Clark County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:A Bit Nation
Description:Government land south of Wyaconda in Union Township. The land is very poor, and the government sold it for "a bit" (twelve and a half cents) an acre; hence the name. (Alberta Callison; Robert McLachlan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Acasto
Description:A post office from 1860-1904; thirteen miles northwest of Kahoka, on the county line in northeastern Folker Township. It is gone today but for the little church that stood southeast of the village. So named for a family in the neighborhood. The vicinity was known as "Possum Hollow" for the location and the number of opossum. (Sutherland & McEvoy (1860); Goodwin (1867); Campbell (1874), 145; ATLAS CLARK (1878), 10; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1861-1915; A.G. Ehrhart; Alberta Callison; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:African Methodist Episcopal Church
Description:A church organized before the Civil War at Waterloo by the negroes. In 1876 a church house was erected in Kahoka. It was rebuilt later and is used occasionally today. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alexander
Description:See Alexandria.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alexander's Ferry
Description:A ferry established by John Alexander, whence the name, at the mouth of the Des Moines River, on what became the site of Alexandria (q.v.). The Courier gives the date as 1825, the County History as 1832. The ferryman, according to the Courier, was the first to build a cabin in the county. (HIST. CLARK (1887), 244; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Bell, Margaret E. "Place Names In The Southwest Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Alexandria
Description:A post office since 1853; in Vernon Township, on the Mississippi River a short distance below the mouth of the Des Moines River, and fifteen miles from Kahoka. It was settled in 1834. Previous to this time the first ferryman, John Alexander, built his cabin on the site, then at the mouth of the Des Moines. The original name of the settlement was Churchville (Colton, 1857-1861), for Francis Church, the promoter, who surveyed and platted the site in 1833. In 1835 the village was a supply station for the trail leading to Fort Des Moines. The first plat by the name of Alexander was laid out in 1838 as an addition to the existing town of Churchville, and called Alexander for the ferryman of that name. The two sites were later consolidated, and were replatted in 1848 under the name of Alexandria, a modification of the name Alexander. The name thus occurs on the maps of Missouri from 1871, though the name Churchville is sometimes revived today. Alexandria on petition was made the county seat in 1847. A gift of twelve and a half acres was set aside for the courthouse, and the removal from Waterloo (q.v.) was effected, the court of 1850 meeting in the new building at Alexandria. The unprecedented high water of 1851 followed by annual overflows made the village, however, unfit for the purpose, and the county seat was sent back on petition in 1854 to Waterloo. Alexandria was at one time the most important town in the county. The richest bottom lands in northeast Missouri lie between the Fox and the Des Moines Rivers, and Alexadria drew upon this rich extent of land. Some 11,000 acres of rich land were reclaimed in the immediate vicinity by the building of the Egyptian Levee (q.v.) the contract for which was let in 1857. In the town's flourishing days steamboats landed at its wharf, and it was not only a trading center, but was regarded as a fine marketplace for grain and stock. At this time it had the ambition to rival St. Louis as a packing center, and for a few years marketed its output in St. Louis, actually killing more hogs than its rival down the river. "Andy" Maxwell, the "original pork-packer of the west" set up slaughter houses here in 1850, and continued in the business until the 1870s when he was caught in the depression on the market. In these years Alexandria became second in output only to St. Louis, far exceeding Chicago. Alexandria was however completely submerged in the high water of 1858. It had stood previously at the mouth of the Des Moines, but the river changed its course emptying into the Mississippi a short distance above the town. There developed an energetic neighbor in Iowa in a more advantageous location, the town of Keokuk. These several causes contributed to the decline of what promised at one time to be a most important shipping point on the Mississippi River. The site of Maxwell's once expansive plant is now a cornfield. The old trading center lies along the river today a straggling, decrepit old village within sight of its rival, now but two miles to the north. (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 145; Postal Guide; Eaton, 276; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; HIST. CLARK 1887, 244, 276, 279-283; 336, 337; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 82; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; ST. LOUIS DAILY GLOBE-DEMOCRAT, Aug. 30, 1925; Mrs. Arla Williams; Mrs. Guy Hummel; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alexandria and Bloomfield Railroad
Description:A road projected in 1865 between Alexandria in Clark and Bloomfield, Iowa, following the Old Divide (See Alexandria and Bloomfield Wagon Road). There was much litigation over the bonds which continued until 1884; new bonds were issued on the consolidation of the road with the Alexandria and Nebraska City Railroad (q.v.) around 1881. (See Keokuk & Western Railroad) (ATLAS CLARK 1878; HIST. CLARK 1887, 292, 303; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 340, 341)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alexandria and Bloomfield Wagon Road
Description:A stage line operating in 1852 on an old trail starting at the mouth of the Des Moines at Alexandria and continuing northwest through Luray in Clark to Bloomfield, Iowa, thence on to Council Bluffs and Omaha and further westward. It was an important road in Northeast Missouri, as elsewhere, in the days preceding the railroad. It was known also as "The Divide," "The Old Divide," and the "Main Divide" for its location, and as such was established before 1842. Highway No. 3, across Iowa follows closely the "Old Divide." (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 33; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alexandria and Bloomington Railroad
Description:A railroad projected from Alexandria, Clark County, to Bloomington, county seat of Macon at that time. The company was chartered and the road surveyed around 1859, but no other work was done under this name owing to the Civil War. (HIST. KNOX 1887, 720; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 376)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alexandria and Nebraska City Railroad
Description:After the issuance of bonds in 1868 the railroad projected to connect Alexandria, Clark County with Nebraska City and entered into a consolidation with the Alexandria and Bloomfield (q.v.) a second projected road, to form the Missouri, Iowa, and Nebraska City Railroad. (See Keokuk and Western). (ATLAS CLARK 1878; HIST. CLARK 1887, 292, 303; HIST. N.C. MISSOURI, 340, 341)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alexandria College
Description:A college of no mean proportion organized in 1869 at Alexandria, whence the name, under the patronage of a corporate association of which Reverend Thomas J. Musgrove, a Baptist minister, was to be president during his life. It was not sectarian but religious in the sense that "in connection with science the Christian religion, a pure morality, and an earnest philanthropy was to be exhibited and enforced on a principle common to all churches." It grew out of Pleasant Hill Academy (q.v.). It flourished for a time, but had to be discontinued because of the inundation of the college site. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 339; Davis & Durrie, 282; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; ST. LOUIS GLOBE-DEMOCRAT, Aug. 30, 1925; Mrs. Arla Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alexandria Consolidated School District
Description:A consolidated school district at Alexandria, consisting of the Lingle School and Fox Island School (q.v.). (Richard St. Clair; Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen's Class
Description:First Methodist Church organization in the county. It met at the home of George Haywood near St. Francisville. So named for Reverend Samuel Allen, the circuit rider who established the class. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allen's High School
Description:A subscription school at Waterloo held in the old courthouse in 1863. Professor John Allen organized the school. He was followed by Dr. Henry Davis. The school drew pupils from all over the county. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alpine
Description:A post office from 1860-1867. Residents do not know the place. For the name cf. Alps (Shelby County). (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Gannett)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Anson
Description:A post office from 1872-1904; south of the center of Grant Township, ten miles north and west of Kahoka. The name was assigned by the post office department. It is a supposition that there was a family bearing the name. It was popularly known as "Greasy Point" for an inn at this point, not too clean, where greasy meals were served. (Campbell 1874; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; MAPS MISSOURI, 1879-1915; Postal Guide; Murphy 1882, 18; T.M. Story; Samuel Bell)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch
Description:A post office from 1886-1904; nine miles south and east from Kahoka, in western Jackson Township. A country store there today, a blacksmith shop, church, and school. So named for the Antioch Methodist Church South (q.v.). (Polk 1889; Postal Guide; MAPS MISSOURI from 1904; A.G. Ehrhart; O.C. Buck; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Baptist Church
Description:A church near Wyaconda, established in 1873. It had no pastor in 1936. So named for Anitoch Methodist Church South (q.v.); for its location west of that church it is frequently known as the West Antioch Church. (MIN. WYACONDA BAPT. ASSOC., 1936; Mrs. Guy Hummel; Alberta Callison; O.C. Buch; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch Methodist Church South
Description:A church five or six miles south of Antioch (q.v.); now disbanded and the building sold. Cf. Antioch Church above. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Antioch School
Description:A school that bears the name of the country store and old post office known as Antioch (q.v.). (Richard St. Clair)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Arkansas School
Description:A schoolhouse in Washington Township in the extreme southwest corner of the county. So named for its location. Arkansas, once a part of Missouri Territory. (See Clark County), was so located with the same relation to Clark County and the State of Missouri. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Arnold Schoolhouse
Description:A pioneer schoolhouse northeast of Cemetery Church (q.v.). Later it was moved to Ashton where it was made into a residence. So named for "Uncle John" Arnold. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Aromatic Creek
Description:See Fox River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Asbury Chapel
Description:A Methodist Chapel in the northwest corner of the county, existing around 1876. Probably organized before or around the Civil War period, as the name Asbury was used that early as a community name. So named for Bishop Asbury of early Methodist Church history in the United States. Cf. Asbury Chapel, above. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ashton
Description:A post office from 1853; an elevator town and station on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, five miles west of Kahoka, in Lincoln Township. It was first surveyed and settled in 1883, and was replatted in 1883. So named for an early settler. (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; HIST. CLARK 1887, 362; Eaton 275; Postal Guide; MAPS MISSOURI from 1879; Plat; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atchison and Topeka Railroad.
Description:See Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad
Description:This railroad enters Clark County midway in Sweet Home Township on the Des Moines River, crosses the county diagonally to Scotland County where it passes through the southeast corner a distance of about nine miles, then enters Knox County which it traverses in the northwest section. Ground was broken at Topeka, Kansas, for this road, chartered as the Atchison and Topeka Railroad, in 1868, and trains were running by 1869. In 1875 the road reached Kansas City, and now followed westward substantially the line of the old Santa Fe Trail (q.v.) whence the name Santa Fe Road as applied to the railroad. In 1876 the line was completed to Pueblo; in 1879 to Las Vegas. The Santa Fe System was organized in 1886 under the name Chicago, Santa Fe, and California Railroad. It is known as one of the most gigantic and best equipped railroad systems in America. The road now runs from Chicago to the Pacific Coast. It was completed in 1887, and the first run on the completed road made January 1, 1888. The road goes most frequently under the name of the Santa Fe. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 303, 304; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 490; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 611; Williams 1904, 361; Duffus 1930, 260-66; HANNIBAL COURIER- POST, Aug. 15, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Athens
Description:A post office from 1853-1922; in Grant Township on the Des Moines River but two and a half miles below the northeast corner of the county, fourteen miles northeast of Kahoka. There was a settlement here as early as 1834, and an early pioneer, William Clark, built his cabin near the site in 1830. It was laid out in 1844 by Isaac Gray, the pioneer settler of the vicinity, and named by him for the ancient city of Greece. The first dam in the county was built at Athens in 1852, and the Athens Woolen Mills were established at that time. The village became known for its fine water power and its enterprise, and did considerable business previous to the Civil War. It was thought that it would become a city of magnificent importance. But it declined during the war period and never revived. It was the scene in 1861 of what is believed to have been the most northern engagement of the Civil War. Though few were slain, the battle ended in wild panic, a miniature Bull Run, which is said to have decided the fate of Northeast Missouri. A house still stands bearing a great hole shot in it during the battle. The owner continued to live there but refused to have the hole closed. The house is unoccupied at present but still has some of the old furniture in it. The house still stands outside the old village site in a beautiful location. Residents hope that the grounds may some day be converted into a state park. (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874, 141, 146; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; HIST. CLARK 1887, 349, 386; Eaton, 275; Postal Guide; Quincy HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Maps Missouri from 1857; Alberta Callison; T.M. Story; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Athens Woolen Mills
Description:See Athens.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Augusta School
Description:A schoolhouse that serves northeast Lewis County and southeastern Clark County. It stands just within the line of Lewis County on the site of the "paper" town, projected in 1837, the name of which it bears. (Mrs. Merle T. Bradshaw; W.B. Anderson; Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bailey Church
Description:A Methodist Church near the Lewis line; built sometime before the 1860s. The first church was of logs. Later a frame building was erected. It is still used occasionally for funeral services. So named for a family in that vicinity. (O.C. Buck; Chas. Seyb; A.G. Ehrhart; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baldwin Island
Description:An island below Alexandria, known also as Island No. 3. It took its name from a Mr. Baldwin who farmed the land. The source of the number cannot be definitely stated. Major W.H. Crosson of the Engineer Corps at Rock Island says that the small numbers given to the islands in this vicinity probably came from surveys made by the General Land Office or by county or private surveyors who had occasion to survey the number of islands which lie in the same vicinity, and so numbered then 1, 2, 3, etc. (For larger numbers, see Montrose Island) (ATLAS CLARK 1915; J.D. Rebo; Major W.H. Crosson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ballard Church
Description:A Baptist Church southwest of Kahoka. It no longer exists. So named for families in the vicinity. (Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ballard School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township, southwest of Kahoka; erected in 1847, a log building chinked with mud. This building was burned in 1850; a new one was not erected until 1871. So named for families in the neighborhood. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barnesview
Description:To the southeast near Honey Creek. Mitchell's map of 1844 shows Barnesville in the same location. Barnesview was indicated, 1842- 1861. There were people it is known in that vicinity of the county of the name of Barnes. No further information could be gathered. (Maps Missouri, 1842-1861; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barnesville
Description:See Barnesview.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bartlett School
Description:A schoolhouse in Des Moines Township. So named for early settlers in the vicinity. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bear Creek
Description:A creek which rises in Scotland County to the southeast and crosses the southwest corner of Clark, entering the North Fabius just above the Lewis-Clark line. So named for the bears found by early hunters in the vicinity. (Campbell 1873; Campbell 1874, 592; ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; HIST. CLARK 1887, 400; Plat Book 1930; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beard School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township. It takes its name from families in the neighborhood. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bechtol's Mill
Description:A small grist mill on Fox River on the site of Waterloo in 1836; owned on its establishment by Johnson and Alexander and known by their name. It established the original site of the village of Waterloo and served as the first post office. It was the third mill in the county. After Mr. Bechtol became the owner in 1837, he added a saw mill and carding machine. So known for its owner. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 343; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beckett
Description:A post office before the Civil War; near Chambersburg (q.v.). It was kept in the Beckett home, whence the name. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Belleplain
Description:A station on the stage coach line from Palmyra to Waterloo in 1850; near the Lewis border. Spelled Belleplaine on the Map of Missouri, 1871. This section of Clark is an extent of prairie; hence doubtless the name, translated "Beautiful Prairie." (Mitchell 1850; Maps Missouri, 1857-1871; F.E. Greenlee)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Belleplaine
Description:See Belleplain.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethlehem Cemetery
Description:See Spencer Cemetery.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethlehem Church
Description:A Methodist Church in northwestern Folker Township on the Fox River; organized about 1860, long before the church decided on its name. Lumber for the church building was hauled from Alexandria by ox teams, and the brick for the chimney and lining for the walls was burned on a neighboring farm. It was not completed until after the Civil War. It was rebuilt not long since and is in good repair, but is seldom used. A Biblical name: Bethlehem, the birthplace of Christ (Mat 2:1). (HIST. CLARK 1887, 289, 388; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Velma Williams; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beulah Land
Description:A timbered tract bordering a stream, about one and a half miles southeast of Chambersburg. It is used for camp meetings by the Holiness people, and received its name from the hymn, "Beulah Land." A Biblical name: Beulah, an allegorical name for Israel, indicating peace and plenty. (Isaiah, 62:4) (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Devil's Creek
Description:See Sugar Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Fox
Description:See Fox River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big River Slough
Description:See River Slough.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Spring
Description:A spring along the Mississippi River, east of St. Francisville. So named for its size. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bigg's Branch
Description:A branch north of Honey Creek, flowing west into that creek. So named for George Bigg, a prominent lawyer and landowner of the vicinity. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bishop's Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River to the north of Alexandria. Previously the Des Moines River discharged at Alexandria (q.v.) but in years it formed a new outlet one-quarter of a mile farther north. This island resulted from the cut-off and the accretion carried down by the river. It took its name from the owner of the land. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; G.W. Hill)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Church
Description:An Evangelical Church southwest of Kahoka. So named for Dr. Black. (Mrs. Guy Hummel; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Hawk
