Dallas County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Andersonville
Description:See Urbana
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Atlas School
Description:District No. 22, in Jasper Township. Named for Atlas Jones, who aided in organizing the district. (MSTR; D.W. Darby)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Barclay School
Description:District No. 14, in Miller Township. Named for the family of Henry Barclay. (MSTR; S.N. Harmon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Beckner Prairie
Description:Located east of Buffalo. Named for Levi Beckner, an early settler who built on the land. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 494; D.W. Darby)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bennett Spring
Description:A post office and spring on the border of Dallas and Laclede Counties. It takes its name from a former mill owner, and has long been a landmark in the countryside. As early as 1805, the place appears on maps, listed as Big Spring. The term was, no doubt, descriptive of its size. In 1840 or soon after, James Brice secured a patent to the land and the place became known as Brice Spring or Bryce Spring. By 1855 Bryce had built a mill and there has been one at the spring since that time, although the present mill is used only to generate electricity. Brice's daughter married a W.S. Bennett and the Bennetts ran the mill, which then came to be known as Bennett's Mill. When the post office was established in 1901, it was named Brice and that name was used until February 1, 1939, when the name was changed to Bennett Spring to avoid confusion. The state park which was established at the place in 1923 was named Bennett Springs, and the public was unable to remember that the post office had a different name. The spring is the setting for Harold Bell Wright's book, THE CALLING OF DAN MATTHEWS. Mr. Wright was for a number of years a minister in Dallas and Laclede Counties. (HIST. LACLEDE, p. 24; Nyberg, p. 105; Postal Guide; Silas Bennett; D.W. Darby; SPRINGFIELD NEWS, January 24, 1939)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bennett's Mill
Description:See Bennett Spring.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Benton Branch
Description:A small stream which rises in Wilson Township and flows into the Niangua River in South Benton Township. Named for the Benton family. (C.N. Bennett; State General Highway Map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Benton Branch School
Description:District school No. 42 in South Benton Township. Named for the stream. (MSTR; N.C. Bennett)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Benton Township
Description:See North Benton Township.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bethel Baptist Church
Description:Organized in 1888, near Buffalo. A Bible name, meaning "House of God" (Gen. 28:19). (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 559)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bethlehem Church
Description:A Baptist Church, organized in 1871, near Buffalo. A Bible name; the birthplace of Christ. (Matthew 2:1). (HIST. DALLAS, p. 558)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Big Black Walnut Creek
Description:Flows out of Big Black Walnut Spring (q.v.), and the name is transferred from it. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 496; D.M. Rush; Campbell (1873)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Big Black Walnut Spring
Description:In Jasper Township. A large spring coming from a ledge near black walnut trees. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 496; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Big Spring
Description:See Bennett Spring.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Big Sweet Spring
Description:On the Niangua River in Jasper Township. Named for T.N. Sweet, on whose farm the spring was. There are a number of springs in the neighborhood. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 496; C. Smithpeters; R.C. Ferguson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Blue Mounds
Description:Three hills located southwest of Buffalo in South Benton Township. These mounds seem to have a blue haze aound them when seen from a distance. This is very characteristic of the country deeper in the Ozarks but unusual in the prairie land. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 497; Goldie Booth)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Boodler School
Description:District No. 25, in northern Benton Township. A school dispute caused two schoolhouses to be built. One was called Boodler, the other Anti-Boodler. Anti-Boodler is no longer used. The name was considered suitable because one faction accused the other of buying the election which was held to determine the school site. This took place when Joe Folk was cleaning up St. Louis in his reform campaign, and the terms Boodler and Anti-Boodler were in current usage. (MSTR; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Booth
Description:A discontinued post office (1900) in Jackson Township. Named by C.R. Darby for Senator W.H. Booth (1788-1871). (Postal Guide; Goldie Booth)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Booth School
Description:District No. 19 near Louisburg. Named for Senator W.H. Booth, who helped to organize the district. The schoolhouse was built in 1881 or 1882. (MSTR; Goldie Booth)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bower's Chapel
Description:A Methodist chapel near Urbana, organized in 1865. Named for Elijah Bower, who aided in organizing it. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 553)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Boyd
Description:A discontinued post office (1873-1887) in Jackson Township. The hamlet was named for Gregory Boyd, an old settler. (Postal Guide; Campbell (1874), p. 184; G. Booth; Campbell (1873), p. 26)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Brice
Description:See Bennett Spring.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Brice Spring
Description:See Bennett Spring.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Brushy Mound
Description:The highest of the Blue Mounds. So named because it is covered with brush. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 497; C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Brushy Ridge School
