Dent County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Alred School
Description:A rural school in Texas Township. Named for the Alred family, prominent in the district. (MSTR; W. Clark; Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Antioch Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Texas Township. A familiar Bible name, the city of Syria where the disciples were first called Christians. (Acts 11:26) (Albert Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Antioch School
Description:In Texas Township. Named from the church. (MSTR; Albert Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Anutt
Description:A village in central Watkins Township. A post office since 1891. The name was suggested in honor of a popular schoolteacher, Miss Annet Lenox, by one of her admirers who was not an exact speller. His phonetic rendering was accepted and perpetuated by the Postal Department at Washington. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); W.A. Young)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ark
Description:A village in eastern Meramec Township; a post office from 1904 to 1918. A logging station. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); Cram)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Arnold Bank
Description:An iron bank located on Benton Creek. Named for T.J. Arnold, who owned the bank. (Barns, MISSOURI, p. 572; Postal Guide; Grosse; William Plank)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Atlas
Description:A post office in 1891, but nothing more could be learned about the place. (Postal Guide)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Avery Station
Description:See Bangert. (Postal Guide; HIST. DENT (1889), p. 608)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bangert
Description:A village in northeast Short Bend Township. First called Avery when the post office was established in 1886 after C.A. Avery, postmaster. In 1889 it was called Avery Station when the railroad was built through there. The post office was discontinued in 1897; and when it was reestablished it was named Bangert (1904) after a railroad engineer who lived there. (Postal Guide; HIST. DENT, p. 608; Postal Guide; Grosse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Barnitz Lake
Description:In Spring Creek Township. Named for Frank Barnitz, who had a tobacco factory by the lake in the 1870s. (W.P. Elmore)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Benton
Description:District No. 31. Named for timber growing near. (W.F. Holbrook; MSTR)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Boscobel
Description:A discontinued railroad station in northwest Short Bend Township. Named by R. L. Foote for Boscobel, Wisconsin, his birthplace. Foote was a foreman for Sligo Furnace Company. Boscobel, Wisconsin was named for a place in Shropshire, England, according to Gannett. (Plat Book (1933); R. McN., J.F. Keys; Gannett, p. 52)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Boss
Description:A village in eastern Osage Township. A post office since 1902. Named after Marion Nelson, who was "Boss" of the lumbering crews. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); W.L. Nelson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bressie's Spring
Description:See Montauk.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cage School
Description:A rural school in Current Township. Named for Allen M. Cage, a prominent citizen who held several public offices in the county. (MSTR; Albert Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cedar Grove Church
Description:A Christian Church in the southwest section of the county. Named for its location in a cedar grove. (Salem POST, May, 1927; V. McSpadden)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Celina
Description:A village and discontinued post office (1874-1893), in Watkins Township. Settled about 1860. Named for Celina, Ohio, the hometown of the Wofford family. According to Gannett, Celina, Ohio, is named for Salina, New York; the orthography was changed to avoid confusion. The name Salina indicates the presence of salt springs or deposits. (Postal Guide; HIST. DENT, p. 598; Campbell (1873), p. 27; Campbell (1874), p. 196; J. Wilkes; MISSOURI GAZ. (1879), p. 172)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Condray
Description:In the northeast part of Norman Township; a post office from 1887 to 1910. Named for Thomas H. Condray, who, in 1885, was superintendent of Hawkins Iron Bank for Midland Blast Furnace. He was formerly a blacksmith in Salem and was born in Linn Township. Listed as Congray in Postal Guide 1887. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); R. McN.; Wilson Plank)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cooksey
Description:A village in central Short Bend Township; a post office in 1910. Named for F.E. Cooksey, a prominent citizen of the disctrict. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Coppedge Bank
Description:An iron bank six miles north of Salem. Named for Elic Coppedge; who owned it. (J.R. Watkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Corinth
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in Current Township. Organized October 13, 1877. A Bible name for the great city at which Paul preached the Gospel to the Gentiles. (Acts 18:1-20.1). (HIST. DENT, p. 618)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Coulstone
Description:A village in Sherrill Township on the Dent County line. Listed in Texas County from 1883 to 1918; in Dent since 1926. Named for W.R.E. Coulstone, merchant. (Postal Guide; Platbook; J.T. Keys; Missouri Gaz. (1883), p. 291; Postal Guide; Grosse; HIST. DENT, p. 597)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Craddock Graveyard
Description:The first cemetery in the county near Salem. Named for the Craddock family; five brothers entered land in the county before 1850. (HIST. DENT, p. 570; McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Crooked Creek
Description:A stream which flows from Meramec Township through Short Bend Township and leaves the county in the northeast part of Short Bend Township. Thence it flows through Reynolds to the Meramec River. This name is descriptive of its winding course. (Plat Book; W.A. Young)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cross School
Description:District No. 8 in Watkins Township. Named for Mat Cross, who donated the land. (MSTR; C. Covert)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Current River
Description:The largest river in the region rises in Dent County at Montauk and enters Shannon County in the northwestern corner. It winds south and merely touches the border of Texas County but cuts through the greater part of Shannon and finally enters Reynolds County on the east and ultimately flows into Black River. An unusually beautiful river, which W.A. Dorrance in his book, THREE OZARK STREAMS, describes as "a river so clean, so full, so broad, so swift that it has forced four races to name it current." The French name was "La Riviere Courante" (literally, running water) and the Spanish, "Rio Corrente." Mr. Dorrance says the name was originally conferred by the "native red men;" but he does not give the Indian form, and I have found it nowhere recorded. (Plat Book (19230); Dorrance, p. 37; Wetmore, p. 245)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Current River
Description:The largest river in the region rises in Dent County at Montauk and enters Shannon County in the northwest corner. It winds south and merely touches the border of Texas County but cuts through the greater part of Shannon and finally enters Reynolds County on the east and ultimately flows into Black River. An unusually beautiful river, which W.A. Dorrance in his book, THREE OZARK STREAMS, describes as "a river so clean, so full, so broad, so swift that it has forced four races to name it current." The French name was LA RIVIERE COURANTE (literally, running water) and the Spanish, RIO CORRENTE. Mr. Dorrance says the name was originally conferred by the "native red men;" but he does not give the Indian form, and I have found it nowhere recorded. (Plat Book (1930); Dorrance, p. 37; Wetmore, p. 245)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Current Township