Description:A village in the extreme northeast corner of the county, on the Des Moines River. It dates from 1833. The name does not appear on the maps after 1861. The name is that of perhaps the most famous Indian that came to be known in this vicinity. Black Hawk, with other Sacs of Rock River, Wisconsin, joined the British during the War of 1812. When the treaty made later with the Indians was signed, the name of this Indian, Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, was translated "Black Sparrow-Hawk." He was henceforth known as Black Hawk. Black Hawk was at that time but a sub-chief, or he may have been merely a warrior. He was, however, chief of his tribe during the war of 1832, named for him the Black Hawk War. Black Hawk (1767-1838), was a Sauk of the Thunder Clan, deeply religious and thoroughly patriotic; he had fought under Tecumseh and had become imbued with some of the ideas of the great Shawnee. A warrior and patriot, in every situation he was the Chief of his Band, asserting their rights with dignity, firmness and courage. He recognized the keen injustice of the intruder in his practice of making "fair promises" which he never fulfilled, and in his taking advantage of the Indians in forcing upon them the degrading treaty of 1804 when the government disregarded the custom of assembling the whole nation in a matter of such magnitude, and treated with but four individuals of the tribe. The Indians felt themselves driven from their land without provocation. To this time they had been undisputed possessors of the Mississippi Valley. Black Hawk's own village on Rock Island at the foot of the rapids in Rock River had stood for more than 100 years. Incensed, they joined the British in 1812 and fought their war of 1832. The name Sauk or Sac comes from Osa Kiwug (people of the outlet, or possibly people of the yellow earth) in contradistinction from the Foxes (people of the red earth). The Sauk were of the Algonquin tribe. There was a Sac village at the head of the Des Moines Rapids on the Mississippi River, near Keokuk, Iowa, (Pike, 15), and there were other Indian villages, Sacs as well, farther up the river. A band of Sauk Indians had become known as the Missouri River Sauk because for some time they had wintered near the post in St. Louis. It was with the headmen of this band that the government officials negotiated the treaty of 1804, which led to the undoing of the Sauk and Foxes. In 1837, Sauk and Foxes made the last of their various cessions of land in this vicinity, and were given in exchange a tract across the Missouri in Kansas. Here they remained practically as one people for about twenty years. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 275, 276; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 18, 19; Maps Missouri, 1857-1861; Hodge; BLACK HAWK, 23-33, 57, 139; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black Oak Church
Description:A Baptist Church north and west of Luray by ten or twelve miles, close to the Iowa line; organized after the Civil War. The church no longer exists. It stood in a dense forest of black oak trees, whence the name. (Mrs. Velma Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township. So named for families in the neighborhood. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Black's Fork
Description:A small stream flowing into the Wyaconda, in the extreme southern part of the county. Formerly known as Morgan's Fork. Both names are for family landowners. (Hutawa Map Missouri, 1844; O.C. Buck; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blattner School
Description:A school in the Wyaconda Consolidated School District, north and east of Wyacanda. So named for a neighboring family. (Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Valley
Description:A name given the Wyaconda valley between Luray and Wyaconda. There seems no particular reason for the name. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; F.E. Greenlee)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bluff Springs Methodist Episcopal Church South
Description:A Methodist Church South on the main highway below Wayland (q.v.). So named because it stands on the edge of the bluff and there are springs in the vicinity. (Mrs. Guy Hummel; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boneta
Description:See Fremont.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Boston School
Description:A schoolhouse in Washington Township. A pretentious name for a humble locality. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brick Church [1 of 3]
Description:A Baptist Church in 1858 or 1859 northwest of Peaksville, near the Highland School (q.v.). So named for the material of which it was built. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brick Church [2 of 3]
Description:A Congregational Church in Kahoka, built in 1871. Now used as a dwelling house. So named because it was the only brick church in the town. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Velma Williams; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brick Church [3 of 3]
Description:See Winchester Methodist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brick School
Description:See Highland School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bridge Branch
Description:A branch which empties into the Des Moines River. So named for a family. (O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brooklin
Description:A post office in 1853. Residents do not know the place. (Hayward 1853)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brown Church
Description:A Congregational Church six or seven miles northwest of Peaksville in the vicinity of Anson. So named for a family. (A.G. Ehrhart; O.C. Buck; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brown's Line
Description:The line run in 1837 in the boundary dispute between Iowa and Missouri (See Jessamine Township). It lay about ten miles north of "Old Indian Boundary Line" (q.v.). So named for the early Missouri surveyor, Joseph C. Brown, who ran the line. (Houck, I, 14)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brush College
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township. So named for the heavy growth of brush on the site. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brush Creek
Description:A creek in Madison Township, south of Waterloo, flowing east and north into the Fox River. So named for the heavy brush on its banks. (ATLAS CLARK 1878, 1915; PLAT BOOK 1930; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck Branch
Description:A branch in the southeast corner of the county, flowing into Honey Creek below Gregory. So named for a landholder. (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; PLAT BOOK 1930; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buena Vista Ferry
Description:A ferry over the Mississippi River above Des Moines City (see Gregory), from Buena Vista in Illinois, whence the name. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 250; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burnt Shirt Branch
Description:A branch which rises in Scotland County to the northeast near Arbela; entering Clark in Folker Township, it flows southeast into the Fox River. "Burnt Shirt" was the old name for Arbela (q.v.). (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; PLAT BOOK 1930; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burrier Branch
Description:A branch north of the Fox River into which it flows. So named for a landowner northwest of Chambersburg. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bush School
Description:A subscription school at Winchester (q.v.) in 1845. So named for the teacher. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buzzard Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River, cut off by Middle Slough (q.v.). So named for the number of buzzards congregating there. (J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cahoka
Description:See Kahoka.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Calvary Church
Description:See Dumas Methodist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cama
Description:A switch for shipping on the Santa Fe Railroad, in southeastern Wyaconda Township; on the Wyaconda River at the point where the two branches meet to form the larger stream. So named by the Santa Fe road, but for what reason is unknown. (R. McN. 1935; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canaan School
Description:A schoolhouse in Folker Township. Land in the vicinity is very productive; hence the name it is thought for the "land of Canaan." (Gen. 17:8). The name may have been suggested by the name Lebanon in a neighboring township. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Canton Bloomfield Railroad
Description:A railroad projected from Canton in Lewis County to Bloomfield, Iowa, the first in Lewis County. It was begun in 1860 and about fifteen miles of road were built, from Canton to Bunker Hill, when operations were interrupted by the Civil War. The road became involved and was sold after an engine stood on the track near Tully for a year or two, the iron being sold to the government for a railroad down in Tennessee. The road was again chartered as the Mississippi and Western Railroad, but nothing followed. At this time the Mississippi and Missouri Air-Line was proposed (q.v.). This was succeeded by the West Quincy and Alexandria, and a road was built, which through various consolidations became the St. Louis, Keokuk, and Northwestern (q.v.). The line is now a part of the Burlington System, and extends westward from Keokuk, Iowa, through Clark and Scotland counties into Iowa by way of Schuyler County, Missouri. (Campbell 1874, 309; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; ATLAS LEWIS 1878, 10; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 170-173; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 454; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI 388; Judge James T. Lloyd; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carmel
Description:A Methodist Protestant Church southwest of Kahoka, near Luray. It still exists. A Biblical name: At Carmel Elijah sacrificed (I Kings 18:30), and there Elisha dwelt (II Kings 4:25). (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; Mrs. Velma Williams; A.G. Ehrhart; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carmen School
Description:See Van Horn School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar College
Description:A schoolhouse in Grant Township. So named for a growth of cedars that used to be there. Cedar Creek is in that vicinity also. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Creek
Description:A creek to the north of Anson (q.v.), flowing generally southeast into the Des Moines River just below the Iowa line. So named for the many cedar trees on its banks. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; PLAT BOOK 1930; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Grove Church
Description:A Baptist Church southwest of Kahoka in the neighborhood of Union. It no longer exists. So named because it stood in a cedar grove. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cemetery Chapel
Description:A chapel at Ashton, built in 1874. Land was given by Grandfather Showalter for a cemetery with the provision that a church be built; hence the name. The first burial was in 1871. After many years the building was sold for a barn, but it was saved from desecration. It still stands and is used for funerals. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Center Chapel
Description:A Methodist Chapel in Old Center School District (q.v.) whence the name. Services are held there once a month. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; KAHOKA GAZETTE-HERALD, Sept. 25, 1936; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Center School
Description:A schoolhouse that served old Center School District (q.v.). It no longer exists. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; F.E. Greenlee)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Center School District
Description:A school district northwest of Kahoka in the neighborhood of Luray, in pioneer days. A community name today. The district was so named because it was at that time a center for several roads. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; F.E. Greenlee)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Centreville
Description:A proposed village a short distance from another paper town, Laurel City (q.v.); laid out in streets in 1855. A site near the center of the county; hence the name. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chambersburg
Description:A post office from 1853-1904; eight miles northwest of Kahoka, on the Fox River. A store was established here in 1837, about which grew up a small village. There remain today a store, a church, and the school, the latter of which keeps the name alive. It is a supposition that it was named for Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, from the vicinity of which some of the residents came. (Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; ATLAS CLARK 1878; 10; HIST. CLARK 1887, 344; Davis & Durrie, 344; Postal Guide; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Maps Missouri, 1879-1915; Mrs. Velma Williams; A.G. Ehrhart; Robert McLachlan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Charleston
Description:A recent country community southwest of Kahoka. So named for the well-to-do darkey who conducted the store. (A.G. Ehrhart, O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chicago, Santa Fe and California Railroad
Description:See Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Christ Church
Description:A Christian Church to the northeast of North Wyaconda Creek; indicated in the Atlas of 1878. This denomination prefers to call itself the Church of Christ; hence the name. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; INTERN. CYC.; Mrs. Velma Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Christiansport
Description:A settlement on the Des Moines River, dating from 1850. The name does not occur on any map. So named for a family of the name of Christian in the locality. (Mrs. Guy Hummel; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Church of God
Description:A religious group that held services in the Carmen Schoolhouse (q.v.), led by Reverend Bolton from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He was a disciple of Winebrenner (1797-1860), originally a minister of the German Reformed Church who in 1830 formed a new sect, introducing a special ceremony of foot washing. The church membership was known as Winebrenarians for the founder. (Mrs. Guy Hummel; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Churchville
Description:See Alexandria.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:City of the Classic Fox
Description:See Waterloo.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark City
Description:A post office from 1870-1902; two miles east of Kahoka, to the west and south in Madison Township, located in a beautiful rolling country, on the M.I. and N. Railroad, now the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy. It was laid out in 1868 as a competing point for the county seat, "a better site than the present one," residents still say, and was given the name of the county. It was settled upon in 1866, but in the heated controversy that ensued between promoters of the Kahoka and the Clark City site, the former was determined upon (See Kahoka). Clark City was designed also as an educational center, an academy having been provided for. (See Clark City Collegiate Institute). Today the schoolhouse bearing the name is all that marks the site. (Campbell 1874; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; Maps Missouri 1879; HIST. CLARK 1887, 362; Davis & Durrie 344; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart; Mrs. Florence Ehrhart; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark City Collegiate Institute
Description:The institute of this name was opened at Clark City (q.v.) in 1870. It was a Presbyterian U.S.A. school, under the management of Reverend Teitworth. The cornerstone for the college building was laid in 1872. The building was never completed. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark City School
Description:A schoolhouse in Madison Township that keeps alive the name of a rival for the county seat, on the site of which it stands. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark County
Description:Clark County is in the extreme northeastern corner of the state, with the state of Iowa to the north, the Des Moines River to the northeast, a short frontage on the Mississippi River to the east, Lewis County on the south, and Scotland and Knox Counties on the west. On its organization Clark County included the northeastern part of what is now Scotland County, embracing over one- third of that county. The statement that the county was organized in 1818, made by Campbell and repeated by Switzer, et al, is undoubtedly wrong, as there were no settlers in Clark County until around 1829. The statement probably arose from the fact that in 1818 the Territorial Legislature passed an act creating the county of Clark in Arkansas which at that time was a part of the Territory of Missouri. Clark was organized for the first time in 1836. Prior to this time it was a part of Lewis County. While still a part of Lewis, it was divided in 1833 into two townships, Jefferson to the north and Des Moines to the south. A redivisioning of the latter followed, and Jackson Township was formed in 1836. Washington Township in 1837 followed the organization of the county. A redistricting was made and new counties formed in 1838, with a final redistricting in 1868, bringing the number of townships to thirteen. The thirteen townships remain today the same except for a few minor changes. Clark is outstanding in that of her thirteen townships six are named for national figures. On the organization of the county in 1836, there were already two post offices established, St. Francisville and Sweet Home. The first settlers were from Kentucky, and settled near the Des Moines River. Two-thirds of the land was prairie; the remainder was well timbered with a heavy growth of cottonwood trees on bottoms along the streams. There was no road above Tully in Lewis County, but the pioneers pushed their way through the brush and high grass to sites near the present St. Francisville. James A. Lewis was given a grant for land situated in Clark as early as 1825. The first cabin was that of John Alexander's, the ferryman, at the mouth of the Des Moines River. (See Alexandria). The family of Jacob-Weaver, the miller, was the first white family in the county. "Uncle Jerry" Wayland was associated with the early story. There is a legend that the famous Virginian, Robert E. Lee, and his brother homesteaded two sections of land in Clark. "General Harrison," so named for the real General Harrison, an early governor of the Illinois Country (q.v.) as trapper and interpreter had trapped up and down the river in this locality for a long period of time later settling near the Des Moines River (See Marysville). Colonel Muldrow, in the 1830s, that interesting romancer, was also associated with the early story of Clark (See "Eastern Run," also Muldrow College). From Father Marquette's narrative of 1673, there is reason to believe that the two French missionaries, Marquette and Joliet must have been very close to the territory now Clark, if not within its borders. Father Marquette, speaks of the two Indian villages, Peouarea and Moningwena, on the western side of the river generally supposed to be the Des Moines. The distance traveled from the Mississippi River where they left their canoes leads to the conclusion that they were situated not far above the mouth of the Des Moines River, probably on the bluffs of the Iowa side not far from St. Francisville. The position of Clark County at the junction of three states, bordering the Mississippi River at an important point in an early story; its wealth of Indian names indicating its association with the story of the red man of the Mississippi Valley through its honey and "sugar" harvests and its rich hunting ground,--all make the story of this county an interesting one. The counties of northeast Missouri participated in this county in a "war" all their own. In the formation of civil townships the county court in 1838 in Clark recognized the Indian Boundary Line (q.v.) as the northern boundary of the county as laid down by the State of Missouri in 1821. Over this boundary ensued in 1839 a dispute known as the Missouri-Iowa War (See Rapids of the Des Moines), a war without a battle, otherwise humorously known as the "Honey War." (See Jessamine Township). Clark County was the terminus of the old "Bee Roads" (q.v.), as well as the terminus of the Old Salt River Road (q.v.) of pioneer days. None the less interesting was the adjustment of the location of the seat, a matter of contention from 1837 to 1871, with as many as five rivals in the interval, hot controversy ensuing over rival sites circa 1866-1871. The General Assembly named the county on its organization for Governor William Clark (1770-1838), last governor of Missouri Territory, United States Army officer, and fellow commander with Lewis of the exploring expedition across the Rockies to the Pacific. Captain Clark was early acquainted with Indian warfare. The statement was made that it was to his knowledge of Indian habits and manners that the expedition owed its success. He also rendered material assistance in scientific arrangements. He was last governor of Missouri Territory, being governor when the territory became a state. Later he was appointed by President Monroe to the office of Superintendant of Indian Affairs, an office which he held to his death. The Indians trusted "Redhead," their name for Clark, and he was able to avert many a threatened invasion through their feeling for him. While in office, he engineered the Platte Purchase by which a large tract of land was ceded by the Indians to the United States, and thus added a large tract to the state of Missouri. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 233, 234, 238, 240, 251, 252, 266, 267, 271, 273, 274, 275, 288, 289; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 82, 338, 339; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 9; Stevens, 67; Williams 1904, 563; Rader, 34, 63, CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; AMER. ENCYC.; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark School
Description:A schoolhouse in the southern part of Union Township. So named for a neighboring family. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clark's Island
Description:See Cloak Island.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Classic Fox
Description:See Fox River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clay
Description:A post office from 1870-1874; eight miles southeast of Kahoka and three miles from Wayland. So named for a family. (Campbell 1874; Postal Guide; Mrs. Velma Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clay Township
Description:A township on the southern line bordered on the north by Des Moines Township, on the east by Vernon and the Mississippi River, on the west by Jackson; organized in 1868. So named for Henry Clay (1777-1852). (See Clay Township, Shelby County). There were also people of this name in the vicinity. (See Clay) Court Record 1868; R. McN. 1935; INTERN. CYC.; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cloak Island
Description:An extent of land east and south of Alexandria extending to a point just above Gregory; cut off by the River Slough (q.v.). Known on the Mississippi Survey Chart as Island, No. 1 (See Goose Island, Marion). Devil's Island of Pike's account and Cloak Island must be the same from the description given. Coues speaks of the large tract of land nearly four miles in extent isolated by Dobson's Slough which must be River Slough as it was known in 1878. The Indian Manito (Manitou) and Devil are the same, a spirit power for good or evil. (See Sugar Creek). No reason could be found for the name Cloak other than its size and its location outside the long slough. One resident knew the island as Clark's, so named, he said, for its owner, but no one else knew it by this name. (Coues-Pike, Note, 16; ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; O.C. Buck; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coal Bank Hollow
Description:A little stream that empties into the Des Moines River. So named for its location. (Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cob Run
Description:A name applied to the vicinity of the elevator and railroad station in Kahoka. In the course of a heavy storm, the elevator burst, and great pile of corn cobs was swept for an extended distance in the stream set flowing by the rain; hence the name. (F.E. Greenlee)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Collins School