Description:District No. 59, in Jasper Township. Named for its location on a hill with a great amount of undergrowth. (MSTR; C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bryant Creek
Description:Rises in Miller Township; flows east to the Big Niangua River. Named after a pioneer farmer and merchant who had a store at Leadmine, A.J. Bryant. (Campbell (1873); C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Bryce Spring
Description:See Bennett Spring.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Buffalo
Description:The county seat of Dallas County in North Benton Township. Laid out in 1841, it has been a post office since 1845. Named by Joseph P. Miles, an Irish bachelor, who built the first house in 1839 and named the place Buffalo after his birthplace in New York. The name may also have been suggested because the town is built at the edge of Buffalo Head Prairie. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 540; Postal Guide; Campbell (1873); Conard, p. 218; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Buffalo Head Prairie
Description:In the west-central part of the county. An early settler, Mark L. Reynolds, placed the skull of a buffalo on a stake which he found driven into one of the Blue Mounds on this prairie. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 493)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Burtonville
Description:A village in Jackson Township. Named for the pioneer family of C.E. Burton, an old school teacher who later became an Indian agent. (R. McN.; W. Booth)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cansler School
Description:District No. 45 in Wilson Township. Named for Job Cansler, farmer. (MSTR; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cassity
Description:See Redtop
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cedar Ridge School
Description:District school No. 44 in Wilson Township. Named for its situation on a cedar-grown hill. (MSTR; Mrs. W. Hart)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Celt
Description:A village in Miller Township; a post office since 1888. The name Celt was furnished by the post office department. The village is commonly called Mill Creek because there used to be four water mills near the village. One of them is still in operation. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; C. Smithpeters; Walter Cline)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Chance
Description:A post office in 1910 in Miller Township. Named by the postmaster, Will Dryden, but for what reason is not known. (Postal Guide; Silas Reser)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Charity
Description:A hamlet in Jackson Township; a post office from 1886. Named after Charity Sherrick, wife of Joseph Sherrick, an old pioneer, who claimed to be over 102 when he died. He was postmaster. Also called Hog-Eye because of its location at the bottom of a hollow between two hills remined the pioneer's of a hog's eye sunken in its flesh. (Postal Guide; HIST. DALLAS, p. 545; R. McN., C. Smithpeters; Platbook (1930)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Church Grove Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Grant Township. The grove was named Church Grove because a church was built in it. Then the church took the name of the grove, and became Church Grove Church. (HIST. DALLAS (1885), p. 544; R.C. Ferguson)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cloverdale
Description:A discontinued post office (1897-1915) in southern Benton Township. An environmental name. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cloverdale School
Description:In southern Benton Township. An environmental name, transferred from the post office. Originally called Cranehill School after Taylor Crane, a pioneer farmer. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 561; MSTR; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Corkery
Description:A village in Miller Township; a post office since 1895. Named for Mike Corkery who had the store. (Postal Guide; Campbell (1873); D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cowden School
Description:District No. 39, in southern Benton Township. Named for W.H. Cowden's family, farmers. (MSTR; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cranehill Church
Description:Organized in 1880 at Cranehill School, from which it was named. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 561; D.W. Darby)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cranehill School
Description:See Cloverdale School.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Crescent School
Description:District No. 38, near Buffalo. A very old school; the name signifies growth. (MSTR; HIST. DALLAS, p. 561; James Munn)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Cross Plains
Description:See Woodhill
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dallas County
Description:Located in the west central part of the state; it is bounded on the north by Hickory and Camden Counties, on the east by Laclede County, on the south by Webster and Greene Counties, and on the west by Polk and Hickory Counties. This territory was first settled in 1831. It was organized as a county in 1841 under the name of Niangua, given because of the river that winds along its eastern border. In 1844, the name was changed, the reason aassigned being that Niangua was "too hard to spell and pronounce." The adjoining county on the west had chosen (in 1835) the name Polk when James K. Polk was as yet only a Congressman; now that Polk had just been elected President (1844-1848), Niangua County followed it's neighbors example by adopting the name of the new Vice-President George Mifflin Dallas (1792-1864). Dallas had already had a distinguished career as Senator from Pennsylvania (1831-1833) and one of the national leaders of the Democratic party, the political faith favored by most citizens of the county. (HIST. DALLAS, pp. 507-508; Platbook; Campbell (1873)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dick's Creek
Description:In Jasper Township; flows east into the Niangua River. Named for the Dick family, many of whom still live in the community. (Campbell (1873); D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Dogtown
Description:See March
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Duesenberry Creek
