lyon Township, on a hill near Kiel. So named by Charley Rehder for its location on top of the hill and for the beautiful view. The English meaning of Schoenberg is "beautiful mount." Nearly a dozen places in Germany or Austria bear the name Schoeneberg or Schonberg; but the Missouri name seems to have been a coinage rather than a borrowing. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 204; Miss Johnson: Oscar Pelster)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schwegmann Mill
Description:A mill which was probably located in St. John's Township, near Washington. It doubtless was named for John F. Schwegmann, who was a miller from 1860-1888. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 88; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sego Seminary
Description:See Seminary School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Seminary School
Description:In the south-central part of Boone Township. The school was at first called Sego Seminary, by way of jest, for a man named William Sego who lived close by. Sego had little education and was practically an illiterate; and some of the boys in the community suggested that it be named Sego's Seminary, or Sego Seminary. In the course of time the Sego part was dropped, but the Seminary part remained. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: T.E. Dotter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Semple School
Description:See Walbert School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Senate Grove [1 of 2]
Description:A small country community in the southwest part of Boeuf Township which grew up in the 1870s. The name intended by its mainly German settlers was Bismarck, and this name appears on the Franklin County Map of 1874 made by Franz Wilhelm and Otto Brix. The great German statesman Prince Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898) was then at the height of his fame just after the War of 1870. His name, however, was not accepted by the Post Office Department, because there was already another Bismarck (more correctly spelled) in Washington County. The name of Meyer's Store was therefore adopted instead for the post office established in 1874. It was given for Chris Meyers (1825-1897), who was born in Germany and came to this country with his parents when a small boy. The name appears more correctly as Meyers' Store or as Meyers Store. On August 14, 1891, a new post office was established on a site not very far removed from Meyers Store, which was then discontinued. It was named Senate Grove, from the nearby Senate Grove Church (q.v.). The post office at Senate Grove was discontinued in 1903. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 198, 205; Miss Johnson; Mrs. Julius Meyers; S.A. Hall; A.P. Roehlfing; Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Senate Grove [2 of 2]
Description:The magnificient home of Senator F.W. Pehle, in the western part of Boeuf Township, so nicknamed for the office of its owner. (Miss Johnson: A.P. Roehlfing; S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Senate Grove Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Church in the western part of Boeuf Township. It was so named for Senator F.W. Pehle's elaborate home, which citizens called "Senate Grove." (Miss Johnson: A.P. Roehlfing; S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Senate Grove Church [2 of 2]
Description:See Good Hope School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shaw Mill Trace
Description:Mentioned but not located by the county history. The name is probably personal in origin as it is found listed as the surname of early landholders in the county. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 220; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 26)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shawneetown
Description:An Indian settlement on the Bourbeuse River about two miles north of Moselle, near the Anderson Coleman farm, in the eastern part of Central Township. The village at one time had about three-hundred Shawnee Indians and over two-hundred cabins. They were friendly to the white and fond of horses. Later they moved to a place near Prairie Church (q.v.), and then to the Enloe Settlement (q.v.). The settlement was also called Shawney Village. The great Shawnee or Shawanese tribe were early known on the upper Savannah, to which they gave their name, in South Carolina, and in the Cumberland Valley in Tennessee. About the middle of the 18th century they were in the Ohio Valley, and during the War of 1812 they fought the United States under the leadership of Tecumseh. Many of them migrated to Missouri. Lewis and Clark report seeing some Kickapoos, a division of the Shawnees, along the Missouri River. Shawnees in Shannon County and several other Missouri localities have preserved their name. The name is translated "southerners," referring to the fact that for a long period they lived further south than any of the other Algonquian nations. (L&C I, ed. Thwaites; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 14; HIST. FRANKLIN, 216, 235; McKenny & Hall III, 41-43; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194; McClure, 6; SULLIVAN NEWS, Aug. 25, 1921; Miss Johnson: A.C. Beasley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shawneetown Ford
Description:A river crossing on the Bourbeuse River, about two miles north of Moselle. Named for Shawneetown. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shawney Village
Description:See Shawneetown.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shaw's Garden
Description:A branch of Shaw's Garden from St. Louis moved out to Grays Summit to get out of the coal smoke. It was so named for Henry Shaw (1800-1889), who was born in Sheffield, England. He came to America and began to work on a botanical garden in St. Louis in 1857 and opened it to the public in 1860. It was then known as "Mr. Shaw's Garden." Through a special act of the Legislature, it became known as the Missouri Botanical Garden. The income from Mr. Shaw's estate provided for it. (DAB; Miss Johnson; J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shepherd Creek
Description:See Berger Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shepherd River
Description:See Berger Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shepherds Creek
Description:See Berger Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shepherd's Creek
Description:See Berger Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shepherd's River
Description:See Berger Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shepperds Creek
Description:See Berger Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shewell
Description:See Meramec Hills.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Short Lode Mine
Description:A lead mine in the eastern part of Central Township. The name is doubtless descriptive. (Foster & Swallow, map; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shotwell
Description:A former post office in the northwest part of Boone Township, about one mile east of the present Gerald. The post office was established in 1855 and discontinued in 1907. Shotwell was probably a local family name; at least one Shotwell is known to have lived in the eastern part of the county. Cf. the Illmo (formerly Shotwell) Mines, above. No record remains, however, of the origin of the name. The temptation to invent an etymological explanation was irresistible, and at least two typical but contradictory stories are current locally. One tells of an early shooting affray between two pioneers who claimed the same deer lick. They met on a dark night and began shooting at each other until they had used up all their ammunition without inflicting any injuries. In mockery of their bad markmanship, John Seaton, the first postmaster, decided to call the new post office Shotwell. Others ascribe the name to some particular exhibition of good shooting. All the explanations cannot be true, and place names seldom originate in particular incidents anyway. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 337; Kile's BIOG. DIR., 210; Miss Johnson: G.F. Duerr; J.A. Schroeder; Dr. W.P. Fitzgerald)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shotwell Mine
Description:See Illmo Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Signal Stand
Description:In the central part of Boeuf Township on a high hill. The name is probably descriptive. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 59)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Silver Hollow Mine
Description:See Thomas Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Silver Lead Mine
Description:In the southwest part of Calvey Township, not far from the Evans Mine. It was discovered in 1858 by Ike Rentfro, who named it for its hard, silver-bearing ore. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sites Ford
