Daviess County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Adam-Ondi-Ahman
Description:Early in 1837 Mormon immigrants began to settle in Daviess County. One year later, May, 1838, Prophet Joseph Smith had one of his famous revelations which directed him to found a town at a point overlooking Grand River to be called Adam-ondi-Ahmon. The etymology of this strange name has never been explained. In this case, as in many others, Smith relied upon the "gift of tongues" for his word coinage. A popular explanation of the word in that it designated the place where Father Adam was buried, which is based upon the teachings of Smith. The Prophet instilled it into his people that Adam and Eve entered Adam-ondi-Ahman after they had been driven out of the Garden of Eden, and it was here they they spent their last days. According to Linn, Smith explained the name by revelation, as "the place where Adam shall come to visit his people, or the Ancient of Days shall sit, as spoken of by Daniel the Prophet." Furthermore, Smith preached that Adam, three years before his death, called a number of high priests to the valley of Adam-ondi-Ahman and there blessed them. A study of the Book of Mormon itself throws a little light upon tne etymology of the peculiar names which Joseph Smith coined. "Omer," "Ener," "Ablom," and "Shim" are examples of a few proper names which he coined. Note also the following: "...and they also had horses, and asses, and there were elephants, and cureloms and cummons; all of which were useful unto man, and more especially the elephants and cureloms and cummons." (p. 494-19). The cureloms and cummons must have indeed been strange animals. Smith's "gift of tongues" seems to have been given to him when he translated the Golden Plates by the aid of the "Urin" and "Thumin." A host of words have come down to us of which he alone could define their meanings. The name Adam-ondi-Ahman was replaced by Cravensville, when a new town was built upon the Mormon site. Sometimes the old Mormon name is used, but it is usually abbreviated to Di-amon, or Diamong. (Linn, p. 195; Riley, p. 168; BOOK OF MORMON, p. 494; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 434; HIST. OF DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 88; HIST. OF CALD. & LIV., p. 118)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Allen School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Altamont
Description:A railroad junction, so named because of its high elevation of 1,002 feet at the depot. Altamont signified high mountain. The town was established about 1890. (Eaton, p. 284; HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 88; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI Vol. 1, p. 454, 461)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Alto Vista
Description:Established in 1865 by M.D. Hines. The name signifies a high view. Although the town has disappeared, the name remains to designate the neighborhood. It is sometimes, more gramatically, spelled Alta Vista. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 89)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Alto Vista School
Description:Named for a town.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Arnold School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Auberry Grove
Description:A pioneer settlement near Jamesport, made by Thomas Auberry; hence the name. (ATLAS OF DAVIESS)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Bancroft
Description:In 1859 John Oram and Thomas Mickels each gave five acres of land for a town site, to be called Bancroft. A popular historian, George Bancroft, published his HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES in ten volumes between the years 1834 and 1874. The town of Bancroft may have been named for this historian. It is now defunct. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, pp. 89-90; HIST. DAVIESS, pp. 712-14; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 461; THE AMERICANA, Vol. 3, p. 133-4)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Bancroft School
Description:Named for a town.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Bardrick School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Barnett School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Bear Branch School
Description:Named for a stream.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Bell Tower School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Benton Township
Description:Benton Township is found in three counties in this survey. All are named in honor of Thomas H. Benton. In Atchison County, the township was organized in 1858 from the Nishnebotna and reduced to its present limits in 1870. In Daviess County, Benton Township was first included in Grindstone in 1837, next in Big Creek, in 1839 and finally in 1840 it was made a separate township. (HIST. OF DAV. p. 248; Names File No. 20; HIST. OF N.W. MISSOURI, p. 449; Sam Evans, (letter); HIST. OF HOLT & ATCH., p. 630)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Big Creek
Description:Doubtless named from the fact that in seasons of heavy rainfall the creek floods the lowlands. In Harrison County there are two tributaries called East and West Forks. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 610; B.P. Sigler; Inman, p. 4; 6)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Big Creek Township
Description:In 1839 a township was organized and called Big Creek, for the stream of the same name which runs through this locality. The court of 1840 changed many of the place names of the county, making them honor national leaders. Big Creek then became known as Benton (q.v.). (Hutawa's Map, ATLAS DAVIESS COUNTY 1876, p. 10)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Big Muddy
Description:Flows through Washington, Grand River, Union and Jackson Townships. It has many tributaries one of which is called Little Muddy. Doubtless the name of the main stream was suggested by the popular (though erroneous) etymology for the Missouri River. (Map in ATLAS OF DAVIESS, 1876, p. 5; Hutawa's Map, 1844)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Big Run