Description:Rises in the northeastern section of the county and flows west through Washington Township to the Niangua River. Named for Carlos Duesenberry, who in the early days owned the land through which much of the creek flows. Various spellings are found, Dusenberry and Dousenburg (Campbell). (Campbell (1873), p. 26; HIST. DALLAS (1889), pp. 495, 556; Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Elixir
Description:A hamlet in Lincoln Township; a post office from 1883 to 1904. An effort was made to establish a town near a fine spring, and it was given this name to attract attention to the project. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 496; C.O. Gammon; Postal Guide; Williams, STATE MISSOURI (1904), p. 375; Missouri Gaz. (1883), p. 323)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Elixir School
Description:District No. 5, in Lincoln Township. Named for the settlement. (MSTR; C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Elixir Spring
Description:See Elixir
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Engle School
Description:District school No. 49, in northern Benton Township. Named for Joseph Engle, pioneer farmer. (MSTR; C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Excell School
Description:District No. 15 in Miller Township. An ideal name, evidently a misspelling which has been retained. (MSTR; C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fifteen Mile Prairie
Description:A prairie located in the northwestern portion of the county. Named from the distance across it. Part of the prairie is in Polk County. (HIST. DALLAS (1888), p. 493)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Fifteen Springs
Description:See Seven Springs.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Flatwoods School
Description:In Jasper Township. Named for the location. It is unusual to find woods, as here, growing on a prairie. (MSTR; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Foose
Description:A hamlet in Jackson Township; a post office from 1892 to 1904. Named by a family named Macy, who came to the region from Fooseland, Illinois, after their hometown. However, there are people with the name Foose living in Dallas County. One of them, Otis Foose, was an early day minister. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; D.W. Darby; Missouri Gaz. (1893) p. 342)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Forkner's Hill
Description:A post office located on the county line and at present listed in Webster County. Named for a pioneer family, it is listed in Laclede in 1860 and 1871 and in Dallas from 1873 to 1886. (Postal Guide; Charles Smithpeters; Campbell (1874), p. 186; Campbell (1873), p. 26; HIST. LACLEDE (1887), p. 692; Mo. Gaz. (1860); Colton (1871)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Four Mile Church
Description:In Wilson Township. Named for the prairie. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 553)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Four Mile Prairie
Description:Located a little north of Buffalo. Named from the distance across it. (HIST. DALLAS (1888), p. 494)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Four Mile School
Description:In Wilson Township. Named for the prairie. (MSTR; D.W. Darby)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Friendship Community
Description:Founded in 1872 by Alcander Longley; a five hundred acre tract on which members lived as one family. It was an economic experiment only. Listed in Campbell's Gaz. in 1874 but disappeared soon after. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 547; Campbell (1874), p. 196)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gann School
Description:District No. 76, in Washington Township. Named for A.A. Gann. Also called Ganntown, but there is no town there. (MSTR; D.W. Darby)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ganntown
Description:See Gann School.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gladys Spring School
Description:District No. 70, in Jackson Township. Named for its location near the spring on the S.A. Gladys farm. (MSTR; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Goss School House
Description:District school No. 82, in Sheridan Township. Named for the N.A. Goss family. (MSTR; C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Grant Township
Description:Formed from Green Township in 1868; located in the north-central part of the county. Named for General Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), 18th President and commander of the UnionArmy at the close of the Civil War. The original Green Township (1841) was named for an early settler. One resident suggested that the township name was transferred from Greene County which borders the township on the south. The spelling, however, is different. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 509; W. Booth; C. Smithpeters; DICT. AM. BIOG., Vol.7, p. 492)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Graves School
Description:District school No. 77 in Washington Township. Built near the home of John Graves and named for him. (MSTR; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Greasy
Description:A discontinued post office (1883-1891) on Greasy Creek. Named for the stream. (Postal Guide; HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 545; MISSOURI GAZ. (1883), p. 380; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Greasy Creek
Description:Rises in the southwestern section of the county and flows north and east, emptying into the Little Niangua (q.v.). The name is descriptive of the water. Some source of oil is near the source of the water and the surface is slightly greasy. The name is explained locally by a story of a man who brought a load of bacon and ham to sell to the settlers. In crossing the creek his wagon overturned, the bacon and ham making the water greasy. Hence the name. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 497; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Great Saltpetre Cave
Description:In Jasper Township. In the early days a band of counterfeiters used the cave, professing to manufacture saltpetre as a blind to cover their activities. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 496; Mrs. Alice Wing)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Green Township
Description:See Lincoln and Grant Townships.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Gum Spring