Description:A ford somewhere on Boeuf Creek, mentioned in the 1878 Atlas. A German named Schmidt is said to have settled near it in pioneer times. The ford was probably named for some landowner. John Sites, Jr., and William Sites lived in St. John's Township in 1830. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 16; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 19)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Skewes Mine
Description:Once an important mine, which is mentioined by Barns, but not located or identified as to origin of name. (Barns, 561)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Skinner Creek
Description:Rises in the north-central part of Boone Township and empties into the Bourbeuse River. It was so named for William Skinner, an early settler, whose land was on both sides of the creek. Mr. Skinner came to Franklin County in 1840. (Miss Johnson: G.F. Duerr)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Skinner Mine
Description:See Enterprise Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Slaughter Branch
Description:Rises in the northeast part of Lyon Township and runs southeast till it unites with Brushy Fork just before the two streams empty into St. Johns Creek. This is the same as Slaughter Creek near Campbellton, which Mr. Kiel thinks took its name from a settler, long dead, named George Slaughterback. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 47; Miss Johnson: Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Slaughter Creek
Description:See Slaughter Branch.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sneed School
Description:In the west-central part of Boone Township. It was earlier known as Renick School in honor of George Renick, who was born in 1872 in Franklin County and later moved to St. Louis. The name Renick still appears in the 83RD REPORT. It has now, however, been replaced by the name Sneed School, which was given for Jeff Sneed, on whose land the school was built. (83RD REPORT; Miss Johnson: Mrs. Alice B. Lockhardt; Dan Spindler)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Beaufort School
Description:In the southern part of Union Township. It is so named for its location south of the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: H.J. Linstromberg)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Berger School
Description:In the northwest part of Boeuf Township. It is so named for its location south of Berger School. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson; A.P. Roehlfing)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Point
Description:A village on the Missouri River, in the northeast part of St. John's Township. It was platted in 1841; the post office was established in 1855, and discontinued in 1885. So named because it was on a southern bend of the river. It was once an important river port and factory and milling center. (Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 16, 39; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 210; PLAT BK. A, 10; Miss Johnson: George Klenke; Amos Beinke; Miss Martha May Wood)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Point School
Description:In the northeast part of St. John's Township. Named for the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Charles Cole)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Skinner Mine
Description:A mine which was doubtless located south of the Skinner Mine, from which it doubtless took its name. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Virginia Mine
Description:A lead mine in the northwest part of Prairie Township, on the Meramec River. It was so named for its position on the south side of the Meramec River. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 26; HIST. FRANKLIN, 9, 209; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Southwest Branch Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad and Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spinkle's Bluff Cave
Description:Located in Meramec State Park. It was so named for Winslow Spinkle, who lived across the river from the cave. (Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Bluff
Description:A post office in the southeast part of Boone Township. It was established in 1866, and discontinued in 1868, and reestablished in 1872. The office was originally known as Five Points because it was at the intersection of many roads. Spring Bluff was probably so named because of its location on a bluff above a spring. The name also appears as Springbluff. (Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 211; Miss Johnson: F.L. Notting)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Bluff School
Description:A school at Spring Bluff, for which it is named. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Creek
Description:Runs north along the western boundary of Meramec River, and empties into the Bourbeuse River. So named because it is fed by a notable spring. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205; Miss Johnson: Julian Pickles)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Creek Mills
Description:In the northwest part of Meramec Township on Spring Creek, for which it is named. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 17; HIST. FRANKLIN, 297)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Springbluff
Description:See Spring Bluff.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Springfield Road
Description:A public road which follows the Pacific Railroad from Pacific to Sullivan, and also one which runs from Jeffriesburg to Gerald via Beaufort and Leslie. No positive reason for its name has been found, but it was evidently so named for its terminus. (PROSPECTUS, Map I; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 195; Wadhington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Anthony's Catholic Church
Description:Located in Meramec Township. It was established in 1861 by Father Marrs, the first church building was built in 1862. Named for Saint Anthony (251-356?), one of the famous founders of monastic life. He was born in Egypt; his day is January 17. (Brewster 70-71; HIST. FRANKLIN, 344; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Bridget's Catholic Church
Description:In the eastern part of Boles Township, two miles north of Pacific. Organized in 1841 by Archbishop Kendrick of St. Louis. Named for Saint Bridget (453-523), patroness of Ireland. Her day is February 1. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 343; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Clair
Description:A town and station on the Frisco Railroad, in the central part of Central Township. The earliest name of the place was simply "The Ridge," given for its location. Later a wayside inn was opened there which enjoyed the catchy name of Traveler's (or Travellers) Repose, and on July 8, 1843, a post office under that name was established, with Joseph F. Funk and Braxton J. Inge as postmasters. By 1849 a village had grown up, and by 1859 the town was laid out on land belonging to William Kerr. When the railroad went through, on April 12, 1859, the name of the post office was changed to St. Clair, in honor of a resident civil engineer of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad, then known as the southwest Branch Railroad. (Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 14, 35; HIST. FRANKLIN, 333-4; Eaton; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 210; Miss Johnson: Joe Murphy)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Clair Mine
Description:A lead mine located on the same lode as the Virginia Mine. The name may have been given for the town. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Clair School
Description:A school at St. Clair, for which it is named. (Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Francis Borgia Catholic Church
Description:Located in Washington and organized in 1833 by Father Verhagen, S.J. The church was built in 1846 and named for St. Francis Borgia (1510-1572), Duke of Gandia and afterwards General of the Jesuit order. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 342; McClure, 18)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church
Description:Located in the east-central part of Prairie Township. It was organized in 1874 by the Vicar General of St. Louis and named for St. Francis Xavier (1506-1552), the great Spanish missionary and founder of the Society of Jesus. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 346; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Gertrude
Description:See Krakow and Henrietta.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Gertrude Catholic Church
