Cole County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Algoa
Description:Algoa, a railroad switch, was, for a time called Ewing's Station in honor of Jilson Ewing, who owned the land. The name was changed by the Missouri Pacific Railroad. The reason for the change is not known. It is possible that Algoa is from the Indian word Algoma meaning "Algonquin waters." [On the Missouri Pacific Railroad three miles west of Osage City] (O.L. Moore; E.S. Burch; Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri, 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Ambrose School
Description:Name of unknown origin.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Bass
Description:This country store was established by the farmers in the community and named in honor of Mr. Methdred Bass, a prominent farmer who owned the adjacent land. The store is now extinct. (E.L. Burch; J.E. Garman; Cited on Railroad Commission Map of Missouri, 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Belleville
Description:Belleville was surveyed in November, 1870. The origin of the name is not known definitely. A prominent farmer Mr. Bell, lived nearby and doubtless the town bears his name. It has long been extinct. [Southwest of Russelville on the Missouri Pacific Railroad.] (HIST. COLE & MORGAN, ETC., p. 304; J.E. Garman)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Bois Brule Creek
Description:In 1844 the "Indians burned Fort McKenzie, which was thereafter spoken of by the French as Fort Brule and its site as Broule Bottoms. The Broule Bottoms lie chiefly in Perry County." Later the name Bois Broule, meaning burnt woods, was given to this territory. Still later we find the French naming a stream in Perry County Bois Brule. [This Ft. McKenzie was not in Missouri, see Thwaites.] Following the New Madrid earthquake of 1811-1812 many settlers from that district moved to the Booneslick country. It is highly probable that the name Bois Brule was brought by them and given to the stream in Cole County. The spelling has undergone various changes. Bois Brule, Boise Broule, and Babruly. The local pronunciation is Bob Ruley. (Thwaites (Ed. Notes) v. 23, p. 87; Conard, I, p. 313; Houck, III, p. 179; Thwaites (Ed. Notes) v. 23, p. 87; Ibid., p. 98; Conard, I, p. 313; U.S. Geological Survey, Jefferson City Sheet)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Brazito
Description:Brazito was founded in 1850. Soldiers of Cole County, returning from the Mexican War, named it for Brazito, New Mexico. (O.L. Moore; Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri, 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Cedar Grove School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Centennial School
Description:Named for its time of founding(?)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Centertown
Description:Sometime before 1860 William S. Freshour established a post office here and called it Lookout. Possibly the battle of Lookout Mountain influenced him in selecting a name for his post office. Another possible source for the name was a railroad sign nearby, which read "Look out for the cars." The exact origin of the name was not found. In 1867 a town was laid off on this site and called Centertown because it was practically the geographic center of the state. (J.C. Conrath; Eaton, p. 274; Cited in County History, p. 300)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Central School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Chouteau
Description:"At the mouth of Little Tavern, on the Osage River was a prospective city of long ago. General Minor, one of the owners and one of the surveyors of the plot, was the first and only settler. A lot was donated to him by the owners but the mosquitoes drove him out." A Mr. Chouteau, of St. Louis, carried on extensive fur trading on the Osage River when this country was being settled. "The prospective city" might have been named for him. However, nothing definite could be found concerning the name or the date of the town. (HIST. COLE & MONITEAU, ETC., p. 304; Perry S. Rader)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Clark Township
Description:This township was named for Mr. James Clark, one of the first settlers. The date of his migration from West Virginia to this county is not known. (O.L. Moore)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Cole County
Description:Cole County was organized November 16, 1820, and named in honor of Captain Stephen Cole, "an Indian fighter and pioneer settler, who built Cole's Fort near Booneville." (Eaton, p. 278; Campbell, p. 165; Parker, p. 233; Gannett, p. 87)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Cole Junction
Description:A railroad junction on the Missouri Pacific Railroad where the main line and the river route meet. The name was given by the railroad company for the county. (J.C. Conrath; E.L. Burch; Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri, 1920)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Concord School
Description:A transferred name from a town. [Note: On 1969 Hartsburg Quad, seven and a half min series, not named and symbol used is that for a church.]
