Cape Girardeau County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Abernathy School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Cape Girardeau Township, named for J. Alfred Abernathy, son of a pioneer, Hamilton Abernathy, who came here in 1848 from Virginia. (Kiehne, Goodspeed, Hope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allenville
Description:A village in the southern part of Hubble Township, on the Belmont Branch of the Iron Mountain Railroad, one mile northwest of Delta. Andrew Franks received a concession of land here in 1798. The town was laid out in 1869 by Thomas Allen, president of the Iron Mountain Railroad, and Thomas A., J.E., A.J., and J.W. Renfroe. The principal streets were named Renfroe Avenue, for the Renfroe brothers, who were prominent farmers; Penny Street for William Penny, who came from Wales in 1808 and settled in this neighborhood; and Rodney Street for Martin Rodney (or Rodner) an early settler who owned a large farm south of the town. The town was named for Thomas Allen (1813-1882), who projected and built more than 1,000 miles of railroad. Thomas Allen was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, studied law in New York and was admitted to the bar in 1835. In 1837 he established a newspaper in Washington, D.C., and in 1842 he came to St. Louis. From 1850-1854 Mr. Allen served in the State Senate. He was president of the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad, and served in Congress from March 4, 1881 until his death in 1852. (Eaton, Conard, Douglas I 373, SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN (1931), MISSOURI & MISSOURIANS, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allenville Covered Bridge
Description:A covered bridge near Allenville over Whitewater River. It was built in 1869, the year the town was laid out by R. Colgan, contractor. The bridge was condemned as unsafe in 1894, but remained as a landmark. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN (1931), M.H.R. April, 1942, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Apple Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A settlement in the northern part of Apple Creek Township in 1873; named for Apple Creek near which it is located. (Campbell (1873), Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Apple Creek [2 of 2]
Description:See Old Appleton.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Apple Creek Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church near Oak Ridge in the northern part of Apple Creek Township, organized in 1820 and named for Apple Creek (q.v.) on which it is located. Rev. Thomas Parish Green was instrumental in organizing the church. (Douglass I 465, 468, 201, Goodspeed 550-551, Hope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Apple Creek Chapel
Description:A German Methodist Church in the northern part of Apple Creek Township organized in 1848 by Schultze, Tushoff, and Westmeier families, on Apple Creek (q.v.), for which it was named. (Douglass I 483, Goodspeed 540)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Apple Creek Church
Description:See Old Apple Creek Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Apple Creek Township
Description:In the northern part of the county, this Township was erected in 1842 from part of Byrd Township. The territory was changed in 1840 when Union Township was created, and retained in 1848 when the entire system of townships was revised. It is named for Apple Creek (q.v.), one of the principal streams of the county. (Douglass I 163, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Apple Creek Valley School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Apple Creek Township, so named from its location in the valley of Apple Creek (q.v.). (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Apple River
Description:See Apple Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Appleton
Description:See Old Appleton.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Arbor
Description:A post office and community in the southern part of Welch Township, on the St. Louis, San Francisco Railroad. A post office has been maintained since 1886. The only suggested solution to the name is that a brush arbor existed there when a name was submitted to the post office authorities. Brush arbors were frequently used for summer revival meetings held by most churches. (Hitt, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Arnsberg
Description:A small village in the northern part of Apple Creek Township. A post office was established as early as 1876 and named by the German settlers of the community for Arnsberg in Westphalia, Germany. (Eaton, Postal Guide, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ashley
Description:See Jackson
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bainbridge
Description:A ferry landing and small settlement in the southeast part of Randol Township on the Mississippi River. It was established before 1827 and named for the Bainbridge family who lived there and operated a ferry, which was very important for travelers between Kentucky and the upper end of Arkansas. It has disappeared since the building of the Cape Girardeau Bridge in 1927. (Putz, Hayward, Wetmore)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barroll
Description:A post office in the southwest part of Hubble Township, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. A post office was maintained here from 1893 until 1904, and doubtless named for a prominent man of the community. May A. Bean was postmaster and storekeeper here in 1898. (Postal Guide, Goodwin)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bee
Description:A post office in the central part of Byrd Township, established in 1886 and discontinued in 1904. Chester B. Davis was the merchant and first postmaster there. Mr. Macke, postmaster at Jackson, and son of a pioneer, believes the post office was named for Chester B. Davis, spelling out as Bee his middle initial, which was often used as his name. (Postal Guide, Goodspeed, Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Belmont Branch
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A Baptist Church a short distance south of Jackson in the eastern part of Byrd Township. It was organized July 19, 1806 by Rev. Daniel Green, and is considered the first permanent church organization in Missouri. The first building was erected in October, 1806 on land belonging to William Bull on Hubble Creek. Bethel means "House of God." (MISSOURI, MOTHER OF THE WEST, Houck III 206-207, Douglass I 198)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Bend
Description:A bend in the Mississippi River two and a half miles north of Cape Girardeau, an important landmark, probably named by the early voyagers from its natural features. It is mentioned in the early County Court records, and here Giradot established a trading post as early as 1766. The first German settlements in the county were made here in 1834 by Otto Buehrmann, William Cramer, and Rev. Frederick Recker. (Conard (1901), County Court Records (1824-1844), Goodspeed 282)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Lick
Description:A salt lick on Ramsay Creek in the early days in the county. Nicholas Revielle owned the place known as Big Lick in 1801. (Houck II 184)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Springs School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Whitewater Township, located near a big spring from which it is named. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Swamp
Description:A bottom about three miles wide located immediately south of the city of Cape Girardeau and called by the French Grand Marais, or Big Swamp. The Americans translated the word "marais" literally in this case, though elsewhere "marais" was translated as "lake" or "pond." The term Big Swamp was used in designating the territorial jurisdiction of the Commandants at New Madrid and Cape Girardeau in 1793. (Houck II 154, Sp. Regime II 413, McDermott)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blomeyer
Description:A village in the southeast part of Welch Township on the Frisco Railroad. It was named for the family of E.H. Blomeyer, early settlers. (Eaton, E.H. Blomeyer, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Hole, The
Description:A large deep hole formed from the quarrying of rock by the Marquette Cement Company located here on Highway 61. It was a favorite swimming resort until it became dry about 1930. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Shawnee Creek
Description:A small branch of Shawnee Creek near New Wells in the northern part of Apple Creek Township. The name Shawnee is from the main stream of which this creek is a branch, and "blue" indicates the clarity of the water, reflecting the sky. (Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bollinger Mill
Description:A mill on Whitewater River at the edge of the village of Burfordville (q.v.). Major George Bollinger built the original mill of logs in 1800. In 1858 the present millhouse of stone and brick was erected. The mill is still operated by water power as a custom mill. (Hamlett, M.H.R. April, 1942)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bollinger's Mill
Description:See Burfordville.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bowman
Description:A small community in the eastern part of Kinder Township. A post office was maintained here from 1908 until 1911, and named for one of the early settlers, Groves W. Bowman, who came to this county in the 1820s from North Carolina. (Eaton, Douglas I 565)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Broadway School
Description:An elementary school in the city of Cape Girardeau established in 1907 near the western end of Broadway, from which it is named. It was also called West Broadway. The school building was abandoned in 1939. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN Oct. 2, 1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brooks School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Cape Girardeau Township, named for Jaspar N. Brooks, a farmer, who is the son of Hardy Brooks who came here in 1810. (Kiehne, Goodspeed, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckeye Creek
Description:The stream rises in the north-central part of the county, flows north, and empties into Hughes Creek. It is named for the buckeye bushes which are numerous along the banks of the stream. Buckeye (aesculus glabra), the American horse-chestnut, is so called because the hilum of the fruit has the appearance of a stag's eye. (Kiehne, County Map 1936)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buckeye School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Apple Creek Township on Buckeye Creek (q.v.), from which it was named. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burfordville
Description:A village on Whitewater River, eight miles southwest of Jackson in the central part of Kinder Township. The first settlement was made in 1800 by Major George Bollinger, who settled here with other Swiss German immigrants. Bollinger established and named Burfordville for John Burford. The village was incorporated in 1900. (Postal Guide, Campbell, Houck I 188, Douglas I 264, 374, John Burford)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burfordville Covered Bridge
Description:A covered bridge across Whitewater River at the village of Burfordville (q.v.). Built a few years after the Civil War, it is one of the eleven known covered bridges in the state. A second one in Cape Girardeau County is near Allenville. (Hamlett, M.H.R. April, 1942)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Byrd
Description:See Jackson
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Byrd Township
Description:One of the original townships organized in 1807. It was bounded on the east by the Township of Cape Girardeau, on the north by the district line, on the south by Big Swamp, and on the west by Whitewater River. Its boundaries underwent many changes and in 1848 was reduced to its present size when the entire system of townships was changed. It was named for Abraham Byrd, son of Amos Byrd, one of the early settlers, and one of the commissioners appointed to establish the first seat of justice. (Douglas I 162, 3)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Byrd's Creek
Description:A creek which flowed through the central part of the county in Byrd Township. Named for Amos Byrd who settled here in 1799. (Houck I, 184, Douglas I 178)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Byrd's Settlement