Description:A small spring in the public square in Buffalo. Named for the type of spring; a gum spring is a small spring that has had the water level raised by means of inserting a black gum holllow log into the shallow spring pool. In this way water can be dipped from the pool without disturbing the mud on the bottom. Usually an augur hole is made in the log near the top which serves as a sort of spout or faucet. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 540; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Handley
Description:A hamlet and discontinued post office (1901-1904) in Washington Township. Named for J.M. Handley, postmaster. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Handley School
Description:A rural school in Washington Township. Named for the settlement, which is nearby. (MSTR; C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Haston School
Description:District school No. 80 in Sheridan Township. Named for a family. (MSTR; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hickory Mill School
Description:District No. 16, in Grant Township. Named for its location on a hill with hickory trees. (MSTR; W.E. Cansler)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hico
Description:A post office in 1904. Located in Washington Township. A coined word made from the first syllables of Hickory and County by the postmaster who originally came from Hickory County. The settlement is gone now, having been in existence only a few years. (Postal Guide; Williams, STATE MISSOURI (1904); Harvey Morrow)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hideout School
Description:A rural school near Buffalo. After the Civil War was declared, Union feeling was very strong in the county. A group of known Southern sympathizers were forced to hide out until the feeling died down a bit. During the absence of the men, the women and children lived together in a schoolhouse which also served as a church. The school received the name Hideout from this incident. (MSTR; Mrs. Alice Wing)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:High Prairie
Description:In the southwestern part of the county. Named from a high mound which stands in its center. Sometimes referred to as Stafford Prairie, for the Ben Staffords, who farm the region. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 498; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hog-eye
Description:See Charity.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Homer
Description:A post office in 1895. Named for Homer Yeager, who was a preacher in the community. (Postal Guide; James Munn)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Hyde School
Description:District No. 9 in Lincoln Township. Named for John and George Hyde, members of a pioneer family. (MSTR; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:In Jasper Township, flowing southeast into the Niangua River. Named because an Indian settlement was on its banks years ago. (Campbell (1873); W. Booth)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jackson Township
Description:One of the original townships, established in 1841. Located in the southwestern section of the county. Named for General Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), seventh President and hero of the Battle of New Orleans. (HIST. DALLAS, p. 509; Plat Book; C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jaques or Jakes Creek
Description:A stream mentioned in the county history, but the origin of the name could not be found. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 496)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jasper Township
Description:One of the original townships, established in 1841 and located in the east-central section of the county. Named for William Jasper (1750-1779), a military hero who distinguished himself by saving the colors at Fort Sullivan, June 28, 1776, when fighting under Colonel Moultrie. He was offered a commission but refused, saying he preferred to remain with the common soldiers who were like himself uneducated. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 508; W. Booth)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Jimtown
Description:See Maddux.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Kelly School
Description:District school No. 52 in northern Benton Township. Named for Captain Morgan Kelly, a farmer in the community. (MSTR; D.M. Rush; HIST. DALLAS, p. 563)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Kirk Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in Miller Township. Named for William Kirk. (HIST. DALLAS, p. 555)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Kirk's Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church. Organized soon after the Civil War, in Miller Township. Named from its location by Kirk's Cemetery. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 555)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Laclede and Ft. Scott Railroad
Description:A railroad which was never built but which burdened the county with a huge debt which kept it handicapped for years. Tday there is not an inch of railroad in Dallas County. The contract for the railroad read that the road bed should be graded and ready for the cross ties. This much of the work was completed, but the ties were never laid. Nevertheless the people of the county were forced to pay off the bonded indebtedness. An old settler tells of members of the county court going to jail for contempt of court, and various other means which were employed to avoid payment, but ultimately they were paid off. Laclede County was affected, but not so seriously as Dallas. The road was to have run between Lebanon, Laclede County, and Fort Scott, Kansas. (HIST. DALLAS , p. 520; Harvey Morrow)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Latimore School
Description:District school No. 61, in Jasper Township. Named after a Latimore family, who was instrumental in organizing the district. (MSTR; Mrs. W. Hart)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lead Mine
Description:A village in Miller Township; a post office since 1879. Named for a lead mine that was operated in the district years ago. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; HIST. DALLAS, p. 545; Missouri Gaz., (1879), p. 388; Harvey Morrow)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lead Mine Prairie