Description:A schoolhouse in Grant Township. So named for a family. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Combs' School
Description:See Enterprise School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cow Bell Tavern
Description:A tavern at Fairmont kept by Daniel Wood in 1851. So named because the tavern keeper used a big brass cowbell suspended on a pole to call his borders to their meals. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 350; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cowgill's Mill
Description:A mill in the southern part of the county. So named for its owner. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cracker-Neck School
Description:See Pleasant Hill School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dagg's Spring
Description:A spring on the bank of the Wyaconda on land owned by Thomas Dagg, whence the name. (Murphy 1882, 63; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:De Moyen River
Description:See Des Moines River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dedman's Ferry
Description:A ferry across the Mississippi River at the mouth of the Des Moines River in 1837-1838. So named for the ferryman, John Dedman. (KAHOKA GAZETTE-HERALD, Sept. 25, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Demon River
Description:See Des Moines River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dempsey Highway
Description:A short stretch of road between St. Patirck and Highway 61, joining 61 north of Canton by several miles. It was named for Father Dempsey who had charge of the Catholic Parish at St. Patrick before and during the time the right-of-way was secured for the road. Father Dempsey in the years before the World War was a policeman, but losing his wife by death, studied for the priesthood and served over seas as Chaplain, later coming to St. Patrick. He was greatly respected by all who knew him, Protestants as well as Catholics. (Mrs. Guy C. Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Des Moines City
Description:See Gregory.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Des Moines River
Description:A river which rises in southwest Minnesota and flowing southeast crosses the state of Iowa diagonally from the northwest, entering the Mississippi River at Keokuk in that state, a course not less than four hundred miles in length. The mouth of the river in 1825 was about two miles further south at the site of Alexandria in Clark, but had gradually moved north to its present location. It was the site in this county of several early settlements, many of which failed to survive. It occupies today an important point owing to its position at the junction of three states, Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri. The outlet is divided into three channels by two islands, the Montrose and the Niota (q.v.). Pike speaks of the river as the largest he had come to since he left the Illinois. He charted it in detail. The stream, though a large and very important one, is however historically less significant than those of similar extent on the Illinois and Wisconsin side, the latter of which during the 17th and 18th centuries served as highways to the mighty river in the heart of the great West. As early variants of the phrase which settled into Des Moines, we find River of the Outontantes with its variations, River of Peouareas, etc., River of the Maskoutens, etc., Nadouessioux (Sioux), etc. Outontantes, Otentas, probably Ottawas , came from Adawe, to trade, a term common to the Algonquins who were noted as intertribal traders. The word Peouarea comes through the French from Piware (Peoria): he comes carrying a pack on his back--a personal name. When Marquette and Joliet descended the Mississippi in 1673 they found these tribes and the Moingwena on the western side of the Mississippi, near the mouth of the river supposed to be the Des Moines. When returning from the south he found that the Peoria had removed to the lower end of the expansion of the Illinois River, near the present Peoria. The word Maskoutens was a name for the Iowa and the Teton. It signified "little prairie people," from Muskuta from the Fox language, prairie and ens, diminutive ending. These were Algonquin tribes living on the prairie. (Wisconsin and Illinois). The word, Sioux, is an abbreviation of the diminutive of Nadowa (Nadowe-is- iw): he is a small massasauga rattlesnake, signifying enemy or enemies. Nadowa expressed utter detestation, and was applied by the Algonquin tribes to their neighboring and most inveterate enemies. The etymology of Moingwena is doubtful. The word was applied to a small tribe of the Illinois Confederacy closely affiliated with the Peoria, and the first recorded notice of the tribe is that of Marquette. Franquelin's Map of 1688 gives the name of the river as Moingana, and indicates the Indian village of Moingoana on the river. One of Joliet's maps has the name, Moengouena. In Nuttall's Journal, 1821, occurs the name, Moins. Shea, in 1855, gives Moingwenas, while in "Jesuit Relations" occurs the form, Mouingouena. Pike (1805) in charting the river set it down as De Moyen, and in his English-French put it River of Means. The same year General James Wilkinson writing to the Secretary of War used the term River Demoin. Pike's editor of his printer got it Demon River; Beltrami (1828) renders La Moine and Monk River. Nicollet, however, in his report of the Upper Mississippi, 1841, says that the name is one given by the Indians of the Illinois nation to their settlement, Moingouinas or Moingona, a corruption of the Algonquin word, Mikonang, signifying "at the road." The Indians, he says, were referring to the well-known road in this section which was still in 1841 the means of communication between the head of the lower rapids and their settlement. The French adapted the name with their custom of pronouncing only the first syllable, and applied it to the river as well as to the Indians, "la riviere des Moins," the River of the Moins. In later times, Nicollet continues, the inhabitants associated this name with that of the Trappist monks (Moines, monks, de la Trappe) who resided on the Indian mounds of the American bottom. It was then erroneously concluded that the true reading of the "riviere des Moins" was the "riviere des Moines" or "river of the monks." We must conclude that though the spelling would indicate the French for "monks" the name Des Moines comes from the Indian name, "Moingonan." (Coues-Pike, Note, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17; Hodge; Nicollet 1841, 237, 238; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Des Moines Township
Description:This township today is a triangular section to the east along the Des Moines River, from which it takes its name. To the south lies Clay, to the west Sweet Home and Madison Townships. While the county was still a part of Lewis, as early as 1833, Clark was divided into two townships of which the Des Moines was the southern. From time to time the extent of Des Moines Township was changed through the organization of new townships until 1868 after which but minor changes have been made. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 266, 273; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Court Records; R. McN. 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Desvaux School
Description:A school in the Fairmont Annexed School District (q.v.). So named for a family. (Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull; Ralph E. Jenkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Devil Creek
Description:A creek in the northwestern part of the county in Folker Township, flowing into the Little Fox. An Indian name (See Sugar Creek). (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Devil's Creek
Description:See Sugar Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Devil's Island
Description:See Cloak Island.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Diamond School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jackson Township. So named for a family. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dinsmore School
Description:A schoolhouse on the site of St. Francisville in 1865. So named for a family in the vicinity. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:District, No. I
Description:The first school district in the county, at St. Francisville; established in 1834. Known by the same name in 1878. (ATLAS CLARK 1878, 9)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dobson's Slough
Description:See River Slough.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dodd's Crossing
Description:A name given to the steamboat channel among the sand bars and islands in the vicinity of Satterfields Creek (q.v.). It was so named for one Dodd who kept for some years a woodyard at this point on the Illinois side. (Coues-Pike, Note, 12)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Doe Branch
Description:A small stream joining Buck Branch (q.v.) just before it enters Honey Creek. The name was evidently suggested by the name Buck. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dog Town
Description:See Luray.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Drew Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Little Fox River close to the mouth of Linn Branch (q.v.). So named for the owner of the land. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Drew's Creek
Description:A stream in south Folker, flowing southeast through the corner of Jefferson Township into the South Fork of the Wyaconda. So named for several families in the vicinity. (Campbell 1873; Chas. Seyb)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dugan School
Description:See Duncan School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dumas
Description:A post office from 1889-1915; on the Des Moines River and the Santa Fe line, to the northeast in Sweet Home Township, twelve miles from Kahoka. It was platted in 1888 as Dumas. (See Dumas Creek). (Polk 1889; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1902; A.G. Ehrhart; T.M. Story)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dumas Creek
Description:A stream that rises northeast of Peaksville and flows north and east into the Des Moines River. So named for the landowner who spelled his name Dumass. The name of the creek was so spelled in 1878, but had dropped the second "s" by 1911. (See Dumas). (ATLAS CLARK 1878, 1915; PLAT BOOK 1930; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dumas Methodist Church
Description:A Methodist Church South that formerly stood one mile east of Peaksville, near Revere, where it was known as Calvary Church. It was later moved to Dumas. A Biblical name:--Calvary (Golgotha, the place of a skull): There Christ was crucified (Luke 23:33). (Mrs. Velma Williams; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duncan School
Description:A schoolhouse in the northern part of the county, in Folker Township: formerly known as the Dugan School. Both names are for families. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ebenezer Cumberland Presbyterian Church
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian Church when organized at Peaksville at the close of the Civil War. Used for their church service in 1887 a building known as the "Church of God." The church was moved in 1890 to Revere where the present building was erected. It went into the union with the Presbyterian, U.S.A., in 1906, and was known as the United Presbyterian Church. It is now a community church used by the Methodist and Presbyterian congregations. For Ebenezer, cf. above. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 402; Mrs. Velma Williams; Alberta Callison; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Egypt School
Description:A school in the Fairmont Annexed School District (q.v.). So named for its location in very hilly land with much timber about it. (Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull; Ralph E. Jenkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Egyptian Levee
Description:A levee reclaiming a tract of 11,000 acres of rich bottom land in the vicinity of Alexandria. From points nine miles on the north side and seven on the south, it extends from the Mississippi River to the bluff. It was chartered by the legislature in 1856 by a company bearing this name, and was built at a cost of $45,000. The company was reorganized in 1903 under the name of the Des Moines and Mississippi River Drainage Company, District No. 1. The levee retains the name given it for the association of the name Alexandria with the East, suggested by the story of Egypt and the inundations of the Nile. (ATLAS CLARK 1915; Switzler, 344; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; G.W. Hull)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:El Dorado
Description:See Eldorado.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eldorado
Description:A post office from 1853-1870; adjoins Luray and may with propriety be called an addition to the town of Luray. It was laid out in 1871, and lies between west Luray proper and the railway, the depot of Luray being in Eldorado. Polk (1876) gives the name as El Dorado; it is written usually as one word. It has been given the sobriquet of "Jim Town," a "Jim Crow name," quoting a county resident. It may be a humorous nickname to offset the other more pretentious one. El Dorado is a Spanish word meaning "the golden," or the "gilded land." El Dorado existed originally in the imagination of the Spanish conquerors of America whose avarice loved to dream of richer rewards than those of Mexico or Peru; hence it was an imaginary place abounding in gold. It appears here only as an ideal name. (Hayward 1853; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; HIST. CLARK 1887, 349; Davis & Durrie, 344; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri, 1844-1871; INTERN. CYC.; Alberta Callison; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm Branch
Description:A branch rising in Scotland County, flowing generally south in Clark into the North Wyaconda Creek. So named for the many elm trees in the vicinity. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; Chas. Seyb)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Christian Church in Folker Township, northwest of Luray; built of logs in 1866. Later a new church building was erected. After some time it was destroyed by a tornado and never rebuilt. So named for the elm trees in the vicinity. The name was also given to a branch and a schoolhouse. (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm Church [2 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Protestant Church, four miles northwest of Luray. So named for the elm groves in the neighborhood. (Mrs. Guy Hummel; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Elm School
Description:A schoolhouse in Folker Township, northwest of Luray; built in 1874. Cf. Elm Branch and Elm Church. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Emery's Mill
Description:See Hershler Distillery.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ensign Tavern
Description:See Harmony House.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Enterprise
Description:A post office in 1876, dropped by 1886, six miles southwest of Kahoka on the Wyaconda. It was settled in 1860. An ideal name. (Polk 1876; Postal Guide; Map Missouri 1879; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Enterprise School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township. Formerly the Combs' School, so named for a neighboring family. Its present name is that of an old post office known as Enterprise (q.v.). (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eureka School
Description:A schoolhouse in Lincoln Township. A motto name meaning "I have found it." The exclamation is attributed to Archimedes on finding a method of determining (by specific gravity) the purity of the gold in Hiero's crown. The term is the motto of California, and has become a stock name for schools. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison; Webster)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fabius River
Description:Like North and South Rivers (q.v.), or "Two Rivers," the Fabius is a double or twin stream; the only difference being that "Two Rivers" never actually unite, though they empty into the Mississippi at practically the same point, whereas the North and South Fabius do unite just one mile above their mouth. The Fabius River proper is therefore but one mile in length. It empties into the Mississippi in east-central Fabius Township, Marion County, near West Quincy, about two miles above the mouth of "Two Rivers." The North Fabius rises in Iowa and flows southeast through Scotland County, which it bisects diagonally; then it cuts off the northeast corner of Knox County and the southwest corner of Clark County, and flows still in a general southeast direction, diagonally through Lewis County into Marion County, of which it cuts off the northeast corner. In Union Township of Lewis County it receives a tributary known as the Middle Fabius, which rises in Schuyler County and flows southeast through Scotland and Knox to the junction. The South Fabius also rises in Schuyler County and takes a southeastern course through Scotland, Knox, Lewis, Shelby, and Marion Counties. In Liberty Township, Knox County, it receives two tributaries known as the North and South Forks of the South Fabius (on the 1876 map named the North and South Branches). North Fork rises in Greensburg Township, Knox County; South Fork rises in Adair County and enters Knox County in Lyon Township, flowing southeast to the junction with the South Fabius. The North and South Fabius, like the other streams of northeast Missouri, are rivers only by courtesy, much too small for navigation. They are called creeks by Beck. The various name by which they had their tributaries distinguished are obviously mere colorless names of position, with the exception of the name Fabius itself. This name, has had a bewildering variety of spellings, and its origin presents a problem of peculiar difficulty. The oldest form of the name, found on the Lewis and Clark Map of 1809, is "R. Fabiane." This form, slightly shortened, appears as "Fabian" in Cumming's WATER PILOT of 1837 (p. 129), and as late as 1871 in James's RIVER GUIDE (p. 9), although farther on (p. 18) James speaks of it as "Fabin's River." On the Lincoln Map of 1822 it is varied to "Ferbien." Forms without the final -n begin to appear in 1821. The spelling "Fabba" is given on the Maps for 1821, 1824, 1826, and 1832. Beck in his GAZETTEER (1823) calls it "Fabba Creek" and speaks of the South Fabius as the "Little Fabba." Holcombe in the HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND (1887), p. 23, says the old forms were "Faba" and "Little Faba," and that the two streams together were known as the "Fabas" or "Fabbas;" so Coues in a note to his ed. of Pike's EXPEDITION (I.9). The modern spelling "Fabius" first appears on a map of 1834, and is used in Wetmore's GAZETTEER (1837). Wetmore calls the two streams together the "Fabii." A popular nickname today for them is the "Faby." After that "Fabius," and the distinctive "North and South Fabius" become general. The name "Middle Fabius" first appears on a map of 1844. On a map of 1881 appears "Trabius," an obvious misprint. The Soulard story offered by Holcombe in 1884 (HISTORY OF MARION P. 771) to account for the name, according to which it was given about 1800 by Don Antonio Soulard in honor of the Roman general Fabius Maximus, has been given at length and criticized under Hannibal (q.v.). In spite of the fact that Holcombe himself presented it doubtfully and later discarded it, it has been accepted by Mahan and Eaton. For the reasons given, and especially in view of the early spellings which have just been listed this story must be ruled out as clearly impossible. In 1887 Holcombe offered a substitute derivation from the Spanish word "faba," a pea or bean. "The Spaniards probably gave it that designation because of the great number of wild peas originally upon its banks. In time the south fork was called Little Faba; then both streams were spoken of as the Fabbas, and of course the corruption was easy to Fabius...With more light on the subject than he had in 1884, the writer is now of the opinion that the name came as stated above, and that the real English name of the stream is Bean Creek." (HISTORY OF LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, AND SCOTLAND, p. 23). Holcombe's second explanation must likewise be rejected, both in the light of the earliest forms listed above and for other reasons. The Spaniards named very few places in Missouri, and none in N.E. Missouri; and such a name as "Bear Creek," though not impossible has few parallels in Missouri nomenclature. And yet Holcombe had perhaps a glimmering of the truth in his ingenious suggestion that the modern Fabius might have arisen from the plural form of the name, as used for the two streams. If the earliest form of the name, as there is every reason to believe, a plausible chain of development would be as follows; Fabiane---Fabian---Fabia---Fabias (pl.)---Fabius. It would be very easy for the final nasal to disappear in American speech, as the later forms Faba, Fabba, and Faby demonstrate that it actually did disappear and with the -s added for the plural, it would be equally natural for some classically minded American, about the time of the founding of Hannibal, Scipio, and Palmyra to get a suggestion from it of the name of the Roman general. Indeed, it is altogether possible that the false etymology which made Fabius out of the old French river name was the actual germ of the "Carthaginian complex" and of the whole series of classical names that swept Northeast Missouri like an epidemic. (See for other classical names the discussion under Hannibal). If the true original of Fabius was indeed Fabiane of Fabian, it follows of course that we must accept a humbler name-father than the famous Roman "Cunctator" and contender against Hannibal. Probably he was merely another of those forgotten French traders and trappers who had left their imprint so widely on Missouri nomenclature. Certainly it is in accord with what we might naturally expect to find the three principal water-courses of Marion County, now known as Fabius, North River (q.v.)---originally the Jeffreon--and Bay de Charles, all of which must have been in the days of the French occupation veritable hunters' paradises, bearing the familiar French personal names of Charles, Jeffreon, and Fabian. (Maps Missouri, 1809-1881; ATLAS MARION, 1913, SHELBY, 1878, KNOX, 1898, LEWIS, 1916, CLARK, 1878, SCOTLAND, 1898; Holcombe's HIST. MARION, 1884, and HIST. LEWIS, CLARK, KNOX, SCOTLAND, 1887; Mahan, HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 1913; Eaton; GAZETTEERS and GUIDES by Beck, 1823, Wetmore, 1837, Cummings, 1837, and James, 1871; Pike's EXPEDITION, ed. Coues, 1895)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairmont
Description:A post office from 1864-1902; twelve miles southwest of Kahoka on the Little Wyaconda, in the western part of Washington Township. It was platted in 1851. The fact that it is on a rise, the highest point in the county, surrounded by open country, accounts for its name--"Fair mount," spelled Fairmont. (Parker 1865; Goodwin 1867; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; HIST. CLARK 1887, 350; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1861; Plat; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Velma Williams; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairmont Annexed School District