Description:A settlement made in 1799 by Amos Byrd sixteen miles northwest of Cape Girardeau. Both the settlement and the creek on which the settlement was made were named for Amos Byrd. (Beck, Houck I 184)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Campster School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Cape Girardeau Township, named for the Campster family who owned land in the community. D.C. Hope lists a Campster (first name unknown) in his biographical list of early Cape Girardeau men of prominence. (Hope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Bayou
Description:On Whitewater River, in the southern part of Welch Township, named for the cane which grows along the banks. (Putz, Kiehne, Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Creek
Description:A large creek in the central part of Byrd Township. David Andrews settled on Cane Creek in 1797. It is named for the cane growing along the stream. (Houck II 185)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Creek School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Byrd Township, on Cane Creek, from which it is named. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Spring Creek
Description:Rises in the central part, flows north, empties into Hughes Creek. It, like Cane Creek and Caney Creek (q.v.), was named for cane. Spring Creek indicates the source of the creek is a spring. (Mackey)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caney Creek
Description:Rises near Lixville in northeastern Whitewater Township in Bollinger County, runs east into Cape Girardeau County, flowing east and then south through Apple Creek and Whitewater Township and emptying into Little Whitewater River. Daniel Sexton settled on Caney Creek in 1798. The name is derived from the cane, a native growth of the county. It is sometimes called Caney Fork because it forms a fork with Little Whitewater River. (Geological Map, Spanish Regime II 412, Douglass I XIII, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caney Fork Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the southwest part of Apple Creek Township, located on Caney Creek (q.v.), often called Caney Fork, from which it is named. The church was organized in 1872 by Elder F.R. Miller. (Putz, Douglass I 464, Goodspeed 558)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caney Fork Creek
Description:See Caney Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Capaha Trail
Description:An old Indian trail which extended from the present city of Cape Girardeau southward, crossing Cape La Croix Creek. It was named for the Capahas, and Indian tribe which had lived here before the coming of De Soto. Houck says that tribe, according to Nuthall, called themselves "Oyuapes" or "Kapahas," but La Salle called them "Arkansas." (Houck I 108-118, Putz, C.C. Kinder)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Creek
Description:A small stream in the northern part of Cape Girardeau Township, named from the city. (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Girardeau
Description:A large town on the Mississippi River in the eastern part of the county. This territory was the hunting grounds and camping place of the Shawnee and Delaware Indians, who had two villages nearby. The first white man whose activities centered near Cape Girardeau was Ensign Sieur Girardat (or Jeredat), who from 1704-1720 was stationed with the royal troops of France at Kaskaskia in the Illinois country. Soon after 1720 he left the army and became a fur trader. The only record on which we may base this statement is a scrap of a diary kept by Matthew Clarkson, fur trader and afterward mayor of Philadelphia, who visited the Illinois country in 1766 and records, "Mons. Jeredat, the elder, who has been a trader for many years among most of the Indian nations about the River Mississippi, informed me, December 22, 1766..." Girardat probably had a rendezvous at Big Bend, three miles north of the present city of Cape Girardeau. This was not a permanent settlement, but the place became known to the voyagers on the Mississippi River, who engaged in trade with Girardat. They called the place Cape Girardat, Cap Girardo, or Cape Girardeau, or in the Spanish form Cabo Girardo. Very little is known of Ensign Girardat. The church records of Ste. Genevieve give the name of Girardat as an ancient inhabitant of the country residing in 1765 at Ford de Chartres, who, according to the church records of the parish of St. Anne of Fort de Chartres, married Therese Nepveu. The first permanent settlement here was a Spanish government post established in 1793 by Don Luis Lorimier and his Indians, under orders of Baron de Carondelet, Governor General of Louisiana. Louis Lorimier (1748-1812) was born in Canada of French parents. His ancestor Guillaume Lorimier came from France to Quebec in 1695. In 1769 Lorimier's father engaged in trade with the Indians in the Illinois country at a place called Pickawilly, later known as "The Frenchman's Store" or "Lorimier's Station." There Louis and his father traded with the Miamis, Shawnees, Delawares, and other Indians. He married a woman of the Shawnee tribe, Charlotte Bougainville, and was adopted by the Indians, with whom he had great influence. During the Revolution he led a band of forty Shawnees and Miamis in a raid on Boonsborough, Kentucky. After the war his activities did not cease. When the Indians refused to recognize the federal government, he encouraged them. Finally Kentucky organized an expedition and destroyed Lorimier's store. He fled, but later established another trading post on the Ohio, known as Lorimier's Encampment. Anthony Wayne drove him out and he moved across the Mississippi River with a band of Shawnees and Delawares in 1786. They settled on the Saline River in what is now Ste. Genevieve County. The Spanish government wanted them to provide protection for their posts against the more warlike Osage tribe, so granted them large tracts of land on Apple Creek. The Indians established two large villages in what is now Perry and Cape Girardeau Counties, and in 1793 Lorimier was made commandant of the post at Cape Girardeau. Later he was granted two large tracts of land, one including the present city of Cape Girardeau, for his services in preventing the Genet uprisings. (This grant was confirmed by the United States government in 1836 to his heirs). In 1794 Lorimier became a Spanish subject, built a house known as the Red House, on what is now Fountain Street in the city of Cape Girardeau, and when the United States took possession of the Louisiana Territory, he granted four acres of land for the seat of justice. He was made Judge of the Court of Common Pleas. In 1797 the settlement which grew up around Lorimier's residence was referred to as Lorimount by John Gihoney and John Randol in land petitions, and in 1805 it was called Lorimier's Ferry in an appeal to the Court of Common Pleas, but these names did not supersede the earlier name Cape Girardeau, applied to Big Bend, and in 1808 when the town was laid out by Lorimier, it was called Cape Girardeau. For some time it was the seat of justice of the district, having been selected by Governor Harrison in 1806, but because Lorimier's land title was rejected by the United States Government, no sale of lots could be made, and in 1815 the commissioners selected Jackson as the seat of justice for Cape Girardeau County, organized in 1812. (Putz, Houck I 168, 9, III 67-8, MEMORIAL SKETCHES, Douglas I 73-4)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Girardeau and Thebes Bridge Terminal Railroad
Description:A short railroad extending from the town of Cape Girardeau to the west end of the Thebes Bridge in Scott County, near Kelso. The company, organized in 1907, constructed the seven mile line from the Frisco lines in Cape Girardeau to the river crossing. The Thebes Bridge is named for its eastern terminus Thebes, Illinois. The railroad is also called the Thebes Spur. (Douglas I 503)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Girardeau County
Description:Bounded on the north by Perry County, on the west by Bollinger County, on the south by Stoddard County, and on the east by the Mississippi River. Cape Girardeau County had its origin in the Spanish District of Cabo Girardeau, which was established about the year 1793 when Don Louis Lorimer was authorized by Governor Carondelet to "establish himself and his Indians on any unoccupied territory on the western bank of the Mississippi River from the Missouri to Arkansas." He located at Cape Girardeau (q.v.) and was made commandant during the Genet agitation 1792-1795. The boundaries of the district were on the northern Apple Creek, and on the southern Tywappity Bottom. The southern boundary between Cape Girardeau and New Madrid remained in dispute until 1801 when General Anthony Soulard was ordered by Spanish authorities to fix the line five leagues below the city of Cape Girardeau (near the present town of Commerce in Scott County) from the Mississippi River to the St. Francois River. The County was organized from the district on October 1, 1812 and retained the original district boundaries until 1818, when Wayne County was cut off and Lawrence and Madison Counties were erected from Ste. Genevieve and Cape Girardeau Counties. Further boundary changes occurred in 1851 when Bollinger County was erected from Wayne, Stoddard, and Cape Girardeau Counties. (Violette 77-89, 46-7, Douglas I 67-9, Houck II 154, 167, Spanish Regime I XXII)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Girardeau Institute
Description:One of the first educational institutions of the city of Cape Girardeau was called the Cape Girardeau Institute, established in 1870 with Professor Daniel S. Wilkinson at the head. (Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Girardeau Township
Description:One of the five original townships laid off in 1807, Cape Girardeau Township was bounded on the east by the Mississippi River, on the south by the middle of Big Swamp, on the north and west by a line beginning at Joseph Waller's ferry and running west and south to Hubble Creek, down Hubble Creek to the middle of Big Swamp. It was named for the principal settlement Cape Girardeau (q.v.). The boundaries of the township were changed in 1848 when the system of townships was revised. (Douglass I 163, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Gulf Railroad
Description:See St. Louis and Gulf Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape La Croix Creek
Description:See Cape La Cruz Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape La Cruz Creek
Description:A small creek in Cape Girardeau Township flowing into the Mississippi River at Gray's Point (q.v.) in Scott County. The original name given to the cape from which this creek takes its name was Cape La Croix, given by Father Gravier in 1700 because of the cross (la croix) which Monsigneur had erected in 1699 on this promontory. The Spanish name La Cruz also appears in many early records and is retained. The spelling Cape La Cruche Creek appears on Campbell's map of 1873; this is probably a map maker's error. (Houck I 245, Jesuit Relations 105, Campbell (1873)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Rock
Description:A large rocky promontory or cape about three miles from the present town of Cape Girardeau. This is the site of Ensign Jeredat's trading post (see Cape Girardeau) and is marked by a memorial tablet. Cape Rock Park surrounding the famous spot affords many views of the Mississippi River. A circle drive six miles in length surrounds the park. This road which also extends from the park entrance to the town of Cape Girardeau is called Cape Rock Road. (W.P.A. GUIDE 205, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Rock Park
Description:See Cape Rock.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Rock Road
Description:See Cape Rock.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carlisle Technical School
Description:See Jackson Military Academy.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Carola
Description:See Tilsit.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor Township
Description:A township erected in 1834 and discontinued in 1835 in the southwest part of the county (now a part of Bollinger County). It was named for Castor River, the principal stream in the township. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Cliffs
Description:A locality about one half mile below where Hubble Creek enters Tywappity Bottom, where David and John Ferrell secured a grant of land in 1803. Named for the natural surroundings. (Houck II 187, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Central High School
Description:A secondary school in Cape Girardeau established in 1914 and named for its central location in the city at that time. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN, Oct. 4, 1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chillicothe
