Dunklin County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Allen Island
Description:An island in the southwest part of Independence Township, and the western part of Salem Township, which is formed during rainy seasons by the spread of St. Francois River. It was named for John P. Allen, who came to the county in 1878. (Jones, T.G. Douglass, Goodspeed's Biography)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen Island School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Salem Township, established since 1910, on Allen Island (cf. above) from which it is named. (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the western part of Buffalo Township, established in 1867 and named for the church at Antioch. (cf. above) (Jones, Duncan, 383)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Buffalo Township, which was named from Antioch Baptist Church. (cf. above) (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Arbyrd
Description:A small village in the southern part of Clay Township where a post office was established in 1915. It was named by Louis Houck by combining the initials and the last name of Mr. A.R. Byrd into the name Arbyrd. Mr. Byrd owned the land in this neighborhood. (Houck's Mss., Harrison, Smith, T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atlantic and Pacific Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Austin School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Salem Township, which was named for the Austin family who were prominent farmers in the community when the school was established about 1900. It has been discontinued. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bach
Description:See Clarkton.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baird
Description:A small community in the eastern part of Cotton Hill Township, established about 1910, and named for Martin V. Baird, who operated a sawmill there. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baker School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Cotton Hill Township, established between 1890-1900, and named for Fred Baker, a wealthy pioneer who owned most of the land in the northern part of the county. (Cox, Smith, T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bark Camp
Description:See Bark Camp School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bark Camp Church
Description:A rural Christian Church in the western part of Buffalo Township, organized in 1893 and named, as was Bark Camp School (q.v.), for a hunter's camp made of cypress bark. (HIST. DUNKLIN 76, T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bark Camp School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Buffalo Township, which was established about 1890. Bark Camp, from which the school took its name, was a hunter's camp made of cypress bark. The bark of the cypress trees comes off in long strips, and thus lends itself readily to covering framework. Many of the outbuildings were covered with this bark.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beech
Description:See Clarkton
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beech Corner School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Independence Township, which was organized between 1890-1900. It was named for a large beech tree, a well known landmark, which grows there and for the location at the corner made by the crossing of two roads. (T.G. Douglass, Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beech Grove Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the center part of Independence Township, which was organized in 1892-1893, and named for its location in a grove of beech trees. (Cox, HIST. DUNKLIN 18-19)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beechwell Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the southern part of Freeborn Township, organized in 1869 by Reverend Elonzo Fowler, though it is probably an outgrowth of the Beechwell Church organized in 1850 which became the Oak Grove Church (q.v.). It is said to have been named from a grove of beech trees in the neighborhood. (HIST. DUNKLIN 68-9, Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beechwell General Baptist Church
Description:See Oak Grove Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethany Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the northwestern part of Union Township, organized before 1894 and named by the founders. (cf. above) (HIST. DUNKLIN 69, 145, ENCY. BRIT.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A rural Christian Church in the northern part of Union Township, organized prior to 1881 and named by the founders. Bethel means "House of God." It was at Bethel that Abraham pitched his tent and built an altar; Jacob saw his vision: the ark of the covenant was placed; and which became the royal and national shrine for the northern kingdom. (Goodspeed 556, HIST. DUNKLIN 76, Gen. 28:10, 8:8, Judges 20:7, I Kings 12, Amos 7, ENCY. BRIT.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Union Township, organized about 1890 and named from Bethel Church. (cf. above) (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bible Grove Church
Description:A rural Christian Church in the southwest part of Independence Township, organized about 1890 and named for the Bible and a grove of trees in the churchyard. (HIST. DUNKLIN 76, Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Branum's Point
Description:A settlement in the southern part of Clay Township, which was made by Michael Branum in 1830; a post office was maintained in 1904. The rural school at this place, named for Jeff Branum, a descendant of the pioneer, was moved into Hornersville when Mr. Kinsolving purchased the land about 1910, and now nothing remains to mark the site of this, one of the oldest settlements in the county. (Eubanks, Mrs. Branum)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brian
Description:A discontinued post office in the northern part of Holcomb Township. The post office was established in 1910 and named for the Brian family, landowners and mill operators. It was discontinued in 1915, after the timber business was exhausted. (Cox, Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridges Creek
Description:A small creek in the southern part of Union Township on which A.D. Bridges settled in 1844, at the place which became known as Four Mile. The creek was named for Mr. Bridges. It has been drained since 1898. (Douglass I 307, HIST. DUNKLIN 40, Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brown's Ferry
Description:A ferry on the St. Francois River in the western part of Holcomb Township, which was named for the man who operated the ferry. Later a bridge was built to take the place of the ferry and was called Brown's Ferry Bridge. (County Court Record, Jones, Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brown's Ferry Bridge
Description:See Brown's Ferry.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bryan
Description:A post office maintained from 1910-1918 in the western part of Union Township. It was named by Dr. Columbus "Lum" Pollock for William Jennings Bryan. (Medley, Welty)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck Donic
Description:A school and community in the southwest part of Buffalo Township. Buck is a variation of Beech, and Donic is a form of donock or Dornick, a Missouri localism for boulder. (See Appendix for Americanisms). The name was suggested by a beech tree among the rocks or boulders of this locality. (Map of County, Karnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bucoda
Description:A small settlement in the western part of Salem Township. The first name was Byrds, named for Mr. A.R. Byrd, who owned a large tract of land in this neighborhood. A post office under the name Byrds was maintained from 1896-1915. In 1915 when Louis Houck, who was building a railroad through this region, named Arbyrd, Mr. Byrd objected to this double use of his name, and a new name had to be adopted for Byrds, which was the terminal of Houck's Railroad. A name was coined by using the first two syllables of the names of Messers Buchanan, Coburn, and Davis, who were farmers on Mr. Byrd's property. A post office was maintained from 1918-1929. (Westmorland, Crawford, Houck's Mss., T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buffalo Creek
Description:A small creek in the southern part of Buffalo Township, which empties into Little River and which, like Buffalo Island (q.v.), was named for the herds of buffalo which inhabited this region. (M.H.R. 7:188, HIST. DUNKLIN 18, Douglass I 231)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buffalo Island
Description:An island in the western part of Buffalo Township formed during high water seasons by Buffalo Creek and St. Francois River. It was named by James Baker and Wiley Clark, early settlers, for the buffalo herds they found there in 1833. (Douglass I 307, HIST. DUNKLIN 26, Crawford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buffalo Township
Description:In the southwest part of the county; organized in 1845 and named for Buffalo Creek. (q.v.) (Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Byrds
Description:See Bucoda.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Campbell
Description:A small town in the center part of Union Township at the junction of the Cottonbelt Raulroad and the Frisco. It was settled by Major Rayburn and others who moved from Four Mile in order to be located near a railroad. Four Mile was settled by A.D. Bridges in 1844, and was named from Four Mile Island (q.v.). Major Rayburn and railroad officials laid out the town in 1886, and named it for Alexander Campbell, Rayburn's friend, who was one of the members of the first county court. (HIST. DUNKLIN 107, M.H.R. 11:164, Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canaan Cemetery
