Dade County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Ackley School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Antioch
Description:Antioch is a Disciples' Church on Turnback in South Township. It has been a community center from pioneer days and bears a New Testament name. ("They were first called Christians at Antioch.") (Captain Lewis Renfro; J.N. Jones)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Arcola (also for a time Pleasant Hill and Son's Creek, q.v.)
Description:George W. White entered the land on which Arcola stands, May 4, 1860, and sold it to Isaac Killingsworth, April 3, 1861. January 20, 1872, he sold two acres to Cyrus C. Bean, who, erected a dwelling and store together and applied for a post office. He asked for the post office to be named Arcola because of his interest in the old city of Italy where Napoleon gained his victory over the Austrians in 1796. (States (24), Vol. I, p. 242; Dr. R.M. Crutcher)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Blackberry Flat School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Boggy Springs School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Bona (first Whiteside and later Lindley, q.v.)
Description:After the names Whiteside and Lindley were refused by the Postal Department, Mr. Whiteside and Mr. Lindley suggested to the Postal Department that they assign a name and issue the commission. The Department did as requested and named the office Bona. (Mrs. E.S. Whiteside; Wellington Depee)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Bowman School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Brown's Mill (later Grisham's Mill, q.v.; then Comet, q.v.)
Description:Brown's Mill was built by William Brown about 1850 on the Sac River in the east edge of Dade County. It was burned in 1863. (M.F. Grisham)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Bryant School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Bunker Hill
Description:Bunker Hill, a Baptist Church and community center in Polk Township, was a very famous place from 1840 to 1890. It was very likely named for the famous Bunker Hill in Massachusetts, on which the battle was fought June 17, 1775. (J.M. Carlock; C.F. Landers)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Bunker Hill School
Description:A transferred name from the Bible or a church.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Campbell's Mill (later Pemberton's Mill, q.v.; then Hulston's Mill, q.v.)
Description:A man by the name of Campbell built a mill nine miles northeast of Greenfield on Sac River in about 1840. This mill was known as Campbell's Mill for a few years until Campbell sold out to Henry Pemberton. (Robert Pemberton; Roy Hulston)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Carlock School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Caseyville
Description:Caseyville was a trading-point three miles south of Dadeville on the Dadeville-Everton road. It was named for Noah Casey, who owned and operated the store, which was established about 1915 and lasted until about 1922. Its short life was due to the fall in price of zinc, with the attendant closing of the Mines which supported the store. (Noah Casey; R.L. Myers)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Cave School (2)
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Cave Spring
Description:Cave Spring is the name of a big spring near the Cave Spring Church and school. (Polk Crisp; J.P. Willett)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Cave Spring Branch
Description:This branch rises just north of Everton and flows northwestward to the Sac River. It has a large spring on it which flows out of a cave. Rufus Speight entered the land on which the spring is located, and he called it Cave Spring Branch. (Lonas Speight)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Cave Spring Church (also Googer, q.v.)
Description:Cave Spring Church is a Baptist Church and community center in the northern part of the county. It was named for the spring. (J.P. Willett; Polk Crisp)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Cedar Creek
Description:Cedar Creek rises in the west central part of Dade County and flows northward to the Sac River. It was named Cedar Creek by the first settlers because of the cedars which lined its bluffs. (W.F. Ringo; Judge B.G. Thurman)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Cedar Township (earlier Horse Creek Township q.v.)
Description:Cedar Township is the name of Horse Creek Township since the Civil War. It was called Cedar Township because Cedarville was the voting precinct. (W.F. Ringo; Dr. E.V. Lafoon)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Cedarville (earlier Horse Creek Post Office and Farmer's Station, q.v.)
Description:Cedarville was platted by Stanley and Thurman, March 3, 1869, and was named for Cedar Creek. (Eaton (28), p. 283). Its name was changed in 1869 from Farmer's Station to Cedarville by its merchant, Benjamin Henley, because it stands near Cedar Creek. (W.F. Ringo; Dr. E.V. Lafoon)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Cedarville School
Description:A transferred name from a town or township.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Center Township
Description:So named because of its position in the center of the county. (S.M. Quick)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Central School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Chalk Level School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Cherry Grove School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Comet (earlier Brown's Mill and Grisham's Mill q.v.)