Description:In the southwest section of the county, formed from Watkins Township in 1866. Named for the river which heads in the township. (HIST. DENT, p. 577; W.A. Young)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Custer
Description:A post office in Franklin Township since 1882. Named by E.M. Welch, once county sheriff, for General George Armstrong Custer, who with his entire command was killed by hostile Sioux Indians on the Little Big Horn River in Montana. Custer was born in 1839 and his famous "last stand" was in 1876. (Postal Guide; Plat Book; DICT. AM. BIOG., vol. 10, p. 7; MISSOURI GAZ., (1883), p. 297; T.P. Dent)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Darien
Description:A railroad extending four miles northwest from Avery Station. Built into the timber region in 1878 and named for the two counties it served. Now abandoned. (HIST. DENT, p. 583)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dent County
Description:Dent was formed from Shannon and Crawford Counties and organized in 1851. The county is located in the south central part of the state and is bounded by Phelps and Crawford Counties on the north; on the east by Iron and Reynolds Counties; on the south by Shannon and Texas Counties, and on the west by Phelps and Texas Counties. The county was reorganized in 1855. Named in honor of Lewis Dent, the first representative. The Dent family were among the early settlers in this region. Mark Dent, Lewis Dent's father, came to Missouri in 1803 when it was still French territory and settled at what is now Bismarck in St. Francois County. Because of Indian attacks, he returned to Virginia and in 1811 returned to Missouri. His oldest son Lewis was born in Virginia in 1807 and remained there until about 1835 when he came to Dent County. A letter in the possession of the Dent family written by Mark Dent in 1831 from St. Francis, Missouri, to Lewis in Virginia urges him to come before next May. The county history sets the date of his settlement near Salem as 1835. Campbell (1873) seems to be in error in saying the county was named for "Frederick" Dent. Frederick Dent was a St. Louisian and the father-in-law of Grant, but had nothing to do with this section. (HIST. DENT, p. 574; Campbell; T.P. Dent)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dent County Courthouse
Description:See Salem.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Doss
Description:A hamlet in northwest Franklin Township. A post office since 1889. Named for a printer, William Doss, who worked on the Dent County DEMOCRAT. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); Postal Guide; Grosse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dotson School
Description:A rural school in Osage Township. Named for James Dotson, farmer in the vicinity. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dry Fork
Description:A stream which rises in Watkins Township and flows northeast to the Meramec River. So named because it is usually dry. (Plat Book; McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dry Fork Valley Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in Watkins Township. Organized in 1889, but now disbanded. Named for its location in the valley of Dry Fork Creek. (HIST. DENT, p. 614)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Earls
Description:A former railroad station in west-central Short Bend Township. Known in the region as Earl's Spur, the station marked the end of a branch line built into the timber region belonging to a Mr. Earl. The wood was used to run the blast furnace. (Plat Book; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Earl's Spur
Description:See Earls
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Eden
Description:A hamlet in Norman Township; a discontinued post office (1886-1904). Named by James A. Hobson because of the beauty of the country. A Bible name (Genesis 2:8). (Postal Guide; Williams, State Missouri, p. 381; HIST. DENT, p. 597; Postal Guide; Grosse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Elba
Description:A discontinued post office in Norman Township (1899-1904) and a trading post used by lumbermen. Named by them for the island in the Mediterranean to which Napoleon was exiled. They thought it was a suitable name for this remote spot. (Postal Guide; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Elk Hollow
Description:A narrow valley in northern Watkins Township. Named for the elk which were native to the district. (A. Click; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Elk Hollow Creek
Description:Rises in northern Watkins Township and flows northeast to the Meramec River. Named for the hollow. In the early days it was known as Nichol's Branch after a prominent family. Two of the brothers were early lawyers in Salem and one was an editor of a newspaper. Both names are still in use. (Plat Book; A. Click; W.F. Holbrook; HIST. DENT, p. 590)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Elm Spring School
Description:A rural school in Franklin Township. Named for a spring by an elm tree which is on the school grounds. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Enke Spring
Description:A spring in Watkins Township which was owned by a family named Enke who tried to make it a resort and wanted to call it Savois Spring, for what reason is unknown. It was never called anything but Enke Spring. The name Savois, however, appears on one map, and Mr. Grosse thought he remembered hearing it had been promoted as a resort. No one else ever heard of that name, although they all knew Enke Springs. Mr. Grosse has worked on newspapers in Dent County for about fifty years. (Campbell (1873); P.G. Grosse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Enon Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in Watkins Township, which was organized August 20, 1856, by E. Hight, J.G. Rutter, and S. Bates. A Bible name for the place where John baptized (John 3:23). (HIST. DENT, p. 616)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fair Haven Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Texas Township. An ideal name. (Salem Post; V. McSpadden)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fawn
Description:A village in southeast Franklin Township. A post office from 1895 to 1904. Named because of its location in a deer country. Hunters come to the region every year. (Williams, STATE MISSOURI (1904) Postal Guide; P.G. Grosse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fishwater School
Description:District No. 16. Named after the Fitzwater Iron Bank, but now corrupted to Fishwater by popular etymology. (Postal Guide; MSTR; P.G. Grosse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fitzwater Bank
Description:An iron bank near Salem. Named for Hugh Fitzwater who developed it. (MSTR; P.G. Grosse; Wilson Plank)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Franklin Township
Description:Formed from Spring Creek Township in 1866. Named for Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790). (HIST. DENT (1889), p. 577; W.F. Holbrook; DICT. AM. BIOG., vol. 6, p. 585)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gano
Description:A post office in southwest Short Bend Township from 1904-1915 at the railroad station of Howes. When the town was first settled, it was called Howes after early settlers there, but when the post office was established, the name was not suitable because of Howe's Mill. Gano, the name of the postmaster, has gradually taken the place of the original name. Both, however, are used. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; Plat Book; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gill School
Description:District No. 42. Named for Joseph Gill, on whose land the school was located. (MSTR; J. McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gladden