Description:See Canaan Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canaan Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church, with a cemetery in the churchyard, in the southwest part of Cotton Hill Township on Canaan Island (q.v.), from which the church is named. In 1862 the Cumberland Presbyterians organized a church here. They disbanded in 1890 and the Methodists used the building. (T.G. Douglass, HIST. DUNKLIN 71)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canaan Island [1 of 2]
Description:A small island in flood seasons when the waters of the St. Francois River spread out over this region. It was settled about 1880, and named by the early settlers who felt that this was an opportunity to become wealthy; that is, this was the land of Canaan. Canaan was the "Promised Land" which God had alotted to Abraham and his seed, a land "flowing with milk and honey." The etymology of the word is unknown. (HIST. DUNKLIN 26, Gen. 12:7, 13, 15. Exod. 3:8, Deut. 12:9)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canaan Island [2 of 2]
Description:See Gibson.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Union Township, drained since 1900, which was named from the cane growing on the banks of the creek. (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Creek School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Union Township, which was named from Cane Creek (q.v.) when it was organized in 1905. (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caneer School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Salem Township, which was organized about 1898 and named for the family of J.I. and W.T. Caneer who are prominent landowners in the community. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cardwell
Description:A small town in the southern part of Buffalo Township located on Buffalo Island at the terminus of the Paragould and Southeast Railroad. It was laid out in 1895 by the Bertig Brothers of Paragould, Arkansas and named for Frank Cardwell, cashier of the bank of Paragould, who helped finance the project. (HIST. DUNKLIN 101, M.H.R. 11, 165, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caruth
Description:A small village in the northern part of Clay Township, settled in 1881 by William Saterfield, in the heart of Grand Prairie and named for Caruth of the firm of Caruth and Byrns Hardware Company of St. Louis, Missouri. (Douglass 307)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carver Switch
Description:A switch on the Cottonbelt Railroad just east of Malden in the eastern part of Cotton Hill Township, which was named for Mr. Carver, a mill operator for the Anderson Lumber Company. (M.S. Anderson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Case School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Holcomb Township, which was organized about 1900 and named for the Cass family, prominent members of the community. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chilletecaux River
Description:A small river in the central part of the county near Kennett. It was named for an Indian chief, Chilletecaux, who had a village here before the coming of the white man, and who remained in the county until 1834. Formerly this name was applied to the entire stream, but now the upper part of the river is Varner's River. (q.v.) (HIST. DUNKLIN 40, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chillitecaux
Description:See Kennett.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cholohollay River
Description:See St. Francois River.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clarkton
Description:A town in the northern part of Independence Township. The first settlement was known as Beech, named for the beech trees there. Eaton and Douglass say the first post office was Bach, but there is no local evidence of this. The Beech post office was discontinued in 1873, having been maintained since 1867. In 1876 a town was laid out about one-fourth mile south of the site of Beech and named Clarkton in honor of Henry E. Clark, contractor of the Plant Road which was built from Clarkton to Weaversville in New Madrid County. (Douglass I 286, Campbell 200, HIST. DUNKLIN 106, Houck Mss., Postal Guide, Niceley, Goodwin, Goodard, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clay Township
Description:In the southeast part of the county. The records of the county court were burned in 1872, but it is probable that this is one of the original townships, and was named for Henry Clay. (cf. above) (Goodspeed 358-9, Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cockrum
Description:A small village in the southwest part of Buffalo Township where a post office was maintained in 1904 and named for J.C. Cockrum, a landowner. A settlement had been made here as early as 1850 by Pleasant Cockrum and James Baker. (HIST. DUNKLIN 39, ENCY. HIST. OF MISSOURI, Bryant, Eubanks)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coon Island
Description:See Treasure Island.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cotton Hill
Description:See Malden.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cotton Hill Township
Description:In the northeast part of the county; one of the original townships created in 1845 when the county was organized and named for the old trading post or settlement of Cotton Hill, which became Malden. (q.v.) (Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cotton Plant
Description:A small village in the central part of Clay Township. This place originally had its beginning in a store built by Judge E.J. Langdon and Billy O. Williams in 1848 at the time of the building of the levee on Buffalo Creek. Just when it took this name is not certain. It is said to have been spoken of as Cotton Plant by a stranger who, on coming into the county, noticed around it the only cotton plants in that part of the county. Douglass says it was so named because it was the center of the cotton industry in that part of Missouri. (Goodspeed 474, HIST. DUNKLIN 103, Douglass' Letter)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cottonbelt Railroad
Description:A railroad which enters new Madrid County from Dunklin County on the west and branches at Lilbourn, formerly Pawpaw Junction, one tract going to New Madrid and the other to Bird's Point in Mississippi County. This branch of the Cottonbelt system was first incorporated as the Little River Valley and Arkansas Railroad in 1876 with the purpose of building a railroad from New Madrid through Malden and Kennett (in Dunklin County); that is, through the Little River Valley, to the Arkansas state line. The road was finished from New Madrid to Malden in 1878 by Otto Kochtitsky and George B. Clark. In 1881 it was extended to the state line of Arkansas and consolidated with the Texas and St. Louis Railroad Company of Missouri and Arkansas. In 1882 the branch was built from Lilbourn to Bird's Point. The line went into the hands of the receiver, Mr. Fordyce, in 1886 and was reorganized as the St. Louis, Arkansas and Texas Railroad in order to extend the road to Texarkana, Texas. In 1890 the railroad was again sold and reorganized under the title St. Louis Southwestern Railroad Company, and in 1893 it became known as the Cottonbelt Route, because it has its terminal in Texas, in the cottonbelt of the United States. (Willis, M.H.R. 21:322, Douglass I 507, Goodspeed 385, Cox, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Craig School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Cotton Hill Township, which was established between 1890-1900 and named for J.P. Craig, a landowner in the community. (Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crowley's Ridge
Description:A range of hills extending from Arkansas and zigzagging through the northern part of the county. It was named for an early Arkansas settler, Mr. Crowley. (HIST. DUNKLIN 44, Blytheville Arkansas NEWS 1937)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cuckle Burr Slough
Description:A small swamp or slough in the southern part of Salem Township between Buffalo Slough (q.v.) and Big Lake (in Arkansas). It was named by the early settlers because of the cockle burrs, pronounced and spelled "cuckle" burrs by the early settlers. (HIST. DUNKLIN 22, Crawford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Devil's Washboard
Description:A derisive name applied to the pole or plank road from Clarkton to Weaversville in New Madrid County, in reference to the uneven surface. (HIST. DUNKLIN 44)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dillman
Description:A switch on the Frisco Railroad in the western part of Clay Township, which was established about 1910 and named for Frank Dillman of Caruthersville, in Pemiscot County, who had a sawmill camp at that place. (Frisco Map, Helen Dillman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dunklin County
