Carter County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Aldrich Valley
Description:In the northeast part of Kelley Township. It leads into Current River at Chilton. The stream is now generally dry. John Aldrich, from Tennessee, settled here as early as 1840. Also known as Hooper Valley (q.v.) for an early family. (J.J. Chilton; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Aldrich Valley School
Description:In Kelley Township, eight miles east of Van Buren. Formed from Chilton District about 1894. Named for the valley. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Baker Graveyard
Description:See Galbraith Cemetery.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Baker Mill
Description:See Mill Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bald Knob
Description:A very large hill north of Chilton, now well covered with small trees and heavy underbrush, but eighty years ago it was entirely bare. (Mrs. Mary Wallace)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ballard Switch
Description:In Carter Township. About 1930 the Egyptian Tie Company put up a stave factory one mile west of Cummings (q.v.) and got the switch established for loading timber. They named it for Raymond Ballard, a veteran railroad engineer. (Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Ballard)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bark Camp Creek
Description:Another name for Bear Camp Creek (q.v.). Mr. Chilton explains that during the Civil War, men who wanted to escape from going to war would hide out in this valley and make camps covered with dead bark from oak logs. Mr. Brame says that since the Civil War some hunters and trappers made this sort of camp in the valley. (J.J. Chilton; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barren
Description:A post office established during the 1880s, in the home of Louis Hedrick in Kelley Township in Carter County. After the death of Mr. Hedrick in 1908, it was moved into various homes near Big Baren Creek, whence its name until Mr. Lewis (cf. Lewis Cave) took it into his home, where it remained until the rural route was established in 1933. (W.R. Holland; J. Whitwell; A.C. Randall; Postal Guide 1888- 1932)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barren Creek
Description:See Big Barren Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barren School
Description:See Hickory Grove School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bear Camp Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church in Kelly Township built about 1921 near the school of this name. Doubtless named for the valley. The church was organized about 1918 by Reverend R.L. Yount of Marble Hill, Missouri. It was also known as Bradford Memorial Chapel (q.v.). Now often known as Lowe's Chapel for the family living nearby. (H.T. Condray; F. Kelley; Mrs. Mary Dell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bear Camp Creek
Description:Heads near Eastowood and flows into Current River in Kelley Township. An old name given by the pioneers and hunters. There were many bears in the early days, and many fur bearing animals and deer are still found. Bear Creek Spring is a beautiful place for hunters, trappers, and campers in this valley. (Mr. & Mrs. R.L. Coleman; Rev. H. Smolser)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bear Camp School
Description:A newer school in Bear Camp Creek Valley. Formed from Barren and Chilton districts. It took the name of the stream. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bear Creek Spring
Description:See Bear Camp Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bear Grass Hollow
Description:Leads into Copper Mine Creek. Bear grass, not very common in many parts of this section, grew profusely in this valley. The flag-like blades are very wide and grow to be eighteen inches in length. In the 1850s and 1860s the natives used this grass to weave bottoms for chairs, and they made ropes for plow lines, by making four strand braids from this grass. The negroes believed it would cure any kind of snake bite. (T.J. Brame; Gooch; A.M. Link)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bear Mountain
Description:In northwest Jackson Township. Bears were numerous in the early days. (A.M. Link; Rev. H.H. Stratton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bear Pen Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township. Leads into Big Barren Creek from the north. The pioneers made large traps here for catching bears. Log houses were built with trap doors; and all covered with brush. To decoy the bears, bait was placed inside. (Mr. & Mrs. J. Wills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Beaver Dam Camp
Description:Near Beaver Dam Creek (q.v.). One of the logging camps for the Grandin Mill. (L. McGhee; J. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Beaver Dam Creek
Description:Rises in southeast Johnson Township in Carter County and flows across Johnson Township in Ripley County, into Little Black River (q.v.) in Butler County. Beavers were numerous in this vicinity in the pioneer days and the animals' dens or dams were common along the stream. (J.K. Langford; Polly Powers; Mrs. Rachel Riggin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethlehem Church
Description:The Freewill Baptist Church at Grandin. It was represented in the association in 1905; but as the timber work declined, the church was abandoned after leading members moved away. It was given the name of the town in Palestine, the place of Christ's nativity. (J.A. Loreau)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Bailey Creek
Description:Shown on Campbell's Map 1873 as the name for Big Barren Creek, but I find no one who ever heard of the name. Probably it is a misprint.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Barren Creek
Description:It rises in Kelley Township, in Carter County and flows across Pine and Kelley townships of Ripley County into Current River. Annual fires for many years prevented the growth of larger timber, but vast stretches of the country were covered with a heavy growth of grass, good for grazing. "The Barrens" were excellent pasture lands during the earlier days, and cattle owners, even fifteen miles away, would drive their herds into these regions where they could live far into the winter. No doubt, the stream acquired its name from these grassy lands. The map of 1842 gives the name Barren Creek. The 1855 map gives the name of this stream 18 Mile Creek; informants say the stream is about eighteen or nineteen miles long. On the 1867 map, it is named Big Barren Creek. Doubtless the adjective "big" was added after Little Barren Creek (q.v.) acquired its name, which time must have been soon after the Civil War when this section was being rapidly settled. It is shown on the 1873 map as Big Bailey Creek (q.v.). It is sometimes known as Sinking Creek, because it flows underground for some distance. (H.D. Condray; J. Lewis; J.J. Chilton; W.D. Randel; C.E. Drain)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Brushy Creek
Description:Heads in northwest Jackson Township. Flows into Black River in Wayne County. The valley was originally covered with dense timber and underbrush. It is incorrectly spelled "Bushey," on the county map. (J.J. Chilton; A.M. Link)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Devil's Run Creek
Description:It heads west of Eastwood and flows into Chilton's Creek in Kelley Township. Little Devil's Run Branch is a tributary of Big Devil's Run . Both old names are descriptive of the rough, rugged topography of the region. (Mr. & Mrs. C. Sample; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring
Description:It is about five miles south of Van Buren the gem of nature in Big Spring State Park. It is one of the largest springs in the world, estimated by the United States government as having a daily flow of 350,000,000 gallons. One writer says the water comes "surging impatiently from an immense basin at the bottom of a 250 foot limestone cliff--the pale blue water drops from a ledge rebounding in spray from the boulders that break its fall, and rushes off to Current River. Allen Hinckey speaks of it as coming "with deafening roar churning and lashing with terrible fury" from the foot of the cliff. These descriptions are good but do not do justice; neither am I able to give a true picture, one must see to appreciate this majestic phenomenon of Mother Nature. The gulf of bluish water rushes hurridly from the small cavern, dashes against the rugged dark boulders whitened with spray and foam, and then moves placidly onward through Big Spring Branch (about one-half mile long) into Current River. The park, containing about 5000 acres, has been considerably improved (much of the work was done by the C.C.C.) but by adding roads and some buildings, this work of man has destroyed much of nature's beauty. Mr. Dorrance, who describes the scenes as poetical and beautiful, certainly speaks truthfully. (THE OZARK STREAMS, , 44; C. Myatt; McCanse; C. Sample; THE COMMUNITY, 2.4; Missouri Guide, 430)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring Branch
Description:See Big Spring (Carter).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring State Park
Description:See Big Spring (Carter).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Springs Valley Camp
Description:One of the logging camps during the timber days. Near Big Spring. (J.N. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boiling Spring
Description:A good living spring south of Cave Spring (q.v.), four miles west of Hunter. The name is significant of the manner in which the spring flows from the ground. (L.Z. Dell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boyer Creek
Description:See Crites Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bradford Memorial Chapel
Description:See Baer Camp Church. Named for Refundon Bradford, an insurance agent. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brightenstein Hollow
Description:Leads into Little Black River southeast of Grandin. A man of this name entered land, and the family lived there before and during the Civil War. (Rev. H.H. Smelser; J. Smith; J.H. Lehr)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bristol School
Description:Formed in 1925 from Upper Barren, Lower Barren, and Dry Valley school districts. Named for Frank Bristol, a landowner and prominent citizen of the community, who promoted the organization. Sometimes known as Middle Barren School because of its location near the stream. (H.D. Condray; Mrs. Mary Dell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township. Leads into Current River near Chilton. James Brown, a pioneer teacher, was one of the first settlers in the valley. His son, John C. Brown, who moved to Fredricktown, Missouri, became judge of the State Supreme Court in 1908. (Mrs. Mary Wallace; A.M. Link; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown Spring
Description:An earlier name sometimes given for Big Spring, since it was on land settled by James Brown. See Brown Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Busick Spring
Description:See Dresser Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Busick Spur
Description:On the Frisco Railroad, a switch were the government railroad from Midco connected with the same line (see Midco). Named for the attorney E.H. Busick, now of Kansas City, who was the attorney and manager for the plant at Midco. (F. Kelley; Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Four
Description:In Kelly Hollow (q.v.). Cf. Camp Five in Oregon County.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Three
Description:See Manills Camp.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Camp Yarn Hollow
Description:Leads into Big Barren Creek in Kelley Township. Here C.W. Neal and others made their hiding place to avoid service in the Civil War. Camping there they had nothing to do with "spinnin' yarns. "(Mr. & Mrs. Jno. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Canty Branch
Description:It leads into the North Prong of Little Black River southeast of Hunter. Soon after the Civil War Thomas Canty of St. Louis settled here and developed an unusually good farm. (J. Smith; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carter
Description:See Carter Station.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carter County
Description:It was formed from parts of Ripley, Shannon and Wayne counties on March 10, 1859. Named for the first settler, Zimri A. Carter (see Carter Creek). Adam Lane of Ripley, John Buford of Reynolds, and D.C. Reed of Shannon counties, who were appointed to locate the seat of justice, met at the home of James Brown (see Brown Hollow) on the first Monday in April, 1859, and selected Van Buren, the old county seat of Ripley County, for the seat of justice. The old log courthouse erected in 1853 was used until 1867, when a frame building was erected, which very recently has been replaced by a good modern structure. (HIST. MISSOURI, Conrad I, 507-508; Douglas I, 317; Houck III, 159-160; R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carter Creek