Description:A store, blacksmith's shop, and a post office were added to Grisham's Mill in 1890. Mr. Clayton Hargraves got a post office in 1900. Names were submitted to the Postal Department, and the Department selected Comet from the list. Mr. Hargraves included Comet in his list probably because of other Comets in North Carolina and Virginia. (M.F. Grisham; R.L. Myers)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Corry
Description:J.M. Blakemore and J.M. Alexander caused a plat to be made on March 27, 1875, for a village which they called Cora, in honor of Mr. Alexander's daughter. By some error the name was spelled C-o-r-r-y on the plat. (Mr. Alexander pronounced his sister's name in this way also). For a few years Corry was a booming mining city. It is now Dade County's "Deserted Village." (J.U. Alexander)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Crisp
Description:Crisp is a store and post office in northern Dade County. In 1818 Redden Crisp and his son, John, came to what is now Cedar County and settled. John Crisp moved away from his father inside the present limits of Dade County and became the first settler of Dade County. The post office was established about 1900 and was named by J.R. Willett, a kinsman of the Crisps, for John Crisp. (J.R. Willett; States (24), Vol. I, p. 44)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Crisp Prairie
Description:Crisp Prairie was named for John Crisp, Dade County's first citizen, who moved there in 1818. The prairie is in the northeast part of Dade County. (States (24), Vol. I, p. 234)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Crisp School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Cross Roads
Description:Cross Roads was a trading-point after 1850. It got its name from the crossing of the Springfield-Fort Scott and the Boonville-Sarcoxie roads, a mile northeast of where Everton now stands. At the coming of the railroad in 1881 the houses were moved to Everton. (W.Y. McLemore; G.W. Wilson)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Dade County
Description:Dade County was set apart from Polk and Barry Counties by a Formative Act of January 29, 1841. This formation was followed by an Approval Act of February 15, 1841. These acts were followed by a Limiting Act of March 29, 1845, in which ten miles was taken off of the north and given to Cedar County, and nine miles from the south end added to Lawrence County. The county was named for Francis L. Dade, a Virginian, who became a lieutenant, captain, and brevet-major in the United States Army. He was killed in a treacherous attack by the Seminole Indians in 1835, near Fort King, Florida. (Colonel William F. Switzler; Missouri (16), p. 445; Session Laws 1840-1841)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Dadeville (Dade--northeast part) (earlier Melville, q.v.)
Description:Dadeville was the name which succeeded Melville in 1865. It was named for the county after the earlier Dadeville (q.v.) had gone into ruin. John Rountree says; "My wife, who was present at the meeting for considering change of name, suggested that the town be named Dadeville, from Dade County." (Eaton (28), p. 283; John Rountree)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Dadeville (Dade--south part)
Description:Soon after the organization of the county there were a store and a farmhouse-courthouse at the big spring on Honey Creek one mile east of Pennsboro. It passed away several years after the selection of a permanent seat of justice at Greenfield. A Mr. Wilson leased lots to all who wished them but would not make deeds until the permanent seat of justice was established there. The supplemental act of February 15, 1841, limited the county seat to within four miles of the center of the county. That blasted the hopes of Mr. Wilson for making Dadeville the county seat, but some of the stores held on until the opening of the Civil War. Dadeville was named for Dade County. (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Davenport School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Davis (also Taggart, Eldridge and later Lockwood, q.v.)
Description:Davis was named from J.W. Davis, a local landowner; for story, see Lockwood. (J.B. Lindsey; E.E. Smith)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Dead Elm School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Dildy Mill (earlier Finley's Mill, q.v.; also Sodom, q.v.)
Description:"In September, 1867, my father, John B. Dildy, came from Kansas and bought the quarter- section on which the present mill stands. He began at once to build a mill, and on Christmas Day, 1867, the neighbors came in and helped to raise the frame." The mill was named for its owner. (Mrs. A.W. Manka (letter); Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Eldridge (also Taggart, Davis, and Lockwood, q.v.)