Description:See Large Shawnee Village.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chilliticaux
Description:See Large Shawnee Village.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Christ Evangelical Church
Description:The Evangelical Church in the city of Cape Girardeau organized in 1895 by Rev. Ed Bleibtreu, and given this appropriate church name honoring the Christ. (Pamphlet (1930)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Circleville
Description:A settlement in the northeastern part of Randal Township in 1865 and 1873. No explanation of the name can be offered. (Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clippard School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Whitewater Township, named for the Clippard family, prominent landowners. W.P., P.C., and Truman Clippard own land there now. Daniel Clippard came to Cape Girardeau County in 1817. (Putz, Kiehne, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clover Hill School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Byrd Township in a long settled region. When the school was organized about 1900 the name was suggested by one of the directors because of the clover blooming on the hillside. (Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clubb Township
Description:See Clubb Township, Bollinger County.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Coker School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Randol Township, named for Samuel T. Coker, commissioner of schools in 1854. (Putz, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Collins-Moore School
Description:See Moore School
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Council Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Welch Township, doubtless named from the fact that this ridge contained signs of Indian signal mounds and indicated this may have been the scene of councils among the Indians. (Kiehne, Putz, Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cousin's Orchards
Description:A part of the early settlement of the city of Cape Girardeau, where the St. Charles Hotel now stands, so named for Bartholomew Cousins, secretary to Louis Lorimier. (MEMORIAL SKETCHES 73-74)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cousinville
Description:A post office maintained from 1883-1897 in the southeast part of Cape Girardeau Township, on the railroad. Bartholomew Cousins, secretary to Louis Lorimier, was doubtless the source of the name, as was Cousin's Orchard (q.v.). (Postal Guide, MEMORIAL SKETCHES 73-74)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crawford's Landing
Description:A ferry landing on the Mississippi River, in the northeast part of Shawnee Township in 1873. The Crawford family was prominent in pioneer days and conducted this ferry. (David Crawford Hope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Critesville
Description:A community in the southwest part of Apple Creek township, known as Critesville for the large family of John H. Crites and/or Davault Crites. (Putz, Kiehne, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Critesville School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Apple Creek Township, named for the settlement known as Critesville (q.v.). (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Croft
Description:A post office maintained in 1896; neither the location nor reason for the name could be discovered. (Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crooked Creek
Description:A large stream which rises in the northwestern part of Bollinger County, flows in a southeastern direction, enters Cape Girardeau County, and empties into Whitewater River near Allenville. The stream thus formed is called Whitewater River until it receives the waters of Caney Creek and East Fork, after which it takes the name of Little River. The name was given prior to 1818. Schoolcraft refers to it and to Castor River (west of this branch) as one stream which he calls Crooked Creek. The name is descriptive. Mr. Yount, pioneer of Bollinger County, says he has stood in one spot and thrown a rock on both sides of him, as the stream flows south and then suddenly turns around to flow north. (Douglass I XIII 280, Schoolcraft, Dewitt, Yount)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crossroads
Description:See Crump
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crump
Description:A settlement and post office in the eastern part of Liberty Township. The community was once known as Crossroads because here two county roads crossed, but when a post office was established in 1886 it was named for a prominent family. The post office was maintained from 1886-1904, discontinued, and restored in 1928. (Postal Guide, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cypress Swamp
Description:A large swamp just west of Cape Girardeau in the western part of Cape Girardeau Township, named for the cypress trees growing in the swamp. (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Daisy
Description:A small village in the southern part of Apple Creek Township, a post office was established in 1889 and named for the wife of an old settler in the community. Joseph Abernathy (Pochantas) had a child named Daisy. (Postal Guide, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Daugherty's Creek
Description:A small creek near the town of Jackson in the southern part of Byrd Township. William Daugherty, son-in-law of Andrew Ramsay of Ramsay Creek (q.v.) settled here in 1795. The creek received its name from him. (Douglass I 77)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Daugherty's Mill
Description:A mill established on Daugherty's Creek (q.v.) in 1799 by William Daugherty, who settled here. (Douglass I 77)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davis Mill
Description:See Gordonville
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Decaturville
Description:A ghost town, probably laid out on paper only by John Riser in 1802 on the present site of St. Vincent's College. The "town" was probably absorbed by the growth of Cape Girardeau, in which the site now lies. The name was probably given for Stephen Decatur (1799-1820), famous American naval officer, who won distinction in the Tripolitan War of 1801-1805, just at the time the Missouri town was laid out. (Houck I 181, Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Delap's Mill
Description:An old mill, a very important one, on Whitewater River, built before 1827 by John Delap, and so named. It was still operated in 1835. It is referred to also as Snider's Mill, and was evidently purchased by Aaron Snider but still popularly called Delap's. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Delta
Description:A small town southeast of Allenville in the eastern part of Welch Township at the point of intersection of the Iron Mountian, the St. Louis and Iron Mountain, and the St. Louis southwest Railroad. So named because the railroads form the Greek letter delta. (Campbell, Stoutmeyer)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Deray
Description:A signal stop and small community on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the southwest part of Hubble Township established in 1900. A post office was maintained from 1900-1910. (Douglass I 374)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Devil's Tea Table
Description:See Indian Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dillard Creek
Description:A small branch of Whitewater River in the southern part of Kinder Township, doubtless named for a landowner. (County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dissen
Description:A small village in the northern part of Apple Creek Township. Trinity German Lutheran Church was organized here in 1848. Named by the German settlers here for Dissen, Germany, a small place in Westphalia near Bielefeld. (Douglass I 480, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Diversion Channel
Description:One of the main channels of Little River Drainage District, which diverts the floodwaters of Castor, Whitewater, and Little Rivers into the Mississippi River. So called from its purpose. (Missouri 526)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dog Hollow
Description:A small valley or hollow in eastern Shawnee Township, leading into the Mississippi River one mile north of Neely's Landing. (County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dogwood School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Randol Township, named for the flowering dogwood found there. Dogwood (carmes florida) grows on the hillsides in this county. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dunn's Ford
Description:A ford across Apple Creek in the northern part of what is now Shawnee Township, near the home of David Dunn. This place was important as a boundary marker in early days. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Duskin Creek
Description:A small stream in southern Shawnee Township, which empties into Indian Creek; probably named for a pioneer family. (Macke, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dutchtown
Description:A small town in the eastern part of Hubble Township seven miles northeast of Allenville. John Logan erected a watermill here about 1800. Other early settlers were John Drybread, Joseph Fite, John Losila, and Remna Brummitt, Germans. Peter Held, a native of Switzerland, settled here in 1860. These Swiss families were called "Dutch" by their American neighbors, hence the name Dutchtown was given to their settlement. The place was called Hendricksville in 1874, doubtless for a local prominent man, but when the post office was established in 1876 the name Dutchtown was given. (Postal Guide, Campbell, Houck II 186, Douglass I 374, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ebenezer Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of Randol Township, constituted in 1821 near the present site of Egypt Mills. The Hebew word means "stone of help," and is a fairly common name for churches. (Douglass I 201, Samuel I 7:12)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Egypt Mills
Description:A small town twelve miles east of Jackson in Randol Township. In June, 1821, a Baptist Church called Ebenezer was constituted in the Big Bend near the present site of Egypt Mills. A post office was established in 1889 and continued until 1934. According to John G. Putz tradition has it that the name originated in this way: a zealous school teacher organized a Sunday school class which met in an old mill located here. One of the first lessons dealt with Egypt, so the place came to be known as Egypt Mills. (Postal Guide, Douglass I 201, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:El Camino Real
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Emmanuel Baptist Church
Description:See South Side Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Emmanuel Evangelical Church
Description:An Evangelical Church in the town Jackson organized in 1867 by the Reverend Frederick Kees of Pochantos, and given this Hebrew name referring to Christ by the founders. (Pamphlet (1930)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fairview Church
Description:A rural church in the western part of Whitewater Township. The name is one of approbation. (County Map, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fallenash Creek
Description:A small creek in the western part of Whitewater Township, emptying its waters into Whitewater River just above Crooked Creek. The name is from an old hunter and Indian fighter, Charles Fallenash, who hunted, trapped, and died in this region in 1799. (SPANISH REGIME III 411, Houck I 186)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Farmer's Village
Description:See Tilsit
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flat Rock
Description:A post office maintained in 1853 and discontinued before 1876, in the eastern part of Apple Creek Township, named from a large flat rock which was there. The rock was blasted away when the St. Louis San Francisco Railroad was built in 1898-1902. (Hayward, Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flatrock Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Apple Creek Township, which flows north into Apple Creek. It rises near Flat Rock (q.v.), from which it is named. (Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flora Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the western part of Randol Township, flows southeast and empties into the Mississippi River. Stephen Cavender settled near the mouth of this creek in 1797. It was probably named for the wife or daughter of an early settler. (Geological Map, Houck II 191, Putz, Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fort A