Description:The district centering in Fairmont close to the southwest corner of the county, to which have been annexed the Desvaux School, Egypt, and Tanyard (q.v.). (Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull; Ralph E. Jenkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairplay School
Description:A schoolhouse in the northwest corner of the county, in Folker Township, on the prairie. An ideal name. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview School [1 of 2]
Description:A school in the Wyaconda Consolidated School District, located southeast of Wyaconda. So named for its location on a bluff. (Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview School [2 of 2]
Description:A schoolhouse in Grant Township, on a wide extent of prairie, whence the name. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview Schoolhouse
Description:A schoolhouse in Washington Township. So named for its location. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fehlhaber Bridge
Description:A bridge below the site of Herdman's Mill, southeast of Chambersburg (q.v.). So named for a family owning land at this point. (Mrs. Guy Hummel; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fehlhaber Slough
Description:A slough east of Chambersburg. It comprises Washington City (q.v.), the site of Herdman's Mill. So named for the landowner. (O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flint Ridge School
Description:A schoolhouse in Wyaconda Township. So named for a rocky ridge of land east of the schoolhouse. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flood's Mill
Description:See McCarty's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Folker Township
Description:The township in the northwest corner, with Grant and Jefferson to the east, and Wyaconda to the south; framed in 1868. So named for families in this locality. (COURT RECORD 1868; R. McN. 1935; Mrs. Guy Hummel; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Force Branch
Description:See Foree Branch.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fore Branch
Description:A branch started from a gully made by a scouring plow in the sand in the bottom of the Egyptian Levee District (q.v.), along the Mississippi River. A heavy cloudburst converted the gully into a branch. It flows only during rain in the upland. For the name see Foree Branch. (Jackson 1935; G.W. Hill)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Foree Branch
Description:A branch north of Neeper and the Little Wyaconda River, flowing generally east and north into the Big Wyaconda River. So named for an old family of French Huguenot stock. The name was originally "Faure." This form of the name was followed by the Anglicized "Fore" (See Fore Branch). Then some of the family began to add another "e" because of the difficulty offered in pronunciation of the Anglicized "Fore." The name occurs on some of the maps as "Force." (ATLAS CLARK, 1915; Plat Book, 1930; ATLAS CLARK 1878; Jackson 1935; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fort Pike
Description:A fort ten miles from the mouth of the Des Moines River, at the site of St. Francisville. Built by Captain Mace and his men of Pike County, during the threatened Indian strife in 1832, known as the Black Hawk War. In September of that year it was abandoned after the imprisonment of Black Hawk. The fort was named in honor of the company. (Davis & Durrie, 102; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fox City
Description:See Fox River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fox Creek
Description:See Fox River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fox Island
Description:A name applied to the accretion of the Fox and Mississippi rivers in the delta of Fox River just below Alexandria. Steamboats in riverboat days drew up here in day time and cut wood for firing. The name is one of location. However it is not an island but it goes by that name. (G.W. Hill; J.D. Rebo; J.O. Bryant)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fox Island School
Description:A school in the Alexandria Consolidated School District, located on Fox Island (q.v.), whence the name. (Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fox Prairie
Description:A prairie at the mouth of Fox River, for which it was named. (Coues-Pike, Note, 11)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fox River [1 of 2]
Description:A long stream which rises in Iowa and flows southwest into Clark County, where it is joined in its course midway through the county by the Little Fox River (q.v.). It traverses the county diagonally from northwest to southeast, flowing into Fox Slough (q.v.). The stream is known also as the Big Fox to distinguish it from the smaller stream bearing the name. In an early period the name Fox was applied only to the Little Fox (South Fox) and Fox Creek or the North Fox, as the upper part of the larger stream was called, the stream below the junction of the two being known as Stinking Creek. This occurs on a map as late as 1904. Campbell in 1873 gives the name Stinking Creek to the upper part of the stream only and Fox River to the lower part. The county Atlas as late as 1915 follows Campbell. In 1871 a map of Missouri gives the name, Stinking Creek, to the whole stream. At the same time from as early as 1805 the name Fox was consistently given to the slough at the delta of the river. The name Stinking Creek goes back a long way. Wetmore (1837) speaks of the stream as "a large stream called by the abominable name of Stinking Creek," and continues, "The next General Assembly will certainly have good taste enough to change the name of this "fine stream" to accord with that given by the compiler." He accordingly substituted on his map the name "Aromatic Creek" for the "abominable" Stinking. But the General Assembly did not react to his suggestion. Wetmore would be relieved to know that by 1935 (R. McN.) the name has disappeared after a matter of nearly a hundred years. All agree with Wetmore that "Stinking" does not accord with a "fine stream;" nor does it accord with the "Classic Fox," the term used when speaking of the county seat located on the river (See Waterloo). But the residents smile at the adjective "fine" and "classic" as applied to the Fox. There appear to be two plausible explanations for the term "Stinking" as applied to Fox River. (1) There are coal deposits near the surface along the stream, and a red, ill-smelling seepage is thrown off from the veins of coal, discoloring the water and giving it an evil odor. Coues says that the river was once known as the River Puante, and Puante is the French word for "stinking." The name may thus have come down from the French word, or it may have been given the name "Stinking" by early hunters. (2) It may be coincident merely that the Winnebagoes were frequenters of this locality and that the name given by the French to these Indians was "Puans," (fetid), "Puants," or "Stinkers." The name Winnebago itself comes from "Winipig" which means "filthy water, wi not" meaning "dirty." The Winnebagoes were found by the French in Wisconsin on the Fox River in that state and gave their name to Lake Winnebago which is an enlargement of the Fox. That lake was earlier designated "Stinking Lake," a fact which seems to link the Winnebago Indians with the place-name "Stinking." The Winnebagoes were in alliance with the Sac and Fox Indians both of whom had villages in the vicinity of the Fox in Clark. Pike speaks of the Puants as being troublesome visitors. Whether or not the Winnebago Indians had anything to do with the odorous name, we do not know. It is likely that the name in this case came from the ill-smelling, oily deposit on the water. The Fox Indians hunted annually over this territory in the fall and visited the "sugar" trees in their sugar-making in the spring. They had a village on the Des Moines River (Darby, 1818). The Sauk had a village at the head of Rapid de Moyen (Pike, 1805). The names Sac and Fox were liked inseparably from the earliest times. The two were probably branches of one original stem. They belonged to the Algonquin tribe. The Fox were almost annihilated by 1780. The remnant incorporated with the Sauk where through long officially one, the two tribes preserved their identity. The name the Fox gave themselves was Mesh kwa kihug, "red- earth people." They gave themselves also the name wagosh, meaning "red fox." The story goes that when the Wagohug members of the Fox Clan were hunting, they met the French who asked them who they were. The Indians gave the name of the clan and ever since the whole tribe have been known by that name. (Darby 1818; Wetmore 1837; 107; Parker 1865; Campbell 1873; ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; Williams 1904; R. McN. 1935; Coues- Pike, 303, 337-339; Ibid., Note, 13, 31, 39; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 50; Hodge; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; O.C. Buck; Chas. Seyb)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fox River [2 of 2]
Description:A post office in 1876; on Fox River, east of Kahoka. It still exists as a country settlement though it has no store. It was never platted. Known also as Fox City. Both names for its location. (Postal Guide; Mrs. Guy Hummel; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fox River Church
Description:A country Baptist Church, south of Wayland by a few miles on land deeded to the church in 1844 by A.W. Mitchell. When the membership of Old Fox River Church (q.v.) was divided in 1836 this one was formed further south on the Fox. The church house still stands but services have not been held there for a long time. It took its name from its location. It was also known as Little Fox Church though it was not on Little Fox River, the name being given it for its size in distinction from the older church of the name. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 397; WYACONDA BAPT. ASSOC., 1936; Alberta Callison; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fox River Country
Description:A name given to the locality of Fox River in connection with the "carnival of crime" that prevailed around 1845 for a period approximating forty years. J.W. Murphy (1882) editor, of the ALEXANDRIA COMMERCIAL, makes the statement that in 1845 the organization of thieves and murderers was over four hundred strong that infested this part of Missouri in particular, and operated in Illinois, and parts of Iowa, Indiana, and Kentucky as well. The old town of Nauvoo, Illinois, on the Mississippi River, at that time settled by the Mormons, was headquarters and rendezvous at one time. So strong was the feeling against the Mormons that it was even said that Joseph Smith and Brigham Young, leaders of the Mormon Church directed many of the movements of the criminals. (Murphy 1882, 5, 6)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fox Slough
Description:A small snicarty or slough that begins at Alexandria to the west of River Slough (q.v.) and runs five miles down to Gregory. It was known also as Old Fox Slough. It takes its name from Fox River which empties into the slough. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; Coues-Pike, Note, 13)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fremont
Description:A post office under this name from 1876-1878; a farming community to the northeast in Madison Township, seven miles northeast of Kahoka, close to Waterloo. Gone by 1889. It was known earlier as Boneta, under which name it was given as a post village in 1860 and 1867. Both Boneta and Fremont were names of families. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Polk 1876; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; Map Missouri 1879; Postal Guide; Mrs. Velma Williams; Mrs. Guy Williams; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Friendship Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the extreme southeastern corner of the county; organized in 1842. It no longer exists. An ideal name. (MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gem
Description:A post office in 1878; north of the center of Jackson Township, seven miles southeast of Kahoka. So named for its location on a beautiful prairie. (ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gem School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jackson Township. So named for a post office at this point. (q.v.). (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Pond
Description:A pond between Alexandria and Wayland at the foot of the sand ridge, near the Mississippi River. So named for the number of geese found there. (J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grace Chapel
Description:A Methodist Protestant Chapel about four miles east of Kahoka. Services are held irregularly. A Biblical name: (I Pet. 5:10; I Pet. 1:13; Psa. 84:11) (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grant Township
Description:The township to the northeast, with the Des Moines River to the east, Jefferson and Sweet Home to the south, and Folker to the west. So named in June of 1868. The township was framed in March of that year and named Green Township for families in the locality. Its present name was given it for Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), Lieutenant General in the Civil War, and eighteenth president of the United States, 1868-1877. (Court Record 1868; R. McN. 1935; INTERN. CYC.; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gravel Hill School
Description:A schoolhouse in Clay Township. It stands on a rocky hill, whence the name. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gray's Ferry
Description:A ferry on the Des Moines River at Athens, prior to 1840. Owned by Isaac Gray, whence the name. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 277; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Hutawa Map Missouri 1844)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gray's Mill
Description:A large water-power flour mill at Athens, established about 1840. It did a prosperous business for many years. So named for its owner. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 349; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greasy Point
Description:See Anson.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greasy Point School
Description:See Grover College.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green Township
Description:See Grant Township.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gregory
Description:A post office since 1870; on the Mississippi River in Clay Township at the point where that township touches the river, twenty miles southeast of Kahoka and six miles south of Alexandria. Gregory was established about 1833 along with Alexandria. Churchville, St. Francisville, and Gregory were platted about the same time. Gregory was a port of landing known as Gregory's Landing in 1834. Situated on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad it became an elevator town and went by the name of Gregory Landing. Rand McNally, 1935, gives it as Gregory. It has never grown to be much of a town. Gregory's Landing is spoken of by Coues in Coues-Pike as situated on the site of Fox Prairie at the mouth of Fox River. Campbell (1874) gives Des Moines City, established in 1838, and Gregory Landing as the same. So also does the County Atlas of 1878. It is indicated in the latter as a post office under the name of Des Moines City. This name is also given by Colton, 1857-1861. Gregory Station and Gregory Landing are both indicated as post offices in the County Atlas of 1915. There was a little store at Gregory Landing, now gone. The name Gregory was a family name. The first sheriff of the county appointed by the Governor was Uriah or U.S. Gregory. The name Des Moines City was suggested by the river. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 276, 339; Davis & Durrie, 344; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gregory Landing
Description:See Gregory.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gregory Schoolhouse
Description:A pioneer schoolhouse two miles east of Clark City (q.v.). It burned in 1873. So named for the pioneer Gregory family. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gregory Station
Description:See Gregory.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gregory's Landing
Description:See Gregory.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grey's Island
Description:An island to the south of Cloak Island (q.v.), between the Mississippi and River Slough. It is designated as Island, No. 2. (Cf. Baldwin's Island). So named for the owner of the land. (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grover College
Description:A schoolhouse in Grant Township. Formerly known as Jeff Davis School for Jefferson Davis (1808-1889), statesman, and president of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865. The school was renamed for Grover Cleveland (1837-1908), twenty-second president of the United States, 1885-1889; serving a second term, 1892-1896. Grover College is located about two miles east of Anson (q.v.), but has been known as "Greasy Point School." (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison; Robert McLachlan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Half-Way House
Description:A station on the stagecoach line, midway between Peaksville and Alexandria. (J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hancock's Mill
Description:See Hershler Distillery.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Happy Hill School
Description:A schoolhouse in Wyaconda Township. It stands on a hill. Otherwise the name is ideal. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harmony Church
Description:See Medill Presbyterian Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Harmony House
Description:A brick tavern on the old Alexandria-Bloomfield Road (q.v.) between Kahoka and Medill. It caved in in 1872. It was a survivor of stagecoach days when it was known as Ensign Tavern for Justice Ensign on whose land the tavern was built. The name later was changed to "Harmony" for the old Harmony Church which stood in the neighborhood. (See Medill Presbyterian Church). Previous to its destruction it was one of the landmarks of the county. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Guy Hummel; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hauptman Branch
Description:A branch on the south side of the Wyaconda River, into which it flows from the southwest. So named for several landowners in the vicinity. (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; PLAT BOOK 1930; Chas. Seyb)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hays School
Description:A schoolhouse in Lincoln Township. It bears the name of several families in the neighborhood. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hazlet Branch
Description:A branch north of Honey Creek flowing west into that creek. So named for a neighboring family. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hazleton
Description:A location of this name in the southeastern part of the county, close to the Mississippi River. Residents know nothing of it though there was a family of the name in that vicinity. (Maps Missouri, 1857-1861; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hemp Slough
Description:A slough east of Keg Slough (q.v.). So known for the hemp raised there. (J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Henshaw Pond
Description:A pond west of Fox River near its mouth, between the Fox River and Sugar Creek. So named for the landowner, C. Henshaw. (ATLAS CLARK 1878, G.W. Hill)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Herdman's Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Fox River close to Herdman's Mill, whence the name. (Murphy 1882, 51)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Herdman's Mill
Description:An early mill on Fox River at Washington City (q.v.), in Jefferson Township. So named for its owner. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 312; Murphy 1882, 19; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hershler Distillery
Description:A distillery close to Antioch; established after the Civil War by a Mrs. Hershler, whence the name. It was successful for a number of years, but declined on the introduction of railroads. It was erected as a sawmill in 1840 by John Hancock and others, when it was known as Hancock's Mill. It paid well for a number of years. Afterwards it was converted into a flouring mill by Campbell Emery, and became known by his name. Not satisfactory in this, the flouring mill was abandoned to be succeeded in turn by the distillery. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 340; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Branch
Description:A branch in Union Township, lying to the west of the Little Wyaconda River, and flowing southeast into that stream. So named for the hickory grove in its vicinity. (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; Charles Seyb)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Highland School
Description:A schoolhouse in east Jefferson about four miles northwest of Peaksville. It stands on a broken prairie; hence the name. Formerly the Brick School for the Brick Church in the vicinity, 1858 or 1859. (q.v.). (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hogan School
Description:A schoolhouse in southeastern Folker Township from 1868. So named for people in the neighborhood. (HIST. CLARK, 1887, 289; Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holmes' Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Fox River at the junction of the Little and Big Fox, near Holmes' Mill, from which the bridge took its name. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Holmes' Saw Mill
Description:A sawmill at the junction of the Fox rivers, located just above the highway bridge today. So named for its owner. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Honey Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A creek formed from two branches which rise in the western part of Lincoln Township and unite to the south and east, thence flowing southeast through Jackson and northeast through southern Clay to empty into the Fox River at the head of Fox Slough. The Lewis County Atlas (1878) shows Honey Creek flowing south into Offerell Lake in northeastern Lewis County. The creek was known also as Shatterfields Creek as late as 1904; Pike speaks of Satterfields as a branch of Fox River. Wetmore (1837) designates it as Satter-Fields, while Hutawa (1844) gives Satterfield. Coues says it was so named for Satterfield, an old place no longer existent. (See Satterfield). Honey Creek received its present name from the rich honey harvests of the vicinity in pioneer days. The bee in early days was supposed to be a forerunner of civilization; "the white man's fly," as it was called by the Indian, to whom it was this a harbinger of evil, was one of Missouri's chief attractions for the early settlers. Early writers have many references to the number of bees and the quantities of honey. Wild honey and beeswax were making the principal exports of more than one pioneer community. Like a veritable Canaan, Missouri may be said to have flowed with honey. The bees no doubt were attracted by the succession of flowers on the expansive prairies. One authority says that he had known as high as ten gallons of honey to be taken from one tree, and frequently three to six gallons. Trees not infrequently would yield as many as twenty-five gallons of honey and have been known to yield as high as fifty gallons. Hunting bees trees was a favorite sport as well as a means of livelihood. The export of honey through the Mississippi River towns was a source of much revenue to northeast Missouri. (Wetmore 1837; Hutawa 1844; Coues Pike, Note, 11; Williams 1904; PLAT BOOK 1930; R. McN., 1935; MISSOURI HIST. REV., July, 1936, pp. 401- 405)