Description:Eldridge was named for a local landowner; for story, see Lockwood. (E.E. Smith; J.B. Lindsey)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Elm Grove School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Elm Limb School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Emmett
Description:Emmett is a small village on the Frisco Railroad near the eastern border of Dade County. It was laid out in 1881, at the coming of the railway, on the land of Joseph Boyd, who named the village Emmett in honor of his son William Emmett Boyd. It is probable that the boy was named for the Irish patriot, Robert Emmett (1778-1803). (Edward Moore)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Ernest
Description:Ernest is a small trading-point north of Greenfield. The first postmaster was Ernest Miller, and the office was named for him. It was established in 1890. (W.F. Ringo; H.H. Howard)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Ernest Township
Description:Ernest Township was named for the store and post office located on it. (E.O. Ball; S.M. Quick)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Everton
Description:Judge J.R. Walker bought forty acres of land from John Dunkle and platted the town in 1881. G.W. Wilson and W.Y. McLemore built the first store. Mr. Wilson says: "I known that the town was named for a Mr. Evert or Everett; one of the organizers, by some officers of the railroad." (G.W. Wilson)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Fair View School (2)
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Farmer's Station (later Horse Creek post office and Cedarville, q.v.)
Description:Farmer's Station was the name of a post office on Cedar Creek in northern Dade County operated by a man named Farmer before the Civil War. It was one name for the present town of Cedarville. (Dr. E.V. Lafoon; W.F. Ringo)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Finley Mill (Later Dildy Mill, q.v.; also Sodom, q.v.)
Description:Britton Finley built a mill on Turnback River in the southern part of the county about 1840. It was destroyed during the Civil War. It was rebuilt later by John B. Dildy. (Mrs. A.W. Manka (letter); Captain Lewis Rendro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Flint Hill School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Flory
Description:Flory, a small trading-point in the extreme western side of Dade County, was named by C.E. Elliff, owner of the store, for Jo Flory who was a republican candidate for Governor of Missouri in 1900. (Fred Conn; H.H. Howard)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Franklin School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Freedom School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Gentry School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Gillespie Mill
Description:In about 1840 James H. Gillespie built a mill on Turnback just below where the Frisco crosses the river. It was known as Gillespie's Mill from its owner. It served for sixty years. (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Glenn Town
Description:Glenn Town is the name of a trading-point seven miles north of Greenfield. It was named for John Glenn, who founded the store about 1915. (Tim Gillaspie; R.L. Myers)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Googer (also Cave Spring Church, q.v.)
Description:Googer is a widely-known name for Cave Spring Church. It originated as a nickname. (Polk Crisp; J.P. Willett)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Grant Township
Description:Grant Township was named for General U.S. Grant soon after the Civil War. (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Greenfield
Description:The Act of February 15, 1841, named Josiah McCreary, of Barry County, William Caufield, of Greene County, and Winfred Owens, of Polk County, as commissioners to select the permanent site for the county seat of Dade County. For some reason they did not act, and another committee, Samuel Weir, Mathias Allison, John C. Wetzel, and Jonathan Parish, selected the site in 1841 and named the town Greenfield on account of its beautiful landscape. (S.J. Weir)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Grisham's Mill (earlier Brown's Mill, q.v.; later, Comet, q.v.)
Description:On the site of Brown's Mill Houston Grisham and his son, Marion, built in 1882 Grisham's Mill, and about 1900 sold it to Clayton Hargraves. The mill was named for its owners. (M.F. Grisham; R.L. Myers)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Grove School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Hampton Church
Description:Hampton Church, a Presbyterian Church, is four miles north of Everton and has been a community center since pioneer times. It takes its name from Henry Hampton, a pioneer who lived nearest to it and was an active member. (G.W. Wilson)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Hampton School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Henry School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Hickory Grove School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Higgins School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Honey Creek
Description:"My father, Absalom Renfro, came to Dade County in 1832, and I have heard him say that Honey Creek was named so because of the abundance of honey in that section." (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Honey Creek School
Description:A transferred name from a stream.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Horse Creek
Description:Horse Creek was named by the Government surveyors or travelers, who, in the 1830s, found a dead horse near the banks of the stream. "My father and old settlers told me." (W.F. Ringo)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Horse Creek Post Office (later Farmer's Station, q.v.; finally Cedarville, q.v.)
Description:Horse Creek Post Office, in Horse Creek Township, was named for Horse Creek and served the neighborhood for a few years before the Civil War. After the war it was changed to Cedarville. (Dr. E.V. Lafoon)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Hoyle Mill
Description:Hoyle Mill, three miles east of Greenfield on Turnback, got its name from Peter Hoyle who built and operated it from pioneer days until late years. (Captain Lewis Renfro; Felix McGhee)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Hulston
Description:Hulston is the name of the trading-point and post office near Hulston's Mill (q.v.), from which it takes its name. (Roy Hulston; Henry P. Hughes)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Hulston's Mill (earlier Campbell's Mill and Pemberton's Mill, q.v.)