Description:At the eastern end of Bellevuue Street in Cape Girardeau. Built in 1861 by the Union forces. This fort is no longer preserved as is Fort D. (q.v.). (Missouri 203-4)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fort B
Description:Erected in 1861 by Union forces on the present grounds of Southeast Missouri State Teacher's College. No longer preserved as is Fort D. (q.v.). (Missouri 203-4)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fort C
Description:Erected in 1861 by Union forces at the end of present day Sprigg Street in Cape Girardeau. No longer preserved as is Fort D. (q.v.). (Missouri 203-4)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fort D
Description:At the northeast corner of Locust and Fort Streets, Cape Girardeau; now preserved as a public park. In March 1861 Union forces constructed Forts A, B, C, and D at strategic points commanding approaches to the city. Fort D was the major defense of the town at the time of John S. Marmaduk'es attack on April 17, 1863. (W.P.A. Guide 203-4, SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN (1937)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Foster Creek
Description:A small creek in the northern part of Hubble Township. Named for Jacob Foster, who located here in 1799. (Houck II 187, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Franklin School
Description:An elementary school in the city of Cape Girardeau, built in 1927 and named in honor of Benjamin Franklin, American statesman and educator. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN Oct. 2, 1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Friedheim
Description:A small village in the northwest part of Apple Creek Township; a post office was established here in 1887 and named by the German settlers for their old home Friedheim, Germany, a small town in West Prussia. The name translated, says John G. Putz, means "peace home" or "home of peace." This is a doubtful etymology; the German name probably originated with the significance of "home of Frederick" or some primitive Teuton whose named happened to begin with the element "Fried." (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Frisco Railroad
Description:See St. Louis San Francisco Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fruitland
Description:A small town in the southwest part of Shawnee Township. A post office was established here in 1888. It was named from the nursery for fruit trees established there by Edgar Wallace. (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fruitland Normal Institute
Description:An academy established in Fruitland (q.v.) in the southwest part of Shawnee Township in 1869; K.K. Keer was the first principal. (Campbell, Shoemaker V 1, 669)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fulbright School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Apple Creek Township, named for E.A. Fulbright, a prominent landowner. (Kiehne, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:German Township
Description:See Scopus Township, Bollinger County.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Giboney Creek
Description:A small stream five miles southwest of Cape Girardeau. The first settlement was made here in 1795 by Alexander Giboney and his family, who came from Maryland. Giboney was a man of great ability, but died soon after coming to the district, leaving seven children. The care of the children and the estate (Spanish grant) fell upon the widow, Rebecca (Ramsay) Giboney. "She was a remarkable woman," says Douglass. "She continued to live on the Spanish grant her husband had received in 1797 until her death in 1840." The plantation is now Elmwood, owned by the Houcks. Mrs. Houck was a granddaughter of Mrs. Giboney. (Houck's SP. REGIME II 408, Houck II 183, Douglass I 77, 78)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gordonville
Description:A village six miles south of Jackson in the northeast part of Hubble Township. It is one of the earliest settlements in the county. In 1802 Martin Rodney (or Rodner) settled about two miles southwest of Gordonville. The first name for the community was Davis Mill, so named from the mill operated as late as 1827 by Greer W. Davis. Then the democratic name Peoples, probably shortened from People's Mill, was given to the settlement, a name in use through 1854, 1860, and as late as 1873. At sometime between 1876 and 1886 the name Gordonville was given to the post office, which was established by the merchant Samuel Gordon, for whom it was named. (Douglass I 374, 483, Postal Guide, Hayward, Campbell, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goshen Church
Description:See Oak Ridge Baptist Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goshen School
Description:A rural school in the west-central part of Apple Creek Township named from Goshen Church (q.v.) once in the same community. (Goodspeed, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grand Marais
Description:See Big Swamp.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Granny Creek
Description:A small branch of Crooked Creek in the western part of Liberty Township, so named because of a species of small fish found in the stream. (Bennett, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gravel Hill
Description:A small village in the northwest part of Kinder Township. A post office was established here in 1867 and named Gravel Road, doubtless from the gravel road which was built from Jackson to Dallas (now Marble Hill) in Bollinger County about 1827. The name was changed to Gravel Hill sometime before 1876. This is a name descriptive of the rocks on the hillside where the village is located. The name was written Gravel Hill until 1895, since then it is written Gravelhill or Gravel Hill. (Postal Guide, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green Cox School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Welch Township, named for Green Cox, landowner. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green Ferry Road
Description:A county road which ran from Green's Ferry (q.v.) on the Mississippi River to Jackson and thence west to Dallas (now Marble Hill) in Bollinger County. It was the most important road from east to west in pioneer days, and is still in existence. (County Map, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greene
Description:See Marble Hill, Bollinger County.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green's Ferry
Description:A ferry located on the Mississippi River, in the eastern part of Shawnee Township. How old this ferry is no one knows. Rev. Parish Green was granted a license in 1826 "to keep a ferry at the place called Green's old ferry." It was known as Smith's Ferry in 1831 when Thompson Smith operated it, and as Vancil's Ferry or Vancil from 1854-1860, but in subsequent records it is known as Green's Ferry or Green's Old Ferry. The place no longer exists but the name is preserved in Green Ferry Road (q.v.). (Shoemaker I 523, County Court Record, Oliver, Knox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gulf Branch
Description:See St. Louis and Gulf Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gulf Junction
Description:A railroad junction named from the St. Louis and Gulf Railroad, built by Louis Houck in 1902 and later purchased by the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad. It was at the junction of the main line of the Frisco and the Gulf Branch to Thebes, Illinois. (Houck)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hahn's Creek
Description:A small creek in the center part of Kinder Township, named for the C.F. Hahn family. (Hahn)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hanover Church
Description:A rural Evangelical Lutheran Church in the central part of Randol Township, organized in 1852 by Daniel Bertling. Most of the members were German, and it was named for the province of Hanover, Germany. (Goodspeed 575-81, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hay's Ferry
Description:See Neelys Landing.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hebron Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church five miles southeast of Jackson in the northwest part of Cape Girardeau Township. Organized in 1822 by fourteen members dismissed from the Bethel Baptist Church (q.v.). At this church the Cape Girardeau Association of Baptist Churches was organized in June, 1824. Hebron is a district south of Jerusalem, Palestine; it was the home of Abraham and burial place of the patriarchs. (Douglass I 20)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Heitman's Mill
Description:A pioneer mill, existing in 1832, in the western part of Hubble Township, named for the Heitman family who operated it. (Conrad)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Helderman Creek
Description:A small settlement in the southern part of Byrd Township, flowing into Cane Creek. See Helderman School. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Helderman School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Kinder Township, named for Buford Helderman, a landowner. Jacob and Conrad Helderman came from North Carolina to this region in 18--. (Kiehne, Hope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hendricksville
Description:See Dutchtown.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Ridge
Description:A rural community seven miles southwest of Allenville in the southwest part of Welch Township. A post office was maintained here from 1853-1874. It is named from the hickory trees which grow along the slight elevation, or ridge, there. Hickory (carya olivaeformis) is a North American tree commonly found in this region. (Campbell, Postal Guide; Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hickory Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Welch Township, on Hickory Ridge (q.v.) from which it is named. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:High Hill School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Shawnee Township, named from its location on a high hill. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hildebrand
Description:See Hilderbrand.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hilderbrand
Description:A small village from the northwest part of Apple Creek Township, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. A post office has been maintained here since 1908. It was named for Dan Hilderbrand, a landowner. The name is often erroneously written Hildebrand. (Putz, Postal Guide, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hines Landing
Description:A ferry landing on the Mississippi River in the eastern part of Cape Girardeau Township named for the Hines family, C.F. Harry, and Guy Hines. (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hobbs Chapel
Description:A rural church in the northeast part of Cape Girardeau Township, named for J.V. Hobbs, prominent citizen of the community and church. (Goodspeed, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Horrell Creek
Description:A small branch of Byrds Creek in the southeast part of Apple Creek Township, named for William Harrell through whose land it flows. (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Horrell School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Apple Creek Township, named for William Horrell, an early settler and prominent man. John Horrell came to this region in 1818. (Putz, County Court Record, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Houck
Description:See Houk
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Houck Stadium
Description:Football stadium of Southeast Missouri State Teachers College, located on Bellevue Street at Broadway in Cape Girardeau. Built in 1930 it was named for Louis Houck, historian, "father of Southeast Missouri railroads," and public spirited man who was instrumental in locating the college in Cape Girardeau. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Houk
Description:A ghost town in the southern part of Hubble Township. A post office was established here in 1889 and discontinued in 1905. The name is erroneously spelled Houck on most maps and the place was supposedly named for Louis Houck, railroad builder. The real name, however, is Houk, which was given for Peter and Abraham Houk, landowners. Mrs. Effie Houk owns land there now. (Conard III, Putz, County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hubbell Creek
Description:See Hubble Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hubbell's Mill
Description:A watermill established in 1797 by Ithamar Hubbell on Hubble Creek (q.v.). (Houck II 186)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hubble Creek