Description:A village in northern Gladden Valley Township. A post office since 1886. A family name, very prominent in the district. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); R. McN.; J.W. Clark; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gladden Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in Dent County and flows southwest to empty into Current River in Shannon County. Named for a prominent family whose name occurs seven times in place names in Shannon, Dent, and Texas Counties. (A. Click; State County Highway Maps)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gladden Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in Dent County and flows southwest to empty into Current River in Shannon County. Named for a prominent family whose name occurs seven times in place names in Shannon, Dent, and Texas Counties. (A. Click; State County Highway Maps)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gladden Valley
Description:A district in the south-central section of the county, which is named for the family who settled there. (A. Click; Missouri State Highway Map (1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gladden Valley Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Christian Church in Gladden Valley Township which was organized in 1874. Named for its location. (HIST. DENT, p. 618; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gladden Valley Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Church in Gladden Valley Township which was organized in 1874. Named for its location. (HIST. DENT, p. 619; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gladden Valley Township
Description:In the south-central section of the county, erected in 1894. Named for the district known as Gladden Valley (q.v.). (Plat Book (1933); A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Glendale
Description:In eastern Meramec Township. A post office in 1887. Named for its location in the timber. (Postal Guide; Martha Askin)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Green Forest School
Description:A rural school in Norman Township. Named for its location in timber land which was given by Joab Jobson. (MSTR; J.R. Watkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Halcyon
Description:A hamlet in Sinking Township; a post office in 1904. Named by J.C. Prugh after the halcyon, a bird fabled in Greek mythology to nest on the sea about the time of the winter solstice and calm the waves, hence calm or peaceful. Prugh was the postmaster. He came to the county from McArthur, Ohio. (Postal Guide; Williams, STATE MISSOURI, p. 381)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hardscrabble School
Description:See Victor School.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hasler Pond
Description:See Round Pond.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hasler School
Description:See Round Pond School.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hawkins Bank
Description:See Hawkins Bank School.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hawkins Bank School
Description:A rural school in Spring Creek Township. Takes its name from an iron bank which was owned by the Hawkins family. (MSTR; A. Click) [See also the newspaper article on Sally Blackwell in Salem NEWS, August 13, 1981. It discusses the Hawkins Bank Community School.]
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hedrick
Description:A village in central Texas Township. A post office from 1886 to 1904. Named for Cicero P. Hedrick, who was associate judge of the county court and justice of the peace from 1882 to 1886. He was manager of the Victor Roller Mills. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); HIST. DENT (1889), p. 1049; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hepsaida Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Franklin Township. Possibly, as is indicated by the pronunciation, a miswriting of the Biblical name Hephzibah, which means "She in whom is my delight." It was the name of the mother of Manasseh, King of Judah (2 Kings 21:1), and was also applied symbolically to the restored Jerusalem (Isaiah 62:4: "Thou shalt be called Hephzibah...for the Lord delighteth in thee"). The strange perversion to Hepsaida is similar to that suggested for the puzzling Hepsidam School near Dunksburg, Grover Township, in Johnson County (see thesis by Miss Bernice Eugenia Johnson, PLACE-NAMES IN SIX WEST CENTRAL COUNTIES, 1933, p. 284). One explanation of the Johnson County name, rejected by Miss Johnson, is that it was transferred from an old Dunkard church known as Hepsidam Church, whose name was somehow corrupted from Hephzibah. The parallel corruption in the Dent County church name makes the rejected explanation more plausible. Another spelling of the Dent County name is Hepsida (cf. Lower and Upper Hepsida Schools). (Duncan; HIST. OF BAPTIST IN MISSOURI, p. 730)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hickman Mill
Description:See Montauk.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hideout
Description:See Mt. Pisgah School.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Highland School
Description:District No. 59. Named for its location on high land. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Highway School
Description:A rural school in Franklin Township. This school is now inaccessible. A car cannot be driven to it. The Superintendent of Schools says that an old road ran near it, but the new road has been built on the ridge far from it. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hobson
Description:A village in Norman Township and a post office since 1895. Named for T.E. Hobson, pioneer settler and a mill owner. (Postal Guide; Plat Book; N.D. Hobson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hobson Mill
Description:See Hobson.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hobson Mill School
Description:District No. 12 in Norman Township. Named for the mill. (MSTR; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Holbrook School
Description:District No. 74. Named because it was built on the farm of Joe Holbrook. (MSTR; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hopewell Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church organized about 1867 in Short Bend Township. An ideal name. (HIST. DENT, p. 614)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hopewell School
Description:District No. 17 in Short Bend Township. An ideal name, transferred from the church. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Howes
Description:See Gano.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Howes Mill
Description:A village in central Osage Township which has been a post office since 1874. The name appears as Howes Mill after 1895. The place was named for the mill owned and operated by Tom Howe. The old mill is a landmark in the countryside and appears on the map of 1873. (Postal Guide; Campbell (1874), p. 196; Plat Book (1933); W.F. Holbrook; HIST. DENT, p. 608; Campbell (1873), p. 27)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hulsey School
Description:District No. 63. Named for the family who lived in the district. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hutching School
Description:See Water Fork School.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Huzzah Creek
Description:Rises in Reynolds County and flows through Osage Township. Also spelled Hussah Creek. An Indian name according to residents. Such an Indian word could not be found, but it might be a form of Osage. One spelling given by Penicaut is Huzzaus. (Plat Book; C.E. Dye)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Huzzah Township
Description:Listed by Davis and Durrie in 1876, but evidently an error, as there is no official record of the township at the county seat. (Davis & Durrie, p. 362)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hyler Branch
Description:A stream in northern Watkins Township. Flows north into Phelps County. Named after John Hyler, who had a farm in the vicinity and ran the store. (Plat Book (1933); J.W. Clark; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Indian Trail State Park
Description:A large park in the northeast section of the county, comprising 13,255 acres which are used as a game refuge. A CCC camp is located there. Named because the park is located on an old Indian trail. (Ryle & Garner, STORY OF MISSOURI, p. 316; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Iron Road
Description:See Highway 45.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jack