Description:Created February 14, 1845. Stoddard County was divided by a line running on the parallel of 36 30 and that part of the county south of the line was called Dunklin County. Its boundaries were fixed as follows: Beginning in the middle of the main channel of the St. Francois River at a point where the state line between Missouri and Arkansas, in latitude 36 30, leaves said river; thence due east to the western boundary of New Madrid County; thence south with said line to the southern boundary of the state; thence west on said line to middle of main channel of St. Francois River; thence up the middle of the river to the place of beginning. In 1853 the north line of the county was moved nine miles north. The territory included in this county, with the exception of the nine mile strip, was a part of the territory originally left in Arkansas, but was added to the territory of Missouri through the efforts of J. Hardeman Walker. The county was named for Honorable Daniel Dunklin, governor of Missouri from 1832-1836. He was born in 1790 near Greenville, South Carolina, and came to Potosi, Missouri in 1810. He was elected to the first constitutional convention of Missouri in 1820. In 1828 he was elected lieutenant-governor, and at the close of this term was elected governor. He resigned in 1836 to accept the position of surveyor general of Missouri, Arkansas, and Illinois under President Jackson. He traced the boundaries of Missouri and Arkansas, and it is probably because of this connection with the people of Dunklin County that the county was named for him. (Douglass I 322, Missouri Revised Statutes 1845)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm Grove School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Independence Township, which was organized about 1900 and named for the growing elm trees on the site. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ely School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Independence Township, organized about 1900 and named for Tom Ely of Kennett. Locally the school is known as "Possum Trot School," from a pioneer mocking term referring to the woods where the roads were mere paths such as opossums might have made "trottin" over them. (Crawford; T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Europa
Description:A small settlement in the western part of Clay Township. The first name for the community was Crossroads, so named because the school building, the center of the community, and the country store were first built at the crossing of two roads. In 1897 when the post office was established it was named Europa. Europa was incorporated for the purpose of selling whiskey. The post office was discontinued in 1904, and now nothing remains except the rural school. The origin of the name is unknown. Europa, in Greek mythology, was the name of the maiden beloved by Jupiter who gave her name to the continent of Europe. (Bryant, Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Forest Grove School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Buffalo Township, which was named for the thick groves of various kinds of trees which grew on the site of the school building. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Four Mile Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church organized in 1866 in the community known as Four Mile, from which it was named. The church, as well as the entire community, was moved to Campbell in 1886. (Duncan 383, HIST. DUNKLIN 56)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Four Mile Island
Description:A small island in the St. Francois River in Union Township. It was named, like the other islands in the river, by the early settlers according to the approximate distance from Kennett, the county seat. The name was also applied to the surrounding country which became an island during flood seasons, and it was thus that the settlement of Four Mile received its name. (T.C. Douglass, Douglass I 307, HIST. DUNKLIN 40, Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Freeborn Township
Description:In the eastern part of the county; erected in 1845 and given this common political or patriotic name by the members of the county court. (Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Friendship
Description:A rural Baptist Church and community in the northwestern part of Union Township. The original name of the church was Rush Creek, which was organized in 1887 and named for Rush Creek (q.v.). The name was changed to Friendship about 1890 when the church was reorganized. This is a common church name. (Goodspeed 557, Cox, Sharp)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Friendship Church
Description:A rural Missionary Baptist Church in the southeast part of Holcomb Township, which was organized in 1880. It was given this ideal name by the founders. (HIST. DUNKLIN 60, Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frisbee
Description:A small settlement in the north central part of Independence Township. The post office which was maintained from 1910-1918 was called Manley, for Manley Pritchard, who was one of the first settlers. When the Frisco Railroad was built and the settlement moved toward the railroad, a new name was suggested, and since Frisbee was the name given by officials to the flagstop, this name was adopted for the entire settlement. Frisbee was named for a Mr. Frisbee, said to have been a railroad official. The first sawmill, switch, and store there were built by T.C. Stokes in 1885. (C. & L. Stokes, Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gibson
Description:A small village in the east-central part of Holcomb Township, established about 1880 as a flagstop on the Frisco Railroad, and named for the Gibson family who owned land there. The original name of this settlement was Canaan Island from its location on Canaan Island (q.v.). (HIST. DUNKLIN, 112, Van Cleve, G. Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glennonville
Description:A small Catholic community in the northwestern part of Union Township settled in 1904 under the direction of Archbishop Glennon of Cape Girardeau and named for him. The immigrants from Germany made up most of the settlers of this colony. (Van Cleve, T.G. Douglass I 377)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grand Prairie
Description:A large prairie in the southeast part of the county; one of the many prairies which were named by the early settlers. This was an unusually large one, extending into Arkansas, and was called La Grand Prairie, or Grand Prairie. (Campbell, Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grand Prairie Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the western part of Independence Township, which was organized in 1854 and named for Grand Prairie (q.v.) on which it was located. (Goodspeed 557, Cox, Duncan 383)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grand Prairie Methodist Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the eastern part of Independence Township, which was organized in 1853 by J.H. Headlee, presiding elder, and T.H. Smith, pastor. Named for Grand Prairie (Cf. above). (HIST. DUNKLIN 66, Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gregory Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in the north-central part of Independence Township, which was started about 1890 and named for the Gregory family, prominent farmers in the community. (Crawford, T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Groff School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Union Township, organized about 1890 and named for the Groff family, who were prominent farmers in the community. (Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gum Slough
Description:A small slough in the western part of Buffalo Township, named for the sweet gum trees growing there. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gum Slough Island
Description:A small island in Gum Slough (cf. above), from which it is named. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hargrove
Description:A station on the Cottonbelt Railroad in the southern part of Buffalo Township, which was named for Bob Hargrove, conductor on the Deering southwest Railroad. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harkey's Chapel
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the western part of Clay Township, which was built in 1854 and used both as school and church. It was named for Daniel Harkey on whose land it was built. The chapel is no longer used. (HIST. DUNKLIN 57, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harkey's Chapel School
Description:A rural school located beside Harkey's Chapel (cf. above) from which it was named. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harp School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Union Township, which was named for the Harp family, prominent farmers of the community. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hasty
Description:A post office in the southern part of Buffalo Township, maintained in 1895 and discontinued in favor of Cardwell. It was started by J.R. Pool, who gave it the name Hasty, but for what reason has been forgotten. (HIST. DUNKLIN 97)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hazel Grove School
Description:A rural school in the east-central part of Clay Township, which was established about 1891 and was, at that time, named Thomas School, for Jim Thomas of Horse Island, who owned the land. It was renamed about 1899, when a new building was erected for "Cat" Hazel, who had bought the land. The grove on the school ground, which gave rise to the second part of the name, is one of various species of trees, none of which are hazel trees. (Crawford, Westmorland, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hedgerow School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Freeborn Township, which was organized about 1890 and named for a hedgerow, perhaps the first fence in the county. (Harrison, Sharp)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Junction