Source:Leech, Esther. "Place Names Of Six East Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:Honey Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A station on a stagecoach route of 1850; located on Honey Creek (q.v.), whence the name. (Mitchell 1850)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Honey Creek Congregational Church
Description:A church six miles southeast of Kahoka, one-quarter mile from the creek the name of which it bears; organized about 1883. A large church building was dedicated in 1887. There have been no services here for a long time. (Mrs. Velma Williams; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hope
Description:A post office from 1886-1891; in the northern part of the county. An ideal name. (Postal Guide; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Horse Mill
Description:See Trabue's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hurricane Hollow
Description:An extensive hollow near the Highland School in the northeastern part of the county. It was given its name from the fact that before the first settlers arrived a mighty wind splintered and twisted the giant oaks, leaving them torn from the ground, scattered in tangled masses, mute evidence of the might of the storm that swept the hollow. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Independence School
Description:A school in the Wyaconda Consolidated School District, south of Wyaconda. An ideal name. (Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Island 401
Description:See Montrose Island.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Island, No. 1
Description:See Cloak Island.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Island, No. 2
Description:See Grey's Island.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Island, No. 3
Description:See Baldwin Island.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jackson Creek
Description:A creek in eastern Clay, flowing into Honey Creek. So named for a family living in the vicinity. (ATLAS CLARK 1915; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jackson Township
Description:A township on the southern border, with Lincoln and Madison to the north, Clay to the east, and Union to the west, first framed in 1836, prior to the organization of the county, including at that time all territory in the county south of Des Moines Township. Reorganized at various times as new counties were framed. (See Clark County). This township was named for Andrew Jackson, "Old Hickory," (1767-1845), seventh president of the United States, 1829-1837. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 266, 267, 273; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Court Records; R. McN. 1935; INTERN CYC.; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jeff Davis School
Description:See Grover College.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jefferson Township
Description:Jefferson lies to the east of Folker Township, with Grant on the north, Sweet Home on the east, and Lincoln on the south. This township was first organized in 1833 while Clark was still a part of Lewis. It included at that time all that part of the county north of Des Moines Township (q.v.). It was reorganized at various times as new counties were framed. (See Clark County). So named for Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), author of the Declaration of Independence and third president of the United States, 1801-1809. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 266, 274; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; R. McN. 1935; Court Records; INTERN. CYC.; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jenkins School
Description:A schoolhouse in Des Moines Township, overlooking the Mississippi River. So named for people in the neighborhood. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jessamine Township
Description:A township created by Clark in 1840 during the dispute over the Iowa-Missouri boundary line, 1839-1840. (See Rapids of the Des Moines). The township passed with the close of the dispute. This territory was the seat of the conflict which came to be known humorously as the "Honey War," and which promised to be a conflict of arms. (See Soldiers Run). Governor Boggs of Missouri issued a proclamation. The situation became acute when Sheriff "Sandy" Gregory of Clark ventured into the disputed strip to collect taxes from some Iowans who had settled there. He was arrested and charged with usurpation of authority. Oil was added to flame when a Missouri farmer went into the disputed strip, cut down a bee tree and proceeded to take the honey. He was arrested as a trespasser and fined. It was a challenge. There ensued a concerted attack upon three bee trees, and organized companies of men from all the counties of northeast Missouri gathered. The Governor of Missouri ordered out the State Militia and Governor Lucas of Iowa Territory announced that he personally would lead his troops to battle. Fortunately bloodshed was averted by an amicable adjustment. The humor of the situation was evident even to those Missourians who were "holding the line." Local satirists took up the story in doggerel verse, a thing which probably did as much as any one thing to bring about a bloodless adjustment. To the tune of "Yankee Doodle," for example, were sung such stanzas as the following, one out of many presenting the story of the "Honey War," a bit of comedy that gave the conflict this name. "Three bee-trees stand about the line Between our State and Lucas. Be ready all these trees to fall, And bring things to a focus. We'll show old Lucas how to brag, And seize our precious honey. He also claims, I understand, Of us three-bits in money." In the "Honey War the loss of the narrow strip of land was not felt by Missouri so much as the loss of the bee trees which were so numerous in that locality. The township seems to have been named Jessamine for no reason other than the fact that the yellow jessamine (jasmine) is known for its honey-sweet scented flowers. The name has come to be applied to a variety of plants bearing fragrant flowers furnishing nectar for the bee harvest. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 278, 279; Stevens 1915, 765; ST. LOUIS DAILY GLOBE-DEMOCRAT, Aug. 30, 1936; Webster DICT.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jim Town
Description:See Eldorado.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson and Alexander Mill
Description:See Bechtol's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson and Sanford Water Mill
Description:A little water mill to saw logs and crack corn, on the Fox River at the present site of Waterloo in 1835, the first water mill in the county. Erected by Whiting Johnson and Colonel C.O. Sanford, whence the name. (Campbell 1874, 143; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson Branch
Description:A branch to the southwest of Peaksville. So named for James Johnson, familiarly known as "Razor Jim." (ATLAS CLARK 1878; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson's Mill
Description:A mill on the Fox River, near Chambersburg (q.v.). It was owned by Johnson and Floyd, and known as Johnson's Mill. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 276; O.C. Buck; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jordan School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township; established in 1868. So named for families in the neighborhood. (See Toops School). (HIST. CLARK 1887, 289; Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:K. and K. Railroad
Description:Residents today know nothing of a road under this name, but suggest that the initials may have stood for Keokuk and Kansas. The 1878 Atlas, which gives the only record found of this road, says that twenty-five miles of road bed were surveyed and completed in some localities, particularly near St. Francisville, "where Boss shoveller walked his one-half mile of track daily, with shovel on his shoulder in order to hold the charter." This presents a striking similarity to the Missouri and Mississippi Railroad (q.v.). There was so much litigation involved in this road building project that this road may have been given the sobriquet of "Ku Klux," the nickname given in the Atlas to the K. and K. road, and these initials may have stood for "Ku Klux," or may have been a travesty on the name Missouri and Mississippi. (ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kahoka
Description:A post office since 1867; to the east and south in Lincoln Township, fifteen miles west of Alexandria, on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad. The first house on the site was built in 1851. The original charter was granted in 1856, and the original town laid out in 1858. The charter was re-enacted two or three times with the final re-enactment in 1868. It was incorporated under the name of Kahoka, in 1869, and later incorporated as a city. A petition for the removal of the courthouse from Waterloo (q.v.) to Kahoka passed the first time in 1865, drawn up by parties interested in the sale of real estate at or near the town. Commissioners were appointed to select a site for the courthouse; later the same year a second petition prayed for the removal of the county seat to another location, and the Clark City site was selected in 1866. Excitement and much controversy ensued between Kahoka and Clark City. Kahoka won in 1870 and the courthouse was erected in 1871. Kahoka lies on a high rolling prairie in a prosperous agricultural district. An old name given to the locality for this reason and frequently applied to the town was "Round Prairie," a name still occasionally used by the old settlers. The prospect of becoming the county seat caused the place to grow rapidly, but it never developed into more than a country town. Unlike most county seats where the courthouse stands in a public square in the center of the business section, the courthouse here stands in a remote corner. When it was built it stood outside the town. This is to be explained only by the operations of Colonel Muldrow who by way of his college project (See "Muldrow College") became the owner in fee of the land on which Kahoka is located. Kahoka had to wait many years before the title to a considerable part of the county seat was entirely cleared. The whole matter of controversy over the location of the county seat in Clark was due primarily to promoters of the river side of the county ("Colonel" Francis Church for one) and "Colonel" Muldrow in the Kahoka vicinity. (See "Eastern Run"). The name for the town is given as Cahoka on the maps of Missouri, 1861-1871. Campbell (1874) gives Kahoka. Parker, however, (1865) gives Cahoka and Campbell (1873) Kahokie. Some of the people pronounce it this way. It was named for a division of the Illinois Indians commonly called Kahokia (Cahokia), spelled by the French Kaoukia; in the Indian Gawakia (lean ones). The tribe was nearly extinct by 1800. They roamed over this part of Missouri as well as northern Illinois where they occupied a neighboring village to the Monks' mound, the dwelling place of the Trappists in the latter state. (See Des Moines River). (Parker 1865; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1873, 55; Campbell 1874; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; HIST. CLARK 1887, 283-287, 351, 352, 354, 357; Eaton, 275; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1861; Hodge; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kahoka College
Description:A college established on a popular subscription basis at Kahoka, as a result of a meeting of the citizens of Kahoka and its vicinity. Directors were elected and the site chosen at a meeting in 1884; the college was incorporated the same year, and a building erected in 1885. The college flourished measurably for a time only and then was discontinued. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 394, 395; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 345)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kahokie
Description:See Kahoka.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keg Slough
Description:A small slough west of Alexandria, in the shape of a keg, whence the name. (J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kellyville Settlement
Description:A settlement on Honey Creek. Nothing could be learned of the reason for the name. (O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kent's Ferry
Description:A ferry on the Des Moines River about 1838. So named for its owner. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 277; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keokuk and Western Railroad
Description:A railroad from the Mississippi River extending north and west through Iowa to Nebraska and points further west, to be known as the Missouri, Iowa, and Nebraska Road, a consolidation of the Alexandria and Nebraska City Road and the Alexandria and Bloomfield (q.v.). It was originally to extend from Alexandria in Clark (1873). Later it was extended to Keokuk, whereupon it became known as the Keokuk and Western. As the Missouri, Iowa, and Nebraska it was completed as far as Memphis in 1871. The road was subjected to long litigation. The court ordered the bonds to be returned and destroyed on the ground that the issue was not sanctioned by the vote of the people. In 1876 the Federal Courts ruled that the bonds were valid. The issue was carried twice to the Supreme Court of the State. The railroad was finally constructed in 1881. It is now a part of the Burlington System. (Campbell 1873, 55; ATLAS SCOTLAND 1876; ATLAS KNOX 1878; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; HIST. SCOTLAND 1887, 455; 458; HIST. CLARK 1887, 292-297, 303; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 340, 341; Williams 1904, 361; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keystone Church
Description:A Methodist Church in the southeastern part of the county. It took its name from Keystone School (q.v.). (Mrs. Guy Hummel; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Keystone School
Description:A schoolhouse in Clay Township. No reason known for its name unless it is the peculiarly cut-in shape of the district. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ku Klux Railroad
Description:See K. & K. Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Frenz Church
Description:A German Methodist Church, so known when first established, to the northwest of Neeper, dedicated in 1873. Gone for a good many years. The building is now used as a hay barn. So named for L.L. La Frenz, the minister. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La riviere des Moins
Description:See Des Moines River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lakin's Mill
Description:A mill north of Chambersburg about two miles. So named for its owner. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lancaster
Description:The first town laid out in the county; on the Des Moines River just above St. Francisville. It was surveyed and platted by Jacob Weaver, the first settler of Clark County, in 1830, when Clark was still a part of Marion County. It never had any existence unless the guesses made by some of the residents are correct that it was the old part of what is now known as St. Francisville. Lancaster is the name of an English seaport, and the name occurs often in the eastern part of the United States. Just why Mr. Weaver gave his town this name is not known. Mr. Weaver came to Missouri from Kentucky. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 335, 336; Maps Missouri, 1849-1861; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Landier Mill
Description:A mill on the Wyaconda River toward St. Patrick (q.v.). So named for its owner. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 276; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lapsley Branch
Description:A stream in the northeastern part of the county, flowing east and south into the Des Moines River. So named for James and Dave Lapsley, landowners. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lapsley Tavern
Description:A tavern at Waterloo (q.v.); early sessions of the circuit court were held there. So named for its owner, John A. Lapsley, a veteran of the War of 1812. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Laurel City
Description:A paper town laid out southwest of Kahoka a few miles, near Union Cemetery. Platted in 1856 by Francis White. Now an open field. The name was ideal for a beautiful location. The laurel was early a mark of distinction. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Guy Hummel; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lawrence
Description:A store in 1873 and it is reported an early post office. The schoolhouse is all that keeps the name alive. So named for the family keeping the store. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lawrence School
Description:A schoolhouse in Madison Township; burned in 1873, but rebuilt. So named for people in the neighborhood. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Le Moine River
Description:See Des Moines River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lebanon Church
Description:A pioneer Baptist Church, it is thought, which stood west of Kahoka at a little distance, and which gave its name to the Lebanon School and Lebanon Cemetery nearby. A Biblical name: Lebanon, a mountain with a growth of cedars. (Deut. 3:25; Psa. 92:12) The name may have been suggested by the hills in this part of the county, bluffs along the Wyaconda, and there may have been a growth of cedars. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lebanon School
Description:A schoolhouse in Lincoln Township; established in 1873. So named for a pioneer church of that name. (Richard St. Clair; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Les Rapides de la riviere des Moins
Description:See Rapids of the Des Moines.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lewis Bridge
Description:A bridge across the Big Fox River, one mile southwest of Oak Grove Church (q.v.). So named for a pioneer family. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church close to the southwest corner of the county; organized in 1847. The church still exists, but it had no pastor in 1936. An ideal name. (MIN. WYACONDA BAPT. ASSOC., 1936; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:A schoolhouse in Washington Township. An ideal name. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lincoln College
Description:A schoolhouse in Madison Township, one mile north of Kahoka. Formerly Lincoln School; but after Jeff Davis School became Grover College (q.v.), Lincoln School assumed the "college." So named for the "Great Emancipator." (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison; Robert McLachlan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lincoln School
Description:See Lincoln College.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lincoln Township
Description:A township in the second tier with Jefferson and Sweet Home Townships on the north, Madison on the east, Union on the south, and Wyaconda Township on the west. It was organized in 1868. So named for Abraham Lincoln, the "Great Emancipator," (1809- 1865), fourteenth president of the United States, 1861-1865. (Court Record 1868; R. McN. 1935; INTERN. CYC.; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lingle School
Description:A school in the Alexandria Consolidated School District (q.v.) close to Alexandria on the northwest. So named for the landowner on whose farm the school was located. (Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull; J.O. Bryant)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Linn Branch
Description:A branch which rises in southern Folker Township and flows southeast through Jefferson into Lincoln and back to Jefferson where it joins the Little Fox River. So named for the linn trees in the vicinity. (Houck, I, 88; ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; PLAT BOOK 1930; Chas. Seyb)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Fox
Description:A stream which rises in Iowa and flows southeast through the northeast corner of Scotland County into Clark, where it joins the Fox River a little north of center. It takes its name from the larger stream. (Campbell 1874, 592; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Fox Church
Description:See Fox River Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Fox River
Description:A stream which rises in Iowa, crosses the northeast corner of Scotland County, flowing southeast, and joins the Fox River (the Big Fox) a little north of Kahoka in Clark. Maps of 1865 and 1871 give the stream as Little Fox or South River. Both names are given for its location and size in relation to the larger stream. (Parker 1865; Map Missouri 1871; ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915, R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Fox School
Description:A schoolhouse in Linclon Township, near the Little Fox River, for which it is named. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Wyaconda River
Description:The stream rises from branches in southeastern Scotland County, entering Clark in Washington Township, and flowing southeast through Union to unite with the Wyaconda in Jackson Township to the south and west. It takes its name from the larger stream of that name. (See Wyaconda River). (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; R. McN. 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Star Schoolhouse
Description:A pioneer school in Clay Township, between Honey and Sugar creeks, close to Fox Slough. It still exists under this name. A common emblem name. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lovers Lake
Description:A little lake at Ashton in Lincoln Township. A fanciful name for a pretty spot. (ATLAS CLARK 1915; PLAT BOOK 1930; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lovers Leap
Description:A height one hundred feet above the water, near Waterloo, on Fox River. Two Indian lovers died here. The story goes that the young Indian chief, wounded in a struggle with his enemy, was pushed over the cliff. Later the girl with the memory of her murdered lover in her heart threw herself to the rocks below. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 344; Murphy 1882, 20, 21)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lower Rapids
Description:See Rapids of the Des Moines.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lura
Description:See Luray.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Luray
Description:A post office since 1860; north of the center of Wyaconda Township, nine miles to the west of Kahoka. An important shipping point and elevator town on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, surrounded by rich agricultural country. A store was opened on the site in 1834; the town was laid out in 1837 and incorporated in 1874. The name is said to have been adopted as an Indian name. It was spelled Lura on the early maps. Campbell (1874) gives it as Luray. There is a Luray in Virginia for which the village may have been named. It has been given the sobriquet of "Dog Town." This suggests an Indian name. Reynard was translated Fox, and sometimes Dog or Wolf was an opprobious nickname or nom de guerre. "Dog Town" is used, in the United States, for a colony of prairie dogs, (OED 18), however, and may be used so here. (Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Goodwin 1867; Campbell 1874; ATLAS CLARK 1878; HIST. CLARK 1887, 345, 349; Eaton, 275; Postal Guide; Coues-Pike, 338; Maps Missouri from 1844; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart; Alberta Callison; O.C. Buck; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:M. I. and N. Railroad