Description:This stream has in its name the word run, meaning a brook or creek. Since it waters a large territory it is called Big Run. Another branch of the stream is called South Big Run. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 725; ATLAS OF DAVIESS 1876)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Big Slough
Description:Many of the streams of Daviess County must have looked very large to the pioneer, judging from the adjective he invariably attached to the name. Here the name has the meaning of a marshy place, though no doubt in seasons of heavy rainfall, it assumed the form of a stream. (ATLAS OF DAVIESS 1876)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Blake
Description:A railroad station. (Cited in HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 454)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Blakley School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Blue School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Boyd School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Brown School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Brownsdale
Description:This country post office was located in Jefferson Township about 1893. Brown is not only a common name in the country but there is also a family living in the vicinity of this post office by that name. There is no evidence that the name Brownsdale was derived from the family name. (MISSOURI GAZ. 1893, p. 192; HIST. OF DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 703)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Brushy Creek
Description:A name descriptive of the land along the banks of the stream was given to creeks in four counties. Sub-branches of the stream in Daviess County are called East and West Brushy, according to their position to the main stream. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 647; ATLAS OF DAVIESS, 1898; ATLAS OF DE KALB, 1877; SOME PIONEER HISTORY; HIST. CALDWELL & LIVINGSTON, p. 550; PAST & PRESENT, Vol. 1, p. 276)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Bullard's Branch
Description:Bullard's Branch finds its origin in Lincoln Township. It perhaps takes its name from a family. (ATLAS OF DAVIESS, 1876)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Carlow
Description:A small village which takes its name from Joseph H. Carlow, a native of Canada, who came to Missouri in 1865, removing to Daviess County about ten years later. He was the owner of Jackson Mills also a sawmill and real estate around the village now known as Jackson Station (q.v.). (HIST. DAVIESS p. 306, 751; HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 87; Sam Evans (letter)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Charity School
Description:An abstract name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Civil Bend
Description:Civil Bend was laid off by Gilbert Canfield in 1868. It was located in the township formerly known as Civil Bend which was established in 1866. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 306; 728; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 461)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Civil Bend Township
Description:Formed in May, 1866, from the north part of Jefferson. Here the Grand River makes a deep bend to the south, which may have suggested a second element to the name; the first part is unexplained. It is now called Marion. (ATLAS OF DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12; Sam Evans (letter)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Clear Creek
Description:Evidently named for the character of its waters. (HIST. OF CLINTON, 1881, p. 88; HIST. OF DAVIESS, p. 610; PAST & PRESENT, Vol. 1, p. 303)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Clear Creek School
Description:Named for a stream.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Clear Creek Township
Description:This township recieves its name from Clear Creek, one of its principal streams. It was established in November, 1837. In 1840 the name was changed to Jackson (q.v.). (ATLAS OF DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Coffey
Description:The post office department named the post office at Salem (q.v.) in honor of B.H. Coffey, the founder of the town of Salem, in 1856. It was first called Coffeyburg and later shortened to Coffey. The town was platted in 1865. (ATLAS OF DAVIESS, p. 12, Names File, No. 7; HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 85; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 844-5)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Coffeyburg
Description:See Coffey.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Cold Spring School
Description:A name of location.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Colfax Township
Description:In both Daviess and De Kalb Counties, a township was organized in 1870 and named Colfax. Schuyler Colfax was Vice President of the United States in 1869-1873. (ATLAS OF DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 689-9; ATLAS OF DE KALB, 1877)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Conestoga School
Description:A name of unknown origin.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Coon Grove
Description:A place name derived from land owned by Andrew McHaney in an early day, which was said to be the best coon hunting district in the county. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 147)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Cottonwood School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Crab Orchard School
Description:Named for a church.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Cravensville
Description:After the Mormons were driven out of Adam-ondi-Ahmon (q.v.), a new town was established on the same site by Dr. Cravens, who came from Virginia. The town was called Cravensville, after its founder. Cravensville and Millport were contestants for the county seat. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 88-9; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 249-50; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 459)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Crittenden