Description:In the eastern part of Texas Township; a post office since 1910. Named for Jack Jadwin, son of J.J. Jadwin, the first postmaster. In 1876 a post office was established at this place called Nursery Hill because of a large farm dealing in plants and seeds. It lasted only a few years and was not reestablished until 1910. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); W.A. Young)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jadwin
Description:A hamlet in northwest Gladden Valley Township which has been a post office since 1879. Named for J.A. Jadwin, who lived there. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); HIST. DENT (1889), p. 580; W.F. Holbrook; Missouri GAZ. (1879), p. 316)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jameson Bank
Description:An iron bank near Salem. Named for James Jameson, who owned and developed it. (Barns, MISSOURI, p. 573; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jameson School
Description:In Spring Creek Township. Named for Joe Jameson, a land owner. (MSTR; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Joy
Description:A village and post office in southeast Texas Township from 1889-1891. It was reestablished in 1928. The name was given by J.M. Hotchkiss, postmaster, or J.M. Hoodenpyle, prominent citizen, to show the emotion caused by the establishment of the office. (Postal Guide; R. McN., Plat Book; MISSOURI GAZ., (1893), p. 480; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Knob View Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in Osage Township which was organized in 1887. The church met in the schoolhouse and still meets there irregularly. (HIST. DENT, p. 615; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Knob View School
Description:District No. 13. Named for its location near bald hills. At one time shortly after the Civil War there was a little hamlet which had a grange at this place, but only the school remains. (MSTR; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lake Spring
Description:A village in northern Watkins Township; the first post office in the county, having been established in the late 1840s. Named by John anmd Samuel Hyer, employees of the Meramec Iron Works, who settled at a large spring on Dry Fork where the spring water formed a lake. They first called the village Laketon and tried to make it the county seat, but it was in the extreme northwest corner of the county and not a suitable place. They changed the name to Lake Spring in 1856, but it is found listed as Laketon as late as 1873. (HIST. DENT, pp. 557, 568, 572, 608; Postal Guide; W.F. Holbrook; J. McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Laketon
Description:See Lake Spring.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Laketon Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church in Watkins Township, established in 1869. Named from the old name of Lake Springs (q.v.). (HIST. DENT, p. 620)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Layton
Description:A post office in southwest Texas Township in 1910. Named for the Layton family, who had a general store in the neighborhood until about 1927. (Postal Guide; Plat Book; Mrs. Mary Fredericks)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lecoma
Description:A village in north-central Watkins Township since 1883; a post office since 1886. Named from the first two letters of the Mercantile firm of Lenox, Comstock, and Martin. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); HIST. DENT, p. 597; P.G. Grosse; MISSOURI GAZ., (1889), p. 748)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Leeds School
Description:A rural school in Spring Creek Township. Named for T.H. Leeds, who was a prominent citizen for years, being a county officer for several terms. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lenox
Description:A village in Watkins Township. A post office since 1886. Named for the Lenox family, who entered land in the county as early as 1837. (Postal Guide; HIST. DENT, p. 597; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lents
Description:A discontinued post office and store in Osage Township (1915-1921). Named for the Frederick Lents, who had the mercantile business there. (Postal Guide; Com. Atlas; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Liberty Church
Description:A Baptist Church near Salem. An ideal name. (V. McSpadden)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Linn Township
Description:In the eastern section of the county, a little south of center, established in 1866. Named for linn or linden trees which grow in the vicinity. (Plat Book (1933); HIST. DENT, p. 577)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Linville School
Description:District No. 5. Named for R.B. Linville, farmer; the school is built on his land. (MSTR; J.B. McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lost Creek
Description:A stream in the western part of Short Bend Township which flows northeast to Meramec. So named because the water sinks into the gravel and disappears. (Plat Book (1933); W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lower Hepsida School
Description:A rural school in Franklin Township. Named from Hepsaida Church (q.v.), with a slight change in the spelling. The district was divided and one school was called "Lower" Hepsida and the other "Upper." (MSTR; Duncan, HIST. BAPTIST IN MISSOURI, p. 730)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lower Parker School
Description:A rural school in Franklin Township. Named after the Parker family, on whose farm the school was built. It is distinguished by the adjective "Lower" from Upper Parker School (q.v.), which is higher up the creek. (MSTR; A. Click; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lurd
Description:In Meramec Township. A logging post office which lasted only three years (1893-1896) and was named for the man who ran the camp. (Postal Guide; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Max
Description:In the north- central section of Linn Township. A post office since 1918. Named after Max Coffman, the postmaster's son. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); R. McN., W.A. Young)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Meramec River
Description:A large river winding through the north-central section of the county and flowing northeast to the Mississippi River near St. Louis. One of the oldest names in the region, which Hodge lists as "Merameg" from "Manumaig," Chippewa for catfish, and the name of a tribe living about the great lakes in 1672 according to the Jesuit Relations. Meramec, also spelled "Maramet," and "Maramegoua" is an Algonquin word signifying "a good fish," according to Rothensteines. Gannett also lists it as meaning "catfish." Mr. Bert Lowenstein, writing in the St. Louis POST-DISPATCH gives a detailed account of the history of the name Meramec. He writes that Joliet and Marquette were probably the first Europeans to pass the mouth of the Meramec; for although they make no mention of the river in their account of their voyage down the Mississippi River to the mouth of the Arkansas River, Father Marquette notes the location of the "Maroa" tribe in the country of the Illinois. The Recollect missionary, Father Membre, who accompanied La Salle and De Tonty, writes of "the village of the Tamaroas on the east bank about six leagues below the River of the Ozages." La Salle, De Tonty, Fathers Joutel, Marest, Pinet, and other missionaireis mention the "Tamaroas" or "Maroas" and their villages, which they locate "ten leagues below the River of Illinois," or six leagues below the mouth of the "Pekitanoui," the river of the "Missouries." The first historical notice of the river is found in the account of a voyage by Father James Gravier in the year 1700. He wrote, "We discovered the river Mearamigoua where a rich lead mine is situated." Penicaut, a member of Le Seur's mineralogical expedition, mentions in 1700, "one finds a small stream called the Meramecsipy." In 1702 De Iberville applied to the French Government for the exclusive privilege to work the lead mines on the Riviere Maramequisipi. The Sieur La Renaudiere explored the region in 1723 and wrote an "Account of the mines of M. de la Motte and M. de Maramet." In May, 1723, Dixon D'Artaguiette wrote, "About one o'clock M. Renault, director of mines, arrived here from the Meramek Mines." On June 14, 1723, Pierre Dugue de Boisbriant and Marc Antonie de La Laire des Ursin, Intendant, granted to Renault a league and a half of ground upon the "Little Merameig" and in the "river Merameig." The "Maroa," the Indian tribe whose villages were nearest to the river's mouth, seems to be the origin of the word according to Mr. Loewenstein. The second syllable "mec," "mac," "meg," or "meq" is a term common among the Algonquin tribes. It apparently signifies a branch river or small stream as opposed to "missi," "mitchi" meaning great. The many spellings would naturally result from the difficulty of settlers with the original name. (MISSOURI H.R. "Earliest History of Mine La Motte," John E. Rothensteines, vol. 20, p. 200; Salem POST, Feb. 8, 1934; Houck, HISTORY MISSOURI, vol. 1, p. 281; Gannett, p. 205; R. McN.; Wetmore (1837), p. 250; Bert Loewenstein, St. Louis POST- DISPATCH, Sept. 10, 1938)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Methan School