Description:A stop on the Cottonbelt Railroad in the eastern part of Clay Township on the Pemiscot County line, which was established about 1920 and named for the hickory trees growing there. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holcomb
Description:A small town in the northern part of Holcomb Township on the old St. Louis and Gulf Railroad. The first station, a mile south of the present town was called Pine City in honor of the Lone Pine (q.v.) nearby, but this name was changed to Holcomb in 1886 when the post office was established. It was named for Lewis Holcomb, the first sheriff of the county. (Douglass I 307, M.H.R. 11:165, 66, HIST. DUNKLIN, 112)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holcomb Island
Description:An island formed by the waters of two sloughs in the eastern part of Holcomb Township. A settlement was made here in 1844 and named for Lewis Holcomb (cf. above). (Douglass I 307)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holcomb Island Township
Description:See Holcomb Township.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holcomb Township
Description:In the western part of the county, organized in 1845 when the county was organized and named Holcomb Island Township from Holcomb Island (q.v.). The name was soon shortened to Holcomb Township. (Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hollywood
Description:A small village in the southern part of Salem Township, which was settled about 1898 when the railroad (now Frisco) was being built. It was first called Klondike by the railroad builders and land promoters, who advertised the place as being as rich in resources as the Klondike region in Alaska where gold was discovered in 1896, and to which people were rushing. When the post office was established in 1900, it was named for the holly trees or bushes which grew there. (Eubanks, M.H.R. 11:65-66, T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hopkins School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Union Township, which was named for the Hopkins family who gave the land for the school. (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hornerstown
Description:See Hornersville.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hornersville
Description:A town in the southern part of Clay Township. The first settlement was made on Little River in 1832 by William Horner. Early traders and hunters called the place Hornerstown when it was a trading post for Indians who brought furs to trade to the white men for traps and ammunition. The town was laid out in 1842 by Dr. William Horner, and named Hornersville for him. Dr. Horner's brother Russell was also prominent in the early history of the town. (Goodspeed, HIST. DUNKLIN, 114, M.H.R. 11:165-166, Welty)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hornersville Junction
Description:A stop on the Cottonbelt Railroad near Hornersville (q.v.) for which it was named. (Welty)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Horse Island
Description:A small island in the southern part of Independence Township where Senath now stands. The first settlement was made in 1834 by Riley Clarkson. No reason for the selection of the name is definitely known, but Mr. Crawford believes it is a reference to the size of the island. (HIST. DUNKLIN 40, Douglass I 307, Crawford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Illinois, Missouri, and Texas Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Independence Township
Description:In the eastern part of the county; one of the original townships organized in 1845 and named by the members of the county court. Three townships were given common political names: Freeborn, Union, and Independence. (Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Camp Slough
Description:A slough in the eastern part of Holcomb Township, which was named because of the Indian camps which were located here in the early days. The Indians remained here until 1834. (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Hill Island
Description:A small island in the western part of Buffalo Township, formed by the flood waters of the St. Francois River, which was named for an old Indian mound (hill) located there. (Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ipley
Description:A small settlement and station on the Frisco Railroad in the central part of Independence Township made in 1904 and named Shipley for Hugh Shipley, an early settler. A post office was established in 1910 and discontinued before 1915. Mr. Will A. Jones, editor, Kennett says the name was changed at the request of Mr. Houck who had a station named Shepley on his railroad in Cape Girardeau County and he thought the two names would be confusing. He made the name by omitting the first two letters of Shipley. (Jones, M.H.R. 11:165-6)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:John Ease's Camp
Description:A hunting camp in the central part of the county, which was named from an old Indian chief who had the camp there long after the coming of the white settlers. John Ease is evidently the Americanized name for the Indian. (Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson Island School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Clay Township, which was established about 1900 and named from Johnson's Island (q.v.). (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Holcomb Township, which was named for Mr. Johnson who gave the land for the school. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson's Island
Description:A small island in the western part of Clay Township, formed by the flood waters of two sloughs, where William Johnson settled about 1895. The place was named for Johnson, as was the school which was established there about 1900. (Douglass I 307, Randol's Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jones School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Freeborn Township, which was named for the Jones family who gave the land for the school. (Crawford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kennett
Description:The county seat of Dunklin County in the central part of Independence Township. It was laid out as a town in 1846 and named after Indians who lived in this region. The citizens protested that the name was too long and too difficult to spell, and it was changed in 1848 by the state legislature to Butler, for F.C. Butler of New Madrid County, who helped select this as the site for the county seat. In 1867 the name was again changed at the request of postal authorities, who felt that there was a chance for confusion of the mail for Butler and Butler County. The new name selected was Kennett, for Luther Kennett, mayor of St. Louis. He had promoted the idea of railroads in Missouri, and in 1852 had cast the first shovel of earth for the Missouri Pacific Railroad so that he was a figure of great interest in this section where men realized the great need of railroads. (Douglass I 284, M.H.R. 11:165-6; HIST. DUNKLIN, 120; Cox, Goodspeed 176, 473)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kennett to Caruthersville Railroad
Description:See St. Louis San Francisco Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kinamore Slough
Description:An old slough or swamp in the southwest part of the county; named for Kinamore, chief of the Indian tribe which inhabited that region. It was destroyed by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. (M.H.R. 7:188, HIST. DUNKLIN, 21, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kinfolks Island
Description:See Two Mile Island.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knight School
Description:See Liberty School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Knight's Schoolhouse Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church which met at Knight's Schoolhouse before 1881. It was disbanded in 1895. (Goodspeed 544, Cox, Douglass 458)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Grande Prairie
Description:See Grand Prairie.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Langdon Cemetery
Description:A small rural cemetery in the northeast part of Clay Township, which was named for C.V. Langdon, on whose farm it is located. (Brannum)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lanse School
Description:An old rural school in the eastern part of Cotton Hill Township. On Peedee Ridge, which was established about 1851 and named for Ely Lanse, a prominent farmer there. The school was abandoned before 1890. (Harrison, Crawford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Freeborn Township organized before 1881. The first school in the community was the Knight School, named for Squire J.J. Knight, who owned land there. In 1896 or 1900 a new building was erected about a mile south of the original site, the board members were Fred Poarchy, W.A. Smith and J.M. Corder. It was suggested that the name be changed to Poarchy, but Mr. Poarchy objected and suggested the ideal name of Liberty. (Geo. Smith, W.P. Smith, Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little River