Description:At Krakow; built about 1845. Named for the patron saint of Mrs. Gertrude Voss, whose husband had donated largely. It is permissible in the Catholic church to honor some especially generous patron by dedicating the church, not to the member, but to his or her patron or "name" saint. Mrs. Voss was doubtless named for St. Gertrude of Germany (1256-1311), surnamed "The Great," a learned mystic, whose day is November 15. The community around Krakow (q.v.) is sometimes called St. Gertrude, from the church or cemetery. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 16; HIST. FRANKLIN, 343; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194; Miss Johnson: Miss Agnes Neider; Father R.B. Schuler)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Gertrude Cemetery
Description:A Catholic cemetery near Krakow. It is doubtless named for the church. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 204)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. John the Baptist Catholic Church
Description:Near Villa Ridge. Named for St. John the Baptist (the forerunner of Christ), whose feast is celebrated on August 29. (CATH DIR., 149; Brewster, 286-7)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Johns
Description:A small village or settlement once located somewhere on St. Johns Creek. According to Kiel, when a post office was established there on August 30, 1833, it was on the upper part of the creek, in what is now the northeast part of Lyon Township. The post office was discontinued on July 29, 1840, and the place has so entirely disappeared that its exact location is uncertain. The earlier St. Johns Settlement, from which the village was doubtless descended, was probably nearer the mouth of the creek, a short distance west of the present Washington. It seems always to have been a scattered country community, and never became a place of any importance. Its insignificance probably accounts for the apparent mistake made on May 25, 1804, by the companies of Lewis and Clark in transferring the name to the village of La Charrette across the river in Warren County. The mistake is not made by Clark himself, or by Lewis, both of whom knew it as La Charrette or Charrette's village; but in the four other journals that are preserved, kept by subordinate members of the party, the place is called St. Johns. The four sergeants Floyd (Thwaites' ed., VII. 5), Whitehouse (Thwaites' ed., VII. 25), Gass (1847 ed., p. 15), and Ordway (Quaife's ed., p. 81) record the events of May 25 in almost identical words: After telling how they spent the night of May 23 encamped near Tavern Creek (q.v.) on the south side of the river, then occupied the whole day of May 24 in a difficult struggle with the rapid known as the Devil's Race-Ground, winning only ten miles during the day, and again encamping on the south side, they started out on the morning of Friday, May 25, and after passing the mouth of "a creek called Wood River" (i.e., on the north side) called St. Johns. This is the last settlement of whites on this River." The editors Coues, Thwaites, and Quaife accept these entries of the worthy sergeants as evidence that the Warren County village of La Charrette had previously borne the name of St. Johns, although they note that no other records survive of the use of the name on the north side of the river, whereas it was indubitably applied to a creek, an island, a village, and a township on the southern side. It may be observed that the almost identical wording of the four journals suggests that three of the entries were copied from the fourth, as we know was often the case among the Lewis and Clark diarists; hence we really have only a single witness to the name St. Johns for La Charrette, as against that of the two leaders Clark and Lewis. It is at least possible that these men, who had just passed close to the mouth of St. Johns Creek and perhaps also the St. Johns settlement on the south side, and near the St. Johns Islands (q.v.) as they crossed over, merely transferred the name to La Charette by pure inadvertence. Closely tied up with the question of whether the village of St. Johns was on the south or the north side of the river is that of the location of what must have been its predecessor, the Spanish "Fort San Juan del Misuri." Our information about the Spanish fort comes from Houck, who bases it apparently on a document from the Spanish archives which he unfortunately fails to quote in full. "Of this fort one Antonio Gautier, lieutenant of the militia, and who in 1796 was an inhabitant of St. Charles, had command. What manner of fort this San Juan del Misuri was, we do not know, nor whether the garrison was a squad of Spanish soldiers or composed of local militia; but most likely this fort was a small log-house built to protect the first settlers against the Indians" (Houck, HIST. MISSOURI, II, 91). In his SPANISH REGIME IN MISSOURI, Houck gives a little more information about the officer who was in command of the fort: he gives us the roster of St. Louis militia companies in 1780, and in the list appears (p. 184) the name "Antonio Gotie, twenty-six years old, born in Canada, rower." To this Houck adds a footnote (p. 190): "Antoine Gauthier married Elizabeth Becquet, widow of St. Joseph Chancelier. He moved to St. Charles, where he was an officer in the militia and in command of the Fort San Juan del Misuri above St. Charles, presumably where the village of Charette afterwards stood." Another document reproduced by Houck (p. 30) is a commission, dated July 9, 1793, to Don Antonio Gautier as Lieutenant in the militia at San Carlos del Misouri, granted by Baron de Carondelet." As for the location of his "Fort San Juan del Misuri" which is obviously not exactly given in the documents before him, Houck accepts La Charrette on the north side of the river. His only ground for doing so is the fact that Gass names the settlement "St. Johns" in his journal, although he notes with surprise that "All rememberance of Fort San Juan del Misuri in 1804 appears to have faded from the recollection of the people there" (HIST. MISSOURI II, 91). It would indeed have been strange if a fort in full operation in 1796 were already completely forgotton in 1804, and on the face of the facts we have it seems far more likely that the fort was south of the river, where it has left so large a crop of descendants. One other possibility may be suggested. Houck gives in his Spanish Regime in Missouri an account, taken from the Spanish archives, of a double fort erected by the Spanish at the mouth of the Missouri River on March 10, 1769: "the royal Spanish fort, Don Carlos el Senor Principe de Asturias, and of the blockhouse Don Carlos Tercero el Rey, both of which are located at the mouth of the Misuri--the first on the south bank, and the latter on the north bank." (p. 49). Might not the later "Fort San Juan del Misuri" have been a similar double fort or pair of blockhouses, one south of the Missouri at the mouth of the "Riviere St. Jean," and the other on the north side, somewhere near La Charrette? This would account for all the facts we have, and vindicate the sergeants from the imputation of error. A definitive solution of the whole problem must await the fuller publication of material from the Spanish archives. In any event, all the St. John names, on both sides of the river, must have been derived from the Fort. The name San Juan was doubtless chosen by the Spaniards in the same spirit as inspired the choice of San Carlos and San Fernando (q.v.): i.e., directly in honor of well known saints of the church, indirectly in honor of royal personages who also bore those names. Thus San Juan would be primarily named for the Apostle, secondarily for one of the many Johns in the royal lines of Spain or Portugal. The most likely candidate for such honor at this time was Don Juan of Austria (1547-1578), the famous Spanish general and victor at Lepanto, illegitimate son of the emperor Charles V. (L&C, & Pike, ed. Coues; L&C, & EWT, ed Thwaites; Gass's JOURNAL, 1847 ed.; Ordway's JOURNAL, ed. Quaife; Houck's HIST. MISSOURI & SPANISH REGIME; all with pp. as cited above; HIST. FRANKLIN, 217; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 210; Miss Johnson: George Klenke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Johns Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Lutheran Church in Lyon Township; organized in 1852. Cf. above. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 355)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Johns Church [2 of 2]
Description:A Catholic Church in the eastern part of Union Township. Named for the Apostle. (Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Johns Creek