Description:In the north-central part of the county. Named because of a lead mine developed in the district in the early days. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 494; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Liberty Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in Wilson Township, organized in 1840. An ideal name. (HIST. DALLAS, p. 555)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lincoln Township
Description:Formed from the north half of Green Township in 1868. Named for Abraham Lincoln, 16th President (1809-1865). Green Township was one of the original townships formed in 1841 and named for a pioneer farmer. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 509; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lindley Christian Church
Description:Organized at Crescent Schoolhouse (q.v.) in 1873 by Elder T.S. Tinsley. Named from the creek. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 560)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lindley Creek
Description:A tributary of the Little Niangua River which rises in northern Benton Township. Named after a man by the name of Lindley who, while driving some hogs near Boonville to Springfield, was snowed in and spent part of the winter by the stream. The spelling Linley is used in the county history, apparently in error as the name appears on other maps and in connection with the church as Lindley. (Campbell (1873); Map (1841); HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 497; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Little Niangua River
Description:A large creek that rises in Grant Township, flows northeast and northwest and leaves the county on the northern boundary. It empties into the Niangua River. Named for the Niangua River. (Campbell (1873)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:London Smoke School
Description:District school near Long Lane. So named because fogs are frequent in the region. (MSTR; Silas Reser)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lone Post School
Description:District No. 20 in Lincoln Township. So named because it is situated in a remote section. (MSTR; W.E. Cansler)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Lone Rock Church
Description:Organized in August, 1881. Named for a large rock bluff near the building. The rock is about 18ft. high. (HIST. DALLAS (1889) , p. 555; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Long Lane
Description:A village in Wilson Township which has been a post office since 1860. Named for a straight lane about six miles in length by which one approaches the town. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; HIST. DALLAS, p. 545; MISSOURI GAZ. (1860), p. 172; Mrs. W. Hart)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Louisburg
Description:A town in Grant Township which has been a post office since 1867 and a settlement since 1865. Named for Louis Hart, an early settler. Parker spells it Lewisburg in 1865. (Postal Guide; C. Smithpeters; HIST. DALLAS , p. 545; Goodwin, 1867, p. 46; Parker (1865) map)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Macedonia Church
Description:A Baptist Church first organized (1848) at Buffalo; but after the Civil War it was reorganized and moved away from town four miles and took its present name. A Bible name: the first province in Europe in which the gospel was preached (Acts 16:9). (HIST. DALLAS, p. 556)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Macedonia School
Description:A district school near Buffalo. Named for the church. (MSTR)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Maddux
Description:A trading point and post office (1904-1915) southeast of Buffalo. Named for the owner, Jim Maddux. The place is also called Jimtown for the same reason. (Postal Guide; Williams, STATE OF MISSOURI; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Maple
Description:A hamlet in Washington Township. Named for the trees in the neighborhood. (Williams, STATE OF MISSOURI, p. 376; Silas Reser)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:March
Description:A village in Jackson Township, a post office from 1889 to 1915. Named by the postmaster T.C. Bennett for the month of the year in which the post office was established, after he had suggested several which were unsuitable. Known in Buffalo as "Dogtown" because of the number of dogs around the post office. (Postal Guide; R. McN., N.C. Bennett; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:March School
Description:District school No. 71, near Red Top. Named for the settlement. (MSTR)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Marmaduke
Description:See Redtop.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mathis
Description:A hamlet in Washington Township. A post office in 1904. Named for Tom Mathis, postmaster. (Postal Guide; Williams, STATE OF MISSOURI (1904), p. 375; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:McKee Cave
Description:A small cave in northern Benton Township. Named for the J.N. McKee family on whose farm it was discovered. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 496; Harvey Morrow)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mill Creek
Description:Rises in Miller Township and flows into the Big Niangua River. Named for the mills which were built on its banks near the village. One mill is unusual in having an undershot wheel. (Campbell (1873); D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mill Creek (village)
Description:See Celt.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mill Creek Church
Description:A Christian Church organized in 1889 at Mill Creek Schoolhouse and named from it. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 562)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mill Creek School
Description:In Miller Township. Now disbanded. Named from the creek. (HIST. DALLAS, p. 562; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Miller Township
Description:One of the original six townships formed in 1841; located in the northeast corner of the county. Named for John R. Miller, who was instrumental in forming the township government. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 509; Plat Book; Harvey Morrow)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Montgomery Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church, organized in 1872 and built on land donated by J.J. Montgomery, for whom it was named in 1875. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), pp. 555, 954)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mount Pleasant Church