Description:Mr. Chris Hulston operated the mill for a few years beginning in 1870 and at his death it went to his son, John, who operated it until his death in 1895. It is now operated by Roy Hulston, son of John. It was named for Chris Hulston. (Robert Pemberton; Roy Hulston)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Jewel School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Johnson's Mill (earlier Seybert's Mill, q.v.; later Seybert, q.v.)
Description:John F. Johnson bought the mill from Silas Seybert in 1870. It was known by his name until a post office was obtained under the name of Seybert in 1900, since which time the mill has been known by the name of the post office. (E.O. Ball; John Seybert)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Jones School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Jordan Creek
Description:Jordan Creek (not the same as the Cedar and Greene County streams of the same name) flows through South Township to Turnback and bears the name of the river in Palestine. (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:King's Point
Description:King's Mill is a small trading-point ten miles southwest of Greenfield and was named before the Civil War because of a point of beautiful timber land which jutted out into the farm of a man by the name of Samuel King. (Captain Lewis Renfro; E.E. Smith)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:King's Point School
Description:A transferred name from a town or township.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Lake School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Limestone Creek
Description:This creek is in southern Dade County and flows northeast to Turnback. It is so named because of the nature of the country it drains. (B.G. Thurman; H.H. Howard)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Limestone School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Lin Branch
Description:Lin Branch rises in the southern part of the county and flows north into Sac River. In the early days there was a large linden tree growing on its bank, and for this reason the pioneers named the creek Lin Branch. (Jephtha Grant) Lin is a dialectic form of linden. The Oxford has these forms for linden: lind, linde, lynde, lyynde, lynd, lyne, line. Webster gives: lin, linn. In Wright's DIALECT DICTIONARY the compound lin-tree occurs. Throughout Southwest Missouri you seldom hear anything but "lin trees" used. The histories and newspapers use the same spelling. (R.L. Myers)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Lindley (first Whiteside, q.v.; now Bona, q.v.)
Description:When Mr. Whiteside failed to get the post office under his own name he submitted the name of Lindley for Cyrus Lindley, a wealthy landowner who was helping him to get the office. The request was refused on the ground that there was another office in the state by that name. (Mrs. E.S. Whiteside; Wellington Depee)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Lindley School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Lockwood (earlier Taggart, Davis, and Eldridge, q.v.)
Description:When the Frisco came to Dade County in 1881 there was not a town along its course in the west side of the county. Judge William Taggart and J.W. Davis owned adjoining tracts of land just where the road came out into great prairies. Judge Taggart tried to found a town on his land, and Mr. Davis tried to build one on his farm only a few yards away. Inducements were offered by one and then the other so that the town of Taggart was moved to Davis and then back to its original place. Houses were taken up and moved back and forth. This transfer was made twice. Then a Mr. Eldridge got it moved across the road to his land, and it became Eldridge. The people got together and agreed upon the name of Lockwood in honor of J.E. Lockwood, General Passenger and Ticket Agent for the Frisco, who often came down from Kansas City to hunt with the men of the town. (J.B. Lindsey; E.E. Smith)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Lockwood Township
Description:Lockwood Township was named from Lockwood. (E.E. Smith)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Lone Jack School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Lotus School
Description:A transferred name from a town or township.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Lotus Springs
Description:Lotus Springs was the name of a booming but short lived health resort five miles northwest of Everton. The origin of the name is probably an allusion to the classics. The resort was founded at the close of the Civil War. (Judge John N. Landers)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Lumley Branch
Description:In 1835 William Lumley built a mill about five miles from the head of the present Lumley Branch near Turnback. Volume I of the Dade County Records shows that this Lumley, a Revolutionary soldier, gave a mortgage under his mark in June, 1842, but there is no record of any other Lumley's ever having lived in this region. It is probable that the branch was named for him or his cons because people on Lumley Branch would go to his mill, which was established fifteen years before Brown's Mill near there. This theory is yet more probable because no Lumley ever owned land adjacent to the branch. (M.F. Grisham; R.L. Myers)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Marion Township
Description:Marion Township was named for the famous patriot, Francis Marion. (S.M. Quick; E.O. Ball)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Maze Creek (earlier Turkey Creek, q.v.)