Description:A village called Crittenden was formerly located in Lincoln Township, on the old Stage Coach Road. After the Civil War the town went out of existence. It was scarcely ever more than "a paper town." (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 89; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 434)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Crofton
Description:Crofton was located on land owned by Susan Ethington, Jacob Fleisher, Henry Koons and Frederick Croft. It was doubtless named for the latter. The name was changed to Winston (q.v.) and the post office became Emporia (q.v.). (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 695; HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 85)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Cross Roads School
Description:A name of location.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Crystal Springs Branch
Description:Three springs are near this stream; hence the name. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 626)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Cypress Creek
Description:This stream is among the many named for some species of trees along its banks. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 248; ATLAS DAVIESS, 1878)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Daviess County
Description:This county was named in honor of Colonel Joseph H. Daviess, "who fell in the battle of Tippecanoe" November 7, 1811. It was organized in 1836, extending from its southern limit to the Iowa line, but was reduced to its present limits in 1845, with the organization of Harrison County. (Eaton, p. 283; Ibid, Conard, p. 235; HIST. DAVIESS, 1882, p. 235; HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 71; SESSION LAWS, 1834-5, p. 51)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Dimon, Diamond, Di Amond
Description:See Adam-ondi-Ahmond and Cravensville.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Dog Creek
Description:This creek was named by the hunters who named Marrowbone Creek (q.v.). (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 171-2)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Eclipse
Description:This village can scarcely be said to have existed at all, except on paper. The plat was recorded December 15, 1856, by James Blizzard. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 89; HIST. DAVIESS p. 434)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Edray
Description:Laid out by Mrs Murray and named for her. It scarcely boasted of an existence at all. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 84)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Elm Flat
Description:This town was laid out "on the banks of Muddy Creek, on a low piece of ground thickly covered with elm trees and known as Elm Flat." It is now known as Pattonsburg (q.v.). It dates back to 1872, with the building of the Wabash Railroad as far as the town. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 618; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 450)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Emporia
Description:The post office at Crofton was called Emporia. The origin of the name was not discovered. Formerly the town was called Winston or Winstonville, becoming known as Emporia about 1879. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 85-6; HIST. DAVIESS, p . 695)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Eureka School
Description:An abstract name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Everly School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Excelsior School
Description:An abstract name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Feurt School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Feurt Summit
Description:Doubtless the town of Feurt Summit derives its name from Thomas Feurt who settled in that vicinity in 1845. Later the name was changed to Jameson. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 660-1)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Foley School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Fountain Blue School
Description:An emblematic name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Freedom Township
Description:Formerly a township in Daviess County established in 1870. Doubtless the name reflects the atmosphere of Civil War times. Liberty Township was established at the same time. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 305; Sam Evans (letter)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Freeport School
Description:A name of unknown origin.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Gallatin
Description:The county seat of Daviess was named in honor of Albert Gallatin, the noted financier who served in the cabinets of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. The town was laid out in 1837 and incorporated in 1851. HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 72; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 272; Eaton, p. 284; Conard, Vol. 11, p. 235; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 447)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Gallatin Township
Description:Three years after the establishment of Gallatin (q.v.) Honey Creek Township became known as Gallatin. The selection of the name was doubtless influenced by that of the county seat. (ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 251)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Goodbar School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Grand River Township
Description:A township named for the Grand River was established in Caldwell County, in November, 1869; in Clinton, 1834; in Daviess, 1837; and in De Kalb, 1845. In Caldwell County, the name was changed to New York Township (q.v.) and in Clinton County, the Grand River Township's boundaries have been changed until finally a new name was given to all the townships formed from the division of it. (HIST. OF CALD. & LIV., p. 456; HIST. OF DAV., p. 238; HIST. OF CLINT., p. 106; Davis & Durrie, p. 360; HIST. OF N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 449; Atlas of De Kalb, 1877)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Grant Township