Description:A Baptist Church organized in 1869 in Washington Township. A name of approbation. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 560)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mount Zion Church
Description:A Baptist Church in northern Benton Township, which was organized in 1871. A Bible name (2 Sam. 5:7; 1 Kings 8:1; Isaiah 2:3). Zion was tne city of David, the site of David's palace and of the tabernacle. (HIST. DALLAS, p. 560; Harvey Morrow)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mount Zion School
Description:In northern Benton Township. Named from the church. (MSTR; Harvey Morrow)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mountain View School
Description:District No. 41 in Grant Township. Named because the school is built on a hill. (MSTR; R.L. O'Bannon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Mt. Harmony School
Description:District No. 72, in Washington Township. An ideal name. (MSTR; N.C. Bennett)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:New Garden School
Description:District No. 81 in Sheridan Township. A newly built school, so named because an attempt has been made to landscape the grounds. (MSTR; Mrs. W. Hart)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:New Hope Church
Description:A Baptist Church located in Grant Township. Organized in 1860; no longer in existence. An ideal name. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 558)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:New Liberty School
Description:In northern Benton Township. An ideal name. (MSTR)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Niangua River
Description:The stream rises in Dallas County, flows north along the boundary between Dallas and Laclede Counties, which it crosses six times. It continues north through Camden County to empty into the Osage River. The name probably comes from an Indian word "Ne anoge" which means water that runs over a person. In the United States Ethnology Bulletin No. 109 the word is listed ne - water, anoge - runs over a person. Earlier forms of the river's name are listed by Pike as Nehemgar and Yungar. He writes that it derives its name from the vast number of springs at its source and that it was supposed to be nearly as extensive as the Osage, and was celebrated for the abundance of bear. County histories and old settlers say that the word comes from an Indian phrase, "I won't go away," or his expression of objection to go-on or on-go and leave his native place. This is plainly an after-the-fact explanation. Spelled Yungar on map of 1805 (photostatic copy). (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 497; Conard, vol. 2, p. 218; U.S. Ethnology Bulletin, No. 109; Sampson "Glimpses of Old Missouri by Exploreres & Travelers" MISSOURI H.R., vol. 1, No. 4, p. 255; Hodge's Handbook of American Indians)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:North Benton Township
Description:Formed from the northern portion of Benton Township in 1890; hence the name. Benton was one of the original townships, established in 1841 And located in the west-central part of the county. Named for Senator Thomas H. Benton, who conducted vigorous campaigns in the district. Thomas H. Benton (1782-1858), was one of the first representatives to the United States Senate from Missouri and represented the state for thirty consecutive years. (HIST. DALLAS, p. 509; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oak Lawn
Description:A tourist highway town a few miles from Buffalo in North Benton Township. Named for a large oak on the lawn before the buildings. (C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Oak Summit School
Description:District school No. 84 in Jasper Township. Named for its location on the crest of a hill. There are oak trees in the vicinity. (MSTR)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:O'Bannon Prairie
Description:Located in the south-central part of the county. Named for the O'Bannon family, who were prominent settlers in the county. (HIST. DALLAS, p. 494; R.L. O'Bannon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Olive
Description:A village and discontinued post office (1886-1914) in Sheridan Township. Named by Dred Faulkner for the church nearby. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Olive Branch School
Description:District school No. 50, in Grant Township. A Bible name. Used to symbolize the peace and harmony extant in the district (Zech 3:8). (MSTR; W.A. Cansler)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Olive Church
Description:A Baptist Church in Sheridan Township, now disbanded. A Bible name (Jer. 11:16): "The Lord called thy name, a green olive tree, fair and of good fruit." (Postal Guide; R. McN.; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Olive Leaf School
Description:District school No. 56 in Lincoln Township. A Bible name (Zech. 3:8). (MSTR; N.C. Bennett)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark Mountains
Description:A mountain range of great antiquity and beauty which embraces all five of the counties in this thesis. The name is of French and Indian origin and a result of a misunderstanding by the English. It means literally "at the (country, river, or place of the) Arkansas." The Indians of Siouan stock who migrated westward called themselves Quapaw (down stream people) but they were called, before and after their migration, the Arkansas by the Illinois. Early 18th century maps by G. De l'Isle show that both the Ohio and Wabash rivers were called the Arkansea. Father Gravier in the JESUIT RELATIONS in 1700 writes: "It is called by the Illinois and the Oumiamis the river of the Arkansea because the Arkansea formerly dwelt on it." It was the custom of the French colonists to abbreviate the long, difficult Indian geographical names; hence les Arkansea became les Arcs. In the French archives at Jefferson Memorial in St. Louis, Mr. W.A. Dorrance states, the phrase "aux arcs" appears many times, meaning on the river, at the post, or in the country of the Arkansas. The abbreviated phrase "aux arcs" was mistaken by the English for one word and they spelled it Ozark. The word is found on a map by Bradbury in 1809. In 1816 it was spelled Osark by Kerr. Schoolcraft in 1819 spelled it Ozark. (Dorrance, W.A., THREE OZARK STREAMS, appendix 1; JESUIT RELATIONS, vol. 65, p. 107)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Ozark Mountains