Description:A river flowing through New Madrid, Pemiscot, and Dunklin Counties. It rises in St. Francois County and flows south into Arkansas. Below the Cape Girardeau County line it is known as Little River; above as Whitewater. Whitewater is the name applied to the entire stream before the earthquakes of 1811-1812. The Indians called the river Ne ska or Unica. Schoolcraft says the Osage name for this river is Unica, meaning white, but he is said to have confused White River, largely in Arkansas and Whitewater, this stream. The Chippeway name for the river was Ne ska, meaning white water. It is often written Niska. The early Spanish explorers called the river Rio Blanch, and the French La Riviere Blanche or L'eau Blanche. In the English translation this became Whitewater, by which name the entire stream was known as late as 1817. The name "Little" seems to have been given between 1817-1822, in the French form La Petitie Riviere, and is a reference to the size of the river as compared with the Mississippi and St. Francois Rivers, between which it lies. (History of Dunklin 29, Campbell, Brown, Rand McNally, Schoolcraft 853, Douglass I 230, Houck I 17, 18)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little River Bottoms
Description:Low swampy land lying along Little River in the western and eastern parts of these counties. (E.E. Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Oak Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the eastern part of Cotton Hill Township; organized in 1894 and named for a large, solitary oak tree growing there. (HIST. DUNKLIN 68-9, Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Pine Tree
Description:A solitary tree in the southern part of Holcomb Township, which served as a landmark to Indians and hunters. No one came to a definite conclusion about the reason for the trees location here; pine is not a native growth of the county. It once served as headquarters for the Murell clan of desperadoes. (HIST. DUNKLIN, 142)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Loyd Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the eastern part of Holcomb Township, named for the Loyd family on whose land the cemetery was located. (Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lulu
Description:A small settlement in the southern part of Clay Township. The post office was established in 1883 and named by Judge E.J. Langdon, as he said, "In honor of one of my old sweethearts." The post office was discontinued in 1904, and now only a rural school and community remain. (HIST. DUNKLIN 131, Cox, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mackey
Description:A flagstop on the Frisco Railroad in the eastern part of Independence Township, established about 1920 and named for Virgil McKay, who with his partner, W.G. Bragg, was a larger landowner in this section. A railroad official spelled the name as it is pronounced rather than McKay as it is written. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Malden
Description:A town in the eastern part of Cotton Hill Township platted in 1877 under the direction of Major George B. Clark and Otto Kochtitsky, engineers of the railroad which was being built. The first settlement in this region was a trading post, Cotton Hill, made about 1850 and named for the cotton which grew on the sandy ridge on which it was located. The post was abandoned and the buildings moved a few miles south in 1877 to begin the town of Malden. Two theories, each having strong adherents, exist regarding the name of Malden. One group insists it was named for Colonel T.H. Mauldin of Bloomfield, judge of the county court there from 1879-1880. Dr. G.T. VanCleve says the most prominent man in the settlement was a Mr. Beckwith, and his name was suggested for the town, but was not accepted because of popular dislike for the man; instead the people chose the name for Colonel Mauldin, whom they respected. S.E. Dunn says it was named for Colonel Mauldin because he owned a large tract of land just north of Malden in Stoddard County and was well known to those who established Malden. Young Dr. VanCleve and R.A. Cox, however, say that the town was named for Malden, Massachusetts because of the man laying out the town being from Malden, Massachusetts. Malden, Massachusetts was named by Joseph Hills and John Wayte, founders of the town, for Maldon in Essex, England, from which they came. The most difficult matter for the first group to explain is the change of spelling, if the town was named for Colonel Mauldin as they maintain, and for the second group the identity of the man who came from Malden, Massachusetts. The latter explanation, however, seems more logical, and is accepted by Eaton and Douglass. (M.H.R. 11, Douglass I 307, Goodspeed 474, Cox, VanCleve, Dunn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Manley
Description:See Frisbee.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marlow
Description:A community in the southeast part of Freeborn Township. Union Grove Methodist Church and Marlow Baptist Church together with Zion or Marlow School make up the community. It was named for James and Toby Marlow who own land there. (Eubanks, Marlow)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marlow Baptist Church
Description:See Zion Baptist Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McElyea School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Union Township, which was established between 1890-1900, and named for the McElyea family farmers in the community. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McGuire
Description:A small village in the southeast part of Freeborn Township. A post office was established in 1910 and named for Fred McGuire who owned land there. (M.H.R. 11:165-66, Van Cleve)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Holcomb Township, which was organized about 1900 and named for Bill Miller, a prominent farmer of the community. (Harrison, Eubanks, Bryant)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Railroad
Description:The original Missouri Pacific Railroad was chartered in 1876 as a part of the Pacific Railroad Company which had failed to build roads as directed in the charter of 1849. It was under the direction of C.K. Garrison until 1879 when it became the property of Jay Gould, who consolidated a number of railroads. This part of the system, however, had its beginning in the Cairo and Fulton Railroad which was organized in 1857 in Charleston, Mississippi County, through the efforts of Colonel H.J. Deal. The name indicated the two proposed terminals - Fulton, Arkansas and Cairo, Illinois. The first train on this road was run from Bird's Point to Charleston April 19, 1859. The chief engineer was J.S. Williams and the engine was called the "Sol G. Kitchen" in honor of a pioneer of Mississippi County. The road was finished to Sikeston, in Scott County, July 4, 1859, and the first locomotive on this run was the "Abe Hunter," named for another prominent pioneer of Mississippi County. During the Civil War the road was partially destroyed. It was reorganized in 1872 under the name Cairo, Arkansas, and Texas Railroad, so named because the company now proposed to extend the road through the state of Arkansas and on to Texarkana, Texas. The nickname "Cat" road, derived from the initials of the official road, came into use locally about this time. It was completed to Poplar Bluff, through Stoddard County in 1873. Shortly after the reorganization it was bought by the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad under the management of Thomas Allen. The St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad had been granted a charter in 1851 to build a road from some point on the Pacific Railroad to Pilot Knob; and in 1852 the Iron Mountain Branch of the Pacific Railroad was incorporated. The purpose of the railroad was the transportation of ore from Iron Mountain to St. Louis, from which point it could be shipped elsewhere, and this fact gave the road its name. The first survey was made in 1852 by J.H. Morley and the first section of rails laid in 1853. The road was opened to Iron Mountain in 1858. The Arkansas branch was completed from Pilot Knob to Moark in 1873, and the name changed to St. Louis Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad to indicate this extension of the road. In 1880 these roads were consolidated under the Missouri Pacific Railroad. (Deal Scrapbook, Charleston Democrat 1937, Kerr, Thornton 14-51, Douglass 499)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moark
Description:A small settlement in the eastern part of Holcomb Township on the Pemiscot County line, where a post office was maintained from 1901- 1904. It was named for the Missouri-Arkansas (Mo-Ark) Lumber Company who had a shipping point there in 1900. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Gilead Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the northern part of Freeborn Township, started about 1881 and named for Mount Gilead Church (q.v.). (HIST. DUNKLIN 68-9, Cox, Jones, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Gilead Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the southeast part of Freeborn Township, which was organized prior to 1895. Mount Gilead is a Biblical name denoting "Hill of Witness," and was the place of Jacob's covenant. It was also a mountain range east of the Jordan River. (Crawford, Sharp, Genesis 31:23, Deut. 34:1)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Need More
Description:See Nesbit.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nesbit
Description:A small village in the western part of Clay Township, which grew out of a country store established by "Nug" Harkey. The place was jokingly called Need More by the young men of the neighborhood, referring to the scanty supplies of the store. In 1855 T.R. Neel opened a store there and established a post office which he named Nesbit for Mr. Nesbit of the firm Nesbit, McKay and Company of Evansville, Illinois. (HIST. DUNKLIN, 141, Cox, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Neska River