Description:A rural school in Linn Township. Named for Jim Methan, farmer, who gave the school land. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Millsap Bank
Description:An iron bank five miles north of Salem. Named for Joseph Millsap, who owned the hill. (N.D. Hobson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Montauk
Description:A village in the central part of Current Township; the second post office established in the county (1860). H.D. Kitchens was an early postmaster. Ephraim Bressie named it Montauk. Since 1927 it has been a state park. The large spring there is the head of Current River. One of the first mills in the county was built there by C.L. Stevenson in 1868. He sold to a Mrs. Hickman and her son in 1881. The locality has been known from the mill owners as Stevenson's Mill and Hickman's Mill, but the name Montauk has always been the official name for the village which was the first county seat. The name is an Indian name of uncertain meaning, according to Hodge. He states that it is the name given a tribe formerly from Long Island and related to the Indians of Massachusetts and Connecticut. Gannett says that it is a corruption of the Indian "minnawtawkit," meaning "island place," or "in the island country." By another authority said to mean "spirit" or "spirit tree." Montauk was first called Bressie's Spring, for Mr. Ephraim Bressie who came to the region in 1830 from Tennessee. (Postal Guide; HIST. DENT, pp. 567, 597; Holbrook; Hodge, p. 934; Gannett, p. 212; J. McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Montauk State Park
Description:See Montauk.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Moser School
Description:District No. 25 near Salem. Named for F.M. Moser, landowner in the district. (MSTR; Grosse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mounce
Description:A village in Meramec Township. A post office from 1893 to 1915. Named for Prince E. Mounce, who settled in the community. (Williams, STATE MISSOURI (1904); P.G. Grosse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mount Hope
Description:See Taladego.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mt. Dyke School
Description:A rural school in the central part of the county. No definite information could be found concerning its name. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mt. Hermon School
Description:District No. 33. A Bible name (Deut. 4:28) thought to be the site of Christ's Transfiguration. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mt. Hope Church
Description:See Taladego.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mt. Pisgah School
Description:District No. 11. A familiar Bible name (cf. above). Locally known as Hideout, a common nickname for schools in remote districts. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mt. Pleasant School
Description:District No. 52. A name of approbation. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nelson Branch
Description:A small stream in Linn Township which flows northeast to the Meramec River. Named for an early family. (J. McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nelson Branch Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Linn Township; established in 1869. Named for the stream. (HIST. DENT, p. 615; J. McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nelson School
Description:A rural school in Linn Township. Named from the early church. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:New Enon Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in Meramec Township which was organized March 12, 1887. A Bible name for the place at which John the Baptist baptized Christ (John 3:23). The "new" distinguishes the church from an older Enon (q.v.) in the same locality. (HIST. DENT, p. 615)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:New Home Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in Sinking Township. Organized on September 25, 1883. A name given to the church because the church was built in a new settlement. (MSTR; Mrs. C.L. McSpadden; HIST. DENT, p. 615)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:New Home School
Description:A rural school in Sinking Township. Named for the church. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:New Hope Church
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Spring Creek Township, founded in 1867. Cf. above. (HIST. DENT, p. 618)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:New Hope School
Description:A rural school in Spring Creek Township. Named from the Presbyterian Church which is near. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:New Salem Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Spring Creek Township, which was established in 1874. Named Salem for the town, and the "New" was added because there was already one Salem Baptist Church. (HIST. DENT, p. 615)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nichols Branch
Description:See Elk Hollow Creek.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Norman Creek
Description:A small stream in north-central Norman Township which flows north into Phelps County. Named for a pioneer family, who had a mill there in the early days. (J. McDonald; V. McSpadden)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Norman Township
Description:Formed in the northeast section of the county in 1866. Named from Norman Creek. (HIST. DENT (1889), p. 577; N.B. Hobson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:North Cross Roads School
Description:District No. 15. Named for its location at a cross roads. Another school in the county is called South Cross Roads (q.v.). (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:North Fairview School
Description:A rural school in Meramec Township. Named for the beauty of the prospect. (MSTR; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:North Lenox
Description:A village in southern Watkins Township, a few miles north of Lenox (q.v.). Named for the older village. (Plat Book (1933); J. McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nova Scotia
Description:A ghost town in Meramec Township, which, between 1880 and 1885, had a population of 3,000 and the largest blast furnace in the United States at that time. When the timber supply failed the Nova Scotia Iron Company, for whom the town was named, withdrew and the town vanished. (Ryle & Garner, p. 274; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Nursery Hill
Description:See Jack.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oak Ridge Church
Description:A Christian Church in Short Bend Township; organized in 1867. Named for its location. (HIST. DENT, p. 619)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oakland School
Description:District No. 35. Named because of its location in the black oak region. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Onie
Description:In Norman Township. A post office in 1896-1897. Named by D.M. Bennight for his son. (Postal Guide; Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Orchard Bank
Description:Iron bank located near Salem (q.v.). Named for Jim Orchard, who owned the bank. (Barns, MISSOURI, p. 572; Holbrook; W. Plank)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Osage School