Description:Not only was Grant a popular name for towns and post offices, but it was also a general favorite with the county courts which selected the names for townships. Five counties thus honored General Grant; one county, Harrison, gave the name in 1845, in honor of a prominent family of the county. In May, 1870, Caldwell County Court divided Blythe Township and named the new township Grant. In 1866, Jackson Township, Daviess County, was divided, forming Grant, but four years later the name was changed to Jamesport. In the same year the name was rejected in Daviess County, DeKalb organized a township and named it Grant. In Nodaway County, Washington and White Cloud Townships were reorganized; the new one formed was named in honor of the commander-in-chief of the Union forces. The dates for the organization of the Grant Townships in Nodaway and Holt were not found. (HIST. OF CALD. & LIV., p. 617; SOME PIONEER HIST. ATLAS OF DAV., p. 12; HIST. OF DAV., p. 305; ATLAS OF DE KALB, 1877; R.H. Dunn; ATLAS OF HOLT, 1876, p. 23; HIST. OF NOD., p. 159)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Griffith School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Grindstone Township
Description:One of the boundaries of this township is Grindstone Creek from which the name was evidently derived. Organized in 1837 and the name was changed to Jefferson three years later. (ATLAS DAVIESS, p. 12; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 238, 251)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Hale School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Harrison Township
Description:Organized in 1840 and named io honor of William H. Harrison who was elected President of the United States in that year. (HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 449; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 251; ATLAS DAVIESS, p. 12)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Haw Branch
Description:Evidently named for the Haw tree which grows wild in that region. (ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Haw Branch School
Description:Named for a stream.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Heath School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Hickory Creek
Description:Four creeks, found in Daviess, Gentry, Harrison, and Nodaway Counties, were named for the timber which grew along the banks of these streams. In Nodaway County, the hickory grove for which the creek was named covered half a section of land. (Adams, p. 112; T.A. Cummins; J.S. Williams; R.H. Dunn; HIST. GENTRY & WORTH, p. 201; HIST. NODAWAY, p. 244)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Hickory Grove School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Hickory Township
Description:In 1841 the County Court of Daviess established Hickory Township, which included the present townships of Salem and most of Washington. Hickory Creek is the principal stream in that part of the country. The name has been changed. (ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12; Hutawa's Map, 1844; HIST. DAVIESS, pp. 248-55; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 449)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Highland
Description:A railroad station perhaps so named because of a high elevation at that point. (HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 454)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Highland School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Hobson's Choice
Description:This place name is given on Clark's Map of 1860, but no other reference could be found.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Hog Creek
Description:Frequently folk stories were told by the pioneers concerning the large number of wild hogs which were found along streams. This stream may have thus received its name. (Cited in HIST. DAVIESS, p. 248)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Honey Creek
Description:According to the HISTORY OF DAVIESS COUNTY, Honey Creek, in that county, was "named from the number of bee trees found in the woods along its banks." John Stokes was one of a party of bee hunters who gave the name. In Nodaway County the name was derived from similar circumstances. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 147; 170; HIST. NODAWAY, p. 128; PAST & PRESENT, Vol. 1, p. 30)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Honey Creek Township
Description:Evidently named for Honey Creek which forms one of its boundaries. It was one of the three original townships organized in 1837. Four years later it became known as Gallatin (q.v.). (ATLAS DAVIESS, p. 12, HIST. DAVIESS, p. 238, 251; HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 66)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Hopewell
Description:A name of unknown origin.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Hopkins School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Hurricane Creek
Description:Historians record that there was a very destructive hurricane which passed along the Grand River district in an early day. Evidently the creek received its name from this fact. (ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Indian Branch
Description:Although Daviess County is said to have never been a permanent home for Indian tribes, the relics have been found from their hunting expeditions. (Cited in HIST. DAVIESS, p. 230)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Jackson Station
Description:A station on the Wabash Railway, originally known as Carlow (q.v.). It is located in Jackson Township, which perhaps accounts for its name. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 748; MISSOURI GAZ., 1891, p. 427)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Jackson Township
Description:Four counties honored Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States, when each named a township Jackson: Buchanan in 1843; Clinton, 1833; Daviess, 1840; and Nodaway, 1866. Andrew & Gentry Counties honored pioneer settlers. Jackson Township, in Andrew County, eas established in 1846. (HIST. OF BUCH., 1915, p. 39; HIST. OF CLINTON, p. 103; HIST. OF DAVIESS, p. 252; 744; ATLAS OF DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12; HIST. OF N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 449; Sam Evans (letter); PAST & PRESENT, Vol. 1, p. 281; C. Gooden; Names File, No. 20; ATLAS OF ANDREW, 1877; J.S. Williams)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Jameson