Description:Rises in the northwest part of Union Township, and takes a winding course north and northeast through St. John's Township, emptying into the Missouri River just west of Washington. The original French form of the name was Riviere St. Jean. It is found on the newly discovered Evans (or Mackay) Map of 1795 or 1796 as "R. St. Jean," with the English form "River St. John" added below. The Perrin du Lac Map of 1802 has "R. St. Jean," and Pike's Map of about 1806 "St. Johns R." Undoubtedly the name was conferred by early French settlers, and almost certainly borrowed from that of the Spanish Fort San Juan del Misuri established sometime before 1796, and probably located at or near its mouth (see under Saint Johns). (Evans or Mackay, Map; Perrin du Lac; Pike Map; HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Miss Johnson: Charles Cole)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:In the northern part of Union Township, three miles north of Union. It was founded by the Germans in 1843 and named for the Apostle. (TRIBUNE, Nov. 29, 1918; Washington Library Records; Rev. G.A. Roedder)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Johns German Evangelical Church
Description:In the central-east part of Lyon Township. It was established by Reverend H. Grate in 1850. Cf. St. John's Church, above. According to the county history this was another St. John's Church in Lyon Township. The two must have been very close together. Four churches in all were dedicated to the Apostle in this part of the county, all located on or near St. Johns Creek. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 255; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. John's Island
Description:In the Missouri River along the northern bank of St. John's Township. Named for the stream. (COUNTY ATLAS 1898, 7)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Johns River
Description:See St. Johns Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Johns School
Description:See Gildehouse School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Johns Settlement
Description:See Saint Johns.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. John's Township
Description:Bounded on the north by the Missouri River and Washington Township, on the west by Boeuf and Lyon Townships, on the south by Union Township, and on the east by Boles Township. Kincaid Caldwell, who came here in 1803 was the first settler of the county. St. John's Township was established in 1819 as one of the four original townships. The name still lives but is applied to only a small part of the original St. John's Township. In 1866 St. John's Township was divided into Union and Washington Townships. In 1873 Washington Township was divided into the present St. John's and Washington Townships. In the years between 1866 and 1873, the name St. John's was not applied. Named for the creek. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 16; HIST. FRANKLIN, 232; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 233; Miss Johnson: Amos Heinke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Jordan's Evangelical Lutheran Church
Description:Located in the western part of Union Township. August Fink and John Fessner organized the church in 1856. It was named for the Jordan River in Palestine. It was called "St. Jordan" because it was regarded as the holy or sacred river. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 46; HIST. FRANKLIN, 352; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Joseph School
Description:See Neier School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Joseph's Catholic Church [1 of 2]
Description:In Meramec Township. It was established by Father Leseifoegel in 1849. Cf. above. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 345; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Joseph's Catholic Church [2 of 2]
Description:Another St. Joseph's Church, located near Neier, in the southwest part of Union Township. It was organized by Father M. Seisl, in 1848. For name, cf. above. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 43; HIST. FRANKLIN, 348; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Description:This well known railroad extends from St. Louis, Missouri into the states of Kansas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas, and from Kansas City to Memphis and Birmingham. It enters Franklin County at Pacific in the southeast part of Boles Township, runs southwest through Catawissa, Moselle, Stanton, and then to Sullivan in the extreme southern part of Meramec Township where it crosses into Crawford County. It had its origin in the Southwest Branch of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, which became the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad in 1876. It used the Missouri Pacific line to the Pacific until a line which runs almost parallel with the Missouri Pacific could be constructed. The Southwest Branch of the Pacific Railroad was chartered prior to 1855 and was so named for its southwesterly direction. In November, 1853, the final route of the road was located from Franklin, now Pacific, and thence to Newton County, a total distance of 320 miles from St. Louis. Construction started at Franklin in 1859, the road was completed to St. Clair in 1858, and it was opeend to Rolla in 1860. When it reached this latter destination, it was found that it was the most expensive road in the state, having cost $63,580 a mile. The railroad sold it to Governor John C. Fremont, "The Pathfinder," on May 12, 1866, and this sale was confirmed on March 17, 1868. The road was completed to Lebanon in 1867 and was to reach Newton County by 1872. The present name obviously records the original terminal and the intended destination for the road. It is popularly known as the Frisco. It was also known for many years as the Atlantic Pacific Railroad for its proposed eastern and western termini. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 207; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 188, 190 & map; Schultz, 109-111; R. & I. COMPENDIUM, May 29, 1941, 76; MHR, Oct. 1920, 146-153; Washington Library Records: Miss Welty's thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Louis, Kansas City and Colorado Railroad
Description:See Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Mary Magdalen's Catholic Church
Description:Located at New Haven and organized in 1863 by Father M. Seisl. Named for Mary Magdalen, a devoted disciple of Jesus. (LU. VIII, 2; JOHN XX, 1-18). (HIST. FRANKLIN, 346; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Patrick Catholic Church
Description:In the northeast part of Calvey Township, near Catawissa. It was organized by Father Peter Donnelly. The first church was built in 1840, near the Meramec River. Another church, more centrally located on land given by Mrs. Patrick McBrierty, was finished in 1867. It was named for St. Patrick, Apostle and patron saint of Ireland. (COUUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 345; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Patrick Catholic School
Description:A parochial school in the northeast part of Calvey Township, southeast of Catawissa. It was so named for the church. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194; Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Paul's Catholic Church
Description:At Berger Station in the northwest part of Boeuf Township. It was organized in 1874 by some members who had previously belonged to St. George's Church at Hermann. Cf. above. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 347; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Peter's Evangelical Church
Description:A church which was organized at Washington in 1844. The first building was erected in 1845 at Third and Lafayette Streets. Named for the Apostle. (McClure, 42, 43)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:St. Peters School
Description:A Catholic school located between Campbellton and Washington, near Villa Ridge, in Bouef or St. John's Township. Cf. above. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 194; Miss Johnson: George Klenke; Dr. O.F. Muench)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stanton