Description:Maze Creek rises in the northeast part of the county and flows northwest to Little Sac River. It was named from an old family who settled along its course in the pioneer days. It was known earlier by the name of Turkey Creek. (John Rountree)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:McConnell School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Meek School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Meinert
Description:Meinert is a trading-point in the southwest part of the county in a German settlement, and was named for the man who owned the land. (Captain Lewis Renfro; H.H. Howard)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Melville (later Dadeville, q.v.)
Description:In 1840 a Mr. Johnson built a cabin in what is now Dadeville. In 1845 Thomas Dale stopped and built a home. Soon afterward Theodore Switzler (a cousin of Colonel William F. Switzler) of Virginia built a home there. Mr. Dale persuaded a young Dr. Hampton to come out from their old home in Tennessee. In 1855-1856 William Davidson built a home and blacksmith shop. Dr. Bender soon arrived. The citizens appointed Mr. Dale and the two doctors to select a name for the place. They met and drew straws to see which one should name it. Dr. Hampton drew the lucky straw and named the village Melville. Years afterward he told Dr. Lafoon that he named Melville from the Greek word _____, meaning honey, because it was a sweet place to live. In 1865 the Postal Department found the mail mixing with that of Millville and ordered the name changed to Dadeville. (Dr. E.V. Lafoon; States (24), Vol. I, p. 235)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Monitor School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Morgan Branch
Description:Morgan Branch was named for the pioneer, Adonijah Morgan, who owned the big spring which supplies most of the water. (Dr. E.V. Lafoon)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Morgan Township
Description:Morgan Township was named for Adonijah Morgan by Dr. William Mathews, who sold his farm to Mr. Morgan upon the arrival of the latter in 1836. (Dr. E.V. Lafoon)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Mound School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Mount Zion [1 of 2]
Description:Mount Zion, a Presbyterian Church ten miles southwest of Greenfield, has been a community center since pioneer times and is still very active. The source of the name is obvious. (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Mount Zion [2 of 2]
Description:Mount Zion near Seybert was a famous Church of the Disciples and a community center from the earliest times until the opening of the twentieth century. The members gave it a Bible name, but their reason for this choice is not known. (William Toler)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Mount Zion School
Description:A transferred name from the Bible or a church.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Muddy Creek (also North Fork of Spring River q.v.)
Description:Muddy Creek is the same as North Fork of Spring River. It drains a section of flat, mucky land and is therefore muddy almost all the time. For this reason it was named Muddy Creek in early days. (H.H. Howard; Bert Webb)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Needmore
Description:Needmore is the name of a trading-point that sprang up at the site of the old Hoyle Mill after the mill fell into ruin. There is a tradition among the local jokers that the merchant always "needed more" goods than he had in stock. (Tim Gillaspie; R.L. Myers)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Neola
Description:Neola, a small trading-point north of Greenfield, was established by Oliver Beard in 1889. There is a tradition that Beard named it for some woman. (John Preston; Frank Grider)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:North Fork of Spring River (also Muddy Creek, q.v.)
Description:North Fork of Spring River was so named because it is a north tributary of Spring River. It is also known as Muddy Creek, especially in its upper course. (E.L. Moore; H.H. Howard)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:North Township
Description:This township was named from its position in the county. (S.M. Quick)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Oak Dale School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Old Sylvania (see Sylvania, earlier)
Description:Old Sylvania is the name given to the plat of earlier Sylvania to distinguish it from the town of later Sylvania. (H.H. Howard; J.K. Armstrong)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Old Sylvania School
Description:A transferred name from a town or township.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Ozark College
Description:Ozark College was a Presbyterian college which was located in Greenfield in 1881-1882 and was operated for twenty years. It was named from the Ozark territory which it served. (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Paragon School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Pemberton's Mill (earlier Campbell's Mill and later Hulston's Mill, q.v.)