Description:A stream in the central part of Byrd and Hubble Townships. In 1797 the stream was known as Riviere Zenon, named for Zenon Trudeau (1748-179-), Lieutenant Governor of the Louisiana Territory. He was born in New Orleans in 1748, the son of Sieur Jean Trudeau. In 1792 he became a lieutenant colonel and captain of the grenadiers. His influence as Lieutenant Governor was widely felt among the settlers in the Mississippi River Valley, where he established posts and warehouses to care for the interests of the government. In 1797 Ithamar Hubbell, soldier of fortune, settled on the stream and established a watermill (Hubbell's Mill). The name was spelled Hubbel Creek until 1806, after which it appears as Hubble, both in the name of the stream and the township. (Douglass I 79, Houck's SPAN. REG. II 409, Houck I 183, 221, III 207)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hubble Creek Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the northern part of Hubble Township, located on Hubble Creek (q.v.) for which it was named. The church was organized shortly before 1864 when the Cape Girardeau Association met here. (Douglass I 464)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hubble Township
Description:This township in the southwest part of the county was erected in 1836 and named for the early settler, Ithamar Hubbell. (Douglass I 163, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hughes Creek
Description:A stream which rises in the north-central part of the county, and flows north to empty into Apple Creek. It was named from an early settler who owned land at the head of the creek. (Macke, Oliver)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:A large creek flowing east through southern Shawnee Township into the Mississippi River. Called Table River, Riviere Table, or The Devil's Tea Table in 1797 when Cornelius Arent settled here. Table River was named from a projection of rock resembling a table on the southern side of the creek. It was pointed out as the Devil's Tea Table by rivermen. The rock is now blasted away. Called Indian Creek since 1800 for the Shawnee Indians who had villages here. (Douglass I 79, 178, Houck I 213, II 191, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Road
Description:See Shawnee Trace
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Village
Description:See Large Shawnee Village.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ingram's Mill
Description:A prominent mill in 1848, owned and operated by Charles Ingram. Still in operation in 1855. (Knox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Iona
Description:See Iona School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Iona School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Randol Township. A place known as Iona existed as early as 1873, although the name is preserved only in the rural school's name. Probably named for the wife or daughter of an early settler. (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jackson
Description:The county seat, located in the south-central part of the county, in the east-central part of Byrd Township. The town, the second in the district, was laid out in 1815 on land that was granted to Ezekiel Able by the Spanish government, and was transferred by him to William H. Ashley. The commissioners appointed in 1814 to locate a permanent seat of justice for Cape Girardeau County. Purchased the land from Ashley. Three names were suggested for the town: Ashley, Byrd, and Lorimier, for prominent local men; but since it was established in 1815 just after the Battle of New Orleans, the town was named in honor of Andrew Jackson. It was incorporated in 1819. (Eaton, Houck III 168-9, Douglass I 163, 178, 261, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jackson Academy
Description:See Jackson Military Academy.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jackson Military Academy
Description:A school in the town of Jackson, first established as Jackson Academy in 1820. In 1892 the Methodists took control of the declining institution and changed the name to Carlisele Technical School, honoring Rev. Willis Carlisle, a teacher of the institution. In 1899 the Methodists suspended operations and later the same year the Jackson Military Academy was opened. (Hope, Oliver)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jefferson School
Description:An elementary school on Jefferson Street, from which it is named, built in 1905.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jenkins Creek
Description:A small creek in the southeast part of Byrd Township, named for Edward F. Jenkins who settled here in 1851. (Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johannisberg
Description:See New Wells; also Atenburg in Perry County.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:John S. Cobb School
Description:An elementary school in the city of Cape Girardeau erected in 1914 and named for John S. Cobb, public spirited citizen and educator. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN Oct. 4, 1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Juden Creek
Description:A small stream in the northeast part of Cape Girardeau Township, emptying into the Mississippi River. It was named for John Juden, a pioneer. Cf. Juden No. 1 School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Juden No. 1 School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Cape Girardeau Township, named for John Juden, Sr., a native of England, who came to Missouri in 1805. This family has been prominent in Cape Girardeau County many years. When a second school was built in the same township the numbers 1 and 2 were used to distinguish them. (Kiehne, Douglass I 199)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Juden No. 2 School
Description:See Juden No. 1 School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kage School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Cape Girardeau Township, established in 1854 and named in honor of Christian Kage, who was on the board, and donated the land for the school, and helped Henry Kempe erect the first building (log). A new building was erected in 1880. Christian Kage was the father of Fred Kage, Mayor of Cape Girardeau and prominent public man. (C.C. Kinder, Kiehne, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kimmelton
Description:A small settlement two miles west of Apple Creek post office on Apple Creek, where Colonel Singleton H. Kimmel had a country house in 1855. (Hope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kinder Township
Description:In the western part of the county, created in 1872 from Whitewater and Liberty Townships and named for the Kinder family, prominent farmers and citizens of the community. (County Court Reord, Kinder)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:King's Highway
Description:A public road established in 1789 following an old Indian trail through New Madrid County northward through Cape Girardeau and Perry Counties and on to St. Louis. It was designated as the public road and named El Camino Real, the King's Highway, by Colonel George Morgan, who planned New Madrid (for which see former study by this writer), in honor of King Charles IV, King of Spain 1788-1808. The French called the road Le Chemin du Roi. U.S. Highway 61 follows the general course of the old highway and the D.A.R. have erected suitable markers along the trail. (Houck II 150-154)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Kurreville
Description:A small village in the eastern part of Whitewater Township; a Lutheran Church was established here in 1860, a post office in 1886. It was named for Fred Kurre, an early settler and the first postmaster. Henry Kurre came to this country in 1844 and purchased land. (Douglass I 480, Postal Guide, Putz, Kiehne, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Riviere Blanche
Description:See Whitewater River.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Large Shawnee Village
Description:One of two former Shawnee villages in this region, established about 1787, when the Shawnees accepted the invitation of the Spanish government to settle here. Large Shawnee Village, as it was known to the American settlers, was on Apple Creek, and embraced the territory now occupied by Shawneetown and Old Appleton in this county and by Union town in Perry County. It was called Village Sauvage by the French. The other, known as Small Shawnee Village (q.v.), was on Indian Creek. Both villages disappeared in 1825, when the Indians were compelled to sell their Spanish grants and move to the west, although the Americans long continued to refer to the site as Indian Village. According to Houck, the name the Indians themselves gave to the larger of their two towns was Chillicothe or Chilliticaux. Towns named Chillicothe are still found in Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Texas, and in Livingston County, Missouri. Most of them are places where the Shawnees once lived, although the county seat of Livingston County, founded in 1837, borrowed its name from Chillicothe, Ohio. Hodge says there were three other places in Ohio that once bore the name, all former Shawnee residences. The name is interpreted by Houck as meaning simply "place of residence," and by Gannett as the name of a Shawnee sub-tribe signifying "man made perfect;" but Hodge declares that the meaning of the word is lost. It was the name, he says, of one of the four tribal divisions of the Shawnees, and was always applied to the village they occupied, which was always regarded as the chief town of the tribe. As the Shawnees retreated west before the white man, several villages of this name were successively occupied and abandoned. (Houck I 213-14, 220, Gannett, Hodge, Miss Adam's thesis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Le Chemin du Roi
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leemon
Description:A small village in the southern part of Shawnee Township. A post office was established here in 1876 and named for Leemon Hale, who owned a farm and sawmill on Indian Creek. He was a captain in the United States Army. (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty No. 1 School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Apple Creek Township. It was known simply by the ideal name of Liberty School when it was established about 1860, but was designated as Liberty No. 1 when a second Liberty School was established about 1890 in the northern part of Hubble Township. (Oliver, Hope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty No. 2 School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Hubble Township, established about 1890 and named Liberty. Since a Liberty School already existed in Apple Creek Township, this school was called Liberty No. 2 School. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Liberty Township
Description:A township in the western part of the county, Liberty was created in 1848 when the system of townships was revised. It was reduced in size by the creation of Bollinger County in 1851 and was divided in 1856 to form Welch Township. An ideal name. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Link School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Kinder Township, named for Amos Link, son of the pioneer Daniel Link, and grandson of John Link who came to this community in 1811. (Goodspeed, Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Apple Creek
Description:A southern tributary of Apple Creek, which rises near Daisy in the southern part of Apple Creek Township. Cf. Apple Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Flora Creek
Description:A small branch of Flora Creek (q.v.), from which it is named, in the eastern part of Shawnee Township. (County Map 1936)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Muddy Creek
Description:A small creek which rises in Whitewater Township and flows through the northern part of Scopus Township into Cape Girardeau County, where it empties into Whitewater River. It is named for a man of that community whose nickname is "Muddy," John M. (Muddy) Johnson. This was doubtless the same John M. Johnson for whom Johnson School (q.v.) near Alliance was originally named. (Hohs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Whitewater River
Description:A tributary to Whitewater River which rises in the northern part of Union Township, flows southeast through Whitewater Township, and enters Cape Girardeau County where it joins Whitewater River from which it is named, near Bufordville in Kinder Township. (County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lizard Lick