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Corinth School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Decatur
Description:Named in honor of Captain Stephen Decatur, who achieved his greatest distinction, in 1815, by stopping the raids of the Barbary pirates on United States merchant men in the Mediterranean. No plot of the town has been filed. (J.H. Conrath; Perry S. Rader; Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri, 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Dixonville
Description:This country post office was named in honor of Mr. Dixon in whose home the office was established. (J.E. Garman; Cited in MISSOURI GAZETTEER & BUSINESS DIRECTORY, (1860), p. 71)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:East Union School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Elston
Description:In 1867 this town was surveyed for Mr. A.M. Elston and in his honor named. He was a member of the legislature from Cole County in 1838. (Eaton, p. 279; HIST. COLE, Moniteau, p. 302)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Elston School
Description:A transferred name from a town.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Enterprise School
Description:An ideal name. (?)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Eugene
Description:Eugene was incorporated on August 3, 1904. The town was surveyed on land owned by Mr. Eugene Simpson and named in his honor. (O.L. Moore; Judge J.E. Garman; Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Forest Hill School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Glendale School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Grand View School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Gray's Creek
Description:Gray's Creek bears the name of a family who lived near it. The following, no doubt, apocryphal story is also told concerning the origin of the name: "Gray's Creek was named by the pioneer, John Colgan, who lost and old gray mare there in the fall and found her the following spring in good condition." (J.C. Conrath; J.E. Garman; HIST. COLE & MONITEAU COUNTIES, p. 244)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Harmony School
Description:A transferred name from a church. [Not on 1968 Lohman Quad 7 1/2 series, on 1948 Centertown Quad 15 series]
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Henley
Description:William Henley owned the land on which this town was surveyed in 1902. (Eaton, p. 274; O.L. Moore)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Hickory Hill
Description:Hickory Hill was plotted December 14, 1867. The land surrounding the town was very broken and covered with small hickory trees, hence the name Hickory Hill. The village is now extinct. (J.C. Conrath; J.E. Garman; Cited in Campbell, p. 168)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Honey Creek [1 of 2]
Description:This post office received its name from the creek near which it was located. (q.v.) It has been discontinued many years. (J.C. Conrath; Cited in MISSOURI GAZETTEER & BUSINESS DIRECTORY (1898), p. 448)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Honey Creek [2 of 2]
Description:Honey Creek doubtless received its name from a family living near it. At present there are several families of that name living in the community. (J.E. Garman, E.L. Burch; Cited on U.S. Geological Survey, Boonville Sheet) The following unauthentic story is also told: In the early days there were many bee trees on this creek. The settlers went there to get honey and often took swarms of bees home with them. Because of this they named the creek Honey Creek. (J.H. Faust)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Howard's Bluff
Description:"The seat of justice of Cole County, is situated on a high bluff of the Missouri River." Nothing more was found concerning the place. (Beck, GAZETTEER OF MISSOURI, p. 284)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Jefferson City
Description:The county seat of Cole County and the capitol of Missouri, was founded in 1822 and named in honor of the great statesman, Thomas Jefferson, under whose administration the Louisiana Purchase was made. The Missourian, published at St. Charles, January 17, 1822 gives the following: "The legislature have at length given the permanent seat of government of this state, a local habitation and a name. It is to be fixed at the mouth of Wier's Creek, on the south side of the Missouri River, a few miles above the mouth of the Osage River, and is called the city of Jefferson, in honor of the late President Jefferson, whose treaty bound us to the Union." The bill, locating the capitol of Missouri because of a law December 31, 1821. It is not known when the name was changed to Jefferson City. (Eaton, p. 279; HIST. COLE & MONITEAU, etc., p. 277) [This additional note is not part of the original Ramsay files: See also proceedings of the 21st Anniversary Meeting of the Missouri Bar Association (1903), p. 155, which says Jefferson City was NOT named for Thomas Jefferson but rather for some early inhabitants of the place with that name.]