Description:A small mining community in the east central part of Meramec Township. It is the successor to a vanished town on a site a short distance to the south, originally called Reedville. Reedville was named for its founder, Dr. Silas Reed, a physician who was born in Ohio in 1810. He came out to Franklin County and became surveyor for Missouri. When the post office was established at Reedville on July 25, 1856, he was its only postmaster. A few months later in the same year, Dr. Reed discovered a very rich copper deposit nearby in the southern part of Meramec Township. These were given the name of the Stanton Copper Mines, for John Stanton, an Eastern man who had come out to Missouri and was proprietor of a powder mill in the vicinity. John Stanton had died a few years earlier, about 1850. On November 11, 1856, the name and location of the post office was changed to Stanton Copper Mines. August Wengler was the first postmaster, and was succeeded by Dr. Silas Reed. The first mine was opened in 1860 and the yield proved abundant. From 1865 to 1867 the town was one of the most flourishing in Franklin County. By 1868, however, deterioration set in, and the population steadily dwindled. In 1920 there was only one person, a renter, living at the former site of Reedville. Meanwhile another community began to grow up a short distance to the north. Charles Gallaher was the first white person to settle there. Bennett Thurmond built the first house in 1866. In 1868 a new town was platted by Theophile Papin, H.W. Leffingwell, R.S. Elliott, Sylvester Papin, and Henry T. Mudd, and given the name of Stanton, shortened from the name of the copper mines. A post office by the name of Stanton was finally established here on August 19, 1880, and has since remained. Also spelled Staunton. (Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 364; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 16; HIST. FRANKLIN, 338-9; Eaton; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 209; 211; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stanton Copper Mines
Description:See Stanton.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stanton Hill Bank
Description:A limonite ore deposit in the northwest part of Meramec Township, about one mile southeast of Stanton, for which it is probably named. (GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 191)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stanton School
Description:A school at Stanton, for which it is named. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Staunton
Description:See Stanton.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stoney Hill Church
Description:See Stony Hill Church.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stony Hill Church
Description:An Evangelical Church in the northwest part of Lyon Township, on the line between Franklin and Gasconade Counties. It was named for the post office, which is in Gasconade County. (See Mr. Weber's thesis). The name is also spelled Stoney Hill Church. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 195; Miss Johnson: H.M. Karstedtt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Strain
Description:A village in the west-central part of Boone Township. The post office was established in 1903, and discontinued in 1910. The name Central, a name of position, which was first proposed, was rejected because it was the name of a town in St. Louis County. J.E. Hulsey, the first postmaster at Strain, named the place after an active promoter, John M. Strain, who was the father of the last postmaster, Andrew J. Strain. The place is also known as Strain Community. John Murphy Strain was born on September 4, 1858 and died at Sullivan, Missouri, on March 12, 1934. He was a farmer, postmaster and storekeeper. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 211 & map; MISSOURI SURVEY MAP; SULLIVAN NEWS, Mar. 15 & 22, 1934; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Strain Community
Description:See Strain.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Strain School
Description:A school in the central part of Boone Township, at Strain, from which it received its name. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sullivan
Description:A town on the southern border of Meramec Township. Its earliest name was Mount Helicon, under which name a post office was established in 1856 and discontinued in 1860. Austin W. Clark was its only postmaster. The name is taken from Greek mythology, where it was celebrated as the seat of Apollo and the Muses. In ancient geography, it was a mountain range with a famous fountain in the Greek country of Boeotia. Doubtless the name was chosen with the hope that the little Missouri village would also become the abode of the Muses. In 1860 the name of the post office was changed to the more prosaic Sullivan. This was given by the Frisco Railroad for Stephen Sullivan, who had laid out a new town close to the site of Mount Helicon, had given the land for the depot, and had built the station himself. Sullivan met a violent death during the War. In some Civil War records the name Sullivan's Station is used. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 355; Eaton; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 206, 211; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: Benton Dill; Stephen Sullivan)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sullivan School
Description:A school which takes its name from its location at Sullivan. (Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.O. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sullivan Switch
Description:A high point one mile west of Pacific. No positive identification of the name has been made, although it is found frequently as a surname in the county. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 204; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 91)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sullivan's Station
Description:See Sullivan.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sulphur Hill
Description:A spring at the base of Ferrar's Hill, on the Meramec River, in the southwest part of Central Township. It is so named for its mineral content. (Swallow, 28)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sweets School
Description:See Villa Ridge School.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sycamore School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Prairie Township, near Little Meramec River. It is so named for its location in a sycamore grove. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tam Mine
Description:See Tamm Mine.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tamm Mine
Description:A lead mine in the western part of Central Township, five miles west of St. Clair, on the Bourbeuse River. It was earlier known as the Hamilton Mine for P.B. Hamilton, its former owner. Mr. Hamilton was born in St. Louis County in 1833, came to Franklin County in 1840 and died in 1892. The name was changed to Tamm Mine in 1915 when Mr. Henry Hamilton sold the mine to Mr. Tamm. Tamm Mine (sometimes spelled Tam) was named for Max Tamm (1842-1920), a native of Germany who came from St. Louis to Franklin County in 1915. (Foster & Swallow, map; HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Miss Johnson: Henry Hamilton; A.C. Beasley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Taney Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the southwest part of Calvey Township, and flows into the Meramec River. It is probably named for Roger Brooke Taney (1777-1864), Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from 1836 to 1864, who issued the famous Dred Scott Case in 1857. Taney County, Missouri, was named for him in 1837 (see Miss Bell's thesis). The name is misspelled Tanzy Creek in the COUNTY ATLAS. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 19; Miss Johnson: Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tanzy Creek
Description:See Taney Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tavern
Description:See Tavern Rock Cave.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tavern Cave
Description:See Tavern Rock Cave.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tavern Cove
Description:See Tavern Rock Cave.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tavern Creek
Description:See Big Tavern Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tavern Rock [1 of 2]
Description:A famous landmark on the Missouri River in the northeast corner of Boles Township. It is a precipitous bluff overhanging the river, about 300 ft. high, containing at its base Tavern Rock Cave (q.v.), from which it is named. Captain Meriwether Lewis ascended it on May 24, 1804, and barely escaped a dangerous fall from the cliff. (L&C I, 27; Ed. Thwaites; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 195)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tavern Rock [2 of 2]
Description:A siding or station on the Rock Island Railroad between Port Royal and St. Albans in Boles Township. Named for the famous landmark Tavern Rock (q.v.) which is nearby. (L&C I, 27, ed. Thwaites; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 195; Miss Johnson; Charles Becker)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tavern Rock Cave