Description:See Oak Ridge.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lorance Township
Description:See Lorance Township, Bollinger County.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lorimier
Description:See Jackson.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lorimier Cemetery
Description:Located on Fountain Street at Washington Avenue in Cape Girardeau on the crest of a hill overlooking the Mississippi River. It is named for Louis Lorimier, founder of Cape Girardeau (q.v.), who is buried here beside his Shawnee consort, Charlotte P.B. Lorimier, who died in 1808, leaving four sons and two daughters. Her inscription reads: "She lived the noblest matron of the Shawnee race..." Lorimier's inscription is "To the memory of Major Louis Lorimier, a native of Canada and first settler and commandant of the post of Cape Girardeau, under the government of Spain, who departed this life the 26th day of June, 1812. Aged 64 years and three months. Ossa habeaut pacem tumulo cineresque sepulti; Immortali animae luceat alma dies." (Douglass I 173, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lorimier School
Description:The first public school in the city of Cape Girardeau, built in 1904 and named for Louis Lorimier, founder of the city. A new building was erected in 1936. (Southeast Missourian (1937)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lorimier's Ferry
Description:See Cape Girardeau.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lovejoy
Description:A small community on the Mississippi River, at the mouth of Lovejoy Creek. A post office was maintained here from 1888-1893. Probably named for an early family. (Putz, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lovejoy Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Shawnee Township, running east into the Mississippi River. Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maple Avenue Church
Description:A Methodist Church on Maple Avenue, in the city of Cape Girardeau; organized in 1912. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN Oct. 2, 1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Maple Grove School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Hubble Township; so named because the school building was erected in a maple grove. Few trees remain now. The maple (acer campestre) is a well-known tree in this state. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marquette Cement Quarry and Plant
Description:On Highway 61 just south of Cape Girardeau. Established in 1909 by the Eagle Portland Cement Company, and purchased by the present company in 1923. Marquette is a common name in this river town, doubtless because of the river's famous explorer. (Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marquette School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Cape Girardeau Township, located near the Marquette Cement Plant, from which it was named. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:May Greene School
Description:A school in the city of Cape Girardeau erected in 1921 and named for Miss May Greene who taught in Cape Girardeau schools from 1879-1929. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN 1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McFerron School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Byrd Township, named for the McFerron family, locally prominent. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McKendree Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church located three miles east of Jackson in the eastern part of Byrd Township. The church, first Methodist organization west of the Mississippi River, was organized in 1806 and located on the grant made to William Williams in 1798. The church was probably organized by Rev. Jesse Walker, who in 1804 was stationed on the Livingston circuit at the mouth of the Cumberland River, and was named for Bishop William McKendree, Presiding Elder of the Kentucky District in 1801, who was associated with Walker in this section of the state. McKendree was the first American born bishop, was an officer in the Revolutionary War and present at the surrender of Cornwallis. Various McKendree Chapels throughout the country are monuments of his labors. (Houck II 190, III 234-6, CENTENNIAL HIST. OF MISSOURI METHODISM)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McLane's Mill
Description:A pioneer mill established in 1829 by John McLane, and often used in marking boundaries or designating places in the early County Court Records. It was located "On the road to Jackson on Apple Creek," in the northern part of Shawnee Township, where Old Appleton now stands. (County Court Record, Goodspeed, Hope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Millersville
Description:A village on the eastern bank of Whitewater River, in the central part of Whitewater Township. The original John Miller came here in October, 1803, with the Swiss German immigrants led by Colonel Frederick Bollinger. The Millers were Scotch-Irish. John Miller had twelve children; so quite a settlement sprang up here. The pioneer mocking name given to this place was "Toad Suck," a name which persisted until 1860 when a post office was established and named Millersville for the family. The village is still composed largely of Millers. (Conard IV, MILLERSVILLE & THE MILLER FAMILY, (Pamphlet), Campbell, C.C. Bond, Douglass I 374, Putz, Hunter Miller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Railroad
Description:In 1849 the Pacific Railroad was chartered and so named because of the intention of the company to reach the west coast. On July 4, 1851, Mayor Luther M. Kennett of St. Louis turned the first spadeful of dirt for the construction of Missouri's first railroad. The first iron for the rails arrived in 1852. Thomas Allen began serving as president of the company in 1850. By 1853 the road had been constructed as far as the Pacific. In 1860 financial difficulties increased and the State Government seized the railroad. During General Price's raid in 1864 great strips of the Pacific Railroad were destroyed. The road was leased to the Atlantic and Pacific Company in 1872, sold at public auction to Andrew Pierce, Jr. September 6, 1876, sold to St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company two days later; sold to L.K. Garrison and reorganized as the Missouri Pacific and became, in 1879, a part of the Jay Gould system. On March 3, 1851, the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad was incorporated, the name indicating the purpose of building a road from St. Louis to Iron Mountain or Pilot Knob. The privilege of extending the road to the Mississippi River at Cape Girardeau or any other point south thereof was also granted. Preliminary surveys were made in 1852. By 1856 only twelve miles of the road had been built, but by 1858 it had reached Pilot Knob. In 1866 the state planned to sell the railroad, but since bids did not cover the indebtedness, the commissioners purchased it. After some difficulties and public protests in 1868 the road went to Thomas Allen, who had resigned as president of the (Missouri) Pacific Railroad in 1854. Already in 1854 J.H. Morley, civil engineer for the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad, had surveyed the 119 mile line from Bismarck in St. Francois County to Belmont in Mississippi County, a line passing through Madison, Bollinger, and Cape Girardeau Counties. Construction was started from both the Bismarck and Belmont ends of the line; and at midnight August 14, 1869, the two parts of the line were brought together in the middle of the Bollinger County Tunnel. It was opened for travel August 19, 1869. In 1880 the Missouri Pacific acquired the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad by purchase, and it has since been known by that name. The branch of the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad which extended from Bismarck to Belmont on the Mississippi River is known as the Belmont Branch, from its terminal. (Thornton, Douglass I 499, thesis by Fitzsimmon (1931), MISSOURI & MISSOURIANS I 765- 6)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moccasin Springs
Description:A small village or boat landing on the Mississippi River in the eastern part of Shawnee Township, once known as Willard's Landing because the Willard family lived there. Later named Moccasin Springs for the water moccasins which were numerous at the spring. A post office was maintained from 1904-1908. (Putz, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Moore School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Welch Township, named for the family of William Moore, early settlers in the community. Officially the school is known as the Collins-Moore School, named for the Collins and Moore families, but through usage the name Collins has been dropped and it is known simply as the Moore School. (Goodspeed, County Court Record, Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Tabor
Description:An English school established in 1799, the first west of the Mississippi River. The school was established by Andrew Ramsay, early settler and landowner. John S. Kochtitzky writing of the early school says, "History gives no intimation of the name so we can speculate. Tabor is a town in Bohemia founded in 1420 and renowned for its industrial school. There is a Mount Tabor in Palestine commanding a view of the Holy Land. It was probably named for the mountain in Palestine." (Douglass I 77, Houck II 182, Goodspeed, Kochtitzky)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Muddy Shawnee Creek
Description:A small branch or creek in the western part of Shawnee Township, which empties into Apple Creek. It is in the Shawnee Village (q.v.) territory and so named. The term muddy indicates that the water is colored from the clay and contains a large amount of sediment. (Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ne Ska River
Description:See Whitewater River.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Needmore School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Hubble Township. Needmore is a mocking pioneer term indicating the lack of some article in the school or community. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Neelys
Description:See Neely's Landing.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Neely's Creek
Description:A small creek which empties into the Mississippi River, at Neely's Landing in the eastern part of Shawnee Township. Both the creek and the settlement were named for Jacob Neely, landowner, storekeeper, and ferryman. (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Neely's Landing
Description:A ferry landing on the Mississippi River in the eastern part of Shawnee Township. John Hays owned the land here in 1805 and operated a ferry known as Hay's Ferry, and Jacob Neely operated a store and ferry in 1808. A post office was established in 1886 and given the name known to river men, Neely's Landing. Neely's Creek empties into the river here. Locally referred to as Neelys. Often written without the apostrophe. (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Neely's School
Description:A rural school in the community known as Neely's Landing (q.v.). Officially the post office is still Neely's Landing, but the school name has been shortened to Neelys. (Putz, Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Neu Wels
Description:See New Wells
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Bethel Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the western part of Shawnee Township, organized in 1873 by John Ford, W.H. Welker, and John Godwin. The name evidently refers to Bethel Church (q.v.), the oldest west of the Mississippi River. (Goodspeed 558, 559)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Wells
Description:A village in the northern part of Shawnee Township, about three miles south of Apple Creek, the northern boundary of the county. It was originally founded in 1840 under the name of Johannisberg by a group of Saxon Lutherans who seceded from the settlement of Dresden, near Altenburg, in Perry County; for the circumstances of its founding and the possible source of its name, see under Altenburg. These Lutherans remained a branch of the parish of Altenburg, and attended church there seven miles to the north until 1853, in spite of difficulties often caused by swollen waters of Apple Creek. In 1852 a new group of German settlers came from Austria, and the next year they built a church of their own. The village then became known to the Altenburg people as Oesterreich, for the country of origin of its new settlers; but they preferred to call the place Neu Wels, from their hometown Wels in upper Austria, fifteen miles southwest of Linz. The spelling was naturally soon Americanized to New Wells. (WESTERN DISTRICT LUTHERAN, January, 1929, Postal Guide; Putz, letter from Rev. L.F. Dippold, pastor of Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church at New Wells)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Niska River