Description:See Little River
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Niska River
Description:See Little River
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Canaan School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Cotton Hill Township, which was established about 1890 and named from its position north of Canaan Island (q.v.). (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove Church
Description:A rural Missionary Baptist Church in the central part of Freeborn Township, organized in 1851. Other organizations, however, had preceded this one. In 1846 Thomas Warren, a Freewill Baptist preacher, organized the first church in Dunklin County at this place. The organization continued until 1849-1850 when an epidemic of black tongue almost depopulated the neighborhood. In 1850 Reverend Miller organized a General Baptist Church here, but died within the year. This church was called Beechwell, from the beech trees growing in the neighborhood. (This explanation is difficult to accept as the succeeding church was named Oak Grove, but perhaps both kinds of trees grew here.) In 1851 the Missionary Baptists took charge of the church and called it Oak Grove Church because of its location in a grove of black oak trees (Quercus niger). (HIST. DUNKLIN 56, Harrison, T.G. Douglass, Sharp)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Octa
Description:A small settlement in the eastern part of Salem Township, made before 1895. In that year a Baptist Church was organized there. A post office was maintained in 1904. The original significance of the name is unknown. (HIST. DUNKLIN 62, Minutes of Black River Baptist Assn.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Liberty Methodist Church
Description:An old rural Methodist Church in the northern part of Clay Township, which was organized in 1853, the second in the county, and given the name Liberty which was a common church name at that time. (Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pacific Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Parsell Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the southern part of Buffalo Township, which was named for the Parsell family, near whose land the cemetery was located. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Paulding
Description:A small settlement in the southwest part of Salem Township where a post office was maintained in 1902-1918. It was named for the Paulding Stave Company which had a mill and shipping point there. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peedee Ridge
Description:A slight elevation in the northeast part of Cotton Hill Township, where a settlement was made as early as 1850. James Waltrip came to this community in 1854 and his son-in-law says that the ridge was named for a Mr. Peedee, an early settler. (Sharp, Crawford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peedee School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Cotton Hill Township, which was organized between 1890-1900 and was named from Peedee Ridge (cf. above). (Sharp, Crawford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pine City
Description:See Holcomb.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pine City Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in the northern part of Holcomb Township. It was started about 1890 and named for Pine City, which was moved to Holcomb in 1886. (HIST. DUNKLIN 112, Cox, Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plank Road
Description:A road built of planks or poles, and so called Plank or Pole Road or Old Pole Road, over the vast swamp from Weaversville in New Madrid County to Clarkton in Dunklin County by the Blanton Plank Company. The road was destroyed during the Civil War, and afterward Henry E. Clark and Otto Kochtitsky obtained a charter to rebuild the road in 1875; they started to work, but instead built a narrow gauge railroad from Malden to New Madrid in 1876-1878. This railroad was known as the St. Louis, Texas, and Arkansas Railroad, and is now a part of the Cottonbelt System (q.v.). (Goodspeed 386, Penman)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Valley Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the eastern part of Holcomb Township, established in 1867 and named by the founders. This is an ideal name rather than a descriptive name. (Cox, HIST. DUNKLIN 68)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pond Slough
Description:A slough in the western part of Cotton Hill Township. The center of the slough is a pond which overflows during flood seasons and makes the slough; hence called Pond Slough. (Cox, HIST. DUNKLIN 27)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pool School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Independence Township, which was established in 1900 and named for J.R. Pool, who gave the land for the school. (Jones, T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Possum Trot School
Description:See Ely School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Providence
Description:A small trading post just south of the town of Malden in the southeast part of Cotton Hill Township, which was established about 1836. Providence Baptist Church was organized June, 1836, and the community was named from the church. Providence is an ideal name, referring to divine guidance. The original Providence Church was that established by William Rogers in Rhode Island. This church was disbanded after 1881 and was reorganized in 1915. (Cox, Crawford, Goodspeed 556-59, ENCY. BRIT.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ragaline Slough
Description:See Raglin Slough.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ragland Slough
Description:See Raglin Slough.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Raglin Slough
Description:A large slough or swamp in the southern part of the county. The Indians claimed this slough, like many others, was once a large fissure which was elevated by the earthquakes of 1811-1812. The first settlement on this slough was made by Monroe in 1850. It is known as Ragline or Ragland Slough. No explanation of the name could be found. (M.H.R. 5:188, HIST. DUNKLIN 18.40, Cox, Jones, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rives
Description:A village in the eastern part of Clay Township. The first settlement was made here when the Deering southwest Railroad was built in 1894, and the flagstop was named for Colonel H.W. Rives, superintendent of the railroad. A post office has been maintained since 1918. (Eubanks, Bryant, Jones, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rocky Hill Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the northern part of Union Township, which was named for the natural surroundings, a ridge of rocky soil. This is the beginning of a ridge which runs into Stoddard County, and the natural condition of the soil is very different from the rest of Dunklin County which is quite swampy. (Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rush Creek
Description:A small creek in the northwestern part of Holcomb Township, named for the rushes growing on the banks of the stream. (Eaton, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rush Creek Church
Description:See Friendship Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rush Creek School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Holcomb Township, organized in 1890. The first settlement was made here in 1841 by Dr. Given Ownes, who named it Rushcreek for Rush Creek (q.v.), the stream on which it was located. (Douglass I 307, Campbell, T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rushcreek
Description:See Rush Creek School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the northwestern part of Cotton Hill Township, organized in 1893. The name comes originally from the Bible, where it is frequently used as a short form of Jerusalem (Gen. 14:18, Hebrews 7:11). Its meaning in Hebrew is "peace." This is a favorite church name in America. (HIST. DUNKLIN 62, Crawford, Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem Methodist Church
Description:A rural church in the northern part of Cotton Hill Township, organized in 1840 by Elder S. Winningham, who selected the name for the church (cf. above). (Goodspeed 54, Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem Township
Description:In the western part of the county, organized in 1845 at the time of the meeting of the first county court, and named, probably, by some member of the court for Salem, Massachusetts, as some of the early settlers of the county came from that state. (Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Ridge
Description:A ridge west of Malden in the western part of Cotton Hill Township, so designated in 1879 from the natural conditions of the soil and the slight elevation. (Kochtitsky, Barnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Senath
Description:A town in the eastern part of Salem Township, established in 1882 by A.W. Douglass and named by him for his wife Senath Hale Douglass. (M.H.R. 11:165-166; HIST. DUNKLIN; Douglass; T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seneca Creek
Description:A creek or stream in the southwest part of the county, which was named for Seneca, an old Indian chief whose tribe inhabited this region shortly before 1845. During flood seasons the waters of this creek and Buffalo Creek (q.v.) unite and form Seneca Island. (Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seneca Island