Description:Campbell sold the mill to his partner and son-in-law, Henry Pemberton, who, after many years, sold to Chris Hulston (in 1870). It is now in possession of the grandson, Roy Hulston. (Robert Pemberton; Roy Hulston)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Pennsboro
Description:In 1888 Captain Lewis Renfro named Pennsboro in honor of William Penn, his grandfather, one of the pioneer settlers of the southern part of Dade County. (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Pennsylvania Prairie
Description:This prairie was named in honor of William Penn, who settled in southern Dade County about 1835. (Eaton (28), p. 283; Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Pickett School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Pilgrim
Description:Pilgrim is a small trading-point on the Frisco in southern Dade County. Tom Reed from Kentucky submitted three names, including this one of a Kentucky town, to the Postal Department in 1890 and Pilgrim was selected. (J.N. Jones; W.W. Smith)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Pilgrim School
Description:A transferred name from a town or township.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Pilgrim Township
Description:Pilgrim Township was cut off of South Township and took its name from the post office and village. (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Pisgah Church
Description:Pisgah had the distinction of being the first Baptist Church in the county. It was organized February 14, 1836, and the old log church was located one mile northeast of the present site of Dadeville. Its founders gave it the Bible name of Pisgah. (Haines (64), p. 122; States (24), V.I, p. 70)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Pleasant Hill (also Son's Creek and Arcola, q.v.)
Description:Pleasantville was a short-lived name for Arcola. Its definite origin is unknown, but the fact that it is in a beautiful location in which it is pleasant to live makes the origin of the name evident. It was called by all three names, Pleasant Hill, Son's Creek, and Arcola at the same time. (Dr. R.M. Crutcher)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Plumb Town
Description:Plumb Town is a trading point about seven miles east of Greenfield. It was named for William Plumb who owned the land. (Tim Gillaspie; R.L. Myers)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Polk Township
Description:Named for President James K. Polk. (J.M. Carlock)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Ragsdale's Mill
Description:Built by John D. Ragsdale about 1845. About 1850 Ragsdale built another mill a mile below the first one. (Silas Bell)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Ray Springs School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Roark's Mill
Description:A Mr. Roark built a mill six miles northeast of Greenfield in the 1830s. The site is a mile below Seybert's Mill. It was named for its owner. (Dr. E.V. Lafoon; E.O. Ball)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Rock Praire Post Office (later Crossroads, q.v.)
Description:During the 1840s a post office was passed around to several farm houses, but about 1850 it fell to Sammy Jones who had a little store at Crossroads. It was discontinued after the establishment of an office at Everton in 1881. The office was named for the prairie. (States (24), Vol. I, 225-6; S.A. Payne)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Rock Prairie
Description:A large prairie lies in northeastern Lawrence County and southeastern Dade. From the nature of the prairie the pioneers called in Rock Prairie. (Captain Lewis Renfro; W.M. Jones)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Rock Prairie Township
Description:Rock Prairie Township took its name from Rock Prairie. (S.A. Payne)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Rockdale School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Rocky Hill School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Sac River
Description:There is a well-grounded tradition that during the 1820s the Sac Indians held some pow-wows at the big spring where Stockton now stands and that the earliest pioneers named the stream for them. We find also that the Sac Indians lived in the western part of Hickory County about fifteen miles from Stockton. (H.H. Howard; Missouri (16), p. 214)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Sac Township
Description:Sac Township took its name from Sac River. (S.M. Quick; E.O. Ball)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Sand Mountain School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Scott School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Seybert Post Office (see Seybert's Mill)
Description:Seybert is the name of a post office at the site of the old Seybert Mill. (E.O. Ball)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Seybert's Mill (later Johnson's Mill, q.v.)
Description:Silas E. Seybert built the first mill at Seybert about 1848 and operated it until he sold it to John F. Johnson in 1870. (John Seybert)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Shady Grove School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Shannon Valley School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Shaw School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Silver Star School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Sinking Creek
Description:In southern Dade County, rising near the east edge of the county and flowing westward to Turnback. It got its name in the early days because of a peculiarity it had then (but not much now) in its upper course of flowing under the ground for a few feet at a time as it passed through the heavy sod. (W.T. Wills)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Sinking Creek Church
Description:This old Methodist Church was a voting precinct in the early days. It has been a very important community center since 1840. It was named from Sinking Creek, which flows nearby. (W.T. Wills; Silas Bell)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Sinners' Union Church
Description:A community about ten miles northwest of Greenfield found themselves without a church about 1890. Many denominations were represented by the neighbors, so they got together and organized a Sunday School, which they somewhat jokingly called Sinner's Union. A little later they organized a church, to which they gave this name, denoting that people of different faiths were uniting. (Tom Courtney; W.H. McMahan)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Smith School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Smith Township
Description:Smith Township was named for a pioneer, Asa Smith. (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Sodom (also Finley's Mill and Dildy's Mill, q.v.)