Description:A large cave at the base of Tavern Rock (q.v.) opening on the Missouri River. So named because it was a famous stopping place for the French and later boatmen and voyageurs ascending the river or returning home. Before the white man came it seems to have been considered a sacred spot or shrine of some sort by the Indians. It attracted the particular attention of all the men on the Lewis and Clark Expedition, which halted there on May 23, 1904. Clark's account of it as follows: "Wednesday, May 23. We passed a large Cave on the Lbd Side Called by the french the Tavern--about 120 feet wide 40 feet Deep and 20 feet high--many different immages are Painted on the Rock at this place the Inds. & French pay omage Many names are wrote on the rock. Stoped about one mile above for Capt. Lewis who had assended the Clifts which is at the Said Cave 300 feet high--hamging over the waters... Capt Lewis near falling from the Pinecles of rocks 300 feet, he caught at 20 foot" (Thwaites I, 27) Elsewhere (Thwaites VI., 56) Captain Clark states that the "Cave Called the Tavern" is exactly forty-seven miles up the Missouri River from its mouth. Much the same description appears in the journals kept by Sergeant Whitehouse (Thwaites VII., 31) and Sergeant Floyd (Thwaites VII., 5), who adds that after leaving the Tavern they proceeded "one mile to a Creek Called Tavern creek and encamped on the South Side." Sergeant Gass, in his journal published separately, calls it the "Tavern Cove-- a noted place among the French traders. One mile above this is the Tavern Creek" (p. 14). A later traveler, John Bradbury, passed the place on March 16, 1811, and writes as follows in his TRAVELS (ed. by Thwaites, EWT V., 41): "We this day passed the Tavern Rocks, so called from a large cave therein, level with the surface of the river. These rocks are nearly three hundred feet high." To this Thwaites adds the footnote: "This cave is noted by all early travelers. The French traders had scrawled names upon its walls, and painted images thereupon, which the Indians regarded with superstitious awe. It appears to have taken its name from being a well-known lodging or camping place." Similar accounts are given by H.M. Brackenridge, 1811, and Edmund Flagg, 1838, as well as practically every other traveler up the Missouri. One of the later accounts is of special interest as possibly preserving the earlier French name for Tavern Rock Cave. The German traveler, Prince Maximilian Wied, who went up the river in 1832, writes as follows: "We reached Isle au Bon Homme, in the vicinity of which we passed the night. On the twelfth of April, the original forms of the calcareous rocks again appeared...A cavern at this place is called the Tavern Rock (Taverne de Montardis)...The walls of this cave contain many inscriptions of names and rude pictures of birds and beasts, the latter of which are the works of the red man." (EWT, XXII., 239). Light on the meaning of the name "Taverne de Montardis" is thrown by documents quoted in Houck's SPANISH REGIME IN MISSOURI. On p. 183 of vol. I, Don Pedro Montardy is listed as Sub-Lieutenant in the roster of St. Louis militia companies in the year 1780, and Houck gives the following note about him: Pierre or Pedro Montardy, a native of Montauban, France. In 1765 he married Marie Theresa Duchemin at St. Anne de Chartres...He was a merchant, and the lot he owned in St. Louis was subsequently acquired by Auguste Chouteau. There is no records as to where and when he died." Don Pierre Montardy is mentioned again on October 29, 1780 (see Houck I., 241) as an officer in orders signed by Lieutenant Governor Don Francisco Cruzat. The way in which the name of this Frenchman in the Spanish service might have become attached to a "tavern" in a river-side cave is parallelled by the case of Montbrun's Tavern in what is now Callaway County, a cave in the bluffs near the mouth of Big Tavern Creek. This is also a very old place name, on the Evans (or Mackay?) Map of 1795, and mentioned by Lewis and Clark, as well as by Gass, who spells it "Mombran's Tavern." There can be no doubt that this cave-tavern was the property of another French officer, mentioned in Houck's SPANISH REGIME, I., 198, as Don Esteban Boucher de Mombrun, who is specially commended in a letter to Governor Cruzat for his help in winning the friendhsip of the Sac tribe. For a similar cave on the Osage River, at the mouth of another Big Tavern Creek in Miller County, see the note in Mr. Weber's thesis: "In each case the cave at the mouth of the creek was known in early days as The Tavern because travelers on the river often spent the night in them in bad weather." Our Franklin County cavern appears on Pike's map, marked simply, "A cave," and also on the Evans (or Mackay?) Map of 1795, marked "Taverns--a cave." For the mistaken notion that there was a Tavern Cave near this point on the north or St. Charles side of the river, see the discussion under Big Tavern Creek. (Evans, or Mackay Map; L&C, pp. Noted; Gass, 14; Pike Map; EWT V., 41; VI., 43; XXII, 239; XXVI, 76; Houck's SPANISH REGIME, pp. noted; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 195; Mr. Weber's thesis)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tavern Rock Creek
Description:See Big Tavern Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tavern Rocks
Description:See Tavern Rock Cave.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tavern School
Description:In the northeast part of Boles Township, near Tavern Rock, for which it is named. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Charles Becker)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Taverne
Description:See Tavern Rock Cave.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Taverne de Montardis
Description:See Tavern Rock Cave.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:The Ridge
Description:See St. Clair.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Thomas Mines
Description:A great number of horizontal lead mines in the southwest part of Prairie Township, so named for a recent owner. They are the oldest mines and the first discovered lead mines in the county. They were found by Gabriel Cerie in 1787. To this group belong the following: Clark and Appleton Mine, Reed Mine, Coe Mine, Harrington Mine, Read Hill Mine, Enloe, Darby, Woods and Christy, and Gallagher (later Halligan) Mines, all of which are apparently names of personal origin. In this group was also included the Silver Hollow Mine and the Gopher Mine, which were doubtless descriptive names. (Foster & Swallow, map; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8; HIST. FRANKLIN, 209; Miss Johnson: E.H. Hoff)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Traveler's Repose
Description:See St. Clair.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Travellers Repose
Description:See St. Clair.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union
Description:The county seat of Franklin County, on the Bourbeuse River in the southeast part of Union Township, fifty-five miles from St. Louis. It has been the county seat since 1827, replacing Newport (q.v.), which had enjoyed that distinction since 1818, when Franklin County was first organized. By an act of December 11, 1818, David Edwards; Philip Boulware, Sr., William Laughlin, David B. Moore, and William Harrison were appointed commissioners to locate a permanent seat of justice. These men were also appointed as commissioners of the county courthouse and jail. The town of Newport was selected, and here court was held until 1826 when it was removed. By an act of January 22, 1825, John Brown, of St. Louis County; Benjamin Horine, of Washington County; and William T. Lamie, of Montgomery, were appointed to select a permanent seat of justice near the center of the county. Barnabas Strickland, Moses Whitmire, and Bracket Barnes were made commissioners of the courthouse and jail. The commissioners of the county seat were ordered to meet at the house of Joseph Welch on or before March 10, 1825. Union was selected, laid out in 1826 by Bracket Barnes and Moses Whitmire, on land of Reuben Harrison and Nathan Richardson, and finally made county seat on January 22, 1827. The post office was established at Union in the same year. Preston G. Rules was its first postmaster. Union, next to Liberty, is the most precious of all ideals to Americans and a favorite place name throughout the nation. In this case, after the dispute over location of the county seat, it was perhaps felt to be particularly appropriate. (Session Act, 1825; Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 21-2; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union and Washington Road
Description:See Union and Washington Rock Road.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union and Washington Rock Road
Description:A road which connects Union and Washington via Henrietta and Krakow. Also known as Union Road and Union and Washington Road. Obviously named for its termini. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 39; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 195)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union Chapel