Description:Established in 1871 and first called Feurt Summit (q.v.). Railroad officials are said to have changed the name to Jameson. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 87; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 660-1; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 460)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Jamesport
Description:Named for the christian name of both of its founders, James Gillilan and James Allen. The town was established in 1870. (HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 459; HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 83)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Jamesport Township
Description:Organized in 1870 and named Grant. Sometime later, the name was changed to Jamesport, perhaps for the principal town within the limits of the township. (ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 564)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Jefferson Township
Description:All of the counties, with the exception of Gentry, which honored Andrew Jackson by naming townships for him, likewise honored Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States. The dates for the organization of these townships are as follows: Andrew, 1846; Buchanan, 1839; Clinton, 1838; Daviess, 1840; Harrison, about 1845; Nodaway, 1871. (Names File, No. 20; ATLAS OF ANDREW, 1877; HIST. OF BUCH., 1915, p. 39; MORNING HERALD, Aug. 20, 1873, p. 8; HIST. OF CLINT., p. 107; HIST. OF DAV., p. 252; Sam Evans (letter); ATLAS OF DAV., 1876, p. 12; HIST. OF N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 449; R.H. Dunn; PAST & PRESENT, Vol. 1, p. 286)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Johnson School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Land School
Description:A name of location.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Lazy Run
Description:Lazy Run conveys the nature of the stream in its unique connotation. It is one of the most distinctive of names given to streams found in this survey. (ATLAS DAVIESS, 1898)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Lee School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Liberty Township
Description:Orgainzed in 1869 and the name was evidently suggested by the Civil War victory. (HIST. DAVIESS, pp. 765-9; ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Lincoln Township
Description:Andrew County named a township Lincoln for John Lincoln mentioned under Lincoln Creek (q.v.). Atchison County, in 1871; Caldwell, in 1869; Daviess, in 1866; Harrison, in the 1860s; and Nodaway, in 1866, all honored Abraham Lincoln by naming townships for him. (Names File, No. 20; HIST. OF CALD. & LIV., p. 526; HIST. OF HOLT & ATCH., p. 789; ATLAS OF DAV., 1876, p. 12; Sam Evans (letter); B.P. Sigler; PAST & PRESENT, Vol. 1, p. 293)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Lock Springs
Description:A railway station on the Wabash, near the banks of the Grand River. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 87-8; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 461; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 308, 748)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Lone Cottage School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Lone Cottonwood School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Lone Hickory School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Lone Star School
Description:An emblematic name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Lost School
Description:A name of location.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Mabel
Description:A feminine Christian name given to a country post office, perhaps in honor of the postmaster's wife or daughter. (Sam Evans (letter); Cited in MISSOURI GAZ., 1893-4, p. 663)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Madeline
Description:Like Mabel (q.v.), this post office bears a feminine Christian name. (MISSOURI GAZ., 1893-4, p. 680)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Madison School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Madison Township
Description:A Madison Township was established in Daviess County in 1840, and another in Harrison County. Both were evidently named for James Madison, fourth President of the United States. (R.H. Dunn; HIST. DAVIESS, pp. 258-61; 251; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 449)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Mann School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Marion Township
Description:Four counties chose the name Marion for a township: Buchanan, in 1837; Ray, which is now included in Caldwell, in 1832; Daviess, in 1869; and Harrison, about 1845. Perhaps all were named in honor of Francis D. Marion, Revolutionary General. (R.H. Dunn; MORNING HERALD, Aug. 20, 1873, p. 8; HIST. OF BUCH., 1881, p. 132; HIST. OF RAY, 1881, p. 240; HIST. OF DAV., p. 725; 306; ATLAS OF DAV., 1876)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Mark
Description:A country post office established about 1879 and discontinued soon afterwards. (MISSOURI GAZ., 1879, p. 432)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Marrow Bone Creek
Description:The following folk story is told concerning the naming of Marrowbone Creek: A party of venison and honey hunters killed six elk and roasted the bones for the marrow. All became ill from eating too much marrow. This same party named Dog Creek (q.v.) because "they had too much dog too." (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 170; Cited in HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 66)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:McClung School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:McCrary School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:McCulley School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Melbourne