Description:See Whitewater River.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Niswanger School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Whitewater Township, named for a prominent pioneer family. Joseph Niswanger (or Neyswanger) came to this section with Colonel Frederick Bollinger in 1803. C.T., N.N., F., J.J. and Mary Niswanger are landowners in this section at the present time. (Putz, Kiehne, Miller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Apple Creek Presbyterian Church
Description:See Old Apple Creek Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Cape Girardeau Township. The building has been moved several miles from its original site in a grove of oak trees, from which it was named, but the school is still in the woods. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Hill School
Description:A rural school in the west-central part of Shawnee Township, named for its location on an oak covered hill. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Ridge
Description:A small town ten miles northwest of Jackson in the southern part of Apple Creek Township. Andrew Ramsay and Alexander Giboney settled in this neighborhood on Ramsey Creek in 1795. Oak Ridge settlement was made in 1852 and named for the natural surroundings. A post office was established before 1874. The pioneer mocking name for the settlement was Lizard Lick. (Postal Guide, Campbell, Houck I 183, Douglass I 264, 374, Putz, Miller, Goodspeed 434)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Ridge Baptist Church
Description:The Baptist Church of Oak Ridge (q.v.) was organized in 1841 by Reverend Peter Williams and named Goshen. The site was originally a few miles west of Oak Ridge. In 1876 it was moved into the village and took its name. Goshen was the fertile land allotted to the Israelites in Egypt, in which there was light during the plague of darkness. (Goodspeed 558-9, Douglass I 469)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Valley School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Welch Township. Officially this is Oak Valley School because of its location in a beautiful valley surrounded by tree covered hills, but it is also called Round Pond School from Round Pond (q.v.) nearby in the early days. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oesterreich
Description:See New Wells; also Altenburg in Perry County.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Apple Creek Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church in the eastern part of Shawnee Township, organized in 1821 by the Reverend Salmon Giddings and known as Apple Creek Church from the important stream in that region. In 1839 arguments divided the congregation into two divisions, known as North and South Apple Creek Churches. The North Church retained the name Apple Creek Church by which it is still known and the South Church became Pleasant Hill Church in 1841. The word old has been added to the name in recent years to indicate its age. (Willis Knox, Douglass I 489, 490)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Appleton
Description:A village on Apple Creek in the northern part of Apple Creek Township, sixteen miles north of Jackson. A settlement was made here in 1824 by John McClain and John Schatz. It was formerly known as Apple Creek from the stream on which the settlement was made. A post office was established before 1876. The town was laid out in 1800 by Abraham Huse. The post office department added the word Old in 1918 in order to avoid confusion of mail with Appleton City in St. Clair County. The pioneer name for the place was Shakerag, so named because during the Civil War days when window glass could not be had, the window frames were covered with cloth, and the rags flapping in the wind were referred to as shakerags. (For a comparison of stories see Shakerag in Pemiscot County, former thesis by this writer; in Jackson County, thesis by Miss Atchison; and in Monore County, thesis by Miss Leech). (Postal Guide, Conard (1901), Douglass I 264)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Camp Ground
Description:The grounds of McKendree Chapel (q.v.) embracing several acres covered with grand old oaks, through which runs a spring, where the early Methodists held their camp meetings. (Houck III 235)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Salem Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the northwest part of Whitewater Township, organized in 1840 by S. Winingham. Salem is a common name for churches, a short form often used in the Bible for Jerusalem. (Goodspeed 558-559, Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Old Salem School
Description:A rural school in the northwest part of Whitewater Township named from Old Salem Church (q.v.) just south of the school. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oriole
Description:A small settlement in the northeast part of Randol Township. A post office was maintained here from 1886-1907. The source of the name has not been ascertained. (Postal Guide, County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pacific Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Panther Creek
Description:See Bollinger County.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Passover Church
Description:A rural church in the eastern part of Welch Township, named for the Jewish feast known as the Passover, or Feast of Unleavened Bread. Cf. Bollinger County. (Bible (Luke 2:41, Jn. 18:28)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Paton
Description:See Patton, Bollinger County.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pecan Grove School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Cape Girardeau Township, named for its location in a grove of pecan trees. The pecan (a species of carya olivaefarmis) tree is a native of North America. The word is Indian in origin (Algonquin pakan or pagan), translated by the Spanish as pacana and French as pacane, it became pecan in English. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Peoples
Description:See Gordonville
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pike Township
Description:A township erected in 1834 in the northwest part of the county; it was discontinued in 1835. Doubtless named for Zebulon M. Pike (1779-1813), famous soldier and explorer, for whom Pike's Peak was named, as well as Pike County, Missouri. (County Court Record (1834-35)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Plainview School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Randol Township. Situated on a hill, it offers a clear (or plain) view of the surrounding countryside. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Gardens
Description:The plantation of the Oliver family located near Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church, and given this name of approbation by John Oliver, the pioneer landowner. (Oliver)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill
Description:A settlement in the southern part of Shawnee Township, on Campbell's Map of 1873. The name was selected by John Oliver, and the settlement included Pleasant Hill Academy, Pleasant Gardens (the Oliver homestead), and Pleasant Hill Church. (Campbell, Oliver)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Academy
Description:An academy conducted under the auspices of the Pleasant Hill Presbyterian Church (q.v.) in the southern part of Shawnee Township. It was established in 1853 under the guidance of John Oliver, Jr. and later articulated with Westminster College at Fulton, Missouri. (Oliver, Hope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church first organized on May 20, 1821 by the Reverend Salmon Giddings and known as Apple Creek Church for the stream on which it was located. A name of approbation. In 1839 the congregation was divided into two groups known as north and south Apple Creek churches. In 1841 the southern Apple Creek Church adopted the name Pleasant Hill Church, a name of approbation. (Douglass I 489, 490, Willis Knox, Goodspeed 566-575)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pocahontas
Description:A small town in the western part of Shawnee Township, nine miles northeast of Jackson. The early settlers here were Robert Baldridge, Robert McNeely, and John Bonney. The village was founded in 1855 or 1856 by Judge Samuel M. Green, who gave the place its name in honor of the celebrated Indian princess, because the largest landowner here, Joe Abernathy, part Indian, claimed descent from Pocahontas. Judge Green gave the name jokingly, it is said. The Hevenor map shows also a Pocahontas Station about one mile west of Pocahontas, on the C.G.N. Railroad. When the railroad was built in 1902 it did not pass directly through the village, consequently Pocahontas Station was established on the railroad. The village was organized in 1861 and incorporated in 1893. (Campbell, Conard V, Postal Guide, Douglass I 24, Putz, Hope)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pocahontas Station
Description:See Pocahontas
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Poor Creek
Description:A branch of Apple Creek in the northern part of Apple Creek Township. Evidently a humorous reference to the people who lived on the creek, who were not wealthy. (Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Poplar Grove School
Description:A rural school in the northeast part of Hubble Township, named from its location on an elevation or ridge where poplar trees grow in abundance. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ramsey Creek
Description:A small creek which rises in Scott County Hills (Scott County), flows north through Cape Girardeau County, and empties into the Mississippi River. It was named for Andrew Ramsey (1746-1815), who came from the neighborhood of Harper's Ferry, Virginia, in 1795 and settled on a grant of 640 acres immediately adjoining Louis Lorimier's grant. Most of his grant was in what is now Mississippi County, though he lived in the present Cape Girardeau County. Ramsey had been a soldier in the Revolutionary War, was a leader among the settlers and owned the largest tract of land in the settlement. Ramsey, interested in education and influential among the settlers, was responsible for establishing the first English school west of the Mississippi River. This school was established in 1799 and was called Mt. Tabor. John, Andrew Jr., James, William, and Allen. Andrew Sr., moved to Batesville, Arkansas and died there in 1815. (Houck II 182-185, Conard, Douglass I 77)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Randall's Creek
Description:See Williams Creek
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Randles
Description:A post office and community in the southeast part of Welch Township, named for the Randles family who live there. A post office has been maintained there since 1892. (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Randol School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Randol Township, named from the township in which it is located. Enos Randal (or Randall) settled in this region in 1798 and gave his name to the community, creek, township, and school. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Randol Township
Description:In the east-central part of the county, this township was formed in 1824 from portions of Byrd and Cape Girardeau Townships. It was named for a large stream flowing through this region. Probably named for the creek, which had been named for Enos Randal. (Douglass I 79, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Randol's Creek
Description:See Williams Creek
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Red Star Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the city of Cape Girardeau established as a mission of the First Baptist Church in 1916. It is so named because the building is decorated with a blazing red star. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN Oct. 4, 1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rieman School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Whitewater Township, named for Louis Riemann, landowner. Ernst Riemann was born in Brunswick, Germany in 1828 and came here in 1867. The name was originally spelled Riemann. In the school name the final "n" has been dropped, whereas Mr. Riemann has changed the spelling of his name to "ei" instead of "ie" as better suggesting the "ei" pronunciation he prefers with a "long e" sound. (Putz, Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rio Blanco