Description:Heads in northeast Carter Township. Flows into Current River south of Van Buren. Zimri A. Carter came from South Carolina in 1812 and settled in the lower part of the valley. He was a modern farmer and the wealthiest man in the county in 1859. He had brought a family of negroes. The old homestead was at the foot of Carter Mountain east of Van Buren. Both stream and mountain took his name. Houck gives the date as 1820. Mr. John Chilton explains that it was Benjamin Carter who came in 1820. Douglas gives the date 1812. (Douglas I, 317; Houck III, 159-160; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carter Mountain
Description:See Carter Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carter Station
Description:In northeast Jackson Township. The terminus of a narrow gauge road built by the Missouri Southern Railway Company from Leeper in Wayne County, about 1890. Often known as Carter or Carterville. There was quite a settlement of the Carter family in the vicinity. William and John Carter, grandsons of Bdenjamin Carter who had come from South Carolina in 1820, owned land here and were prominent in the timber business. (Mr. & Mrs. R.L. Coleman; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carter Township
Description:One of the three divisions in 1873. It included all of the western half of the county. Pike Township (q.v.) was cut off from it about 1892. Now the north-central part of the county. Doubtless named for the creek. (Campbell Atlas 1873)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carter's Creek
Description:Later shortened to Carter Creek (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carter's Creek School
Description:On Highway 60, five miles east of Van Buren. Named for the creek nearby. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carterville
Description:See Carter Station.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cates
Description:Jesse Carter, a Civil War veteran, justice of the peace and president of the school board, who died about 1908, had a small country store in the northeast part of Jackson Township. He got a post office established and brought the mail from Mill Spring in Wayne County. I do not find the office listed in the guides, but informants say it was kept only two or three years. (A.M. Link; J.M. Blue)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cave Camp
Description:See Cave Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cave Creek
Description:A large stream which rises in Wayne County and empties into Current River in Carter County. "Its name is derived from the number of caves found on its bank," according to Beck in 1823. (Beck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cave Creek
Description:A small picturesque stream leading from Cave Spring (q.v.) into Current River at Van Buren.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cave Fork
Description:See Cave Fork Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cave Fork Hollow
Description:Heads in small streams and caves in the vicinity of Eastwood and leads into Big Barren Creek in the southeast part of Kelley Township. The stream does not have water during very dry seasons. (Mr. & Mrs. J. Lewis; H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cave Spring [1 of 2]
Description:A small cave from which a good stream flows, about four miles west of Hunter. A small camp is arranged with cabins. Since it is easily accesible from Highway 60, numbers of tourists, attracted by the sign on the highway, stop over for a rest. The tourist camp is known as Cave Camp. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Jaco)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cave Spring [2 of 2]
Description:Another Cave Spring, on Highway 60, about two miles west of Van Buren. It is a small cave from which comes very fine, cold spring water. It has been a favorite picnicking place for many years. (Mr. & Mrs. R.L. Coleman; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Bluff Hollow
Description:Leads from the northeastern part of Oregon County into Kelley Township, a southern tributary of Big Barren Creek. There are cedar covered bluffs along the headwaters. (J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chicopee
Description:The railroad station on the Current River Branch. Because of the exorbitant price asked for the right of way through Van Buren, the road was built around the town, and the station established one mile south. The post office was there for a time. Now by growth the two are as one. On June 14, 1888, the town was laid out by the president of the Kansas City, Fort Scott, and Memphis Railroad Company. George H. Nettleton and his wife Julia A. Nettleton of Kansas City. It was named for Mr. Nettleton's birthplace, Chicopee, Massachusetts. Chicopee is the name of a river, falls, and city in Hampden County, Massachusetts. According to Gannett, it is an Indian word, meaning "cedar trees," or "birch-bark place." (J.J. Chilton; C. Sample; Mrs. Lizzie Haynes; Gannett)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chicopee Spring
Description:Named for the railroad station Chicopee.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chilton
Description:A small village and post office in Kelley Township on the Current River Railroad on the east side of Current River. Laid out December 31, 1887, by George H. Nettleton and his wife (see Chicopee) on land purchased from James Brown. Named from the Chiltons across the river and for James Chilton, an early settler, near Chilton. During the timber days of 1890 , the village had as many as five hundred persons, now only a store, post office, and a few homes. (F. Kelley; R.L. Coleman; J.J. Chilton; Postal Guide 1889- )
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chilton's Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A small tributary of Current River in northern Carter Township. Named for Truman Chilton, who owned a farm there as early as 1835. It remained in the hands of members of the Chilton family until 1930, when it was sold to Jack Culpepper. (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chilton's Creek [2 of 2]
Description:Another Chilton's Creek in Kelley Township. See Chilton's Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chilton's Graveyard
Description:The family burial ground on the old Chilton farm in Carter Township. See Chilton's Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chilton's Mill [1 of 2]
Description:John and Mark Chilton, from Ray County, Tennessee, entered one hundred sixty acres of land on the west side of Current River about one mile north of Chilton (q.v.). In 1828 or 1829 they set up a grist and saw mill near the mouth of the creek that bears their name.The mill, now in ruins, has not been used for thirty years or more. (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chilton's Mill [2 of 2]
Description:Another mill of this name, owned by Thomas Chilton for a number of years. See Mill Creek. Cf. with Chilton's Mill near Chilton (q.v.). (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chinese Mountain
Description:A hill, probably two hundred feet high, west of Van Buren, which got its name when the survey was being made for the Kansas City, Fort Scott, and Memphis Railroad. Contention grew up between Mr. Alec Carter, and Mr. Horton, the chief engineer; Carter, believing the hill to be impassable and doubtless having in mind the Great Wall of China, exclaimed, "That's a Chinese Mountain!" The engineer with an oath answered that he would blow the top off of it. The blasting was done on the top of a hill in 1887, and the road bed was made much more economically than if the Carter land had been bought at the exorbitant price asked and the road built around the hill. The steep bluff thus made beside the railroad is now called the Chinese Wall. (Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland; J.J. Chilton; Mr. & Mrs. R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Chinese Wall
Description:See Chinese Mountian.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clark's Mill
Description:Noah Clark and his son, John W. Clark, owned and operated the old mill on Mill Creek (q.v.), for a good many years, getting possession of it several years after the close of the Civil War. (J.J. Chilton; Wm. W. Baker)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clay Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township. Leads into Brown Hollow. Robert Clay operated a saw mill there during the timber days. Several car loads of iron ore were taken from this place to Midco (q.v.). (Mrs. D. Crites; T.J. Brame; A.M. Link)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clear Spring
Description:In Henpeck Creek vicinity. A good spring of sparkling, clear water . Occasionally, in very dry seasons, it does not flow. During rainy seasons other small springs occur. (T.J. Brame; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clear Springs School
Description:Formerly Henpeck School (q.v.). John L. Smith, a teacher who did not like the old name, was influential in getting the old name changed in 1893 for the clear sparkling springs nearby. (J.J. Chilton; H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Club House
Description:A "flag" railroad station, one mile south of Chilton, on the Current River Railroad. About 1890 a group of Kansas City businessmen, chiefly railroad officials, erected a club house nearby on a high bluff. It is an unusually good, well-improved building, now opened mainly by St. Louis people, is just a club house. (F. Kelley; J. McGhee; R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clyburn Branch
Description:A small northern tributary of Big Brush Creek in Jackson Township. Levi Clyburn, an elderly man who had been dead for years, lived there. This family was one of the earliest to settle in the vicinity. (T. J. Chilton; A.M. Link; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cole School
Description:One of the earliest schools, two miles east of Elsinore, later made parts of Elsinore and Freeland schools. It took the name of Reuben Cole, a landowner there, who came from Ste. Genevieve in the early 1870s. (J.M. Blue; J. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Coleman Valley
Description:It enters Henpeck Creek near Clear Spring (q.v.). Pioneer settlers of the name lived there. (T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Coleman's Failure
Description:A mocking name given to Coleman's Ferry (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Coleman's Ferry
Description:In 1915 Robert L. Coleman put in a ferry at St. Joan (q.v.). After operation for about three years, rafting logs down Current River, the barge was wrecked in a log jam. Good natured joking called the place Coleman's Failure, which has remained. (F. Kelley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Colemansville
Description:A mill village in northern Jackson Township. William Coleman had a grist and small sawmill here before the Civil War. Campbell's GAZ. (1874) names it a post office, thirteen miles northeast of Van Buren. Cram's map (1879) and Rand McNally's map (1884) spell it Colemanville. (J.J. Chilton; Postal Guide 1876)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Colemanville
Description:See Colemansville.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Concord Church
Description:The Missionary Baptist Church at Ellsinore organized as early as 1889. An idealistic name. (Rev. Wm. S. Smelser; MINUTES)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Condray Graveyard
Description:On land now owned by William N. Sutherland, three miles northwest of Elsinore. Now a public cemetery, but not much used. Ellis N. Condray entered the land in the 1840s. His child was the first one to be buried there. (H.D. Condray; Rev. H.H. Stratton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Copper Mine Creek
Description:A small stream in Johnson Township, heading in a good living spring, Copper Mine Spring, north of Hunter (q.v.), and leading into Current River southeast of Chilton. A few early settlers attempted to open up a copper mine here, but the ore was not sufficiently good to be profitable. Mrs. Wallace says that in 1873 there was a small smelter there, apparently quite old and out of use at that time. (A. Hinchey; Mrs. M.J. Wallace; W. Gooch)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Copper Mine Spring
Description:See Copper Mine Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Copper Mines
Description:A railroad station on the Current River Railroad north of Chilton. See Copper Mine Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Copper Mountain
Description:A long ridge extending from Hunter northward to Grassy Valley in Jackson Township. Drained into Copper Mine Creek on the northwest. See Copper Mine Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cow Creek