Description:In the western part of Boone Township. An ideal name. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 50)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union Road
Description:See Union and Washington Rock Road.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union School [1 of 2]
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Union Township, for which it is named. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union School [2 of 2]
Description:Another Union School at Union, from which it takes its name. (Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union Township
Description:This township, which was organized on December 14, 1866, and named for the town, is bound on the north by St. John's Township, on the west by Lyon Township, on the southwest by Boone Township, on the south by Meramec Township, on the southeast by Central Township, and on the east by Boles Township. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13, 16; HIST. FRANKLIN, 237; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 232; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:United School
Description:In the northeast part of Lyon Township. It is so named because of the unity of the people of the community in securing the school. (83RD REPORT; Supt's Records; Miss Johnson: F.W. Schroeder)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Upper Bottom School
Description:In the northwest part of Boeuf Township. Originally there was but one school, known as Bottom School, established about 1868 to serve the entire Missouri River bottom along the northern edge of Boeuf Township. Later, because the territroy included was too large, the Bottom district was divided into two parts, Upper Bottom School to serve the upper northwest part, and Lower Bottom School for the lower or northeast part. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: S.A. Hall)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Usher Diggings
Description:See Usher's Diggings.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Usher Mine
Description:A mine which was in the same vicinity as Enterprise Mine (q.v.). The name is doubtless personal in origin as a man of that name did considerable prospecting in this section. (Swallow, 29-30; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 8)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Usher's Diggings
Description:An old galena mine in the southwest part of Central Township. It is also known as Usher Diggings. The name is doubtless personal in origin because a Mr. Usher prospected in this region. (Swallow, Map IV, 29-30)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Vault Store
Description:A store in the southern part of Lyon Township. The name may be personal in origin. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 55)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Villa Ridge
Description:See Villaridge.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Villa Ridge School
Description:In the southwest part of Boles Township. Formerly named Sweets School, for R.S. Sweets, on whose property it was located. Later when it was moved to Villaridge it was renamed for the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Villaridge
Description:A town and station on the Rock Island Railroad, in the southwest part of Boles Township. The post office has been established since 1889. The name was chosen by Mr. Emmerson, who was supervising the building of the railroad, for its location on a ridge that forms the watershed between the Meramec and Missouri Rivers, will Villa-prefixed for town. Locally, and in some postal records, the name is written Villa Ridge, as two separate words. The site of the town was later changed to a nearby valley, but the original name was left. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 212 & map; Miss Johnson; Miss Martha May Wood; G.H. Merton; J.W. Reynolds)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Virginia Lead Mine
Description:See Virginia Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Virginia Mine
Description:A former post office and mining center near the site of the Virginia Mines (q.v.). The post office was first established on February 13, 1838, with Daniel Conn as the first postmaster. It was discontinued in 1856, and reestablished in 1871, to be finally discontinued on February 11, 1876. Samuel B. Skeel was the only postmaster during the second period. (Davis & Durrie, 365; Campbell, 205; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 212 & map; Miss Johnson: Joe Murphy)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Virginia Mines
Description:These galena mines, in the southeast part of Central Township, were struck by Mr. Bundrage and Mr. Williamson in 1832 or 1834. They are said to be the first mines discovered in Franklin County. They were run by an English company, and Queen Victoria is said to have owned stock in them. Mr. Bundrage named them for his daughter Virginia; the choice of name was suggested by the fact that it was a "virgin" mine. The name appears in some authorities as the Virginia Mine, the Virginian Mine, and Virginia Lead Mines. (Foster & Swallow, map; Davis & Durrie; 365; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 13; HIST. FRANKLIN, 208; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 212; Schultz, 127; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: Joe Murphy)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Virginian Mine
Description:See Virginia Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Voss Creek
Description:Rises in the southern part of Union Township and flows southeast into the Bourbeuse River. It is so named for an early settler, probably Dietrich Voss, who built the Voss Mill near here, later Noser Mill (q.v.). (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 43; HIST. FRANKLIN, 205)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Voss Mill
Description:See Noser Mill.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Walbert
Description:A post office in the western part of Boone Township. It was established in 1895 and discontinued in 1910. Ulrich K. Baur, a merchant, was its first postmaster. His sons were named Walter and Herbert; and the first syllable of Walter's name and the second syllable of Herbert's name were combined into Walbert, which was made the name of the place. (Postal Guide; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 212 & map; Miss Johnson: F.L. Notting)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Walbert School
Description:In the west-central part of Boone Township, earlier known as Semple School in honor of Herman Semple, who lived nearby. It was later renamed Walbert School when it was moved near the site of the town. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: F.L. Notting)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Warrensville
Description:See Warrenville.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Warrenville
Description:A small community near Robertsville (q.v.) which has now disappeared. It was named for Robert E. Warren, postmaster and merchant at Calvey and Gray Summit. The name is sometimes written as Warrensville. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 94; LANDS & HOMES, 5; Miss Johnson: Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Washington
Description:A town on the Missouri River, now coextensive with Washington Township (q.v.), a municipal township which is located on the northern border of St. John's Township. It has had a long history and has enjoyed a remarkable variety of names. The earliest recorded settlement was made here by John Long, a Revolutionary War veteran, who claimed 5,000 arpents along Du Bois Creek, on a concession from the famous French explorer and traveler Jean Baptiste Trudeau. This must have been shortly after the American occupation. Long also claimed large tracts of land along St. John's Creek, a small part of which is now included in the city of Washington. As early as 1822 there was a boat landing on the site which came to be known as Washington Landing. John Caldwell was licensed to keep a ferry here on August 22, 1822. A small trade was carried on at the ferry landing, out of which grew a small hamlet, including a store and several dwellings. Settlement is said to have begun as early as 1815. John Caldwell may have been responsible for naming the place for George Washington (1732-1799), but the name of the father of the country was especially popular at the time and was being adopted as a place name in every state in the Union. Here it was destined eventually to carry the day over a number of rivals. Meanwhile a man arrived in the neighborhood who is spoken of by contemporaries as "the founder of Washington." William G. Owens, a Kentuckian, was born on November 5, 1796. He was educated to be a lawyer. In 1815 he married Lucinda Young, and in 1818 came to Franklin County, settling first at New Port, now Dundee. He was the first clerk of the county after it was organized in 1818. He owned the property on which the future town was to be located, and before his death there is evidence that he had begun to plan and plot the townsite. His plans, however, were abruptly cut short when he was shot in a duel on November 16, 1834. Nearly at the same time a neighboring community was rising just a short distance east of Washington Landing, settled largely by Polish immigrants, which chose for itself the name of Bassora. It was plotted on October 5, 1836, and a post office under the name of Bassora was established there on November 1, 1837. The origin of the name is uncertain. It hardly seems possible that it was borrowed from the ancient Turkish city of Bassora, now Basra, the chief seaport of modern Iraq on the Persian Gulf. Mr. Kiel suggests that it was coined from the name Bass, a member of a real estate firm at Union, by addition of the suffix -ora. This method of coining names does occur, by the process known as "clipping;" e.g. Laddonia from Ladd by adding -onia, clipped from such names as Caldonia or Livonia, or Peytonia, Columbia, Centralia, formed with the very common suffix-ia, as in Virginia; so Bassora might have been modeled on such names as Angora or Pechora. The difficulty is to authenticate Mr. Bass; if the place was named for him, it is strange that he is not included among the men who laid out the town, listed as George Morton, William Walker, Andrew King and Baldwin King. On the whole, however, Mr. Kiel's explanation is preferable to supposing that the name was a Turkish borrowing. The village of Bassora was not destined to a long life as a separate community. The post office was discontinued on April 4, 1840, evidently having been absorbed by the adjoining town of Washington. The name is still used, however, for the eastern section of Washington. The nickname of Goosetown for that section was inspired by the large number of geese raised by the Polanders. On April 3, 1837, the post office of Washington was established, and since 1840 has superseded all other names. The town was laid off, on the property of Mrs. Lucinda Owens, in 1839, and incorporated in 1841. It was obviously shortened from Washington Landing, the older name of the settlement, which neither William nor Lucinda Owens apparently wished to change. Some wanted to call the place New Washington, but it was so called only for a short time. More persistent was the name Owensville, for the founders, Mr. and Mrs. Owens, and it is said that this was long used as a sort of nickname for Washington. (Hayward; Goodwin; Postal Guide; COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 37; HIST. FRANKLIN, 230, 301; Eaton; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 197, 212-13; INT. ENCYC.; McClure, 5-7, 9; PLAT BK. A, 19; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: Kiel (letter)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Washington Landing
Description:See Washington.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Washington School
Description:A school at Washington, from which it receives its name. (Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: Dr. O.F. Muench; O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Washington Township
Description:The limits of this township are at present the same as those of the town of Washington (q.v.). It once, however, included all the territory in the northern part of the county now comprised in both Washington and St. John's Townships. The original St. John's Township (q.v.), organized in 1819, was divided on December 14, 1866, into two townships, Union and Washington, and thereby vanished from the map. It was restored, however, on August 7, 1873, when Washington Township was reduced to a separate municipal township, kept only for voting purposes, and the rest of it was made into the present St. John's Township. Washington Township was named of course, for the town. (Davis & Durrie, 365; COUNTY ATLAS, 1878, 13, 17; HIST. FRANKLIN, 237; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 213; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Whistling Cave
Description:An unusual cave in the northwest part of Central Township. It is so named because high water sometimes forces a current of air through an aperture, creating a whistling sound. (Swallow, Map XI, 43)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wicker Mine
Description:A lead mine in the southwest part of Central Township, five miles west of St. Clair. It was so named for its owner, a Mr. Wicker, who lived in Ohio and never moved here after he purchased the mine. (COUNTY ATLAS 1878, 26; HIST. FRANKLIN, 209)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wildcat Cave
Description:In the Meramec State Park. It was so named for the wildcats and catamounts formerly trapped in this cave. (Miss Johnson: Benton Dill)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Winch Creek
Description:A tributary of the Meramec River somewhere in Calvey Township. It is said to have been named for an Indian who was drowned in it. This story was confirmed, says Kiel, by Miss Margaret Agnes Turnball, who was consulted by him in 1916. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 196; Washington Library Records; Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Windsell Creek
Description:Rises near Sullivan and flows into Spring Creek west of Stanton. It was named for a settler who lived near the stream. (Miss Johnson: Charles Ripley)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wood River
Description:See Dubois Creek.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Woodland School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Calvey Township. It was named for a family who lived nearby. (83RD REPORT; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson: G.B. Zumwaldt)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Woods and Cristy Mine
Description:See Thomas Mines.
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Woods School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Boles Township. It was named for Charley Woods (or Wood), who came to Franklin County from Virginia and owned the land where the school was built. (83RD REPORT; Supt's Records; Miss Johnson: O.E. Burke)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wood's Summit
Description:A high elevation five miles east of Union on the St. Louis Rock Road. The origin of the name has not been discovered. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 204)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wortman's Store
Description:A store at Beemont in the extreme western part of Lyon Township. It was named for Frederick Wortmann, who was proprietor of the place from 1867-1888. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 96; Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Youngs Mills [1 of 2]
Description:A post office once located in the southwest part of Meramec Township. Its earliest name was Molino, established in 1856 and discontinued in 1857. The only postmaster for Molino was Isaac N. Young. The name chosen is the Spanish word for mill. The reference to the postmasters enterprise was made more explicit in 1858, when the name of the post office was changed to Youngs Mills. It was finally discontinued in 1867. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 206, 213; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Youngs Mills [2 of 2]
Description:A mill in the southwest part of Meramec Township. It was named for Isaac N. Young. On November 1, 1862, the mill became the property of the Spring Creek Woolen Manufacturing Company. (Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 213)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Zark Mines
Description:A mine listed by the Washington Library Records, but not located. It was opened about 1915 and employed about twenty men. The origin of the name could not be discovered. (Washington Library Records)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ziegenmeyer's School
Description:In the central part of St. John's Township. It was named for Louis F. Ziegenmeyer, a teacher of distinction and a farmer of Lyon Township. He was born in Brunswick, Germany, in 1840, came to the United States in 1858, and taught until 1865. (HIST. FRANKLIN, 351; 83RD REPORT; Kiel's BIOG. DIR., 196; Supt's. Records; Miss Johnson)
Source:Harrison, Eugenia L. "Place Names Of Four River Counties In Eastern Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Go back to the top of the page | View other place names