Description:A small island formed in high water seasons (cf. above).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seven Mile Island
Description:A small island in the St. Francois River which, like the other islands of the river, was named by the early settlers according to their approximate distance from Kennett. (HIST. DUNKLIN, Campbell, Burnett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shady Grove Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the central part of Clay Township, which was organized in 1857. It was named for the natural surroundings, a grove of shade trees in the churchyard. (Goodspeed 609, HIST. DUNKLIN 62, Minutes of Black River Assn.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shady Grove School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Clay Township, near Shady Grove Church (cf. above), from which it was named when established in 1890. (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shields School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Clay Township organized in 1896 and named for S.W. Shields of Hornersville who owned land there. (Bryant, Eubanks)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shipley
Description:See Ipley.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shipley School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Independence Township, which was named for the settlement of Shipley, the name of which was changed to Ipley (q.v.). (Jones, M.H.R. 11:65)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shumac
Description:See Sumach.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Silverdale School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Salem Township. The settlement was originally called Hunter's Deadening. A deadening is a tract of land on which trees have been deadened; that is, they have been girdled so that they die. This is done usually in order that the soil may be cultivated and crops grown while the trees are still standing. This deadening belonged to Mr. Hunter, and thus was called Hunter's Deadening. During the World War a woman Red Cross worker suggested that Silverdale would be a "better sounding" name, and it was adopted for the community and the school. (Karnes)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Simpson School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Independence Township, which was named for Mr. Simpson, a landowner who gave the land for the school. (Harrison)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slicer School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Cotton Hill Township, which was established between 1900-1910 and named for P.A. (Tut) Slicer, a landowner and prominent citizen. (Cox, Smith)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snider School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Union Township, which was established about 1900 and named for the Snider family. (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Canaan School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Holcomb Township, which received its name from its location south of Canaan Island (q.v.). (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Pacific Railroad
Description:See below
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francois River
Description:A large river which rises in the northern part of St. Francois County, flows through Wayne and Madison Counties, forms the western boundaries of Stoddard and Dunklin, and finally empties into the Mississippi River in Arkansas near Helena. It was known to the Indians as Cholohollay, a Choctaw name meaning "smoke," taken from Oca-Cholohollay meaning "smoky water." Eaton says it was named by early explorers for the patron saint of their order. This would be St. Francis of Assisi. However, none of the prominent early explorers were of the Franciscan order, at least none who descended to the mouth of the St. Francois River. Hennepin was the only Franciscan among the prominent explorers and he named the St. Francois River in Michigan, now known as Rum River, so it is not likely he also named this river, nor did he descend south as far as the St. Francois. DeSoto mentions a river answering the description of the St. Francois River, but he does not mention its name. Marquette reached a point near where the river empties into the Mississippi in 1673, and possibly he named it as he had spent some time at the mission of St. Francis Xavier before starting on this trip. St. Francis Xavier (1506-1552) was a Jesuit missionary, like Marquette, and a friend of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit Society. The St. Francois River was first used in business proceedings in the grant of New Madrid to Colonel Morgan in 1787. The name is sometimes spelled St. Francis on recent maps. (M.H.R. 13:60, Shea 112, Buel 240-241, HIST. MAGAZINE VOL. 5, MAGAZINE OF AMER. HIST. VOL. 2, Houck I 16-17, quoting from Silliman's Journal of Science III:25)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad
Description:This railroad was first organized as the Southwest branch of the Pacific Railroad in 1849, along a surveyed route from St. Louis west to the Pacific Ocean. In 1851 it became the South Pacific Railroad and was completed to Rolla in 1861. In 1866 it was created the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad by an act of Congress, and authorized to build to the Pacific Coast. It was finished to Vinita in Indian territory in 1871. In these counties the road is the result of the consolidation of a number of short lines which were connected to form the present system. It had its beginning in the Cape Girardeau and State Line Railroad Company, which proposed to build a line from Cape Girardeau to the Arkansas line in 1869. No work was done on this road, and in 1871 Governor Fletcher of Missouri reorganized the company as the Illinois, Missouri and Texas Railroad Company with the idea of connecting those three states by rail. This charter was purchased in 1880 by Louis Houck and organized as the Cape Girardeau Railroad Company because the businessmen of that city were to furnish the capital. In 1881 the branch was built to Lakeville in Stoddard County, and the name changed to Cape Girardeau and Southwestern Railroad Company, indicating the direction of the road from Cape Girardeau. In 1891 the name was again changed to the St. Louis, Cape Girardeau, and Fort Smith Raiload, named to indicate the intention of extending the road north to St. Louis and south to Fort Smith, Arkansas. The railroad also includes the line of the Missouri and Arkansas Railroad organized in 1891 by Mr. Houck to build a road from Morley to Cape Girardeau, and the St. Louis, Kennett and Southern Railroad, which was built in 1890 from Campbell to Kennett, and the Kennett to Caruthersville Railroad, which was built in 1894. In 1902 all these roads were consolidated under the name St. Louis and Gulf Railroad with the intention of extending the road from St. Louis to the Gulf of Mexico, and shortly afterward the property was transferred to the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad. The latter company extended the line from St. Louis to Memphis, Tennessee, thence to Pensacola, and west from Memphis to Oklahoma, but it has not yet reached its intended destination - San Francisco. In Pemiscot County the company purchased a right-of-way extending from Caruthersville to the Arkansas line and thence to Blytheville, Arkansas from Cunningham Brothers of Caruthersville, who had been interested in building a railroad and had begun private operations. This road is commonly called Frisco, a shortened from of San Francisco. (Willis, Douglass 502-504, Wollman 16, Ham, Wilson, Barns 615, 673)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis, Kennett, and Southern Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Patrick Church
Description:The Catholic Church of Malden, established in 1894 through the efforts of Father Furlong of New Madrid. It was named for St. Patrick (387-493), Apostle of Ireland, who,was entrusted by Pope St. Celestine I to the work of "gathering the Irish race into one fold of Christ." He was given the name of "Patercius" or "Patririus," a name which proved to be a foreshadowing of his work, for he became pater civium (father of his people). He used the shamrock with its triple leaf to illustrate the Trinity. (HIST. DUNKLIN 76, CATHOLIC ENCY.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stanfield Cemetery
Description:A rural cemetery in the eastern part of Freeborn Township, which was named from Stanfield Church (q.v.). (Sharp)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stanfield Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of Freeborn Township, which was organized in 1904 and named for the landowner who helped to build the church. The land has since been purchased by Mr. Gunn. (Sharp)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sumach
Description:A small settlement in the eastern part of Independence Township. A post office was maintained here from 1890-1896. The name was sometimes spelled Shumach; that is, it is spelled as it is pronounced. It was named for the sumach bushes which grew in profusion at this place. Sumach is a shrub or tree of the genus Rhus. (Jones, Polk, T.G. Douglass, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sumach Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the eastern part of Independence Township, which was named for the early settlement Sumach (cf. above). (Jones, T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sumach School
Description:A rural school named from Sumach (cf. above).