Description:A small branch of Devil's Run, in Jackson Township. Small springs and plenty of wild grass makes its valley an excellent pasture for cattle "on the range." (T.J. Brame; A.M. Link)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Coward's Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township. Leads into Big Barren Creek from near Eastwood (q.v.). A large cave is near and a little mining of iron ore has been done. No reason was found for this old name. Coward or Cowherd is a well known family name in other parts of Missouri, having produced both a Governor of the State and a mayor of Kansas City; cf. Cowherd Branch in Jackson County. (Miss Atchison's thesis). (J. Lewis; Mrs. Jno. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crites
Description:A post office established before 1889 in the home of Mrs. Matilda Crites, widow of Solomon Crites (see Crites Creek), three miles west of the site of Elsinore. The mail was brought by horse from Mill Spring in Wayne County, and from Grandin (q.v.). Discontinued when Elsinore (q.v.) was established. (J. Smith; A. Hinchey; Postal Guide 1889)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crites Corner
Description:On Highway 60, five miles west of Elsinore (q.v.). In 1927 Donald Crites put up a store here on his farm. He has a large building for the general store, and serves meals and rooms to tourists. The road to Elsinore meets Highway 60 here, thus making a corner on which the store is built. There are two filling stations and four homes. (Mrs. Donald Crites)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crites Creek
Description:A small branch of Little Brushy Creek in Jackson Township. Solomon Crites, a farmer from Bollinger County, Missouri, entered land here before the Civil War. He was killed by a band of bushwhackers during the Civil War. It is also known as Boyer Creek, for Thomas Boyer who is a farmer there now. (Mrs. Donald Crites; W. Sutherland; J. Lehr)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crommer Town
Description:During the early 1870s, William Crommer operated a large sawmill in the vicinity of Union Hill Church (q.v.). (J. Smith; Rev. H.H. Stratton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crommer Town Church
Description:See Union Hill Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crommer Town School
Description:In Jackson Township, near Elsinore. It took the name of the mill village. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cross Roads School
Description:In Johnson Township, three miles west Grandin. Consolidated with Grandin but still used. It is situated at the crossing of roads on section lines. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cummings
Description:A switch for loading timber, on the Frisco Railroad, six miles west of Van Buren. During the timber days it was a little sawmill village with some other business houses. Nothing now left. Named for John B. Cummings from Pennsylvania, a member and one of the directors of the Missouri Lumber and Mining Company of Grandin. (J. McGhee; J.J. Holland; A. Rinchey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Current River
Description:This stream, considered by many persons the most beautiful one of the Ozarks, has its headwaters in two branches, one of which is Jack's Fork rising in Texas County, the other and main stream heads in Dent County. These two units in Shannon County, and the stream flows through Carter and Ripley counties, and into Arkansas where it unites with Big Black River at Pocahontas, Arkansas. Schoolcraft remarks of it in his TOUR INTO MISSOURI, p. 85: "...a noble stream, 1000 feet wide at the ferry Hick's or Hix's...originates in springs in the Missouri barrens two hundred fifty miles west." McCane explains that the stream flows from huge springs in Montauk State Park. Various spellings have been found for the name. Schoolcraft on p. 59 of the above mentioned book, spells in "Current's," but in later pages the apostrophe is dropped. On maps of 1822, 1824, 1922, 1842 the spelling is "Current." Beck spells it "Currents." Various persons have been given as the donor of the name. Goodspeed says that John Shaw, who came to this stream in 1808, called it "Current" for its swiftness. Mr. Hinchey mentions this statement but he says the first name Swift Water, was given by the Indians; but I have found no definite proof of this nor a trace of the Indian name. Dr. Dorrance explains that after the Red Man, the French name of the stream was La Riviere Courante; after them, the Spanish Rio Corrents; then the name, which is apparently lost, signified "Swift Water;" the French translated this adequately as "La Riviere Courante, since the French adjective "courant" means "running or rapid." The present name Current River is rather an anglicisation of the French than a translation. (A. Hinchey; Conard II, 208; McCanse 32' THOSE OZARK STREAMS., 37; TOUR INTO MISSOURI, 59, 85)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Current River Lodge
Description:See Mount Jefferson.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Current River Railroad
Description:A branch of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad constructed during the later 1880s. It extends from Willow Springs (q.v.) across Howell, Shannon, and Carter counties into Wayne County, where it connects with other lines at Williamsville. It took this name from Current River which it crosses. It provides transportation for a large area in the Current River country and made possible a large timber business and later settlements.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis Creek
Description:An earlier name for Pike Creek. There were original settlers, named Davis, who came in 1821. (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis Fork
Description:See Pike Creek; also Davis Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dead Man's Cut
Description:A big cut made in the hill near Chilton. When the railroad bed was being made, the workers, in filling in the depressions, used the stumps of trees, as well as dirt and stones. While following the inspector's orders that the stumps all be removed, the men called them "dead men." The name stuck fast. (F. Kelley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dead Man's Hollow
Description:Another name for Watered Hollow (q.v.). The story is told that during the Civil War, James Chilton saw two soldiers and a civilian go up the valley toward a cave. Soon the soldiers returned without the man. (Mr. & Mrs. R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Devil's Horn Hollow
Description:See Fool Catch Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Devil's Run
Description:A hollow in Kelley Township. Leads into Big Barren from the north. Probably the name was given because of "rough necks" or possibly for the topography of the country. Both reasons seem quite plausible. There are great hills, narrow gulches, boulders, and cataracts in this section. (Mr. & Mrs. J. Lewis; Mrs. J. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Devil's Run Creek
Description:In Jackson Township. A small southern tributary of Big Brushy Creek. Some of the informants attribute the name to the topography of the country and the swiftness of the stream; others to the unethical elements in its society. One story is that during the earlier hunting days, one hunter upon returning at night to the camp and being questioned as to where he had been, answered that he had been on the devil's run. One elderly informant said he didn't know why the name unless it was such a rough place socially; there was an old saying for pastime: "Go down devil's run by hell's kitchen to ole Miss Green's." He then remarked about the steep hills and valleys. (Rev. H .H. Stratton; A.W. Link; H.D. Condray; J.J. Chilton; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Devil's Run School
Description:In Jackson Township. Named for the stream nearby. (H.D. Condray; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dick Sanders Hollow
Description:Into North Prong of Little Black River, north of Grandin. Richard Sanders owned land there. (Rev. H.H. Smelser)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dildine Gin
Description:As early as 1865, a Mr. Dildine operated a small cotton gin and grist mill near the headwaters of Beaver Dam Creek on the old Doniphan and Greenfield road. The mill was run by horse tread. (Sam McPheeters)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doyle Branch
Description:A small branch of Ten Mile Creek in Johnson Township. Andrew J. Doyle, one of the sons of an earlier settler, lived there during the Civil War. (J. Lehr; R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dresser Spring
Description:A large spring at the Midco (q.v.) ruins. Long before the Civil War a Dr. Dresser had a water grist mill here. Later known as Peck Spring for the brothers: George, Seth, Frank, and Albert Peck, of Geneva, Illinois, who early in 1900 bought from the Missouri Land and Lumber Company 23,000 acres of land (now a part of the Fristoe Unit) for a ranch which was never developed to any extent. Later known as Busick Spring for E.H. Busick, attorney of Kansas City, who was the manager for the Midco Plant. Now known as Midco Spring, for the Midco plant and village. (Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Hill School
Description:In west Jackson Township. It is a descriptive name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Hollow
Description:Leads into Big Barren Creek from the south in Kelley Township. A descriptive name. (A.C. Randel; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Valley
Description:A long, wide valley of Pike Township, leading into Pike Creek from the south. There is not a spring in the valley, and it is all now in farms. Earlier it was drained by a considerable stream, called Dry Creek, which is only a wet weather stream. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Jaco; Mr. & Mrs. C. Samples)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Valley Camp
Description:In the vicinity of Dry Valley School; also known by the name Poca Hollow Camp (q.v.). Both are names of the valley. One of the timber camps for the Grandin Mills was located here. (J. McGhee; J.J. Chilton; L. Jaco)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Valley Cemetery
Description:About one mile from Dry Valley School. It took the name of the valley (q.v.). (J.J. Chilton; L. Jaco)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Valley Creek
Description:See Dry Valley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Valley School
Description:One of the oldest schools. In Pike Township, in the valley whose name it adopted. When the log house was replaced in the early 1880s by a frame building, Reverend S.D. Biffle, who had a son in Yale at the time, suggested the name Yale School. During the timber days, the school was large, employing two teachers. Both names persisted for some years, but gradually the name for the valley proved more acceptable, and the name Yale is only a memory. (Mr. & Mrs. L. Jaco; Mr. & Mrs. R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eastwood
Description:A discontinued post office and village in northeast Kelley Township. About 1905, William W.G. Helm bought 150,000 acres of cut over timber land in the county. He and R.H. Eastwood formed a company for the purpose of "colonizing the section." The town was laid off August 23, 1910, by Edna T. Helm and William Helm, and named for R.R. Eastwood. The village grew to a population of three hundred, but now there is only a store and filling station with a few small homes. After some speculation they sold to the Munger Land Company of Kansas City in 1913. See Oak Lodge. (F. Kelley; R.D. Condray; C. Samples; A. Rinchey; Postal Guide; 1913-1923; Plat of County)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eastwood Cemetery
Description:Near the village, the name of which it acquired.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eastwood School
Description:In northeast Kelley Township. Practically all that remains of the village. (R.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eighteen Mile Creek
Description:See Big Barren Creek
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ellis Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church five miles north of Freemont, established 1878 and named for Joseph Ellis, a prominent member active in community welfare. (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ellsinore