Description:See Keokuk and Western Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Madison Township
Description:A township in the middle tier of townships, with Sweet Home to the north, Des Moines to the east, Jackson to the south, and Lincoln to the west; framed in 1838, reorganized in 1868. (See Clark County). So named for James Madison (1751-1836), American statesman, and fourth president of the United States, 1809-1817. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 273; Court Records; R. McN. 1935; INTERN. CYC.; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Main Divide
Description:See Alexandria and Bloomfield Wagon Road.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Manitou Creek
Description:See Sugar Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mantle's Branch
Description:A branch on the south side of the North Fox River, into which it flows. So named for John Mantle, a large landholder northwest of Chambersburg. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Martin Mills Plow Works
Description:Plow and wagon shops at Fairmont that grew out of a flourishing blacksmith shop established in 1857 by Martin Mills. The machinery was first run by horse power; steam was introduced in 1887. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 350; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marysville
Description:An early trading post which grew into a settlement, to the north in Des Moines Township on the Des Moines River, 1831. It was here that "General Harrison," hunter, trapper, and Indian trader, himself part Indian, settled in 1819. (See Clark County). He has descendants still in this part of the county. It was known also as St. Mary's. Both names, the latter particularly, bear evidence of an early Catholic Church at this point, but no information could be obtained regarding such a church. Otherwise the name cannot be accounted for. A school in the vicinity is all that keeps the name alive. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 242; ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marysville School
Description:A schoolhouse on the site of Marysville (q.v.), on the Des Moines River in Des Moines Township. It is all that keeps alive the name of an early settlement. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCafe School
Description:A school in the Revere Consolidated School District (q.v.). So named for early settlers in the community. (Lawrence Johnson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCarty Mill
Description:A grist mill and wool carding machine at Clark City (q.v.), on the Fox River. Established previous to 1872; at that date the carding machine was put in. So named for its owner, Ira McCarty. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; HIST. CLARK 1887, 345; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Chas. Seyb)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCarty's Mill
Description:An early grist mill at Winchester (q.v.); owned and operated by a Mr. Flood, and known as Flood's Mill. It was later purchased by Ira McCarty and became known by his name. (O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McCormick's Ferry
Description:A ferry across the Des Moines River about one and a half miles below Dumas; on the road to Keokuk, Iowa. It was operated by B.F. McCormick, whence the name. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; T.M. Story; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McDaniel's Bridge
Description:A bridge over the Little Fox River. So named for the family living at that point. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Medill
Description:A post office since 1890; west and north of Kahoka, a station on the Santa Fe Railroad. Platted by the Santa Fe Town and Land Company in 1888. It is said to have been named for a promoter of the road. (Maps Missouri from 1902; Postal Guide; A.G. Ehrhart; F.E. Greenlee)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Medill Presbyterian Church
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian Church, the first in the county, established in 1854 as Harmony Church, near the Santa Fe Crossing, northwest of Kahoka. Many of its foundation stones were hauled in ox carts from St. Francisville where they were to have been used for a dam in 1848-1849. The church was torn down and moved to Medill in 1889. It has been remodeled in recent years. Harmony--an ideal name. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; HIST. CLARK 1887, 402; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Guy Williams; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Velma Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Middle Slough
Description:A slough extending from Alexandria to Gregory. The name is one of location. (J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miller's Mill
Description:A saw and corn mill at Fairmont around the 1850s. Operated by Mort Miller; hence the name. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 351)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Miss McKee's Subscription School
Description:A subscription school opened at the McCoy home in Clay Township in 1866 by Miss Isabella McKee, whence the name. It developed into Pleasant Hill Academy (q.v.). (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mississippi and Western Railroad
Description:See Canton Bloomfield Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri and Mississippi Railroad
Description:A railroad chartered by a local company in 1865 to run from Macon in the county of that name through Edina in Knox County to the northeast corner of the state. The route proposed was much the same as that proposed for the Alexandria and Bloomington (q.v.). Bonds were issued for the road in 1871, Clark County was surveyed and grading was begun at St. Francisville. Conditions for the building of the road were not fulfilled, the bonds were destroyed and litigation ensued, continuing for some time. The road which was to connect the two rivers, whence the name, was never built. The counties have but recently paid off the last of the indebtedness incurred. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 292-297, 303; HIST. KNOX 1887, 713 ff.; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 367, 368; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri Half-Breed Tract
Description:A part of land reserved by the Sac and Fox tribes of Indians. The land given this name was once owned by an Indian woman, a half-breed, named Kataiqua. (Mrs. Guy Hummel (Record Book A, p. 192)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri, Iowa, and Nebraska Railroad
Description:See Keokuk and Western Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moingana
Description:See Des Moines River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Monk River
Description:See Des Moines River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Montague Ferry
Description:A ferry at the mouth of the Des Moines River, 1835, operating across that river and also the Mississippi River at that point. It was owned by John Montague, whence the name. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 337; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 49; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Montrose Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River opposite Nauvoo, Illinois. So named for Fort Montrose which stood on the Des Moines River across from St. Francisville. (q.v.). It was known also as Island 401. On the maps of the survey made by W.S. Engineer Department in 1878, the islands in the Mississippi River were numbered from St. Paul downstream. The number 401 which is assigned to this island is of this series of numbers. For the source of the smaller numbers, see Baldwin Island. (Coues-Pike, Note, 16; A.G. Ehrhart; Major W.H. Crosson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moore's Mill
Description:A water mill on Weaver's Creek (q.v.), close to Fox River, below the site of Waterloo. Established in 1835 by Jacob Weaver, the pioneer miller and first settler in the vicinity, it was known by his name. Later it became the property of Moore, and was known as Moore's Mill. (Campbell 1874, 142; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 9; HIST. CLARK 1887, 256; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morgan's Fork
Description:See Black's Fork.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Morrison Branch
Description:A branch to the north, flowing into the Des Moines River. So named for families in the vicinity. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Vernon
Description:The site first recommended for the county seat, between Kahoka and Medill, out where the old Ensign Tavern stood (q.v.). It was platted in 1837 by Dr. Stark and Justice Ensign, but the recommendation was not accepted and Mount Vernon remained but a paper town. The story goes that two of the commissioners appointed to select a site, misinformed as to the date, met earlier, and after visiting several points in the county determined on this site. On this basis the circuit court disqualified the report, and appointed new commissioners. (See Waterloo). It was named for Washington's home in Virginia. (The original Mount Vernon was named for Admiral Edward Vernon of the British navy under whom George Washington's elder brother Lawrence served in 1741. Lawrence named in his honor the estate which he bequeathed to his more celebrated brother.--Von Engeln and Urquhart, 92) (HIST. CLARK 1887, 344, 345; Maps Missouri, 1857-1861; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; KAHOKA GAZETTE- HERALD, Sept. 25, 1936; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mountain Ridge
Description:A hilly highway, whence the name, between Wyaconda and Luray. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Velma Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Albia School
Description:A schoolhouse south of Wayland in Clay Township on the Fox River. It appears to be a poetic name for its location on the bluff (Alb of Alp, a height). It was doubtless suggested by Albia, the county seat of Monroe County in Iowa, a short distance across the state line. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Hope School
Description:A schoolhouse in Wyaconda Township. It stands on a slope. Otherwise the name is ideal. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Salem Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the northern part of the county; organized in 1838. It no longer exists. A Biblical name, signifying peace. (Heb. 7:2) (MIN. BETHEL BAPT. ASSOC., 1934)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mt. Tabor
Description:A schoolhouse in Washington Township on the bluff of the Wyaconda River. So named by a visiting minister for the view over the lowland. A Biblical name: Mt. Tabor was traditionally the site of Christ's transfiguration (Mark 9:2) (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Muldrow College
Description:In the early 1830s that marked the beginnings of St. Francisville, Waterloo, and other early settlements of Clark County, Colonel William Muldrow (See "Eastern Run") conceived another of his remarkable real estate transactions, this time in Clark County. Of philanthropic enterprises it is spoken of by the chronicler as one of the most remarkable on record. He set about the plan to enter 4,000 acres of land in the center of the county, two townships, on which to establish in the heart of what was still a wilderness covered with brush a magnificent institution of learning. The college was to be not only self-supporting, but profitable through the manual labor of the students. (See Marion College). It was to stand in the center of the tract. Surrounding it a belt of land was to be laid off in town lots, and the proceeds of sale were to be paid to the New York investors, whom he hoped to interest, with the exception of one-sixth of the proceeds which with an additional 10% of the whole was to be reserved by Muldrow as compensation for his services. Muldrow also was to have another tract of township, 2800 acres in extent, for like consideration. The tract in the center of the county to be laid off in town lots was to be the county seat. The investors were to act as trustees of the college, and all rents, issues, and profits were to be applied to the support of the institution. Muldrow received $28,000 from New York investors, but in 1838, before the plan could be carried out, the investors began to distrust the promoter and started litigation against him. In the course of the suit it was discovered that Muldrow had reduced the extent of the college grounds from 4000 to 1497 acres without the knowledge of the investors, but had not failed to enter the 2800 for his own use. The case was settled by arbitration, but in the threat of litigation Muldrow put a trust deed on his tract without his wife's signature. This tract included the land on the edge of which Kahoka stands (q.v.). Muldrow remained very proud of his possessions in Clark County. The New York investors dubbed him a scoundrel, and the citizens of Clark, while divided in their opinion of him, had a strong leaning in the same direction. The college which remained but a promoter's project was never given a name. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 357, 359, 360; Stevens, 90; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Musgrove Branch
Description:A branch in Wyaconda Township, south of the Little Wyaconda, flowing northeast into that stream. So named for the family owning the land. (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; A.G. Ehrhart; Chas. Seyb; G.W. Hill)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nassau Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River to the north of Alexandria. Now a peninsula every foot of which today is in Iowa. It was so named for an old Indian. (ATLAS CLARK 1878, 1915; O.C. Buck; J.D. Rebo; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Neeper
Description:A post office from 1876 to 1904; ten miles southwest of Kahoka, somewhat north of the center of Union Township. So named for Dr. Samuel Neeper, landowner, who came to Union Township from Ohio in 1867. (Polk 1876; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1879; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nelson's Lake
Description:See Silver Lake.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Neva
Description:A post office from 1880-1902; established in 1880 in Folker Township, eighteen miles northwest of Kahoka. So named by the department. No reason for the name could be found. (Polk 1889; Postal Guide; A.G. Ehrhart; Al Watson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Niagara
Description:A village on the Des Moines River, northeast of Waterloo. It was platted in 1837. The site is unknown today though it is thought that the village stood about where Weaver Branch empties into the Des Moines River. The water of the branch falls over a cliff into the river. It was known also as Niagara City. The name is a travesty on the great Niagara Falls of New York. The word niagara is an Indian word meaning "thunder of water." (Colton Maps Missouri, 1857-1861; Mrs. Guy Hummel; Samuel Ball; INTERN. CYC.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Niagara City
Description:See Niagara.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nichols School
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township, close to the southern line of the county. So named for several families in the vicinity. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Niota Island
Description:An island in the Mississippi River, two and a half miles long, at the mouth of the Des Moines River. Pike camped on the sandbar now represented by this island, or on one of the small islands nearby. An Indian name, given also to a town up the river. (Coues-Pike, Note, 17; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Nobby Affair
Description:A name applied humorously to the pioneer home of Sam Bartlett, which stood one mile from the river on the line of bluff, near the present St. Francisville; hence the name. (ATLAS CLARK 1878, 9)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Fox
Description:See Fox River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Santa Fe
Description:A settlement nearly on the south border, near the site of St. Patrick; platted in 1837. No reason for the name could be learned. However the settlement was on or close to the Mississippi end of the Santa Fe Trail (q.v.). (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 82; Maps Missouri, 1857-1861; Mrs. Guy Hummel; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Wyaconda
Description:A branch of the Wyaconda which rises in Iowa, and crosses Scotland County northeast of center. In western Clark it unites with the South Wyaconda to form the Wyaconda River, from which it takes its name. (Campbell 1874, 592; R. McN., 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove Church
Description:A Methodist Church north of Kahoka about one-half mile from Oak Grove Schoolhouse. The church was built around 1893 or 1894. Now discontinued and the building sold. So named for its location in an oak grove. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. Earlier known as the Lewis School for the I.N. Lewis family, early settlers. At that time it stood one mile north of the present building. So named for an oak grove that stood near. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Ridge School
Description:A school in a district located both in Madison and Des Moines Townships. The building stands on a ridge on which there is a growth of oak trees. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oakland Camp Ground
Description:A campground on the western side of the county, near Luray established recently as a pleasure ground. So named for its many beautiful oak trees. (Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oklahoma
Description:A name applied to the southwestern part of Kahoka in the "boomer" days of Oklahoma, in the late 1890s. A like "boom" was in effect in Kahoka residents felt; hence the name. (F.E. Greenlee)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Cottonwood's Cabin
Description:A cabin along the Des Moines River on the edge of the prairie north of Waterloo, around 1834; built out of cottonwood logs by John Hill of Kentucky; hence the sobriquet. (ATLAS CLARK 1878, 9)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Fox River Church
Description:See Fox River Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Fox Slough
Description:See Fox Slough.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Indian Boundary Line
Description:A line intended to conform to the parallel of latitude passing through the Rapids of the Des Moines River (q.v.) though at this point there is a deflection of four miles. The line was established in 1816 by Colonel Sullivan, a United States surveyor. It was recognized by the United States in no less than sixteen treaties with the Indians; hence the name. It also came to be known as Sullivan's Line for the surveyor. Congress fixed upon this line as the northern boundary of Missouri on Missouri's admission to the Union in 1821; and following the Iowa-Missouri "bloodless war," the line, in 1840, was redetermined by Congress as the northern boundary of Missouri. It is affirmed in the county of Clark that Robert E. Lee of Virginia, who was a surveyor and who it is known was in Missouri, surveyed the original line. This cannot be true as Robert E. Lee was not graduated from West Point until 1829. Lee was in this vicinity from 1837-1841, acting as superintending engineer of improvements on the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. If he surveyed the line, it was at this time which was the period of the dispute. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 366, 377; Houck, I, 14; Rader, 84, 85; INTERN. CYC.; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old State Road of Northeast Missouri
Description:A state road surveyed and laid out in 1833 by order of the legislature, connecting the county seats of the counties in a line from the mouth of the Des Moines River (q.v.) to Paris, Monroe County, by way of Waterloo (q.v.) in Clark, Monticello (q.v.) in Lewis County, Shelbyville (q.v.) in Shelby County. It crossed the Hannibal nd St. Joseph State Road (q.v.) in Shelbyville. The date of the establishment of the road is given in the Shelby County History as 1836 and 1837. (HIST SHELBY 1911, 35; SHELBY COUNTY HERALD, July 31, 1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Panther Hanan's Cabin
Description:The most westerly cabin on the organization of the county; located near Luray. Thomas Hanan was so named for bagging two panthers in one day. (Campbell 1874, 144; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pea Ridge School
Description:A school located in Clark though in the Granger Consolidated School District, Scotland County. It is directly north of Flint Ridge School, a fact which may account for its name though it is located on a ridge where formerly wild peas grew. (I.M. Horne)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peaksville
Description:A post office from 1867-1904; six miles north of Kahoka, in the western part of Sweet Home Township. It was laid out in 1852 by Mrs. Mary E. Peake. There was a little store here, but business was killed by the building of the Santa Fe road which missed Peaksville and established the station of Revere close enough to leave Peakesville but little more than a community name. It was named in honor of Dr. Peake, an early settler. The name is spelled variously; Peaksville, Peakeville, Peakville. Peaksville is given by the 1915 Atlas and by R. McN., 1936. (Goodwin 1867; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; HIST. CLARK 1887, 351; Davis & Durrie, 344; ATLAS CLARK 1915; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1861; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peaksville School
Description:A school in the Revere Consolidated School District, (q.v.), on the site of the old village of that name, whence the name. (Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull; Lawrence Johnson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peevler Branch
Description:A branch which flows into the Des Moines River south of Athens. So named for a family owning the land. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pepper Creek
Description:A stream in the northeastern corner of the county, flowing into the Des Moines River. So named for a family. (ATLAS CLARK 1915; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pickle Ridge School
Description:See Pleasant View School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plainview School
Description:A schoolhouse on the prairie or bottom land in Clay, overlooking the Mississippi Bottom, whence the name. It goes sometimes under the name, "Stringtown" School. (See Stringtown) (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Academy
Description:An academy in Clay Township in 1867 which grew out of Miss McKee's Subscription School (q.v.). From it developed Alexandria College (q.v.). It was given its name for a location on a bluff. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School [1 of 2]