Description:A mountain range of great antiquity and beauty which embraces all five of the counties in this thesis. The name is of French and Indian origin and the result of a misunderstanding by the English. It means literally "at the (country, river, or place of the) Arkansas." The Indians of Siouan stock who migrated westward called themselves Quapaw (down stream people) but they were called, both before ands after their migration, the Arkansas by the Illinois. Early 18th century maps by G. De l'Isle show that both the Ohio and the Wabash rivers were called the Arkansea. Father Gravier in the JESUIT RELATIONS in 1700 writes: "It is called by the Illinois and the Oumiamis the river of the Arkansea because the Arkansea formerly dwelt on it." It was the custom of the French colonists to abbreviate the long, difficult Indian geographical names; hence les Arkansea became les Arcs. In the French archives at Jefferson Memorial in St. Louis, Mr. W.A. Dorrance states, the phrase "aux arcs" appears many times, meaning in the river, at the post, or in the country of the Arkansas. The abbreviated phrase "aux arcs" was mistaken by the English for one word and they spelled it Ozark. The word is found on a map by Bradbury in 1809. In 1816 it was spelled Osark by Kerr. Schoolcraft in 1819 spelled it Ozark. (Dorrance, W.A., THREE OZARK STREAMS, appendix 1; JESUIT RELATIONS, vol. 65, p. 107)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pasco
Description:A hamlet listed in Campbell in 1873, but no one in the county has any recollection of it. (Campbell (1873)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pattersonville School
Description:In Grant Township. Named after Lem Patterson, who gave land for the school. The "ville" seems to have been added for no reason other than that perhaps the school was regarded as a community center and therefore a town. A similarly inappropriate suffix is found in two other places, Ganntown, in Dallas, and Bugtown in Laclede. (MSTR; W. Booth)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pisgah Church
Description:A Baptist Church, located eight miles southwest of Buffalo at first, but moved to a spot one and a half miles from Long Lane in 1866. Organized in 1841. A Bible name, the mountain from which Moses saw the promised land. (Deut. 34:1) (HIST. DALLAS, p. 556)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Plad
Description:A village in Jasper Township; a post office since 1892. The people in the community were so glad to get an office that they decided to call it "Glad." Through some mistake the postal authorities made out the papers as Plad, and the name remains. (Postal Guide; R. McN., Paul Phillips)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Pleasant Home Baptist Church
Description:Located near the eastern boundary of the county. Organized in 1884. An ideal name. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 561; Paul Phillips)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Prairie Grove Church
Description:A Christian Church originally organized at Kelley School House in 1865. Named for its location. (HIST. DALLAS, p. 562; C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Prairie Grove School
Description:In North Benton Township. Named from the church. (MSTR; C.O. Gammon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Prairie View School
Description:District school No. 53, in North Benton Township. Named for its location on a prairie. (MSTR; D.W. Darby)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Prospect Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Wilson Township. Organized in 1868; it burned in 1937. A name descriptive of the locality. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 553; G. Booth)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Rambo Mines
Description:In Jasper Township. A hamlet which grew around the mines developed by E.V. Rambo, who discovered them in 1868. (R.L. O'Bannon)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Redtop
Description:A village in Jasper Township, a post office since 1889. Named by T.N. Cassity after redtop, a kind of grass distinguished by its reddish color when ripe, which was used by the Indians for medicine and by modern farmers for cattle feed. Mr. Cassity states that his wife suggested the name because of a large field of the redtop which grew back of the store in which the office was housed. The office was first called Cassity after the postmaster, but the name was to similar to Cassidy, a southern Missouri post office. The name was then changed to Marmaduke, but the name was too long for the postal ring or stamp. John Marmaduke was a Confederate general. The post office has been recently moved to Highway 65. (Postal Guide; Williams, STATE MISSOURI (1904), p. 375; T.N. Cassity; HIST. DALLAS, p. 546; MISSOURI GAZ. (1889), p 967)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Reynolds
Description:A discontinued post office (1891-1897) in South Benton Township. Named for Mark Reynolds, who was generally considered the first settler in the county. (Postal Guide; Conard, p. 218)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Reynolds Chapel
Description:A Baptist Church four miles west of Buffalo. Organized in 1877 at the residence of R.D. Reynolds for whom it was named. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), pp. 558, 559)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Reynolds School
Description:District school No. 51 near Buffalo. Named for C.R. Reynolds, a school director. (MSTR; Mrs. Hart)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Round Prairie [1 of 2]
Description:Located in the northwestern portion of the county. Contains about four square miles. Named for its shape. (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 493; Mrs. William Hart)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Round Prairie [2 of 2]
Description:A discontinued post office (1860) in Miller Township. Named for its location on Round Prairie. (Missouri Gaz. (1860); D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Seven Springs