Description:A small town in northeast Johnson Township, on the Frisco Railroad, laid out by Charles Herrin and Millie Herrin, his wife, on their farm, February 21, 1889. It has had a post office sine 1890. Informants differ as to the origin of the name. One (Mr. Hinchy) believes it was named by the civil engineer of the railroad, Major Brooks, for the town of Elsinore in Denmark, the setting of Shakespeare's HAMLET. This is a plausible explanation, for there are several other American Elsinores, evidently named by Shakespeare lovers. Another (Rev. W.H. Stratton) maintains that it was named for Elsie and Nora Pace, daughters of Joseph Pace, who lived nearby and according to Judge Deem, taught school there. This method of coining a name by compounding two or more is also very common in Missouri. It is possible that both explanations are correct; someone like the village schoolteacher might well have noticed that when the girls' names were put together they happened to form the place-name made famous by Shakespeare. A double origin of this sort would be an example of the process known as "contamination." Still a third view, held by Mr. Smith and Mr. Chilton, is that the place took its name from the daughter of Louis Houck, who presumably bore the name of Elsinore, but confirmatory details are lacking. None of the explanations account for the original spelling of the name with a double "l" an orthography preserved by the railroad station, although the postal authorities have corrected it to Elsinore. The precise source must remain uncertain until more facts can be obtained. (Postal Guide; I.J. Chilton; C. Hunter; J. Smith; A Hinchey; Judge B. Deem; Rev. H.H. Stratton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elm Branch
Description:A southern tributary of Big Brushy Creek in Jackson Township. Named for the timber growing abundantly there. In the valley was located Elm Branch Camp, one of the team camps of the Grandin Mills, and Elm Branch School, both adopting the name of the stream. (J.J. Chilton; J.N. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elm Branch Camp
Description:See Elm Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elm Branch School
Description:See Elm Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elm Spring
Description:A good spring just across Current River from Chilton (q.v.). A large elm tree over-shaded the spring in the earlier days. (Mrs. Mary J. Wallace; F. Kelley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elsinore
Description:See Ellsinore.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Evans
Description:See Owl Roost Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Evelyn Cemetery
Description:In the Green Settlement, three miles southwest of Fremont. John L. Green named it for his wife Evelyn, and endowed it with a $500 government bond with loan stipulations, making the county court trustee. (R.L. Coleman; H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Flowing Springs
Description:See Twin Springs on Galbraith farm.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fool Catch Camp
Description:One of the logging camps, situated in Fool Catch Hollow. (J.N. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fool Catch Hollow
Description:A long, very crooked valley southeast of Fremont leading into Big Barren Creek. There are two prongs of the hollow that converge in such matter that a person, in going down the one prong, is unaware that he follows the second, and instead of arriving at Big Barren as he intended, he comes to the hills at the head of the second prong. Sometimes called Devil's Horn Hollow, with much the same implication. (J.B. Gibson; J.N. Sparks; Mr. & Mrs. J.H. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Forrest City
Description:A town on paper only, for Section 19 in Jackson Township. On June 30, 1887, E.F. Willis of Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio, appeared before the Notary Norris G. Harlow of the...[remaining text unavailable]
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Frazier Mill
Description:See Mill Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Free Union Church
Description:A General Baptist Church, organized by Reverend H.H. Stratton in the Elm Branch Schoolhouse in the late 1880s. A house was erected near the mouth of Elm Branch (q.v.). As the building was to be open for denomination, Reverend Stratton suggested this name. The church dwindled to a few who later built a church about two miles northwest of the original location. (Rev. H.H. Stratton; H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Freeland
Description:A discontinued post office, one of the first established in the county, was kept in farm homes in the northeast part of Johnson Township. One postmaster, if not the first, was Andrew Patterson, a pioneer settler on Cane Creek. The fact that the homestead act had recently been passed and there was here so much free land probably suggested the name. (J. McGhee; J.J. Chilton; C. Hunter; F.L. Campbell Gaz. of Missouri (1874) 118; Postal Guide 1876-1917)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Freeland School
Description:In northeast Johnson Township. It took the name of the post office. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fremont
Description:A town on Highway 60 and the Frisco Railroad in Pike Township. Formerly the place was known simultaneously by two names: Peggy (q.v.), the post office, and McDonald (q.v.), the railroad station. In order to prevent confusion, soon after the Frisco acquired possession of the railroad, this name, suggested by the local Frisco agent, E.E. Dinger, was accepted by both the United States Postal Department and the railroad officials. David Eaton explains in the MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW that the name was given for the "Pathfinder," John C. Fremont (1813-1890) a son-in-law of Thomas R. Benton. I believe the following explanation gives the true origin, because my informant Mr. Mills, is the son-in-law of the man concerned. Mr. Mills says that his father-in-law, A. Jackie Freeman who had come to this community from North Carolina in 1870, put in a sawmill here soon after the railroad was built to this place in 1887 and operated it for several years. There is a small mountain north of the town. The name, declares Mr. Mills, was formed by compounding the first syllable of Freeman's name with "-mont," for the topography. (MISSOURI HIST. REV. (July 1916) 272; Mrs. J.H. Mills; Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland; Postal Guide and maps 1910- 1941)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fristoe Unit of the U.S. Forest
Description:It includes northeastern Oregon, southeastern Shannon, southwestern Carter, and northwestern Ripley counties. Mr., Bailey thinks that a Mr. Fristoe was a commissioned officer in the Civil War, and the name probably came from him. Mr. Sollars, who had much experience during the timber days in this section says that J.W. Fristoe was a partner of the Moss Tie Company that worked off the inferior oak timber in this section of the Ozarks. By his marriage to the widow of the former company president, Thomas J. Moss, Mr. Fristoe became the president of the company. He died in 1933. It seems most probable, as Mr. Sollars thinks, that the name was given for this company executive. (E. Bailey; W. Heiskell; J.A. Sollars)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Galbraith Cemetery
Description:An old burial ground in Henpeck Valley (q.v.). Originally it was known as the Baker Graveyard, for Nathaniel Baker, who settled the land in 1829. Some years later Andrew McElmurray owned land near and the cemetery held his name for years. In 1869 Thomas Galbraith came from Tennessee and settled land in the valley near the burial ground. His grandson, Samuel Galbraith, lives on the farm. (W.N. Baker; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Galbraith Mill
Description:See Mill Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Garden Switch
Description:An earlier name for Orchard Switch (q.v.). Here an elderly man, Ennis Agers, started a little farm of twenty acres, where he grew a variety of fruits. Doubtless the name was given for the fruit gardens. Later the larger orchards were developed. (J.A. Sollars)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gay Fork
Description:See North Prong of Carter Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:George's Graveyard
Description:An old burial ground in Carter Township near the old mill site on Mill Creek. The first persons buried here were some members of John George's family. See Mill Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:George's Mill
Description:See Mill Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gooseneck Hollow
Description:A long, narrow, partly bluff-walled valley, heading near Eastwood and leading into Current River. The shape of its curve suggested the name. (C. Sample; W.N. Baker)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grandin
Description:A small town in Johnson Township on the Frisco Railroad and North Prong of Little Black River. About 1885, the Missouri Lumber and Mining Company established here one of the largest lumber mills in the state. The president, John B. White, was influential in getting the Kansas City Company to extend the railroad on to this place. The mill town grew until there was a population of over 2000 in the timber days. The fine timber lands were bought in many cases at $1 per acre. The town was laid out by the Missouri Lumber and Mining Company September 20, 1910, and named for the two main stock holders, E.B. Grandin and George Grandin of Pennsylvania. (J. McGhee; C. Hunter; A. Minchey; Williams HIST. MISSOURI 496; Postal Guide 1889-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grandin Mills
Description:In addition to their large mill at Grandin, the Missouri Lumber and Mining Company had portable mills and camps in various places in the section. All of the mills were generally known as the Grandin Mills. See Grandin.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grandin Switch
Description:Also Junction Switch. The crossing of the Grandin Lumber logging road and the Houck Railroad, four miles west of Ellsinore. Formerly there was a store; now there is nothing but a timber and tie loading switch. (C. Hunter)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Granite Mountain
Description:A name very recently given to Carter Mountain (q.v.) because of the fine building and paving stone there. A Kansas City company sponsored the quarrying which made a good industry near Van Buren for three or four years about 1928. (R.L. Coleman; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grassy Valley
Description:Heads in Jackson Township and leads into Current River southeast of Chilton. The early pioneers gave the name because of the fine grass growing wild making it a good grazing section. (H.D. Condray; A.M. Link)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grassy Valley School
Description:In the valley from which it took its name. About six miles north of Hunter. (H.D. Condray; J. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Green Mountain School
Description:In was situated on the divide three miles southwest of Fremont, with which it was consolidated in 1916. John L. Green, from Tennessee, who owned land and lived near was influential in getting it established. (J.J. Chilton; H.D. Condray; J.J. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grisham Graveyard
Description:In the Dry Hill School district. Before the Civil War, Andrew G. Grisham and his four sons-- George, William, David, and Joseph--came from New York and settled along Big Brushy Creek. A number of the family are buried here. (J.J. Chilton; A.M. Link; Rev. H.H. Stratton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grubb's Graveyard
Description:On land near the home of Harry Grubb. See Phillips Springs.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Grubb's Springs
Description:See Phillips Springs.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gum Spring
Description:In Holland Valley that leads into Grassy Valley (q.v.). It was walled in with a wooden gum casing. Now called Holland Spring for Richard Holland, who owned it until his death in 1931. (Rev. H.H. Stratton; A.M. Link)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ham Store
Description:A small rural store and filling station on Highway 60, three miles northeast of Van Buren, established in April, 1935 by M.C. Ham. (F.E. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hanna
Description:A post office near Elm Branch (q.v.), kept in the home of Joseph Hanna about 1892 to 1896. (H.D. Condray; J.M. Blue)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hardcastle School
Description:See Hickory Grove School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hay Hollow
Description:Another name for Little Pike Valley (q.v.). So named because of the blue stem grass that grew wild so abundantly. People of the community would mow the grass which made fine winter forage. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hell Hollow
Description:Leads into Current River from the west. Phillips Spring (q.v.) is located here. Perhaps named for an early settler. (J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Henpeck Creek
Description:It heads in Reynolds County and flows into Current River in the northern part of Carter Township. Mr. Hinchey explained that there is a tradition that the stream acquired its name because in that community one of the wives was "boss." Mr. Chilton, whose ancestors lived in that part of the county, told the following story. "At Woods Mill lived two families whose daughters were courted by the mill hands and by young men from the Sugar Creek neighborhood. The two young men from Sugar Creek, eventually successful in inducing the young ladies to marry them, were teased by their former rivals, who called them henpecked." Thus "Sugar Creek" became "Henpeck Creek." (A. Hinchey; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Henpeck School