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sunnyside School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Union Township, which has been established since 1910. This is an idealistic descriptive name. (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tatum Chapel School
Description:See Tatum School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tatum School
Description:A rural school, also known as Tatum Chapel School, in the western part of Clay Township, which was established about 1895 and named for Luther and James Tatum who owned land there. It is sometimes called Tatum Chapel because a Methodist Church holds its services in the school building. (Crawford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Holcomb Township, organized in 1900 and named for Bob Taylor, a farmer there. (Bryant)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Creek
Description:A small stream, sometimes called Taylor's River, which ran through Taylor's Swamp (q.v.), from which it was named. (Campbell, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's River
Description:See Taylor's Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Slough
Description:In the southeast part of the county where Jacob Taylor of North Carolina settled in 1830. The slough, the swamp, and the creek in this region were named for Taylor. (HIST. DUNKLIN 39)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Taylor's Swamp
Description:A large swamp in the central part of the county. It was also called West Swamp, a reference to its location west of St. Francois River. Just when the name was changed is unknown. Campbell in 1873 uses these names interchangeably or writes Taylor's West Swamp. The name is from Jacob Taylor. (Campbell, Douglass I 307, HIST. DUNKLIN)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ten Mile Island
Description:A small island in the St. Francois River in the southern part of Salem Township, which was named for its approximate distance from Kennett. (Karnes, Burnett, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Glades
Description:A strip of black, mucky, low land from two to five miles wide lying along the St. Francois River. The term glade, as used here, meaning swamp of lowland, is of American origin, and was first written everglade. Weekly says glad, meaning swamp, and particularly the compound everglade "makes no sense and is probably tne corruption of some native name." The term seems to have been first used in 1796 in Morse's American Geo. I 649. Tanner used Everglade of the region in Florida in 1827 and of Virginia in 1860. The term is used by Lewis and Clark. (HIST. DUNKLIN 26, Weekley, Skeats, ENG. OX. DICT. Crisswell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thompson School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Clay Township, established in 1905 on Treasure Island (q.v.), for which it was named. The name was changed to Thompson School in 1928 in honor of Earl C. Thompson, who had bought a large tract of land in the county and who was one of the promoters of the Lindbergh flight in 1927. (Jones, Rodgers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tompkins School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Union Township, which was named for the Tompkins family, early settlers in this section. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Townley
Description:A small village in the northeast part of Cotton Hill Township, where a post office was maintained from 1910-1918. It was settled as a sawmill camp by Townly and Painton, and named for the former. (M.H.R. 11:165-66, Van Cleve)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Treasure Island
Description:A small island in the eastern part of Clay Township formed by the flood waters of Little and St. Francois Rivers. It was called Coon Island by the early settlers and hunters who found many raccoons there. In 1905 land promoters, attempting to find a more attractive name in order to encourage buyers, named it Treasure Island. (Jones, Rodgers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Treasure Island School
Description:See Thompson School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Two Mile Island
Description:A small island in the St. Francois River. D.W. Moore, who was the second white child born in the county, owned land there and named the island because it was two miles from town (Kennett). It is also locally known as Kinfolks Island, because of the many relatives of the Moore family who live on the island. (Campbell, Burnett, Crawford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Two Mile Island School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Salem Township, which was established about 1890 and named from its location on the island. (cf. above). (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tywappity School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Independence Township, which was established in 1895 and given this Indian name common in this region (cf. above). (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Grove Church
Description:A Methodist Church in the southeast part of Freeborn Township in the community known as Marlow (q.v.). It was given this common church name by the founders. (Marlow)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Methodist Church
Description:A rural Methodist Church in the southern part of Independence Township, which was organized in 1839 by Elder William Keys. Union is a common name for churches, possibly because in the pioneer days many church denominations used the same building; that is, they were union churches. (Goodspeed 544, Douglass, Riley)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Township
Description:In the northwestern part of the county; organized in 1845 and given this common patriotic or political name by the members of the county court. (Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Valley Ridge
Description:A small village in the northern part of Union Township. A post office was established in 1868. The first settlement was made by William Okley and named by him because of the peculiar formation of the ridge land on which it is located, or according to Douglass "because of the land which is as rich as valley land." The post office was discontinued in 1904 and the place no longer exists. (M.H.R. 11:165-66, HIST. DUNKLIN 144, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vardell School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Clay Township, which was named for the Vardell family, early settlers of this county. (T.G. Douglass, Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Varner River Church
Description:A rural church in the western part of Salem Township; organized by the Baptists in 1892 and named for Varner's River on which it is located. It is often called Varney River Church (cf. above). (HIST. DUNKLIN 39, Minutes of Varner River Church in Black River Assn.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Varner's River
Description:A small river in the central part of the county. The lower part of the stream is called Chilletecaux (q.v.), a name by which the entire stream was formerly known. Varner's River was named for Thomas Varner, who settled near the source in 1835. Locally it is often called Varney's River, a mispronunication of the real name. (HIST. DUNKLIN 39, Douglass I 230, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Varney River
Description:See Varner's River.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Varney River Church
Description:See Varner River Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vincet
Description:See Vincit.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vincit
Description:A small settlement in the southern part of Independence Township, founded by George W. Maharg, who established the post office in 1886. The post office was discontinued in 1904, and all the timber having been cut, the settlement was abandoned. It was named, according to Douglass, by Mr. Maharg, "who was a great player of marbles, and the name comes from an expression used in playing the game of long taw." This expression, however, is not generally known, and it is not used by Strutt in GAMES AND PASTIMES. The term may well be entirely local or personal with Mr. Maharg; perhaps it has some connection with the Latin word vincit, meaning "he conquers," or with the marbles term "ventures" which is used in this section of the state. This latter term means that the taw must be shot from the exact position it is in. The name is sometimes spelled Vincet; in fact that is the spelling used by Douglass and Smyth, two historians of the county, but the post office name is Vincit. (M.H.R. 11:165-6, Douglass, HIST. DUNKLIN, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Independence Township, which was established in 1895 and named for a grove of walnut trees growing there. (T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ward School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Salem Township, organized in 1900 and named for W.J. Ward, who located on Horse Island in 1883, and who gave the land for the school. (T.G. Douglass, Goodspeed's Biography)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Prairie [1 of 2]
Description:A large prairie in Dunklin County, which was named by early explorers and traders from its location west of other prairies in this section (cf. East Prairie). (Goodspeed 197)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Prairie [2 of 2]
Description:A small settlement in the eastern part of Cotton Hill Township, which was made in 1844 and named from the large prairie (cf. above) on which it was located. The settlement was abandoned about 1874. One of the most important features of the settlement was a grist mill, known as West Prairie Mill, which was used by the early settlers. (HIST. DUNKLIN 44, Cox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Prairie Mill
Description:See West Prairie.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Prairie Presbyterian Church
Description:A rural Presbyterian Church in the northern part of Independence Township on the site of the present town of Clarkton. It was organized in 1868 and was named from West Prairie (q.v.) on which it is located. It became the Clarkton Church in 1875. (Goodspeed 571, Van Cleve)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Oak
Description:See Whiteoak.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whiteaker Cut
Description:A ditch or canal, known as a cut-off or cut, formed by the waters of the St. Francois River, in the northwestern part of Union Township. It was named from Whiteaker Place (q.v.). (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whiteaker Place
Description:An estate in the northwest part of Union Township, named for the owner, W.C. Whiteaker, who was presiding judge of the county court from 1894-1896, and a prominent farmer of the community. (HIST. DUNKLIN 271, Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whiteoak
Description:A small village in the northern part of Independence Township. A post office was established in 1892. The name was written White Oak from 1892-1895 when the present spelling was adopted. It was named from the whiteoak trees. (quercus alba) growing there. (M.H.R. 11:165-66, HIST. DUNKLIN 145, T.G. Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilhemina
Description:A small village or colony in the southwest part of Union Township, which was settled by German immigrants who came here in 1915 under the direction of Archbishop Glennon of Cape Girardeau to found a Catholic colony. The settlement was named for Queen Wilhemina of Holland, who was born in 1880 and became Queen in 1890. (T.G. Douglass, Jones, ENCY. BRIT.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wrightsville
Description:A post office established in 1891 and maintained until 1904. In the eastern part of Freeborn Township, which was named by the Wright Brothers who operated a store and the post office. (Postal Guide, Douglass, HIST. DUNKLIN)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Baptist Church
Description:A rural church in the southeast part of Freeborn Township, which was organized in 1867 and given this common church name by the founders. Zion was a mountain in the city of Jerusalem, and appears frequently in Biblical writings. It is now usually called the Marlow Church, for the Marlow community (q.v.). The name Zion has been transferred to the school in that community. (Goodspeed 344, Douglass, Marlow, HIST. DUNKLIN 62)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Freeborn Township, which was organized about 1895 and named for Zion Church (q.v.). It is called Marlow School locally, for it is in the Marlow Community (q.v.). (T.G. Douglass, Marlow)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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