Description:A rural school located in Osage Township. Named for the township. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Osage Township
Description:A township in the east-central section of the county, established in 1866. Named for the Osage Indians. (HIST. DENT, p. 577; Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark Mountains
Description:A mountain range of great antiquity and beauty which embraces all five of the counties in this thesis. The name is of French and Indian origin and a result of a misunderstanding by the English. It means literally "at the (country, river, or place of the) Arkansas." The Indians of Siouan stock who migrated westward called themselves Quapaw (down stream people) but they were called, before and after their migration, the Arkansas by the Illinois. Early 18th century maps by G. De l'Isle show that both the Ohio and Wabash rivers were called the Arkansea. Father Gravier in the JESUIT RELATIONS in 1700 writes: "It is called by the Illinois and the Oumiamis the river of the Arkansea because the Arkansea formerly dwelt on it." It was the custom of the French colonists to abbreviate the long, difficult Indian geographical names; hence les Arkansea became les Arcs. In the French archives at Jefferson Memorial in St. Louis, Mr. W.A. Dorrance states, the phrase "aux arcs" appears many times, meaning on the river, at the post, or in the country of the Arkansas. The abbreviated phrase "aux arcs" was mistaken by the English for one word and they spelled it Ozark. The word is found on a map by Bradbury in 1809. In 1816 it was spelled Osark by Kerr. Schoolcraft in 1819 spelled it Ozark. (Dorrance, W.A., THREE OZARK STREAMS, appendix 1; JESUIT RELATIONS, vol. 65, p. 107)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark Mountains
Description:A mountain range of great antiquity and beauty which embraces all five of the counties in this thesis. The name is of French and Indian origin and the result of a misunderstanding by the English. It means literally "at the (country, river, or place of the) Arkansas." The Indians of Siouan stock who migrated westward called themselves Quapaw (down stream people) but they were called, both before ands after their migration, the Arkansas by the Illinois. Early 18th century maps by G. De l'Isle show that both the Ohio and the Wabash rivers were called the Arkansea. Father Gravier in the JESUIT RELATIONS in 1700 writes: "It is called by the Illinois and the Oumiamis the river of the Arkansea because the Arkansea formerly dwelt on it." It was the custom of the French colonists to abbreviate the long, difficult Indian geographical names; hence les Arkansea became les Arcs. In the French archives at Jefferson Memorial in St. Louis, Mr. W.A. Dorrance states, the phrase "aux arcs" appears many times, meaning in the river, at the post, or in the country of the Arkansas. The abbreviated phrase "aux arcs" was mistaken by the English for one word and they spelled it Ozark. The word is found on a map by Bradbury in 1809. In 1816 it was spelled Osark by Kerr. Schoolcraft in 1819 spelled it Ozark. (Dorrance, W.A., THREE OZARK STREAMS, appendix 1; JESUIT RELATIONS, vol. 65, p. 107)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Parkview School
Description:A rural school in Osage Township. Named for its location near Deer Run State Park. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pilot Grove Church
Description:A Methodist Church organized in 1835 at the home of Wilson Craddock in Spring Creek Township. This was the first Methodist Church in the county, but nothing could be found concerning the origin of the name. (HIST. DENT (1889), p. 618)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pine Flat School
Description:A rural school in Current Township. Pine usually grows on ridges since it needs to be well drained. Pine on flat land served as a means of identifying the neighborhood and the name was transferred to the school. (MSTR; J.W. Clark; Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Plank Branch Railroad
Description:A railroad branch built in 1882 for five and a half miles to connect the Plank Iron Bank with Howes. Named for its terminus. (HIST. DENT, p. 583)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Plank Iron Bank
Description:See Plank Mines.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Plank Mines
Description:A region north of Salem in Spring Creek Township. Named for James A. Plank, who discovered and developed the bank. The name is also explained as being due to a plank road built to facilitate the removal of the ore, but Wilson Plank, now county treasurer, states that it was named for his grandfather. (Cram (1924); J.W. Clark; Wilson Plank)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Grove Church
Description:See Salem Baptist Church.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Hill
Description:A hamlet which had a grange in 1873; now deserted. Located in southern Watkins Township. Named because it was a delightful location. (HIST. DENT (1889), p. 615; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church organized in 1858 in Watkins Township. Named from the long deserted hamlet of Pleasant Hill. (HIST. DENT, p. 610)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Valley Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in Meramec Township. It was organized at the home of Judge Fountain Holbrook. Named for its location. (HIST. DENT, p. 614; Salem POST, Aug. 14, 1920; Duncan, MISSOURI BAPT., p. 730)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pomeroy Bank
Description:An iron bank three miles north of Salem. Named for Judge W.B. Pomeroy, who owned the land. (Barn's MISSOURI, 571; W.A. Young)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Priest School
Description:See South Ozark School.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ranger
Description:A village in southeast Texas Township which was a post office from 1899 to 1918, but no explanation of the name could be found. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Red Point
Description:A settlement in the extreme eastern part of the county, now listed in Iron County. Listed as a post office in Dent in 1883. Named for the iron in the neighborhood. (MISSOURI GAZ. (1883), p. 778; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rhyse
Description:A village in Texas Township; a post office since 1921. Named by Sam Jeffries for his grandson, Rhyse Jeffries. Rhyse was the boy's mother's maiden name. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; W.A. Young)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Riverside
Description:A deserted hamlet in Franklin Township. A large blast furnace and iron mine was located on the bank of the Meramec River. It is completely gone now. (Cram (1924); Grosse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rock Spring Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Osage Township. Named for a small spring near the building. (Duncan, HIST. BAPT. IN MISSOURI, p. 730; C.E. Dye)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rocky Ford School
Description:In Osage Township. Named for its location near a stony ford of the Huzzah Creek. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Round Pond
Description:A small body of water in Norman Township. Named from its circular shape. It is also known as Hasler Pond from the family whose farm is near. (W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Round Pond Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in Norman Township. Named for Round Pond (q.v.). (HIST. DENT, p. 614)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Round Pond Church [2 of 2]
Description:A Presbyterian Church in Norman Township. Named for its location at Round Pond (q.v.). (HIST. DENT, p. 621; A. Young)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Round Pond School
Description:A rural school in Norman Township. Named from its location by Hasler Pond (q.v.) which is circular in shape. The school is also called Hasler School, the name Hasler being that of the family living nearby. Both names are used. (MSTR; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rufus