Description:In northern Carter Township, near the stream whose name it took when it was established in 1868. When a good stone building was erected years afterward for church and school, the name was changed. See Clear Springs School. (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Henson Cemetery
Description:The burial ground for Ellsinore and community, near Hill Top (q.v.). The land was given in the early 1880s by L. Benton Henson who homesteaded there as early as 1880. (J. Lehr; J. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hickory Grove School
Description:In the southern part of Kelley Township, located in a beautiful grove of black hickory timber. It is sometimes known as Lower Barren School because of its location about four miles from the mouth of Big Barren Creek. When the first house was built in 1887, one and a half miles northwest of the present location, it was named Hardcastle School for James Hardcastle, a farmer and landowner of the community. About 1891 it was moved to the Tabor Mill (q.v.), two miles north of its present site, where it took the name of the mill, but it was also known as Barren School for Big Barren Creek nearby. In 1899, it was moved to its present location where it was given its new name, "Hickory Grove." (J. Lewis; H.D. Condray; )
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hickory Hill Church
Description:In 1933, the Missionary Baptists, some of whom came from Mount Carmel Church (q.v.), organized under Reverend J.A. Duncan and bought the old Hickory Hill School house (q.v.), transferring the name to their new church. (J.P. Boyer; J. Lehr)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hickory Hill School
Description:Established in the early 1880s, three miles west of Hunter. Discontinued and consolidated with Hunter in 1915. Descriptive of the timber and topography. (H.D. Condray; J.P. Boyer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hill Top
Description:The highest elevation along the Frisco Railroad between Ellsinore and Williamsville, about one and a half miles east of Ellsinore. Also known as Hill Top Switch. When trains were heavily loaded during the timber days, it was necessary to divide the train at this place, take over one-half of the load, and return for the remainder. (J.M. Blue; A.M. Link)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hill Top Switch
Description:See Hill Top.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hixon Mill
Description:See Mill Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hog Hollow
Description:Leads into Big Barren Creek in Kelley Township from the northwest of Eastwood. Probably many hogs were raised there. Mr. Brame declares that the wild hogs of the early days had bristles on their sharp backs that remind one of perch fish. (Mr. & Mrs. C. Sample; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hogan Hollow
Description:It leads into Cane Creek (q.v.). The name of an early family there. Hogan Hollow School, in the hollow, twelve miles southeast of Ellsinore, is not one of the oldest schools. (H.D. Condray; Mrs. R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hogan Hollow School
Description:In Johnson Township, twelve miles southeast of Ellsinore. It took the name of the hollow in which it is located. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Holland
Description:The first name for Fremont (q.v.). While the railroad was being built, reaching this place in 1887, James Holland operated a store and kept the post office, officially known as Peggy (q.v.). Because there was already a Holland, Missouri, in Pemiscott County, this name could not be given officially when the town was laid out, and the name McDonald (q.v.), was given for the railroad station. (Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland; Mr. & Mrs. J.H. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Holland Spring
Description:See Gum Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Homestead
Description:A post office and large farm in the extreme southeast part of Johnson Township. In the late 1800s W.S. Windsor from St. Louis, a building contractor, made a "homestead" for himself here: he bought four hundred acres of land, built a good house, started a large orchard, and kept a small farm supply store at this home. A post office was kept in the store for a short time. The farm now belongs to W.R. Brown. (J. Smith; J. McGhee; J.M. Blue; Mrs. R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hooper Branch
Description:Heads northwest of Grandin and flows into Little Black River. George and Ennis Hooper entered land here before the Civil War. (Rev. H.H. Smelser; Mrs. Mary J. Wallace; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hooper Valley
Description:See Aldrich Valley.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hoskins Graveyard
Description:The family burial ground started during the Civil War by Washington Hoskins, whose daughter was the first person buried there. About two miles south of Carter Creek School. See Hoskins Valley. (Miss Leona Hoskins; Mrs. Edith Crist; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hoskins Store
Description:Soon after the Civil War Washington Hoskins established a good general store near Carter Creek School and operated it for several years. See Hoskins Valley. (T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hoskins Valley
Description:Long before the Civil War Washington Hoskins owned much of the land along the upper part of Carter Creek, which was locally known by this name. (T J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:House's Creek
Description:A small stream in Carter Township, flowing from the southwest into Current River about two miles north of Van Buren. Matthew House, who was born in Germany, came from Tennessee in 1818, the first settler on this stream. Reaching the east bank of Current River the House family crossed over in their wagon and landed among the Indians. This crossing about two miles north of Van Buren is known as House's Ford. (J.J. Chilton; T.J. Brame; W.N. Baker; H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:House's Creek Graveyard
Description:Near the school. Named for the stream. (J.J. Chilton; H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:House's Creek School
Description:In northwest Carter Township near the stream which name it adopted. Used for school and church, formerly Methodists, but now most of the people are Pentecost. (H.D. Condray; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:House's Ford
Description:See House's Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hunter
Description:A small town on the Frisco Railroad in west Johnson Township. Established by George Nettleton October 27, 1888. The town was laid out by the Missouri Lumber and Mining Company May 8, 1891 and August 18, 1891. The name was given for L.L. Hunter, the secretary of the corporation. (J. McGhee; County Plat; Postal Guide 1900-)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Indian Ford
Description:The old crossing of Current River, just south of Chilton, where the Indians waded across in low water time. The old Indian trail is still followed by persons on foot or horseback from this ford through Aldrich Valley to Van Buren. (J.J. Chilton; F. Kelley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jackson Township
Description:The northeast division of the county just as it was in 1873. The source of the township name has not been ascertained. The fact that Van Buren (q.v.), the county seat, was named for one president, and Johnson Township, the adjoining township, may have been named for another, suggests the possibility that Jackson Township was named for President Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), who had many warm admirers in Missouri.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jerome
Description:A post office, named for Jerome J. Kintz, a lawyer and at one time prosecuting attorney of the county, who while a teacher at Cross Roads School, had the post office in his home southwest of Van Buren about five miles. (R.L. Coleman; Postal Guide 1886- 1888)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Joan Spur
Description:A timber center on the Frisco Railroad, one mile north of Chilton, established and named by the railroad officials about 1915. The Dunn brothers operated a sawmill and Joe Graham bought ties. R.L. Coleman operated a ferry on Current River near for a time. The source of the name has not been ascertained. It looks like a girl's name. (R.L. Coleman; F. Kelley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson Township
Description:In the southeast corner of the county. It was formed from Kelley Township shortly after 1873. It may have been a local family name, for there are a number of Johnsons in this section. For the possibility, however, that it was named for President Andrew Johnson (1808-1875), see above under Jackson Township. It was formed just about the time of the ex-president's death, which would have been a natural time to honor him; and townships are more often named for men of national reputation than places of any other class.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jones Branch
Description:A northern tributary of Pike Creek in western Pike Township. Richard Jones owned land here years ago. Also, later, William Jones owned the farm here when the Jones Hollow Camp of the Grandin Mills was established here in 1902. Store No. 7 was at this camp. (J.J. Chilton; J.N. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jones Hollow
Description:For William Jones. See Jones Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jones Hollow Camp
Description:See Jones Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Joplin Church
Description:A defunct General Baptist Church, the site of which is known by the Joplin Graveyard, about four miles southwest of Ellsinore. It was organized as early as 1867, and took the name of a prominent member and landowner, A.G. Joplin, who had lived there for years, having settled there before the Civil War. (Rev. H.H. Smelser; Mr. & Mrs. J. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Joplin Graveyard
Description:The first person buried there was a member of A.G. Joplin's family. See Joplin Church. (Mr. & Mrs. J. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Joplin Store
Description:Before the Civil War A.G. Joplin kept a store in his farm home. They hauled the goods from Cape Girardeau. See Joplin Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Junction Switch
Description:See Grandin Switch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:June Switch
Description:In Jackson Township on the Frisco Railroad. It looks like a girl's name; cf. Joan Spur.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kansas City Club House
Description:See Club House.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Keeney Corner
Description:A grocery store, lunchroom, and Conoco filling station in Jackson Township at the junctions of highways 21 and 34. It was established by Samuel Keeney about 1925. Now owned by Fred Darnell and James Howard of Ellsinore, but the name has not been changed except as it is occasionally known locally as The Junction. Operated by Ray Miller. (Ray Miller)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kegville
Description:On Highway 60 about halfway between Van Buren and Fremont. Named Midway, but generally known by its acquired name. About 1929 Mr. James Hedgepeth put in a small store here and bought ties, so a sort of tie camp grew up. Whiskey was smuggled in and accordingly the owner was known as "Keg." Mr. and Mrs. J. Holland explain that all they had in the store for chairs were nail kegs. (R.L. Coleman; J.J. Chilton; Mr. & Mrs. J. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelley Fork
Description:In Jackson Township. Flows into Big Brushy Creek. Named for an early settler. A sawmill village grew up here known as Woodville for the mill owner, A Mr. Wood from St. Louis. (Mr. & Mrs. J. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelley Graveyard
Description:See Kelley Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelley Hollow
Description:Leads from near Grandin into Current River in Kelley Township. One of Isaac Kelley's sons settled there. (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelley Mill
Description:A grist mill about eight miles south of Chilton on Current River operated by Charles Kelley before the Civil War. Soon after the Civil War Harry Johnson bought it and put in a sawmill also. (Mrs. Mary Wallace)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelley Spring