Description:A schoolhouse in Union Township. It stands on a hill furnishing a good outlook over the surrounding country. It has been given because of its location the absurd nickname, "Cracker-Neck." (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School [2 of 2]
Description:A schoolhouse in Clay Township in the southeastern part of the county. It existed in 1868. So named for its location. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 288; Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant View School
Description:A schoolhouse in Madison Township, situated on a ridge of land affording a wide view; hence the name. The school is sometimes spoken of as "Pickle Ridge" because so many cucumbers are grown here for pickling. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Possum Hollow [1 of 2[
Description:See Acasto.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Possum Hollow [2 of 2]
Description:A name given to the hollow in which the Duncan-Upp schools are located, in the northern part of the county. It is frequented by opossums; hence the name. (Alberta Callison; Robert McLachlan)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie Church
Description:A Baptist Church about three miles southeast of Revere; established in 1851, and rebuilt in 1876. Abandoned about 1904. It took its name from its location. (Mrs. Velma Williams; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie Presbyterian Church
Description:A church at Peaksville; established in 1859. It was used also as a schoolhouse. Services are held here today once a month. So called because those doing the work of building lived down in the wooded land adjacent to the Des Moines River. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Velma Williams; Mrs. Guy Hummel; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prairie School
Description:A school in the Revere Consolidated School District (q.v.). So named for the Prairie Presbyterian Church in the community. (Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull; Lawrence Johnson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pride of the West
Description:A schoolhouse in Jackson Township. An ideal name. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rabbit Ridge School [1 of 2]
Description:A country school east of St. Patrick, now absorbed by the latter. So named for its location and the number of rabbits found there. (Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rabbit Ridge School [2 of 2]
Description:See Revere School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rapids De Moyen
Description:See Rapids of the Des Moines.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rapids of the Des Moines
Description:The name was applied to rapids in the Mississippi River above the mouth of the Des Moines River, for which they were named by the French explorers (1673) "Les Rapides de la riviere des Moins." Sometimes known as the Lower Rapids in distinction from those higher up about the mouth of Rock River. Pike, speaking of the river at this point, says that the Rapids de Moyen were eleven miles long with successive ridges and shoals extending from shore to shore and furnishing difficult passage. These rapids furnished a point of contention in the history of Iowa and Missouri, affecting particularly the counties of Scotland and Clark in northeast Missouri, and leading to hostilities that threatened open warfare. The boundary of Missouri was described in 1820 as extending to the Rapids of the Des Moines River. (See Old Indian Boundary Line). When Iowa was made a state, in 1838, her southern boundary was fixed by the north line of Missouri. The latter contended for a line about nine miles north of the present limit to include certain ripples or rapids within the Des Moines River itself, though in the formation of her counties the state had recognized the Old Indian Boundary Line. Iowa claimed to the Rapids of the Des Moines in the Mississippi. The contention was determined by Congress in 1840 in favor of the Indian boundary line and the Rapids of the Des Moines in the French sense of the term. Some minor adjustments followed later. Today Keokuk, Iowa stands at the foot of the rapids. (Peck 1851, 772; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; HIST. CLARK 1887, 278, 279, 363, 377; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 343, 344; Coues- Pike, 14, 15; MISSOURI HIST. REV., July, 1936, p. 401; BRIT. ENCY.)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Revere
Description:A post office since 1889; an elevator town on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe, to the south in Sweet Home Township, three miles west and south of Dumas. It was platted in 1887. A name given the station by the Santa Fe for what reason is unknown. (Maps Missouri from 1902; Postal Guide; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Revere Consolidated School District
Description:A consolidated school district at Revere, consisting of Prairie, Van Horn, Peaksville, McCafe, and Rabbit Ridge schools. (q.v.). (Richard St. Clair; Harry Jenkins; Ethel Tull; Lawrence Johnson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Revere School
Description:The village school in Revere. It stood formerly a mile distant and went under the name Rabbit Ridge for its location and the number of rabbits that harbored there. The building was moved to its present location when the town of Revere was laid out. (Lawrence Johnson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:River Demoin
Description:See Des Moines River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:River of Means
Description:See Des Moines River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:River Slough
Description:A long, wide slough along the Mississippi River extending from Alexandria to a point just above Gregory; so named for its location. Coues is evidently referring to this slough as Dobson's, certain sections of which he says are known later as Big River and Potter's. Reasons for the names Dobson's and Potter's can be only a guess. The name "Big River" is suggestive of its nature, size, and location. (ATLAS CLARK 1878, Coues-Pike, Note, 16; A.G. Ehrhart; O.C. Buck; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riverside
Description:A station on the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad, three miles south of Alexandria, along the river, whence the name. It no longer exists. (Campbell 1874; Davis & Durrie, 344; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rollins Branch
Description:A branch to the north of Athens, close to the Iowa line, flowing into the Des Moines River. So named for a family along the branch. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Prairie
Description:See Kahoka.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:San Jose
Description:A flag station and freight siding on the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad, on the line between Clark and Lewis. No reason known for the name, unless it was so given for the proximity of the station to the old Santa Fe Trail (q.v.), which has San Jose in southern California as one of its termini. (Chas. Seyb; G.W. Hill)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Cemetery
Description:A cemetery at St. Francisville. So named because of its location in the sand. (Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sand Terrace
Description:An extent of loam sand extending along the base of the western bluff of the Mississippi River in the vicinity of Alexandria. The supposition is that it was carried down and deposited by the toe of a glacier in the glacial period. The sand loam is not the same as the sand found in the old river bed; hence the supposition. (G.W. Hill)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Santa Fe Crossing
Description:The point where the Santa Fe crosses the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad at Medill (q.v.). (R. McN., 1935; Mrs. Guy Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Satterfield
Description:An old place no longer existent, so spoken of by Coues. Doubtless in the southern part of the county on or near Satterfields Creek (q.v.). Residents know nothing of the name. (Coues-Pike)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Satterfield Creek
Description:See Honey Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Satterfields Creek
Description:See Honey Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Satter-Fields Creek
Description:See Honey Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scherer Branch
Description:A branch which flows into the Big Fox River from the west at a point about one and a quarter miles west of the Oak Grove Schoolhouse. So named for a German family, Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Scherer, who on their marriage in Germany came to America many years ago. They lived in a "dug-out" before building their log cabin. Carrying water one mile from the Big Fox. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shaw's Mill
Description:See Snyder's Distillery.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sherwood
Description:A post office from 1890-1896; sixteen miles from Kahoka and seven miles from Luray. So named for a family. (Polk 1891; Postal Guide; Mrs. Velma Williams; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sherwood Bridge
Description:A bridge across the Little Fox River, just above the junction, about two and a half miles north of Kahoka. So named for an adjoining family. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Silver Lake
Description:A lake in southeastern Clark, in Vernon Township; previously known as Nelson's Lake for the owner of the land, Captain Nelson. The name today is purely an ideal one. (ATLAS CLARK 1915; PLAT BOOK; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sisson Chapel
Description:A Methodist Protestant Chapel about nine miles southeast of Kahoka; organized in 1850. It has been rebuilt twice. So named for a family. (Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slaughter School
Description:A subscription school during the Civil War kept by Harriet Slaughter, whence the name. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snyder's Distillery
Description:A distillery in the northern part of the county in an early day; operated for many years. Earlier as a saw and grist mill it was owned by a Mr. Shaw and known as Shaw's Mill. Houck gives it as Snyder's Mill. So named for its owner. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 363; Houck I, 88; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Chas. Seyb; G.W. Hill)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snyder's Mill
Description:See Snyder's Distillery
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Soldiers' Run
Description:A small branch of the Fox River, near Waterloo, so named in 1839. It was the site of a camp in November and December of that year when troops were mustered out to the number of 660 men "to uphold the peace and dignity of the state" in the boundary dispute between Iowa and Missouri. (See Rapids of the Des Moines). The name was still retained in 1878, but the stream is no longer identified by this name. (ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South River
Description:See Little Fox River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Wyaconda Baptist Church
Description:A country church to the southwest on the Wyaconda River; organized in 1847 by Reverend Jas. Lillard. A church house was erected in 1847 by Reverend Jas. Lillard. A church house was erected in 1850, which was replaced by a new building in 1878-1880, remodeled in 1910. The name is one of location. (See North Wyaconda Baptist Church) (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; MIN. WYACONDA BAPT. ASSOC., 1936; Mrs. Guy Hummel; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Velma Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Spencer Cemetery
Description:The cemetery at Bethlehem Church (q.v.) previously known as Bethlehem Cemetery. In 1877 the Spencers, a family of five persons, were murdered in this vicinity and buried here. This occurred in the period of lawlessness that prevailed in Clark County, 1845-1880. (See Fox River Country) A monument to their memory has been erected, and the cemetery has come to be known by its present name. (Murphy 1882, 65; Mrs. Velma Williams; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francisville
Description:A post office since 1835; nine miles northeast of Kahoka, on the southern bank of the Des Moines River. It was the only post office north of Palmyra at the time of its establishment, and supplied mail to the officers located at Fort Montrose across the river. The first white settler, Jacob Weaver, from Kentucky, located near here in 1829 (See Lancaster); near here also was the cabin of "Uncle Jerry" Wayland, later washed away in the flood of 1832. On the completion of the organization of the county, the court was established at the home of John Hill near here. The first packing house in the county was opened at St. Francisville in 1835. The town was laid out in 1834 by William Clark and Francis Church, the latter a substantial citizen and an energetic promoter. The name was made by prefixing "Saint" to the given name of Church and adding "ville," thus St. Francisville. The chronicler waggishly questions the right of Church to the title. Doubtless Mr. Church, if he added the prefix, was giving the new town the name of his patron saint instead of naming the place for himself. The early settlers fondly hoped that the town would become a great manufacturing center, and much work was done on locks and dams across the Des Moines River at this point in 1848, but the project was abandoned. It was early boasted that the town occupied the most beautiful sight in northeast Missouri. St. Francisville today is a little village with two churches and two stores. It boasts however a new bridge. In 1935 it had but 144 residents. (Wetmore 1837; Hayward 1853; Sutherland & McEvoy 1860; Campbell 1874, 147; ATLAS CLARK 1878, 9; HIST. CLARK 1887, 9, 339, 340; HIST. LEWIS 1887, 60; ATLAS CLARK 1915; Postal Guide; Davis & Durrie, 344; Maps Missouri from 1857; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francisville Baptist Church
Description:A church at St. Francisville owned by Jeremiah Wayland until his death when he gave the church house to the Baptist congregation. Now remodeled, and still active. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francisville Female Academy
Description:An academy under the auspices of the Presbyterian Church at St. Francisville. It was established in 1838 under the management of the Reverend Porter and his wife. The building burned in 1853. Church and school then used the same building. The school was conducted until after the Civil War. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Mary's
Description:See Marysville.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Mary's Catholic Church
Description:A Catholic Church organized at North Santa Fe (q.v.), in 1852. The church was not named until some little time after its organization. Named in honor of the Virgin Mother. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER; Oct. 2, 1935; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Mary's Parish
Description:See St. Patrick.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Marysville
Description:See St. Patrick.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Michael's Catholic Church
Description:A Catholic Church at Kahoka organized in the early 1880s. Cf. above. (Mrs. Velma Williams; F.E. Greenlee)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Patrick
Description:A post office installed between 1876 and 1886, continuing until 1915; reinstated in 1922. A small village in southeastern Jackson Township, platted in 1857 as St. Marysville, so named for the Catholic Parish, St. Mary's, established in 1837. St. Marysville appeared on the Colton map of 1861. When application was made for a post office the name of the village had to be changed because of another St. Marysville in the state. The name St. Patrick was given to the village at that time; it appears on the maps for the first time in 1871. The village was founded by a band of Irish pioneers. It holds a unique position in that it is the only town of that name in the United States, a name otherwise common. A shamrock-decorated sign on Dempsey Highway (q.v.) points the way to the town five miles distant. St. Patrick is today an important church town. A convent and a strong Catholic school are there also. (Cf. St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church, Shelby County). (ATLAS CLARK 1878, 10; ATLAS CLARK 1915; HIST. CLARK 1887, 362; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 345; Davis & Durrie, 344; Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1861; QUINCY HERALD- WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel; Robert McLachlan; W.B. McRoberts)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Patrick School
Description:A parochial school at St. Patrick (q.v.), changed to a public school in 1936. (Richard St. Clair)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Paul Evangelical Church
Description:A German Evangelical Church at Kahoka; organized in 1865. In its first years the services were conducted in the German language. The first church house was erected in 1886. It is a strong church today. For name cf. above. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 354; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. A.G. Ehrhart; Mrs. Velma Williams; Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Star Church
Description:A Christian Church south of Kahoka. It does not exist today, and the building is used for a residence. So named for the Star School (q.v.). (HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 108; Mrs. Velma Williams; Alberta Callison; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Star School
Description:A schoolhouse in Lincoln Township. An emblem name. (HIST. CLARK 1887, 359; Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stephenson Pond
Description:A pond west of the North Wyaconda, close to the Scotland County line. Known also as Thompson Pond. Both names are for land holders. (ATLAS CLARK (1878); O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stevenson's Branch
Description:A branch east of Chambersburg (q.v.), flowing into the North Fox River. So named for a family owning land along the branch. (ATLAS CLARK 1878; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stinking Creek
Description:See Fox River.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stone School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jackson Township. The building is of stone, whence the name, and is a unique structure, one of the oldest in the county. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stringtown
Description:A name applied to a straggly row of a few houses that have sprung up in the vicinity of Plainview School (q.v.). (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stringtown School
Description:See Plainview School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sue Creek
Description:See Sugar Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Creek
Description:A creek which rises in southern Clark County, and flows generally southeast into the Wyaconda River in northeast Lewis County. The vicinity is known for its "sugar" trees; hence the name. Williams (1904) gives it as Sue Creek. No one could be found with any knowledge of this name, which is probably an error. (ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; Colton Map (1861); Williams 1904; (F) E.W. Lillard)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A creek in the southwest part of the county, rising in southern Madison, and flowing through Jackson and northern Clay Townships into Honey Creek in the eastern part of the county, as shown by the modern map. Coues says that Sugar Creek flows into Dobson's Slough (see River Slough), and that later this creek was dedicated to his Satanic majesty under the name of Devils' or Big Devils' Creek, and was called by Beltrami (1828), Manitou Creek. Manitou is from the Algonquin manito, hence associated with Devil: among the Algonquin Indians a spirit power controlling natural phenomena. The religion of the Sauk is fundamentally the belief in what is commonly known as manitos, a word which indicates a combination of power and magic. The Indian looked upon the world as inhabited by beings permeated with a certain magic force for good or for evil, represented in all nature, mysterious potencies and powers of life and of the universe. Taken over into the vocabulary of the white man this belief signified a spirit, good, bad, or indifferent, Indian god or devil, demon or guardian spirit, fetish or genus loci. The Indian Wakonda was a manito, a spirit that held all things in their living form--signifying all power. (See Wyaconda River). The Manito could be either a good or an evil spirit; hence the names as given this stream. Some writers use Manito or Good Manito for Good or Great Spirit, the Evil Manito for the Devil. The spelling Manitou indicates French influence. The name of the stream, as we know it, came from the practice of the Indians to resort at sugar-making season to the localities known for their "sugar" (maple) trees; this stream was one well known for its sugar trees and annually visited by them. Here they found an expression of magical power, the manito, god or devil. The industry of making maple sugar, Hodge says, is undoubtedly of American Indian origin. He quotes from Joutel a note by Lafiteau which reads "The French make (maple sugar) better than the Indian women from whom they have learned to make it." Maple sugar has sometimes been called Indian sugar. (Hodge, under Maple Sugar). (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; PLAT BOOK: COUES-Pike, Note, 16; Webster's DICT., Hodge)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A post office in 1867; northeast and north of Athens on the Des Moines River. So named for the creek of this name. (Parker (1865); Goodwin (1867); Maps Missouri, 1861-1871; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sugar Creek School
Description:A schoolhouse in Madison Township on Sugar Creek, whence the name. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sullivan's Line
Description:See "Old Indian Boundary Line"
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sweet Home
Description:A post office from 1836-1837; a trading post in the northeastern part of the county on the Des Moines River. It grew into a flourishing little village of some fifty houses and one or two stores. Sweet Home was platted before 1833; in that year an addition to the village was laid out. A dam built across the river at Athens (q.v.) not very far down the river led the settlers to leave Sweet Home and rebuild in the new and better location. The story goes that a Captain Phelps and his bride on a hunting and trapping expedition to the north stayed too long, and on their return to the river, finding themselves ice-bound, had to stay until they could travel by boat. They built a log cabin on a steep hillside by the river and called it "Sweet Home." In any case the trading post and later the post office was established under this name at this point, the County History says at the residence of Dan McMullen, the Courier says at the home of Mason Couchman. Each is credited with giving the name to the post. (Wetmore (1837); ATLAS CLARK (1878); 10; HIST. LEWIS (1887), 60; HIST. CLARK (1887), 244; Maps Missouri 1844; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sweet Home Township