Description:Melbourne, in Daviess County is a railroad station. In Harrison County, the name is said to have been given by railroad officials for the city in Australia. A post office was established in Melbourne, Harrison, in 1897. (Railroad Map, 1910; B.P. Sigler; BETHANY REP., March 31, 1915, p. 5)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Miller School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Millport
Description:Millport, one of the oldest towns in the county, was a thriving village in 1836 when Daviess County was organized. It was settled in 1831 by Robert P. Peniston who laid off the town five years later. Peniston operated the only mill where the pioneers of Daviess County could secure meal or flour nearer than Richmond, Ray County. The Mormons burned the mill in 1838 and it was never rebuilt. (MISSOURI HIST. REV., Vol. 13, 1918-1919, p. 113; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 459; HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 88, HIST. DAVIESS, pp. 441-3)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Monroe Township
Description:James Monroe, fifth President of the United States, was honored by a township having been named for him in each of the three counties of Andrew, Daviess and Nodaway. The County Court, of Daviess, reorganized and renamed many of the townships, giving them names for national leaders. Monroe Township, Nodaway, was organized on February 12, 1881. (Names File, No. 20; ATLAS OF ANDREW, 1877; ATLAS OF DAV., 1890, p. 12; HIST. OF DAV., p. 799; Sam Evans (letter); PAST & PRESENT, Vol. 1, p. 299)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Mt. Pleasant School
Description:An emblematic name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Muddy Creek
Description:The name Muddy, when given to a stream, testifies as to the character of the waters of the creek. (ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876; ATLAS DE KALB, 1877; R.H. Dunn; PAST & PRESENT, Vol. 1, p. 303; John Ewing)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Netherton School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:New Famington
Description:A country post office, west of Gallatin, which was located at a Mr. Kindig's. (ATLAS DAVIESS, p. 15)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:North Township
Description:Named from the fact that it was formed from the northern part of Benton Township and extended north to the Iowa line. The name is no longer in existence. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 256; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 449)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Oak Ridge School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Old Pattonsburg
Description:Matthew Patton built the first water mill in the township, on Big Creek. The place was first known as Patton's Mill (q.v.) and Pattonsburg (q.v.). When the railroad was built to Elm Flat (q.v.), two miles away, the businessmen of Old Pattonsburg moved there and that town became known as Pattonsburg. The town centering around Pattons Mill therefore became Old Pattonsburg. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 620; 434-5; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, Vol. 1, p. 460)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Owl Creek
Description:Few place names of northwest Missouri were derived from names of birds. This stream bears the name of a common bird, the owl. (ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Patton's Mill
Description:See Old Pattonsburg.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Pattonsburg
Description:Derived from the town now called Old Pattonsburg (q.v.), a half mile away. The town dates back to 1872. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 86-7, 89; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 434-5)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Pilot Grove
Description:An early settlement. Joseph Everly, the first settler, came from Pennsylvania. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 708)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Pilot Grove Creek
Description:In the locality called Pilot Grove (q.v.). (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 708)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Pilot Grove School
Description:A name of location.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Pin Oak Grove
Description:The name Pin Oak Grove, from the familiar trees, was given to two post offices, both of which were established about 1880. (MISSOURI GAZ., 1876-7, p. 371; 1883, p. 762; T.A. Cummins)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Pleasant Grove School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Prairie Center School
Description:Named for a town.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Prairie City
Description:The plat of this village was filed by J.R. Vancil, June 1, 1857, but the place can scarcely be said to have had an existence. Doubtless the name was descriptive. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 89; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 434)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Prairie Hall School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Prairie View School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Raccoon Creek
Description:Chiefly flows through Grundy County, just touching Daviess in the northeast part. It perhaps takes its name from the raccoon which frequented the banks of the stream. (Adams, p. 81)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Red School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Reed School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Rice Creek
Description:Probably from an early settler, William Rice. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 550; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 688)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Roasting Ear School
Description:A sobriquet; an assumed name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Rosedale School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Salem