Description:In Kelley Township south of Chilton on the west side of Current River. Isaac E. Kelley of Tennessee, entered one hundred-sixty acres of land and made the first settlement in this part of the county in 1817. The Kelley Graveyard near is said to be the oldest burial ground in the county. It is about two miles south of Chilton on the Kelley homestead. (Mr. & Mrs. L.E. Dell; F. Kelley; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelley Township
Description:It now includes the southwest, the southeast, and the central part of the county. In 1873 it also included what is now Johnson Township (q.v.). Some think it was named for Marion Kelley who had settled east of Current River; others, for Isaac Kelley the early settler. See Kelley Spring. Mr. Fred Kelley, a grandson of Isaac Kelley, says it was named for Isaac Kelley. (J. Lewis; F. Kelley; Mrs. Mary Wallace)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kinnard School
Description:Established about 1907, two miles southwest of Van Buren. George Kinnard, descendant of early settlers, gave the land for the school. (J.J. Chilton; R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kirby Graveyard
Description:An old burial ground in Johnson Township about four miles southeast of Ellsinore. Named for Rosin Kirby on whose farm it was started. (J. Smith; H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:La Riviere Courante
Description:See Current River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Larmore Spring
Description:In Clay Hollow (q.v.). In 1924, Walter Larmore built a house for his home near the spring, on land belonging to Mr. Donald Crites. (Mrs. D. Crites)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lattie Valley
Description:Leads into Carter Creek about one and a half miles from its mouth in Kelley Township. Andrew Lattie settled there before the Civil War. (T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Leach
Description:A post office established by Henry Hardin in his home four miles south of Ellsinore and named for his neighbor, James Leach, a farmer and landowner. The mail was carried by horse from Mill Springs in Wayne County. Discontinued when Ellsinore was established. (J. Smith; J. Lehr; Postal Guide 1887-1888)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lead Hollow
Description:See Bryant Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lee
Description:Andrew Potterson kept the post office in his home one mile northeast of the site of Grandin. He named it for Daniel Lee, a merchant of Doniphan. The mail was carried by horse from Doniphan by this post office to Van Buren. Discontinued when Grandin (q.v.) was established. (Rev. H.H. Smelser; C. Hunter; P.L. 1883 Polk, 90; Postal Guide 1886-1889)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lick Log Hollow
Description:Heads near Eastwood and leads into Current River northeast of Bark Camp Creek. The early settlers bored holes in logs into which they put salt to entice the deer. Later stock raisers used the same method for salting cattle on the range. (J.J. Chilton; J. Lewis; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Brushy Creek
Description:Heads in Johnson Township and flows northeast into Big Brushy Creek. Descriptive name. (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Devil's Run Branch
Description:See Big Devil's Run Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Pike Valley
Description:Leads from southwest Pike Township northeast into Pike Creek. Fremont is situated in the lower part of the valley. (Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Long Hollow
Description:Enters Pike Creek from the south near Kegville (q.v.). One of the longest valleys. (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Cave
Description:See Titanic Cave.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Man's Cave
Description:See Titanic Cave.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lower Barren School
Description:See Hickory Grove School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lower Carter's Creek School
Description:Located southeast of Van Buren, in the lower part of Carter Creek Valley. One of the older schools. It consolidated with Van Buren School in 1916. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lower Ten Mile School
Description:In northeast Johnson Township. The name signifies its position on Ten Mile Creek. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lowe's Chapel
Description:See Bear Camp Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Malden Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township, leading into Big Barren Creek from the south. During the 1870s two brothers, Ennis and John Malden lived there. (Mr. & Mrs. J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Manilla Camp
Description:One of the camps, also known as Camp Three, of the Grandin timber industry, situated south of Grandin. Since it was established in the late 1890s, doubtless it was named for Manilla, capital of the Phillippine Islands, and scene of military action during the Spanish American War. (J.N. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Marsh Mill
Description:See Mill Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mary Long Hollow
Description:It leads into Ten Mile Creek. Mary Long, possibly widow of Samuel Long who lived there and was killed during the Civil War, lived there for years. (J.H. Lehr)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McDonald
Description:The earlier railroad station name for Fremont (q.v.). The eastern part was laid out by James and Peggy Snyder April 25, 1888; the remainder by George and Julia A. Nettleton (see Chicopee) July 10, 1888. Named for Dr. John McDonald who owned a farm and lived there. The name was given by officials of the Kansas City, Fort Scott, and Memphis Railroad which was built to this place in 1887. (R.L. Coleman; Mr. & Mrs. J.H. Mills; County Plat; Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McElmurry Graveyard
Description:See Galbraith Cemetery.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McKinney School
Description:An old school southwest of Grandin, named for Thomas McKinney who operated sawmills in Carter and Ripley Counties. Later the name was changed to Oak Grove for the oak forest near. Now consolidated with Grandin School. (Rev. H.H. Smelser; H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McRone Graveyard
Description:About one mile east of Grandin. An old family name. (Rev. H.H. Smelser; F. Kelley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McSpadden Hollow
Description:Leads into Chilton's Creek, in the vicinity of Short (q.v.). In 1912 or 1914 Frank McSpadden had a sawmill there. (Mr. & Mrs. R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midco
Description:A village and post office of short, but vivid life that grew up about two miles north of Fremont near Peck Spring (q.v.) during the first World War. Shortly preceding the entrance of the United States into the war, a Kansas City Company, known as the Mid Continent Iron Company was formed for the purpose of producing war supplies. In 1914 Midco Plant, abbreviated form of the company name, was erected and E.H. Busick was made manager. Charcoal, wood alcohol, and pig iron were produced. Then in full blast, the plant used as much as 240 cords of four foot oak wood a day. Some local iron ore was used, but trainloads of Michigan ore were shipped in. A railroad track was extended out to the plant and camps from Fremont, a large hotel was erected, and the population was thought to have reached 3000. The school soon grew to be a two-year high school, and ninety were enrolled in the first grade. Many investors became bankrupt. The government took control and invested large sums during the war. Little now remains but the old ruins and the tall chimney of the old smelter. The post office, Midco, named for the plant, was established prior to 1918. (Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland; F. Kelley; H.D. Condray; Postal Guide 1918-1932)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midco Plant
Description:See Midco.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midco School
Description:A large but short-lived school established near the Midco plant, for which it is named. Consolidated with Fremont about 1920. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midco Spring
Description:See Dresser Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Middle Barren School
Description:See Bristol School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Middle Brushy Creek
Description:Heads in Jackson Township and empties into Big Brushy Creek near Williamsville, Wayne County. Named for its position between Big Brushy Creek (q.v.) and Little Brushy Creek (q.v.). (J.J. Chilton; J. Lehr)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Middle Prong of Cane Creek
Description:See Cane Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midway
Description:See Kegville.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Branch
Description:Into North Prong of Little Black River near Grandin. Before the Civil War John Hixon operated a grist mill here. (Rev. H.H. Smelser)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek [1 of 2]
Description:Heads in Shannon County and empties into Current River in Carter Township. Named for the water power grist mill and sawmill set up near its mouth about 1830 by John George. He sold to John Woods who operated it for many years. Thomas A. Galbraith bought it soon after the Civil War and made considerable improvements. After a number of years, Alvin Marsh of New York bought it. He discontinued the sawmill but improved the grist mill by putting in a turbine wheel, quite an improvement over the old paddle wheel. He sold to Donald Frazier of Tennessee who in turn sold to James M. Russell from whom Noah Clark bought it. Later Thomas Chilton, and then James F. Baker owned it. Later Henry Gassaway operated it for a few years, when it was abandoned in the early 1890s, but it seems not to have taken his name. (J.J. Chilton; Wm. N. Baker)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek [2 of 2]
Description:An old post office at Woods Mill, which see. Also see Mill Creek, the stream from which it was doubtless named. It is shown on an 1850 map. (P.L. Hayward (1853) 826; P.L. Goodwin & West (1867) 49)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek Camp
Description:This camp and store No. 5 of the Grandin Mills were located in the upper part of Mill Creek valley in Pike Township about 1901. (J.N. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek School
Description:In Pike Township near the stream that bears its name. (H.D. Condray; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Spring Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township. Leads into Big Barren Creek from the north. Soon after the Civil War, Walker Neal operated a grist mill at the spring. (Mrs. J.H. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Montay
Description:A post office from 1911-1913 in the vicinity of Eastwood. Nothing could be ascertained about the source of the name. (Postal Guide 1911- 1913)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Carmel Cemetery
Description:See Mount Carmel Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Carmel Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church organized in the home of Anderson Boyer February, 1894, by Rev. H.H. Smelser. Soon the house was erected three and a half miles east of Hunter. Mrs. William Boyer suggested the Bible name, the place where Elijah proved to the prophets of Baal the power of God. Mount Carmel, in Palestine, is a mountain ridge twelve miles long; it juts out into the Mediterranean Sea about 1700 feet above sea level. The word means a fruitful place. The cemetery of the same name is near the church. The school nearby took the name of the church. It is now consolidated with Hunter. (J.P. Boyer; J.H. Lehr; I Kings 18: Indexed Bible, p. lxviii)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Carmel School
Description:See Mount Carmel Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Jefferson
Description:A high elevation on Current River and Highway 60 on the edge of Van Buren on the right of the river. It was probably named for President Thomas Jefferson . One can readily agree with McCanse, who says, "The panorama it commands of the Current River basin is one of the most inspiring of the entire Ozarks." Current River Lodge, a modern family resort, is located here. (McCanse, 64)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mud Hollow
Description:Leads into Current River from near Eastwood. A descriptive name. (Mr. & Mrs. C. Sample)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Muddy Branch
Description:A small stream leading into Henpeck Creek. Store No. 9 of the Grandin Mills was here for a short time. A descriptive name. (J.N. Sparks; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nelson Hollow
Description:See Bryant Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Hope Church
Description:A General Baptist Church organized about 1920. The house was built about one mile from the old Joplin Graveyard and site of the old Joplin Church, defunct for a number of years. An ideal name. (J.F. Boyer; Mr. & Mrs. J. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Hope School