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Jefferson Township
Description:Jefferson Township received its name from its principal town - Jefferson City. (q.v.). (J.E. Garman)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:King's Chapel School
Description:A transferred name from a church. [Note: On present day topographic map, labeled only as King's Chapel; --possibly the same as King's Chapel School.]
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:An ideal name. (?)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Liberty Township
Description:This is doubtless another abstract name reflecting the patriotism of those who applied it.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Lohman
Description:Lohman was originally one of the stores in the Stringtown community (q.v.). About 1884, Mr. C.W. Lohman, owner of the store, moved his merchandise to the railroad. A post office was established in the store and the place named in honor of the owner. (HIST. COLE & MONITEAU, p. 304; J.E. Garman)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Lohman School
Description:A transferred name from a town.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Marion
Description:Marion was plotted in 1820, and named in honor of Francis Marion, a hero of the Revolutionary War, known as "The Swamp Fox." This appelation was given him because of his ability to elude British pursuers. Marion was born in South Carolina in 1732 and died there in 1795. I found no connection between the town and the man other than the name. Marion was the county seat of Cole County from 1821-1829. (Eaton, p. 279; HIST. COLE COUNTY, p. 299)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Marion School
Description:A transferred name from a town. [Note: School may now be represented on newer maps as "Community Hall" (as on 1969 7.5 minute series (topographic) map of Centertown northwest quadrangle, of Cole County, Missouri)]
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Marion Township
Description:Marion Township was doubtless named for the town of Marion (q.v.). However, it might have been named in honor of Marion Eliott, an early settler. (O.L. Moore; J.C. Conrath)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:McKinney
Description:This station on the river route of the Missouri Pacific Railroad bears the name of Mr. Tenney McKinney, who owns the land on which it is located. (J.C. Conrath, J.E. Garman, Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Millbrook
Description:Many years ago Mr. John G. Sheperle had a flour mill on a small stream, hence the name millbrook. (O.L. Moore; J.C. Conrath, Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Moreau
Description:Moreau, a railroad station received its name from the creek near which it is located (q.v.). (J.E. Garman; Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri 1910) [Does not appear on topographical map--location from Cole County 1914 Atlas]
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Moreau Bend School
Description:Named for its location. [On 1941 highway map]
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Moreau River
Description:The term Moreau, signifying "extremely black," was given to this river by the early French explorers probably because of the character of its water. The name has undergone various changes, River a Morou, Morrow Creek, Murrow Creek. (Heath, p. 366; Thwaites (Ed. Notes), Vol. 14, p. 145)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Moreau Township
Description:Organized April 3, 1821 and named for the Moreau Creek which flows through the township (q.v.). (O.L. Moore; J.E. Garman)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Mt. Carmel School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Mt. Hope School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Mt. Pleasant School
Description:Named for its location. [Shows as abandoned on Russelville 7.5 minute quad, 1969]
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Mud Creek School
Description:A transferred name from a creek.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Newton School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Osage Bend
Description:As indicated by its name, this village is located in the bend of the Osage River. It has recently acquired the nickname Tintown because the store, church, and school are covered with galvanized iron. However, the post office is still Osage Bend. (J.C. Conrath, J.E. Garman, Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Osage Bend School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Osage Bluff
Description:In 1885 a general store, saw mill, and wagon shop were located here. The name was derived from the bluffs along the Osage River. The town is now extinct. (Eaton, p. 279; J.C. Conrath)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Osage Bluff School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Osage City
Description:Osage City, surveyed March 9, 1867, is situated at the mouth of the Osage River and named for the river (q.v.). (Eaton, p. 279; Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Osage River
Description:The Osage River was named by the French traders and trappers from the Wasashi (French, Onasage) Indians. The spelling has been corrupted into Osage. The meaning of the word is unknown. (Gannett, p. 283) Hodge in his HANDBOOK OF AMERICAN INDIANS, vol. II, gives Wazhazhe as the name of the tribe from which the French took the name Osage.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Osage Township
Description:This township received its name from the Osage River (q.v.). (O.L. Moore)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Pleasant Grove School
Description:Named for its location. [Note: Is symbolized and named on 1943 Centertown fifteen minute Series Quad, but not on 1969 Hartsburg 7.5 Series Quad]
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Pleasant View School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Rock Creek
Description:Rock Creek received its name from its course through a rough and rocky part of the county. (J.C. Conrath, E.L. Burch, Cited in Beck, p. 313) [Flows intermittenly before it becomes viable. Begins as a viable stream in the southwest part of Sec. 18 and flows in a general north and east direction.]