Description:In Caldwell County, three Mormon brothers settled in 1833, at a place called Salem, a Hebrew word signifying peace. Coffey (q.v.) in Daviess County, was known as Salem, when it was established in 1856. Evidently its founder, B.F. Coffey, selected the name from the Bible. About 1857, M.S. Couch opened a store in Jackson Township, Gentry County, and added a third name to the list of towns called Salem. This name was changed to Island City (q.v.). (HIST. OF CALD. & LIV., p. 123; SOME PIONEER HIST.; HIST. OF DAV. & GENTRY, p. 85; 280; Names File, No. 7; ATLAS OF DAV., 1876, p. 12; HIST. OF GENTRY & WORTH, p. 189)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Salem Township
Description:Formed from a division of Hickory Township in 1859 and evidently named for the first town established within its boundaries, Salem, which had been laid out three years before. (ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 842-3)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Sampson Creek
Description:Benjamin Sampson was the first settler on the creek which bears his name. He located there in 1833. The post office at Hamptonville (q.v.), established in 1868, was called Sampson Creek, for the stream. (HIST. DAVIESS, 1876; BETHANY REP., Mar. 31, 1915, p. 5; R.H. Dunn; B.P. Sigler; Alexander Reid (letter)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Scotland School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Sell School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Shady Grove School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Sheridan Township
Description:Organized in 1869 from Gallatin and Jefferson Townships and evidently named for General Philip H. Sheridan. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 785; ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Shriver School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Smith Creek
Description:Perhaps named for Samuel Smith, who came to Daviess County in 1857, from Indiana. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 688, 740)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Smith School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Splawn Ridge School
Description:A name of location.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Splawn's Ridge
Description:A pioneer settlement. John Splawn, the first white man to settle in Daviess County, located in 1830 at the place which became Millport (q.v.), one year later. The name Splawn's Ridge, for the early settler, prevailed for some time for the whole community. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 235)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Spring Hill School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Stitt School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Stony Point School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Sugar Creek Township
Description:Sugar Creek Township, Harrison County, was named for the stream, and indirectly, because a large number of sugar maple trees grew within its boundaries. The township in Daviess County was organized in 1839 and perhaps derived its name also from the creek, which borders its northeast corner. In 1886 it became known as Lincoln (q.v.). (HIST. HARRISON, p. 98; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 248; ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12; HIST. N.W. MISSOURI, vol. 1, p. 449)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Swisher School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Tolen School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Trotter School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Tub Creek
Description:In all probability this was a fanciful name, like Kettle Creek (q.v.). Nothing could be found in regard to its origin. (ATLAS DAVIESS, 1898)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Union School
Description:An emblematic name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Union Township
Description:Union Township, Daviess County, was first a part of Honey Creek and Jackson Townships. Then it became known as Gallatin but in 1869 it was given the name Union and the last name prevailed. An atlas of Harrison County, published in 1876, gives the following testimony as to the naming of Union Township in that county: The people of Harrison County were nearly unanimous for the Union, when the war came in 1861." Worth County, like Harrison, was strongly Republican, especially in Union Township. From the name, and from the date in which it was formed, 1861, there is little doubt but that it was named because of its stand in the war of Rebellion. In Nodaway County, Union Township was organized in 1856. The origin of the name here is uncertain, for incidents of the formation of the township may have influenced the choice. (PAST & PRESENT, vol. 1, p. 314-5; R.H. Dunn; ATLAS HARRISON, 1876; HIST. DAVIESS, p. 439; ATLAS DAVIESS, 1876, p. 12; John Ewing)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Victoria
Description:Named for the English Queen. The town was organized in 1855 by John Osborn. After 1880 it went out of existence. (HIST. DAVIESS & GENTRY, p. 89)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Victoria School
Description:Named for a town.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Virginia Ridge School
Description:A name of location.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Whitt School
Description:Named for a prominent family.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Winston
Description:First called Crofton (q.v.) but when the railroad built through it in 1871, it was named Winston or Winstonville. The post office was called Emporia (q.v.) to avoid confusion of the mails with another town named Winston. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 694-5)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Winstonville
Description:See Winston.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Wood Creek
Description:Thomas J. Wood was one of the earliest settlers in the locality through which Wood Creek flows. Joseph and Edward Wood also settled there shortly after the Mormon occupation of the county. (HIST. DAVIESS, p. 688; 106)
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

Place name:Wooderson School
Description:Named for a prominent man.
Source:Ewing, Martha K. "Place Names In The Northwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1929.

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