Description:Situated two miles east of Fremont. The school was consolidated with Fremont in 1917, and the house was bought by the community to be used for funerals, church, and community activities. An idealistic name. (J.J. Holland; H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Prospect Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church, organized as early as 1906, very likely in White's Mill Church. The present building was erected about 1911. M.B.G.A. gives the organization date as 1933, but the Minutes of Cane Creek Association show it to have been an active church in 1906. An idealistic name. (Rev. H.H. Smelser; H.D. Condray; Mrs. D. Crites)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Fork of Little Black River
Description:See Little Black River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Prong of Cane Creek
Description:See Cane Creek and North Fork.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Prong of Carter Creek
Description:Formerly known also as Smith Valley for Richard Smith who had entered land there long before the Civil War but left during the war. After the war Samuel Buchanan owned the farm and lived there a number of years. It is still known as Buchanan Valley by his name. South Prong was known as Gsy Fork because some of the people there dressed so much better than the average persons and felt themselves "above common folks." (T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Prong of Little Black River
Description:Heads near Hunter, flows into Ripley County. See Little Black River in Ripley County.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Norwood City
Description:Another paper town only; it was platted for a town eight miles southeast of Hunter by E.F. Willis, June 30, 1887 (cf. Forrest City). Reasons for the proposed name have not been learned. Possibly it was taken from the old Norwood Mill (q.v.), in the northern part of the county, but no connection between the two has come to light.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Norwood Hollow
Description:North of Van Buren. Leads into Henpeck Creek. Named for the mill. Also called Possum Hollow, for the great number of opossums found there. (J. N. Sparks; Wm. N. Baker)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Norwood Hollow Camp
Description:One of the logging camps for the Grandin Mills in Norwood Hollow. (J.N. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Norwood Mill
Description:A grist and lumber mill, set up about 1865, near Henpeck Creek (q.v.). The mill company was composed of Captain A.D. Rose who had come from Fairview, Illinois, and a Mr. Thompson and a Mr. Hewlett. The source of the name has not been ascertained. (Mrs. R.L. Coleman; Mrs. Lizzie Haynes; Wm. N. Baker)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak City
Description:A town only on paper. July 1, 1887, J.M. Bain, and S.B. Bain and his wife of Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio, laid out forty acres in Jackson Township near Crites Creek and filed with Carter County July 12, 1888 when additions were made. Much oak timber grows there. (R.L. Coleman; County Plat)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:See McKinney School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Lodge
Description:A lodge built about 1905 one and a half miles northeast of Eastwood (q.v.), by the Helm Eastwood Company. See Eastwood. A sort of hotel with the capacity of twenty-five persons, and a large barn were built for the purpose of accommodating persons who came to look for lands and home sites, advertised by the company. It was situated in a large grove of oak trees northeast of Eastwood in Kelley Township. The building burned in 1930. (F. Kelley; C. Sample; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Spring
Description:See Oak Spring Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Spring Hollow
Description:In west-central Jackson Township leading into Big Brushy Creek. It took the name of the good spring there. There were white oak trees around the spring. (A.M. Link; Rev. H.H. Stratton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Odel Prong
Description:A southern branch of Big Brushy Creek, in west Jackson Township. Phillip Odell from Tennessee settled here long before the Civil War. (J.J. Chilton; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old Van Buren
Description:See Van Buren.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Orchard
Description:See Orchard Switch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Orchard Switch
Description:A switch near Hill Top, established on the Houck Railroad (now Frisco Railroad) for loading timber. Named for the fine orchard near, started by L. Benton Henson. See Henson Cemetery. Later Jack Mauck owned the farm and increased the apple orchard to one hundred acres in the late 1880s. The post office here, named Orchard, from the switch, existed only a short time. (R.L. Coleman; J.M. Blue; J. Link; Postal Guide 1916-1917)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Owl Roost Mill
Description:A humorous descriptive name for the sawmill operated by a Mr. Evans and a Mr. Russel of Mill Spring, Wayne County. It was set up four miles south of Ellsinore about 1895. The post office established here was named Evans for Mr. Evans. (J.J. Chilton; J. Smith; Postal Guide 1897-1901)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oxstock Hollow
Description:Leads into Henpeck Creek near Norwood Hollow Camp (q.v.). Jacob Angle, living here, set up a blacksmith shop for the purpose chiefly of shoeing the oxen that were used in the logging business here. Stocks were built for fastening the oxen while they were being shod. (Wm. N. Baker; F. Kelley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ozark Handcraft Shop
Description:On Highway 60, thirteen miles southeast of Van Buren. Established February, 1935 by H.H. Blurton who came from Illinois in 1926. Various articles, such as baskets, chairs, etc. are made from oak bark, willow and rattan. Situated in these foothills of the Ozarks. (Mrs. R.R. Blurton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Peck Ranch
Description:See Dresser Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Peck Spring
Description:See Dresser Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Peggy
Description:The original name of the post office at Fremont, while the railroad station was McDonald (q.v.). See Holland also. The post office was established during the middle 1880s and the name suggested by John L. Green for Mrs. Peggy Snyder, the wife of his very close friend Dr. James Snyder, who had come before the Civil War. (J.J. Chilton; Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland; Postal Guide 1889- 1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Phillips Mill
Description:See Phillips Springs.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Phillips Springs
Description:In Kelley Township near the Ripley County line, one-half mile from Current River in Hall Hollow. Henry Phillips, a farmer and landowner, lived here and operated a grist mill soon after the Civil War. He was captain of the Ku Klux Klan. Now owned by Henry Grubb, and sometimes called by his name. (J.J. Holland; J. Lewis; F. Kelley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pike
Description:A post office kept in various homes along Pike Creek. An 1860 map shows it near a region where lead was found; 1865 map gives the name. It was kept for a time by Mrs. Abrigal Barnes in her home two miles north of Fremont, and was moved to Fremont about 1890. No doubt it was named for the stream (q.v.). (Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland; P.L. Hayward (1853) 826; Goodwin & West (1887) 49; Polk (1883) 91; Postal Guide 1886-1890)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pike Creek
Description:Heads in Shannon County. Flows east into Current River near Van Buren. Earlier known as Davis Creek (q.v.). It is shown as Davis Fork on 1850 map, Davis Creek on 1855, and Pike Creek on 1865 and later. Different reasons are given for the name. One story is told that long before the Civil War some people who were traveling through caught some pike fish in the stream and this name struck the settlers. Mr. Kelley suggests the following fact as a possible reason. In May of 1859 or 1860 Rance and William Kelley went to Pike's Peak in an ox wagon, but came back in the fall nearly starved; thus called pikers for two reasons. Another explains that some of the indolent settlers spent most of their time shooting the pike fish and were called pikers from which the stream gradually took its name. These conjectures are obviously mere guesses. Doubtless the stream was named for the fish, as Miss O'Brien concluded in her thesis on the place-names of Shannon County. It seems quite clear that there were pike fish in the stream, which is most likely the reason for the change of name. (F. Kelley; J.J. Chilton; Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pike Township
Description:Includes the northwest and west-central part of the county. Formed about 1892 from Carter Township and named for its main stream. (J.J. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Valley School
Description:In Kelley Township, eight miles south of Fremont. Originally large pine timber grew throughout this section. Sometimes known as Upper Barren School because of its location near the head of this stream. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Site Cemetery
Description:See Pleasant Site Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Site Church
Description:A Methodist Church one mile east of the school for which it was named. A complimentary name which is well deserved; the cemetery at the church is one of the best kept in the county. (Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Site School
Description:In Pike Township four miles west of Fremont. Well improved beautiful surroundings. (Mr. & Mrs. J.J. Holland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poca Hollow
Description:Another name for Dry Valley (q.v.). The old Bellview road, the early pioneer thoroughfare from Ironton, Missouri, the nearest railroad station, to Pocahontas, Arkansas, the head of navigation at that time on Black River, followed this valley. Hence the abbreviated form of Pocahontas. Poca Hollow Camp, one of the Grandin Mill Camps, was here for a time. (J.J. Chilton; J. Lewis; J. N. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poca Hollow Camp
Description:See Dry Valley Camp. Also Poca Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Polecat Hollow
Description:Leads into Big Barren Creek in Kelley Township from the north. These animals were very numerous in the early days. (Mr. & Mrs. J.H. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Possum Hollow
Description:See Norwood Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Richbark Cave
Description:A cave on the Baptist Assembly grounds. In the early 1890s a man by the name of Richbark wanted to buy a good cow belonging to Mrs. A.D. Rhodes. As she refused to sell he killed the cow and hid the meat in this cave. He admitted his crime and was sent to the penitentiary for three years. Some years afterwards he was converted in Kansas and sent back the money to pay for the cow. (Mr. & Mrs. R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rio Corrente
Description:See Current River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Robertson Cemetery
Description:About two miles west of Union Hill Church (q.v.). Jesse Robertson owned the land. (Rev. H.H. Stratton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Roger's Creek
Description:Heads in Shannon County and flows across northern Pike Township into Current River in Carter Township about eight miles north of Van Buren. John Rogers, a hunter and trapper settled on this stream near Current River in 1821. (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Roger's Creek School
Description:One of the younger schools. In Carter Township on the creek for which it was named. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Russell Mill
Description:See Mill Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Scott Graveyard
Description:Near Ten Mile Creek north of Grandin. James Scott settled land there long before the Civil War. (J.N. Blue; J. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Seed Tick Camp
Description:A camp for the Grandin Mills, south of Fremont. A humorous epithet. (J.E. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shaw Patch Hollow
Description:A small hollow leading from the east into Carter Creek. A man by the name of Shaw cleared a little place for a cabin some years after the Civil War and lived there for a time. (T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Short
Description:A flag station on the Frisco Railroad. The road workers' camp was there in 1887. Named for William Short, a farmer who owned the land. (J.J. Chilton; F. Kelley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sinking Branch