Description:A resort development in the northwestern section of the county near Celt. Owned by E.C. Winters of Kansas City, the resort takes its name from the number of springs in the vicinity. It is also called Fifteen Springs for the same reason, depending, I suppose, on who does the counting. (Keith McCanse; E.C. Winters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Shady Grove
Description:A hamlet in Jackson Township and a post office in 1860. Now only a school district. Named for its location in a grove of trees. (Campbell (1873); Postal Guide; C. Smithpeters; Missouri Gaz. (1860)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sheridan Township
Description:Formed from the southern part of Jackson Township in 1870. Named for General Philip Henry Sheridan (1831-1888), Union General, who made a famous ride at the Battle of Chattanooga. (Plat Book; DICT. AM. BIOG., vol. 17, p. 79; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Sherman Township
Description:Formed from the eastern portion of Lincoln and the western portion of Miller Township in 1870. Named for General William Tecumseh Sherman of Civil War fame (1820-1891) who was noted for his destructive "march to the sea" which is usually considered the reason for his being classed among the first of modern generals. (Plat Book; DICT. OF AM. BIOG, vol. 17, p. 93)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:South Benton Township
Description:Formed from the southern portion of Benton Township in 1890. (D.M. Rush; C. Smithpeters; Plat Book)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:South Fork of Black Valley Creek
Description:See Black Valley Creek.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:South View School
Description:District No. 62 in Washington Township. So named because it faces the south. (MSTR; Mrs. W. Hart)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Spring Grove
Description:A hamlet in Jackson Township since 1865 and a discontinued post office (1867-1904). Named for a grove which has a fine spring. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; R.L. O'Bannon; Parker (1865), map; Goodwin (1867), p. 46)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:St. Luke
Description:A post office in the northern part of the county from 1860 to 1870. Named for St. Luke, the author of the gospel. (Missouri Gaz. (1860); Colton (1870); James Munn)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Stafford Prairie
Description:See High Prairie.
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Thorpe
Description:A village and discontinued post office (1881-1904) in Washington Township. Named for J.G.T. Thorpe, an early settler in the vicinity. (Postal Guide; Williams, STATE MISSOURI, p. 375; HIST. DALLAS, p. 546; MISSOURI HANDBOOK (1881), p. 128; C.D. Bennett)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Tilden
Description:A village in Jasper Township; a post office from 1889 to 1921. The name was chosen to honor Samuel J. Tilden, Democratic candidate for President in 1876. (Williams, STATE MISSOURI (1904), p. 375; Postal Guide; HIST. DALLAS, p. 546; C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Tunas
Description:A village in Sherman Township and a post office since 1895. The source of the name was not learned. (Postal Guide; R. McN.)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Union Victory School
Description:District No. 12 in Lincoln Township. Two school districts were combined and took a name to symbolize the consolidation. (MSTR; C. Reser)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Urbana
Description:A town in Lincoln Township; a post office since 1867. Named after Urbana, Illinois, by settlers who came to Dallas County from there. Originaly called Andersonville after a Dr. Andrews who resided there for years. The reason for calling the town Andersonville instead of Andrewsville remains unexplained, but Dr. Andrews was a pioneer doctor who lived in Urbana, and the story of the town's name is found in the county history and is told by various old residents. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; HIST. DALLAS, p. 546; D.M. Rush; Goodwin (1867), p. 46; Campbell (1873), p. 26)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Wall Street
Description:A hamlet in Wilson Township; a post office in 1904. A mocking or slurring name given by village wags and accepted by the postal department. (Postal Guide; Williams, STATE MISSOURI, p. 375; W.E. Cansler)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:District No. 59, in Wilson Township. Named for a grove of walnut trees. (Mrs. W. Hart; MSTR)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Washington Township
Description:One of the original townships, established in 1841. Named in honor of President George Washington (1733-1799). (HIST. DALLAS (1889), p. 509; DICT. AM. BIOG., vol. 29, p. 509)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:White Palace School
Description:District No. 40, near Buffalo in North Benton Township. Named to glorify the new schoolhouse which was built about twenty-five years ago. (MSTR; C. Reser)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Wilson Township
Description:Formed from the southern portion of Washington Township in 1921. Named for Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), World War President of the United States. (C. Smithpeters)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Windyville
Description:A village in Jasper Township; a post office since 1921. Named because its location in the valley causes it to be windy. (Postal Guide; R. McN.; D.M. Rush)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Woodhill
Description:A village in North Benton Township; a post office from 1867 to 1904. The settlement was originally made a few miles north and was called Cross Plains because of its location at the edge of the prairie. When the settlement moved (c. 1873), the new site was called Woodhill, a descriptive name, by J.M. Alford, an old settler. (Postal Guide; Campbell (1873), p. 26; Goodwin (1867), p. 46; R. McN.)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

Place name:Woodhill School
Description:In North Benton Township. Named for the abandoned settlement. (MSTR; D.W. Darby)
Source:O'Brien, Anna. "Place Names Of Five Central Southern Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1939.

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