Description:The mill site of Finley's and Dildy's Mill was long known by people as Sodom. Mrs. Manka says, "The place was called Sodom then, as it was a wild, rough place." (Mrs. A.W. Manka (letter); Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Son's Creek
Description:In 1827 Samuel Son and his brother of Kentucky came to Missouri. Samuel settled in what is now Vernon County, while the brother settled on Son's Creek. The creek was named for the brother. Tradition bears out this report of Mrs. Son. (Mrs. W.H. Son (letter); H.H. Howard)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Son's Creek Post Office (also Arcola, q.v.; and Pleasant Hill, q.v.)
Description:Some of the people called the new village of Arcola by the name of Son's Creek, because it is located near Son's Creek, but the name failed to find general favor. (Dr. R.M. Crutcher)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:South Greenfield (earlier Watkins, q.v.)
Description:South Greenfield is the present name of the town originally known as Watkins. Because of a conflict in names in the Postal Department in 1888 the name of South Greenfield was given to the young town of Watkins. South Greenfield was chosen because the town was near and just south of Greenfield, the county seat. (H.H. Howard; B.G. Thurman)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:South Township
Description:South Township was so named because of its position in the county. (S.M. Quick)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Speight School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Star School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Stockton School
Description:A local family name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Stone School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Stony Point School
Description:A descriptive name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Sunnyside School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Sunshine School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Sylvania [1 of 2]
Description:A coal company of Allegheny, Pennsylvania, leased coal land in Dade County and platted a town which they named Sylvania for Pennsylvania. The Civil War came, and the project ended in a plat only. (H.H. Howard; J.K. Armstrong)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Sylvania [2 of 2]
Description:Sylvania was established at the close of the Civil War by J.R. Seaton, a member of the Allegheny Coal Company. He laid out this town three miles north of the old plat and gave it the same name. (H.H. Howard; J.K. Armstrong)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Tabernacle School
Description:A transferred name from the Bible or a church.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Taggart (also Davis, Eldridge, and Lockwood, q.v.)
Description:Taggart was named for Judge William Taggart, a local landowner. For story, see Lockwood. (E.E. Smith; J.B. Lindsey)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Turkey Creek (later Maze Creek, q.v.)
Description:Turkey Creek is the earlier name for the stream now known as Maze Creek. It was named by the early settlers for the abundance of wild turkeys along its course. (John Rountree)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Turnback Post Office [1 of 2]
Description:Turnback (post office) was the name given to the office at the Dildy Mill about 1870. It was named for Turnback River (q.v.). (Mrs. Manka (letter)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Turnback Post Office [2 of 2]
Description:About five miles southwest of Finley Mill, was named for Turnback River (q.v.). (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Turnback River
Description:A party of pioneers camped on the banks of this river in 1830. Cold weather and rough land caused the party to divide, some going on and entering land and others returning to their home in Tennessee. Because some of the party "turned back" the river was given the name which it bears. (Mrs. C.C. Preston (letter); John Cecil)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Union School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Victory School
Description:An ideal name.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Ward
Description:A store and post office combined was established about 1895 five miles north of Everton and named for John Ward, postmaster at Everton, who was instrumental in getting the office. (R.L. Myers)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Washington Township
Description:Washington Township was cut off of South Township and named for George Washington. (Captain Lewis Renfro)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Watkins (later South Greenfield, q.v.)
Description:At the coming of the railroad in 1881 L.W. Shafer and John A. Ready, two Greenfield lawyers, platted the town of Watkins and named it for a railroad official. In 1881 the name was changed to South Greenfield. (Captain Lewis Renfro; H.H. Howard)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Whiteoak School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

Place name:Whiteside (also Lindley, q.v.; later Bona, q.v.)
Description:In 1891 Mr. E.S. Whiteside established a trading-point four miles north of Dadeville, which he called Whiteside. He asked for a post office under the name of Whiteside, but was refused on the ground that there was one by that name in the state already. (Mrs. E.S. Whiteside; Wellington Deppe)
Source:Meyers, Robert Lee. "Place Names In The Southwest Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1930.

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