Description:A small settlement in northwest Current Township which was a post office for less than a year. Named for Rufus Burns, storekeeper and postmaster. (Plat Book (1933); P.G. Grosse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sacred Heart Church
Description:A Catholic Church in Salem. Originally organized in 1878, it was named to honor the Sacred Heart of Jesus, a special object of devotion for Catholics. The church is a mission church and holds services irregularly, although it was reorganized in 1934. (Father J.J. Wood; Catholic Register)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Salem
Description:The county seat was first settled by F.M. Jameson in 1852 in Spring Creek Township. Organized as a town in 1853, it has been a post office since 1860. The town was named by Joseph Milsap and Jameson, county agent and settler. Salem is a Bible name, a Hebrew word meaning peace, an old name for Jerusalem. It was listed as Dent County Court House for several years. There are fifty- three other Salems in the United States. (HIST. DENT (1889), p. 598; Campbell (1873), p. 27; Plat Book (1933); Eaton, vol. 13 (1918), p. 60; W.F. Holbrook; MISSOURI GAZ. (1860), p. 442)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Salem and Southeastern Railroad
Description:Built about 1880 from Salem to the Riverside Iron Bank. Following the usual custom of railroads its name was derived from the territory it served. (HIST. DENT, p. 583; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Salem Branch of the Frisco
Description:An almost abandoned branch of the Frisco River running from Cuba (in Phelps County) on the main line to Salem. The road was originally known as the St. Louis, Springfield, and Little Rock, as the original idea was to build the road south and west to Springfield and Little Rock, Arkansas. (HIST. DENT, p. 582)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Salem Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Spring Creek Township. Named in 1855 for its location in the town of Salem, but it was previously known as Pleasant Grove Baptist when it was organized in 1843. The original church was built a few miles from Salem. (HIST. DENT, p. 614)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Savois Spring
Description:See Enke Spring.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Shop Hollow
Description:A narrow valley in Meramec Township near Stone Hill (q.v.). Named for a blacksmith shop which stood at the mouth of the hollow. (Wolvis, HIST. SKETCH OF DENT (1928); Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Short Bend
Description:A trading post and post office since 1860 in east-central Short Bend Township. Named for its location on a sharp turn of the Meramec River. R.T. Springer was the first postmaster. (Postal Guide; Plat Book; P.G. Grosse)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Short Bend Township
Description:Formed from Spring Creek and Meramec Townships in 1873. Named from the post office. (HIST. DENT, p. 577; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Simmond's Mountain
Description:See Simmon's Iron Mountain.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Simmon's Iron Mountain
Description:A mountain which contains quantities of surface iron. Near Salem. Named for its owner Judge C.C. Simmons of St. Louis. Also called Simmond's Mountain. (Davis (1876), p. 361; Barns, COMMONWEALTH MISSOURI, p. 571; Missouri GAZ., Campbell (1874), p. 195; W.F. Holbrook; HIST. DENT, p. 565)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Simmons School
Description:In Spring Creek Township. Named for the iron bank. (MSTR; J. McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sinking Creek
Description:A stream which rises in southeastern Dent County and flows southwest into Shannon County to empty into Current River near Round Springs. Named for a low natural bridge under which the stream sinks into a hill. (State Highway Map (1938); L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sinking Creek
Description:A stream which rises in southeastern Dent County and flows southwest into Shannon County to empty into Current River near Round Springs. Named for a low natural bridge under which the stream sinks into a hill. (State Highway Map (1938); L.D. Shuck)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sinking Township
Description:One of the first townships established in 1851 in the center part of the county. Named for the stream. (HIST. DENT, p. 577; Plat Book; Albert Lunn)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sligo
Description:An abandoned town in northeast Short Bend Township. At one time over three hundred families lived there. Now there are six. Listed in the Postal Guide as Sligo Furnace in 1886 and 1887; afterwards as Sligo. Named after the furnace company which was established by the Sligo Iron Company of St. Louis. Sligo is the name of a town and bay in Ireland. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); S.O. Keys, Gannett, p. 285)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sligo Branch
Description:Built in 1881 to connect the Sligo Blast Furnace with the main line. (HIST. DENT, p. 583)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sligo Furnace
Description:See Sligo.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sligo School
Description:A rural school in Short Bend Township. Named for the village. (MSTR; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:South Cross Roads School
Description:A rural school in Gladden Valley Township. Named for its location near the crossing of the two roads. The South distinguishes it from North Cross Roads School (q.v.). (MSTR; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:South Fairview School
Description:A rural school in Current Township. A name of approbation for the prospect. (MSTR; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:South Ozark School
Description:District No. 57. Named for the mountain range in which it is located. Locally known as Priest School House after the farmer on whose farm it is built. (MSTR; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:South Shady Grove School
Description:District No. 64. Named for its location in a grove south of Salem. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Spring Creek
Description:A stream which rises in Spring Creek Township and flows northeast to the Meramec River. So named because seven small streams form its source. (HIST. DENT, p. 575; Plat Book; Albert Lunn)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Spring Creek School
Description:A rural school in Spring Creek Township. Named for the stream. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Spring Creek Township
Description:One of the original townships organized in 1851. Located in the north-central part of the county. Named from Spring Creek, which flows through it. (HIST. DENT (1889), p. 574; Plat Book Dent (1933)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Springer's Mill
Description:Probably the first mill in the county; established a little before the Civil War on the Meramec River at what is now Short Bend. Named for the miller who became the first postmaster at Short Bend. (Missouri GAZ. (1874), p. 191; J. McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:St. Louis, Springfield, and Little Rock Railroad
Description:See Salem Branch of Frisco.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stevenson Mill
Description:See Montauk.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stone Hill [1 of 2]
Description:In Meramec Township. A rocky river bluff which was named by the Cole family. (HIST. DENT, p. 594; MISSOURI H.R., vol. 23, p. 310)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stone Hill [2 of 2]
Description:A village in southern Meramec Township. A post office since 1886. Named for its location on Stone Hill. The second largest town in the county, it claims to be the oldest settlement, as George Cole came to the Meramec banks in 1828. (HIST. DENT, p. 594; Postal Guide; Plat Book; J.R. Watkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stony Point School
Description:A rural school in Short Bend Township whose name was suggested by its location. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Success School