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Rock Creek School
Description:A transferred name from a creek.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Russelville
Description:Russelville was surveyed in 1838 and named for Joseph Russel who owned the land on which the town was laid out. (HIST. COLE & MONITEAU, etc., p. 302; J.E. Garman)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Schuberts
Description:Mr. Martin Schubert operated a store, post office and blacksmith shop on his farm. The post office was moved to Osage City and Schuberts is now extinct. (E.L. Burch, J.E. Garman)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Scott's Station
Description:Scott's Station received its name from a former judge of the supreme court who lived in that community. (J.C. Conrath, Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Scrivner
Description:Mr. J.E. Scrivner established the first store here and was also the postmaster. (E.L. Burch, J.E. Garman, Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Scruggs
Description:Scruggs was named in honor of John W. Scruggs, owner of the land on which the station was built in 1882. (J.C. Conrath, J.E. Garman, Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Shumate's Chapel School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Spring Valley School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:St. Stanislaus School
Description:Name of unknown origin.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:St. Thomas
Description:St. Thomas was first settled in 1855. It soon became a Catholic community and was named by them for St. Thomas the apostle. (J.C. Conrath, Perry S. Rader, Cited in Campbell, p. 168)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Stringtown
Description:This name was applied to a community because two country stores were located a mile apart with several farm houses between them. Andrew Bohnenberger and Charles Lohman operated the stores. When Lohman moved his store to the railroad Stringtown became extinct. (J.E. Garman, E.L. Burch, Cited in Campbell's GAZETTEER OF MISSOURI, p. 168)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Stringtown School
Description:A transferred name from a town.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Taos
Description:Taos was founded about 1849, shortly after the Mexican War. It was named by returning soldiers, of Cole County, for Taos, New Mexico. (J.C. Conrath; J.E. Garman; Cited in Campbell, p. 168)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Tavern Creek
Description:The origin of the name is unknown. (Cited in HIST. COLE & MONITEAU, p. 204; O.L. Moore; J.E. Garman)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Teal
Description:A former resident of Teal says the name was given by Mr. George Turner, who operated a mill there, because of his fondness for hunting teal ducks. The village is now extinct. (J.W. Hoehler; Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Teal School
Description:A transferred name from a town.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Twiest
Description:Twiest was probably a country store. No record of it was found. (Cited on Clark's Sectional Map of Missouri 1860)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Valley Home School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Wardsville
Description:Mr. Junius Ward owned the land on which the town was laid out and it was named in his honor. (E.L. Burch; J.E. Garman; Cited on Railroad Commissioner's Map of Missouri 1910)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Waterloo School
Description:Name of unknown origin.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:West Union School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:White Oak School
Description:Named for its location.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Wier's Creek
Description:Wier's Creek received its name from a family who lived nearby. (J.E. Garman, Cited in HIST. COLE & MONITEAU, p. 203)
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

Place name:Zion School
Description:A transferred name from a church.
Source:Pace, Nadine. "Place Names In The Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1928.

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