Description:Campbell's map 1873 gives this name for what is now known as Little Pike Valley (q.v.). The stream is dry except just after a rain. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sinking Creek
Description:See Big Barren Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sisco
Description:A settlement in northeast Jackson Township. One of the family was a justice of the peace and had the post office for a short time. It is shown on the map of 1907. (J.J. Chilton; R.L. Coleman; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Smith Valley
Description:See North Prong of Carter Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Smith's Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church established four miles south of Ellsinore about 1894. The site was donated by Mr. and Mrs. James Smith, now of Hunter (q.v.), who lived near. (J.P. Boyer; Mr. & Mrs. J. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Prong of Cane Creek
Description:See Cane Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Prong of Carter Creek
Description:See North Prong of Carter Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:South Van Buren
Description:This part of the town was platted by the Missouri Lumber and Mining Company about 1910, but never incorporated. (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railway
Description:The St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company now owns all the roads in these five counties except the "Cairo Branch" and the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Hence the present name, locally known as "The Frisco." It was taken, of course, from the terminal cities.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Still House Hollow
Description:Leads from south of Eastwood into Cave Fork. It was an old whiskey joint headquarters. (Mr. & Mrs. C. Sample)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Store No. 5
Description:See Mill Creek Camp.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Store No. 7
Description:See Jones Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Store No. 9
Description:See Muddy Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sugar Creek
Description:See Henpeck Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sunny Side
Description:The northern addition to Van Buren. Platted by Thomas C. Brown October 10, 1887. This residential section is on a slope of a hill getting full benefit of the sun. (Mrs. R.L. Coleman; Plat)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Swift Water
Description:See Current River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tabor Mill
Description:A Mr. Tabor set up and operated a timber mill on Big Barren Creek about 1889. The school nearby took the name of the mill. (J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tabor Mill School
Description:See Tabor Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Team Camp [1 of 2]
Description:Another name by which Carter's Creek Camp (q.v.) in the Brame Settlement was often known. Cf. Team Camp in Pike Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Team Camp [2 of 2]
Description:One of the logging camps for the Missouri Land and Lumber Company in Pike Township on Roger's Creek. Mules were kept here for the work. Another such camp was in the Brame Settlement (q.v.), known also as Carter's Creek Camp, for the stream nearby. (J.N. Sparks; T.J. Brame; Mrs. E. Crist)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tedder Graveyard
Description:On land now owned by Oscar Tedder. Also known as Brame Graveyard in the Brame Settlement (q.v.), for John M. Brame, who owned the land and was the first one buried there. (Mrs. Edith Crist; T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ten Mile Creek
Description:Heads northeast of Hunter in Johnson Township and flows into Cane Creek in Butler County. Named for its length. (Rev. H.H. Stratton; A.M. Link; Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Frisco
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railway.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Junction
Description:See Keeney Corner.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Titanic Cave
Description:A large cave, named for its size, near Cave Camp (q.v.), the entrance of which is upon the hill, not easily found by one unacquainted with the vicinity. One enters the cave by a ladder. Hence it is also known as Lost Cave and Lost Man's Cave. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tolliver Pond
Description:On land belonging to a Mr. Tolliver who lived there before the mills were put up at Grandin. See White's Pond. (J.N. Sparks)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tower Mountain
Description:Near Eastwood. Upon it is located a government tower, erected in 1935. (C. Sample)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turley School
Description:The old school that later developed into the Midco School (q.v.). For William Turley, an early settler who owned land near. His son, Carl Turley, still lives on the farm. (H.D. Condray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Twin Springs [1 of 2]
Description:Two springs of average size on the Samuel Galbraith farm in Henpeck Creek vicinity. Because the water flows boldly, or bubbles out, from these springs at irregular intervals, they are also known as Flowing Springs. (J.J. Chilton; L.E. Dell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Twin Springs [2 of 2]
Description:The two large springs generally known as Phillips Spring (q.v.) (L.E. Dell; J. Lewis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Union Hill Church
Description:A General Baptist Church in Jackson Township, near Crommer Town School. In the early 1880s the Missionary Baptists and the General Baptists built a little box house upon a hill one and a half miles from the present location. Reverend R.R. Stratton suggested the idealistic name. When in 1904 the church was moved to its present location it came to be known as the Crommer Town Church for the school near. The organization was still Union Church. In 1934 an unusually good building was erected by the community and any denomination uses the house. (H.D. Condray; Rev. H.H. Stratton; A.M. Link)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Upper Barren School
Description:See Pine Valley School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Upper Ten Mile School
Description:In north-central Johnson Township. Named for its position on Ten Mile Creek. Also called Mount Carmel School for the church near. (H.D. Condray; J.H. Lehr)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vail Spring
Description:Houck mentions this as being below Van Buren, but I have been unable to find anyone who ever heard of the name. (Houck I:18)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Van Buren
Description:Situated on Highway 60 and the Frisco Railroad one mile from Current River in the north-central part of Carter Township. It was established in 1830 and had been the county seat of Ripley County until Carter County was established in 1859, when Donivan (q.v.) took its place in Ripley County. It was named for Martin Van Buren (1782-1862) who was at that time Secretary of State under President Andrew Jackson, but was already a recognized leader of the Democratic Party and became President (1837- 1841). The first settlement apparently on Current River, on the west side was later known as old Van Buren. When the county was formed, Zimri Carter sold fifty-nine acres for a town site. In 1867, the courthouse, only recently replaced by a new building, was created; and the old log courthouse, built in 1833, was abandoned. (Douglas I.372; P.L. Wetmore (1837) 273; P.L. Haywood (1853) 824; Postal Guide 1876-; Eaton, 271; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vermillion Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church and cemetery three miles northeast of Fremont. The church was organized by Reverend S.D. Biffle in 1887 and named for John Vermillion a prominent citizen who, with others, had come from Ohio about 1870. (J.J. Chilton; R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Virginia Warrior Path
Description:Houck's map shows it extending westward from Poplar Bluff from the Natchitoches Path through Butler, across Carter and Current River south of Van Buren, across Shannon and Howell counties. Nothing has been found about the origin of the name, but very likely it is from the state of this name. (Houck I.226)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Virginia Warrior's Path
Description:See Warrior's Path.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wappapello Unit of the U.S. Forest
Description:It took its name from the village Wappapello in Wayne County. Approximately 78,000 acres were in Butler, 130,000 in Wayne, and 35,000 in Carter, according to a report of March 27, 1934. Probably more has been added. (THE AMERICAN REPUBLICAN, March 27, 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Water Cress Spring
Description:About one-half mile northwest of Van Buren, on the Baptist Assembly grounds. So called for this plant growing abundantly there. (Mr. & Mrs. R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Watered Hollow
Description:In Kelley Township. Leads into Aldrich Valley north of Chilton. Small springs furnish water for stock. A descriptive name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Watermelon Ford
Description:In pioneer days this was a good ford, about seven miles north of Van Buren. In the spring of 1819 Isaac Kelly's brother, who had settled near the present site of Current View, went to visit the Kelley and Chilton settlers in Carter County. At this sandy ford he scattered some watermelon seeds. When he returned in the late summer excellent melons were growing there. Apparently this ford is Houses Ford (q.v.), but the name has stuck through all these years, for it is mentioned in MISSOURI, A GUIDE TO THE "SHOW ME" STATE. (MISSOURI A. GUIDE)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wheeler Cave
Description:See Wheeler Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wheeler Hollow
Description:Leads into Henpeck Valley. Name of early settlers. William Wheeler was born on the old Wheeler farm and lived there until 1901, when he moved to Oklahoma. Wheeler Hollow Camp of the Grandin Mills was located here. Wheeler Cave, in the valley, is on land owned by Orville Chilton. (J.N. Sparks; J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wheeler Hollow Camp
Description:See Wheeler Hollow.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White's Mill
Description:A portable sawmill set up on Big Brushy Creek four miles north of Ellsinore about 1878. It was the first mill established in this county by the Missouri Lumber and Mining Company. Named for their president, J.B. White. (H.D. Condray; J.N. Sparks; J. Smith)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White's Mill Church
Description:The name by which New Prospect Church (q.v.) is generally known locally, because the school of this name (q.v.) was used for church services for a number of years. (Mrs. D. Crites; Rev. H.H. Smelser; Rev. Wm. S. Smelser)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White's Mill School
Description:In Jackson Township, at the old White's Mill site, established in the late 1870s. Now consolidated with Ellsinore, but still used as a local school. (H.D. Condray; W.N. Sutherlin; A.M. Link)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White's Pond
Description:Also Tolliver Pond (q.v.). A natural pond enlarged to about five acres by the Missouri Lumber and Mining Company at Grandin. Used for preserving the logs at the mill. It acquired this name for J.B. White, manager of the mill and president of the lumber and mining company. Mr White was a poor boy, a country schoolteacher of Pennsylvania, but became a millionaire in the timber business. (J. McGhee; A. Hinchey; C. Hunter)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:White's Spring
Description:In Henpeck Valley. Shawnee Indians were living there in 1818-1820. A family of this name were the first settlers at the spring. (J.J. Chilton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wolf Branch
Description:A small stream leading into Big Brushy Creek in eastern Jackson Township. Habitat of wolves, very numerous in the earlier day. (J.J. Chilton; J. Lehr)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wolf Hollow
Description:In northeast Carter Township into Carter Creek from the east. During the Civil War the few inhabitants were glad to hear the howl of the wolf and the cry of the panther instead of the tread of the "Bushwhackers." (T.J. Brame)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Woods Mill
Description:See Mill Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Woodville
Description:See Kelley Fork.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Yale School
Description:See Dry Valley School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

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