Description:District No. 34 in Linn Township. An ideal name. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sugar Tree Grove School
Description:A rural school in Meramec Township. Named for a maple sugar tree grove. (MSTR; J.W. Clark)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sylvan
Description:A long deserted hamlet in Linn Township which was a post office from 1860 until after the Civil War. Named because of its location in a wooded section. (Campbell (1873); Albert Lunn)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Taladego
Description:A discontinued post office (1881-1893) in Current Township. An Indian name. The name is now used to apply to the W.A. Young home and Mr. Young stated they explained it as meaning "Welcome, Friend." The word is probably a variant form of the word Talladega. According to Read, the word is a combination of the Creek, Talwa, meaning town, and atigi, meaning border; hence Border Town. The final syllable "wa" is regularly lost in Creek compound words. The settlement was originally called Mount Hope after an early church and recent maps show the place as Mount Hope. (Postal Guide; W.A. Young; Read, PLACE NAMES IN ALABAMA, p. 62; Missouri GAZ. (1883), p. 1213)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Taylor Bank
Description:An iron bank in Norman Township. Named for C.S. Taylor, who was a partner of Watkins in a mining company. (Barn's MISSOURI, p. 571; J.R. Watkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Texas Township
Description:Formed from Watkins and Spring Creek Townships in 1866. So named because it borders Texas County. (HIST. DENT (1889); W.A. Young)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Turtle
Description:In the southwest part of Linn Township. A post office since 1910. Named from the pond. (Postal Guide; Plat Book (1933); W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Turtle Pond
Description:A pond in southwest Linn Township. Named for the unusual number of turtles in it. (W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Turtle School
Description:A rural school in Linn Township. Takes its name from the pond. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Twane
Description:A village in Meramec Township which was a post office from 1860 to 1895. The office was originally called Winston. The postmaster was Joseph Gill, who had the office in his home. During the war the equipment was stolen. When the war was over, Gill wanted the office reestablished, but the name Winston had been used in Daviess County. Gill decided to call the office after Mark Twain, who was coming into prominence. The postal department dropped the first half and the latter was misspelled Twane. Winston is a stock name for towns, being found in twelve states. The office of Twane was not at the same place as Winston, being farther east, but it served the same territory. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; Wolvis, HIST. DENT (1928), p. 31; Missouri GAZ. (1860), p. 481; Goodwin (1867), p. 46; Campbell (1873), p. 27; Missouri GAZ. (1874), p. 196)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Union Church
Description:Built in Salem; it was named because it was constructed for the use of all denominations. (A. Click; HIST. DENT, p. 615)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Union Independent Academy
Description:An early school in Watkins Township, founded by the Hyer family and others in February, 1857. It was so named because it was non-sectarian. It flourished until the Civil War. (HIST. DENT, p. 613)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Upper Hepsida School
Description:See Lower Hepsida.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Upper Parker School
Description:A rural school in the central section of the county. It was named after the family on whose farm it was originally located. The upper distinguished it from another school farther down the creek. (MSTR; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Valley Knob
Description:A hamlet in north-central Linn Township. Named for a geographical formation at the head of the valley in which the hamlet is located. (Plat Book (1933); McDonald)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Victor Mill
Description:A mill in the vicinity of Lake Springs. An ideal name given to a mill established by John Hyler. (HIST. DENT (1889), p. 608; J.R. Watkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Victor School
Description:A rural school in Texas Township. Named to honor the establishment of a permanent school. For many years the district was called Hardscrabble School because of the difficulty in maintaining a school. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Warfel School
Description:District No. 47. Named for Tom Warfel, a large landowner in the region. (MSTR; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Water Fork
Description:See Watery Fork.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Water Fork School
Description:In Meramec Township. Named for the creek. Also called Hutching School from the family who live near. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Watery Fork
Description:A stream in northwest Meramec Township which flows into the Meramec River. Named because it is a large stream and makes a fork with the Meramec. Also called Water Fork. (Plat Book; J.R. Watkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Watkins Bank
Description:An iron bank, eight miles north of Salem. Named after J.A. Watkins, who discovered and developed it. (Barn's MISSOURI, p. 571; J.R. Watkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Watkins School
Description:District School No. 4. Named for the J.A. Watkins family. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Watkins Township
Description:One of the original townships; in the northwest section of the county, erected in 1851. Named for James Watkins, an early settler, who came to the region in 1837. (HIST. DENT (1889), p. 577; J.A. Watkins)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Weber School
Description:District No. 9 in Norman Township. Named for the J.R. Weber family. One of the sons, C.R. Weber, is now circuit clerk and collector for the county. (MSTR; C.R. Weber)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:West Bunker
Description:A village in Sinking Township. Named from Bunker, a town across the county line in Reynolds County. The locality is part of the holdings of the Bunker, Culler Lumbering Company, which has several sawmills in the neighborhood. (County Plat Book; J.W. Clark; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:West Ozark School
Description:A rural school in Sinking Township. Named for the mountains; the west distinguishes it from South Ozark School (q.v.). (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:West Prong Creek
Description:Rises in Clinton Township and flows southeast to the Big Piney. Named because it forms a fork with the river from the west. (HIST. TEXAS; S.O. Keys)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:West Shady Grove School
Description:District No. 38. Named for its location in a grove west of Salem. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:West White Oak School
Description:In Current Township. Named for timber in the vicinity. The "West" distinguishes it from another school called White Oak. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:White Oak School
Description:District No. 26. Named for the timber in the region. (MSTR; A. Click)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Winston
Description:See Twane.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Woford Township
Description:A township which was formed in 1871 and was soon unmade. Named for Smith Woford, a prominent farmer. (HIST. DENT (1889), p. 577; W.F. Holbrook)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Young School
Description:District No. 41. Named for the W.A. Young family, on whose farm it is located. (MSTR; W.A. Young)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Zeigler Bank
Description:An iron bank near Salem. Named for John Zeigler, who discovered and developed the bank. (Barns, MISSOURI, p. 573; Wilson Plank)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

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