Description:A township which lies on the Des Moines River, with Des Moines Township on the southeast, Madison on the south, and Jefferson on the west; organized in 1838. This township was settled in 1834, and in 1836 was established the post office known as "Sweet Home," for which the township was named. It underwent some changes in extent up to and including the year 1868. (See Clark County) (HIST. CLARK, (1887), 274; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Court Records; R. McN. (1935); Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tadpole Creek
Description:A small stream that joins Honey Creek two and three-quarter miles southwest of Kahoka. So named for the number of tadpole holes in the bed of the stream. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tanyard School
Description:A school in the Fairmont Annexed District (q.v.), to the west of Fairmont. So named because a father "tanned" his boys in the schoolyard and told the teacher that was the way to make them behave. (Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull; Ralph E. Jenkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tennessee Addition
Description:An addition to Kahoka laid out in 1919, south of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy right of way. It was laid out by the Love-Hill Realty Company of Springfield, Tennessee, whence the name. John R. and Daisy Love were the owners of the land. (Plat; Harry E. Jenkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Divide
Description:See Alexandria and Bloomfield Wagon Road.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Old Divide
Description:See Alexandria and Bloomfield Wagon Road.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:The Santa Fe Railroad
Description:See Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thompson Pond
Description:See Stephenson Pond.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thompson School
Description:A schoolhouse north of Luray, in Folker Township. So named for a family. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Todd Branch
Description:A branch northeast of Luray, flowing into Linn Branch (q.v.). So named for Dr. Todd, a pioneer physician who lived in a double log house by this branch. (ATLAS CLARK (1915); PLAT BOOK; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Toms' Mill
Description:A grist and flour mill at Athens on the Des Moines River in 1845. So named for its owner, Charles Toms. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Toop-Jordan District
Description:See Toops School.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Toops School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township. So named for the man who was instrumental in cutting off the district from the Jordan. The two are spoken of as the Toop-Jordan District. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trabue's Mill
Description:A horse mill on the southern side of Honey Creek, in Clay Township in 1831. It was the first horse mill in the county. Previous to this time the settlers had been compelled to go sixty miles to Palmyra to have their meal ground. It was owned by Dr. John E. Trabue, the first physician in the county, and known by his name as well as by that of "Horse Mill." (Campbell (1874), 141; ATLAS CLARK (1878), 9; HIST. CLARK (1887), 243, 256; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 336; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; F.E. Greenlee)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tranquility
Description:A post office in 1902 only; near the southeast corner of the county. An ideal name. (Map Missouri (1916); Postal Guide; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union
Description:A post office in 1878; six miles south of Kahoka, to the northeast in Union Township, to which the village gave its name. It was surveyed and laid out in 1855 by Benjamin Rodgers, and was of importance in the early days. In 1859 pork packing was conducted here and the product shipped to St. Louis. There was a store there until 1883, but there is nothing today and the village is all but forgotten. An ideal name. (ATLAS CLARK (1878), 10; HIST. CLARK (1887), 351; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Chapel [1 of 2]
Description:A Methodist Protestant Chapel on the "Divide Road" (q.v.), below Revere; built in the 1870s. It was sold many years ago. An ideal name. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Chapel [2 of 2]
Description:A community church, whence the name, near Acasto; built in 1882. For a number of years it had no regular minister. The building is kept in repair and is used for funeral services. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Church
Description:A Baptist Church on the site of the village of Union, whence the name. The church had no pastor in 1936. (MIN. WYACONDA BAPT. ASSOC., 1936; Alberta Callison; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Church [1 of 2]
Description:A church on the Main Divide Road (See Alexandria and Bloomfield Wagon Road) in 1842 or 1843; used by all denominations, whence the name. Services were held in a barn built for the purpose by Jacob Tinsman on his land. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER; Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Church [2 of 2]
Description:A church at Fairmont, established in 1879. Used by both Methodist Episcopal and Methodist Church South, whence the name. (HIST. CLARK (1887), 351; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Velma Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union School
Description:A schoolhouse in Folker Township. An ideal name. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Township
Description:A township on the southern border, with Lincoln to the north, Jackson to the east, and Washington to the west; framed in 1868. So named for the old town of Union (1855) within its borders. (Court Record (1868); R. McN. (1935); Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Upp School
Description:A schoolhouse in Folker Township. So named for Jonas Upp. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Van Horn School
Description:A school in the Revere Consolidated School District, (q.v.), west and south of Revere by one-half mile. As the first school in the township it went under the name of the Carmen School, and stood about two miles from Revere. The name was changed when a new building was erected on a new location closer to Revere. Both names are for the original owners of the land. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Henry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull; Mrs. Guy Hummel; Lawrence Johnson)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vernon Township
Description:A narrow triangular section of the county bordered by the Des Moines River on the north, the Mississippi River on the east- southeast, and by Clay and Des Moines townships on the west. It was organized in 1868. So named for Mount Vernon of Virginia, the famous home of George and Martha Washington. (Court Record (1868); R. McN. (1935); Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Victory Park
Description:An addition to Wyaconda, platted in 1919. Laid out during the World War, it was given this name. (Plat; Harry E. Jenkins)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wade Branch
Description:A branch to the southwest of Peaksville. So named for a family of early settlers. (ATLAS CLARK (1878); A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Waggener's Ferry
Description:A ferry on the Des Moines River. License to run the ferry at this point was granted June, 1838, to Alexander Waggener, whence the name. (HIST. CLARK (1887), 276; Court Record; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wagner Branch
Description:A branch north of Honey Creek flowing west into that creek. It bears a family name. (ATLAS CLARK (1878); A.G. Ehrhart; Chas. Seyb)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Washington City
Description:A paper town in Jefferson Township, planned by Herdman and Sherrick in 1852. The only buildings on the site were Herdman's Mill (q.v.) and a little log schoolhouse. A pretentious name given for our first president, George Washington. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Washington City School
Description:A little log schoolhouse that stood on the site of Herdman's paper town which he named Washington City (q.v.), and which gave its name to the schoolhouse. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Washington Township
Description:The township in the southwest corner of the county, with Wyaconda Township to the north and Union to the east; organized in 1837. It has been reorganized from time to time. (See Clark County). So named for George Washington, the "Father of his Country," (1732-1799), first president of the United States, 1789-1797. (HIST. CLARK (1887), 271; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Court Records; R. McN. (1935); INTERN. CYC.; Samuel Ball)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Waterloo
Description:A post office, intermittently, from 1837-1870; a village on Fox River, north of the center of Madison Township, nine miles from Kahoka. There were settlements around Waterloo as early as 1833. It was settled in 1835, and the original site established in 1836 by its first store. When Mount Vernon (q.v.) was not accepted as the county seat, the site of Waterloo was proposed. Again Obadiah Dickerson (See Dickerson Ford, Shelby County, and Dickerson Township, Lewis County) acted as one of the commissioners to select the site. The reason given for the selection was that wood, water, and grinding could be obtained there, and the land was not fit for farming. It was laid off in 1837 by Colonel Francis Church. The first courthouse of the county was built here in that year, land having been purchased from John Alexander (See Alexander's Ferry) for the consideration of $1.00. In 1847 the county seat was moved on petition to Alexandria (q.v.), but was returned to Waterloo in 1854. The county records remained at Waterloo until 1871, the year in which the county seat was finally fixed at Kahoka. On the removal of the records, the courthouse built at Waterloo was used for a house of public worship and a seminary. (See Allen's High School) Waterloo lost its prestige on the first removal of the county seat, and steadily declined until nothing is left to mark the site. The name did not occur on a map by 1879. Colonel Francis Church, according to the county history, gave it its name, which may have been suggested by its excellent water facilities. The story goes, however, that there was an old French soldier there by the name of Ribault who had fought with Napoleon at Waterloo; hence the name. There still are members of this family in the county, some of whom have adopted the English spelling "Rebo" for the French "Ribault." When it was the county seat, Waterloo was known as the "City of the Classic Fox." (See Fox River) (Sutherland & McEvoy (1860); Parker (1865); Goodwin (1867); Polk (1876); ATLAS CLARK (1878), 10; HIST. CLARK (1887), 281, 286, 342, 343; Maps Missouri, 1857-1871; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER; Oct. 2, 1936; KAHOKA GAZETTE-HERALD, Sept. 25, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart; Alberta Callison; F.E. Greenlee; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Waterloo School
Description:A schoolhouse on the site of the old county seat for which it is named. It is all that keeps alive the name. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wayland
Description:A post office under this name since 1886, and as Wayland Station in 1878; a station and elevator town on the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad, near the Fox River, seven and a half miles east of Kahoka. Platted as Wayland City in 1880. The Waylands were pioneers who from "Uncle Jerry," who came in 1829, and "Uncle Julius," to Dr. Fielding Wayland, all had much to do with the making of pioneer history of this vicinity. Dr. Julius Wayland settled in 1833 at the present site of the station named in his honor. (Campbell (1874); ATLAS CLARK (1878), 10; HIST. CLARK (1887), 242, 361; ATLAS CLARK (1915); Postal Guide; Eaton, 275; Maps Missouri from 1879; Plat; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wayland City
Description:See Wayland.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wayland Covered Bridge
Description:A bridge over Fox River near Wayland, whence the name. It was built in 1858. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wayland Creek
Description:A small creek in Des Moines Township, emptying into the Des Moines River at St. Francisville. Earlier known as Weaver Branch. Both names are family names. There were a number of families of Weavers in this vicinity, but the branch was named for Peter R. Weaver, who was one of the first settlers, coming into the county about 1839. The marker to his grave may still be seen north of St. Francisville. For the present name, see Wayland. (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; A.G. Ehrhart; J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wayland Station
Description:See Wayland.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wayland's Ferry
Description:A ferry on the Des Moines River at Pike around 1833, as reported, and again "at his residence" in 1836 at Lancaster (q.v.). A license was granted for the same locality in 1838 according to the Court Record of June of that year. Owned and operated by the pioneer, Jeremiah Wayland, whence the name. (See Wayland) (HIST. CLARK (1887), 277; HIST. LEWIS (1887), 39, 49; HIST. N.E. MISSOURI, 382; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Weaver's Branch
Description:See Wayland Creek.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Weaver's Mill
Description:See Moore's Mill.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Weber Settlement
Description:A settlement in the southwest part of the county, near Fairmont. It was established about 1836 by Henry Weber and his family, whence the name. The County History is in error in giving the spelling as Webber. (HIST. CLARK (1887), 397; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wells School
Description:A schoolhouse in Washington Township. So named for families in the vicinity. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Antioch Church
Description:See Antioch Baptist Church.
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:West Quincy and Alexandria Railroad
Description:See Canton Bloomfield Railroad
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Westminster College
Description:A tract so designated southeast of the Fox River. Cf. West Minister College, Marion. (ATLAS CLARK (1878)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Branch
Description:A branch in southern Jackson. A great extent of land here owned by the White family, whence the name. (ATLAS CLARK (1915); A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Church
Description:A Cumberland Presbyterian Church in the southern part of the county; completed in 1873. So named for the White family, large landholders in the vicinity. (Mrs. Guy Hummel; O.C. Buck)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White Hall
Description:A post office in 1853. Nothing could be learned of its location or of the reason for the name. There were Whites in the county. (See White Branch, White Church, White School) (Hayward, 1853)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:White School
Description:A schoolhouse in Jackson Township, close to the south county line. So named for a landowner who owns practically the whole district. (Richard St. Clair; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wickell's Schoolhouse
Description:A schoolhouse in Jefferson Township in 1868. It no longer exists. So named for the family of William Wickell, a pioneer. (HIST. CLARK (1887), 289; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wilcox Ferry
Description:A ferry established across the Mississippi River at the site of Alexandria in 1833, said to be the first ferry operating from the county. The license was granted by the Lewis County Court in that year. It was operated by John R. Wilcox, whence the name. (HIST. CLARK (1887), 37, 337; HIST. LEWIS (1887), 49)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Willow Pond
Description:A slough in southeastern Clark County. So named for the willows that grew there in great numbers. (J.D. Rebo)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Winchester
Description:A post office from 1853-1904; near Honey Creek in Clay Township, nine miles southeast of Kahoka. It was laid out in 1837. A store and blacksmith shop there today. The vicinity was settled by Virginians, and the name it is thought was given for Winchester, Virginia. (Hayward (1853); Goodwin (1867); ATLAS CLARK (1878), 10; HIST. CLARK (1887), 345; Davis & Durrie, 344; Postal Guide; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Maps Missouri from 1857; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Winchester Methodist Church
Description:A Methodist Church in Winchester erected before the division in the Methodist Church in 1844. At that time it was taken over by the Methodist Church South. Soldiers were quartered there many times during the Civil War. The old building was torn down in 1888 and a new one erected. The church is still active, though no longer a Methodist Church South. It was formerly known as the Brick Church for the material of which it was built. (Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wolf Branch
Description:A branch which rises near the Iowa line, and flows southeast into the Little Fox River. So named for a family. (ATLAS CLARK, 1878, 1915; PLAT BOOK; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Woodville Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church seven or eight miles southwest of Kahoka; organized in 1853. It no longer exists. So named because it stood in the woods. (CLARK COUNTY COURIER, Oct. 2, 1936; Mrs. Velma Williams; Alberta Callison)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wrightville
Description:A post office from 1854-1867; in Union Township, on the Wyaconda River, ten miles southeast of Waterloo, the county seat in 1867. It was settled in 1845. So named for a family. (Sutherland & McEvoy (1860); Parker (1865); Goodwin (1867); Maps Missouri, 1861- 1871; Mrs. Velma Williams)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda
Description:A post office since 1889; near the western county line. It is a station and elevator town on the Santa Fe, of fairly recent origin. It was platted in 1887. It takes its name from the two Wyaconda streams between which it is located. The residents depart, however, from the pronunciation given the name of the rivers, (q.v.). (Polk (1889); Postal Guide; Maps Missouri from 1904; Eaton, 275; QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, Dec. 29, 1935; A.G. Ehrhart)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda Baptist Association
Description:An association of Baptist churches in Clark, Lewis, and the eastern part of Knox Counties. (See Bethel Baptist Association). The association was ninety-two years old in 1937 and met in the Providence Baptist Church (q.v.) in Williamstown, Lewis County. The association on organization took the name of the Wyaconda Rivers that traverse the two counties of Clark and Lewis. (MIN. WYACONDA BAPT. ASSOC., 1936)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda Consolidated School District
Description:A consolidated school district at Wyaconda on the western side of the county, consisting of Fairview, Independence, Blattner, and Tanyard schools (q.v.). (Richard St. Clair; Harry E. Jenkins; Ethel Tull)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda River
Description:This river is formed by the union of two long streams known as the North and South Wyaconda, both of which rise in Iowa and flow southeast through Scotland County, uniting in northern Clark to form the main stream. This follows a southeastern course through southwest Clark, joined on the way by the Little Wyaconda, enters Lewis by way of Lyon Township, traverses the latter county through the northeast and east, joining the Mississippi a short distance above La Grange. It is one of the largest rivers between the Des Moines and the Salt rivers. Pike speaks of its mouth as being 100 yards wide, and bearing due west from the Mississippi. Beck (1823) speaks of it as the Waconda Creek. It is known by an Indian name which goes back to an old Indian tradition of two Sioux Indians who died on its banks in the night with no marks of violence upon them. Their death was thus ascribed to the supernatural; hence the place of their death became known as the Waconda--residence of the Master of Life or the Great Spirit, whom they knew as Wakonda. The latter is a term applied by tribes of the Siouan family when the power believed to animate all natural forms is spoken to or spoken of in supplication or in rituals. (Spelled Wakanda by Riggs in the Dakota Dictionary, where it is given as a verb signifying to reckon as holy or sacred--to worship). The noun Wakan signifies a spirit, something consecrated. To the Omaha nothing is without life; the rock lives, as do the cloud and the tree as well as the animal. He projects his own consciousness upon things. The power which brings to pass and holds all things in their living form he designates as Wakonda. All power is of the Wakonda, which is invisible and therefore of the spirit, to which is ascribed all that is mysterious or beyond ordinary experience. The name is pronounced usually as written--properly_____the common pronunciation in the vicinity of the river is_____Pike (1805) spelled it as at present, as did also Peck (1851). The Lincole Map (1822) indicates it as Wahkondah. Beck (1823) spelled it Waconda, and it was so indicated on the Map of Missouri, 1824. Other early writers spelled the name Wakenda (Map Illinois and Missouri, 1834). In 1832 Wyaconda again appears, in 1844 Wiaconda, in 1850 Wiconda, in 1858 Wyaconda again. The name continues to vary in form until about 1878 when it becomes somewhat consistently Wyaconda. The stream is also known as the Big Wyaconda, and the North Wyaconda Creek, because of its relation to the other stream of the same name. (See Little Wyaconda). (HIST. LEWIS (1887), 152; ATLAS LEWIS, 1878, 1916; ATLAS CLARK (1878); Pike (1805), 291; Beck (1823); Peck (1851); Eaton, 275; Hodge; Maps Missouri from 1822)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wyaconda Township
Description:A township in the middle tier of townships on the western border, with Folker to the north, Lincoln to the east, and Washington to the south; organized in 1842 with some changes made in 1868. (See Clark County) So named for the north and south Wyaconda streams which traverse the township diagonally from the northwest, meeting to form the Wyaconda in the southeast corner. (Court Records; R. McN. (1935)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zion Evangelical Church
Description:A church southeast of Kahoka, two miles northeast of Winchester; organized soon after 1865. It still exists. A Biblical name: Zion, the city of David (II Sam. 5:7) and the chosen city of God (Ps. 48:1, 2). (Alberta Callison; Mrs. Guy Hummel)
Source:Elliott, Katherine. "Place Names of Six Northeast Counties of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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