Description:See Whitewater River.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riviere a la Pomme
Description:See Apple Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riviere Charles
Description:See Williams Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Riviere Table
Description:See Indian Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Roberts School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Byrd Township, named for Elisha Roberts, prominent man of the community since 1840. William J. Roberts was also prominent in the community. (County Court Record, Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rock Levee
Description:A railroad flag station in the southern part of Cape Girardeau Township on the St. Louis, San Francisco Railroad. It commands a view of a rocky bluff, ledge or "levee," and hence is so named.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rocky Creek
Description:A small stream in the southeast part of Cape Girardeau Township, emptying into Flora Creek. It is so named because of the rocky bed over which it flows. (Map, Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rodney's Mill
Description:The early settlers came here in 1836 and the Rodney (or Rodner) family established a mill, which was soon bought by Benedict Mullett and Benedict Schnieder. A German Evangelical Church was organized in 1847. (Douglass I 482)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Pond
Description:A small pond in the western part of Welch Township. Named from its shape or contour. It was known during Civil War days because of a guerilla attack upon Captain Tacke's men who were stationed there. Captain Tacke was commander of a company of State Militia. The pond has since been drained. (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Round Pond School
Description:See Oak Valley School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rum Branch
Description:A small stream in the southwest part of Welch Township. Mr. John Hitt, who lives nearby, says the creek received its name in this way: a man was caught making rum near this stream; the rum was poured into the branch and so the name arose. (A.J. Hitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rum Branch Church
Description:A rural church in the southwest part of Welch Township, located near Rum Branch (q.v.) from which it is named. (Rolla Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rum Branch School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Welch Township, near the Stoddard and Bollinger County lines. It is named for Rum Branch (q.v.) on which it is located. (Putz, Kiehne, Dewitt, Hitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sandy Creek
Description:A small creek in the northern part of Apple Creek Township, a branch of Apple Creek. So named because of its sandy bed. (Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sandy Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Hubble Township, named from its location on a sandy ridge. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sawyer School
Description:A rural school and community in the southwest part of Shawnee Township, named for a family prominent in the community.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schoenebeck School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Byrd Township, named for a prominent German family of the community who own land there. (Kiehne)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shakerag
Description:See Old Appleton.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sharpsboro
Description:A small community and post office in the southern part of Welch Township on the St. Louis San Francisco Railroad. A post office was maintained from 1900-1902. Doubtless named for a local family. (Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shawnee Creek
Description:A stream in the western part of Shawnee Township, which flows northeast into Apple Creek; named from the Indian tribe which maintained Large Shawnee Village (q.v.) there as late as 1825. The creek name appears on Campbell's map of 1873, but evidently was drained soon afterward. (Campbell, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shawnee Path
Description:See Shawnee Trace.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shawnee Township
Description:Organized in 1848 when the system of townships was revised by Aaron Snider, John Johnson, and William Harrell, this township was named for the tribe of Indians who had two large camps in the neighborhood of Shawneetown (q.v.). Shawnee is from the Indian word Shawun (south) or Shawunog (southerners). After the Revolution some of the Shawnee joined the hostile Creeks and Cherokees, while a considerable body accepted the invitation of the Spanish government in 1787 and settled, together with some Delawares, on a tract near Cape Girardeau (in what is now Perry and Cape Girardeau Counties). After the treaty of Greenville in 1795 when the hostile group who were then in Ohio had to give up their lands, they joined the group in the Cape Girardeau district. Finally in 1825 the Indians sold their land here and moved to Kansas. (Douglass I 163, 374, County Court Record, Hodge)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shawnee Trace
Description:A road leading from the residence of Don Luis Lorimer in Cape Girardeau (q.v.) to Big Shawnee Village and thence to Ste. Genevieve and St. Louis in Spanish times. Called the Shawnee Path in Lorimer's proposition concerning the County Court. The Shawnee village was moved in 1825. Since that time it is usually referred to as the Indian Road. (Missouri 524-25, Douglass I 162, Houck I 213)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shawneetown
Description:A small town on Apple Creek; originally it was a Shawnee Indian Village, called by the first French settlers "Village Sauvage." The Indians were forced to give up their Spanish land grants in 1825 and move west. The first house was built by John Anderson in 1865 and a large woolen mill was erected here in 1867. (Postal Guide (1889), Douglass I 374, Beck, Goodspeed 435, Knox)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sheffield
Description:A ghost village in the northeast part of Shawnee Township. A post office was maintained in 1865-1868, but was discontinued before 1874. Doubtless named by its ambitious founders for Sheffield, England, a large steel manufacturing center. (Campbell, Goodwin)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sheppard School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Shawnee Township, named for E.W. Sheppard, an old settler who operated a ferry there in 1838. He also owned a large farm in the district. (Kiehne, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sheppard's Landing
Description:A ferry landing in the eastern part of Shawnee Township. E.W. Sheppard operated a ferry in 1838. It is no longer operated at this place. (Kiehne, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Small Shawnee Village
Description:One of two significant Shawnee camps or villages in this region, established about 1787, when the Shawnee accepted the invitation of the Spanish government to settle here. This village was located on Indian Creek, in what is now Shawnee Township. It, like Large Shawnee Village (q.v.), was destroyed in 1825. (Houck I 213-14, 220)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Smith's Ferry
Description:See Green's Ferry.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snider's Mill
Description:See Delap's Mill.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Apple Creek Church
Description:See Pleasant Hill Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Side Baptist Church
Description:A Baptist Church in the city of Cape Girardeau organized in 1931 and named Emmanuel Baptist Church, but because it is located in the southern part of the city, the name South Side Church is more commonly used. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN (1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Southeast Missouri State Teachers College
Description:One of the five state teachers colleges, located in Cape Girardeau on Normal Avenue between Pacific Street and Henderson Avenue on the site of Fort B. The Third District State Normal School was established by act of legislature March 22, 1873, and on December 3, 1873 the Board of Regents selected the site for the buildings and made arrangements for the opening of school. Cape Girardeau was selected for the site of the college following a long controversy between Iron County and the city of Cape Girardeau. Louis Houck, member of the Board of Regents was largely responsible for the decisions being made for this place. In 1919 the General Assembly changed the name from Third District State Normal School to Southeast Missouri State Teachers College. There is now (1944) a movement under way to suggest to the State Legislature the dropping of the word "Teachers" from the name. (Douglass I 420-436, OFFICIAL MANUAL OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI (1907-09) (1917-19)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Francois Township
Description:One of the five original townships, including the territory between the east line to north and middle of Big Swamp on the south, "extending as far west as there were any settlements." It included the present Wayne County and was cut off to form the latter in 1818. The name is preserved in the much smaller St. Francois Township in Wayne County (q.v.). Named for the river. (Douglass I 163)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Johannisberg
Description:See New Wells.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis and Gulf Railroad
Description:A railroad line extending from Cape Girardeau to Thebes Bridge (in Scott County), often called the Gulf Branch, now abandoned. It was built by Louis Houck in 1880 and later became a part of the St. Louis San Francisco Railroad. The name indicated the purpose of running a line from St. Louis to the Gulf of Mexico. The line was abandoned April 15, 1934. (Houck, SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN, Oct. 4, 1934, W.P.A. Guide 202)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis San Francisco Railroad
Description:Thomas Hart Benton proposed a railroad from St. Louis to San Francisco in the second St. Louis Railroad Convention in 1849. The early history of the road is the same as that of the Missouri Pacific (q.v.). In 1856 the Southwest Branch was chartered, and in 1860 the line extended from Pacific to Rolla. In 1876 the St. Louis San Francisco Railroad Company was organized and took over the property of the Atlantic and Pacific Company. The name indicated the proposed destination, which has never been reached. In 1901 the company purchased the Kansas City, Fort Scott and Memphis line. In 1902 the line was finished from St. Louis to Memphis, Tennessee, through this section of the state. In these two counties the property and part of the constructed road was purchased from Louis Houck. (MISSOURI & MISSOURIAN I 756-66, Barns 616, 673)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis San Francisco Railroad (Southwestern Branch)
Description:This branch of the St. Louis San Francisco Railroad joins the main line (St. Louis to Memphis) at Cape Girardeau and extends in a southwesterly direction through Cape Girardeau, Bollinger, and Wayne Counties, and on to Hoxie, Arkansas. The first name applied to the railroad was Cape Girardeau and Southwestern Railroad, from its direction. It was built by Louis Houck and was completed to Williamsville in Wayne County in 1886. From Williamsville the road extends through Butler and Ripley Counties and on to Hoxie, Arkansas. This part of the road is called South Missouri and Arkansas Railroad (S.M. and A.). The civil engineer for the road, which was completed in 1880, was Charles McCray. It was a part of the Louis Houck enterprise. (Julian, Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis Southwest Railroad
Description:In 1890 the St. Louis Southwest Railroad Company was organized. It purchased roads already constructed and extended the line. The name indicates the direction of the road from St. Louis southwest to Texas. It is commonly known as the Cottonbelt Railroad, because its southwest terminal is the cottonbelt of the United States. Only a few miles of this road extend through this section, from Randles to Cape Girardeau. (M.H.R. 211, 322)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Mary's School
Description:A parochial elementary and high school in the city of Cape Girardeau, named to honor Mary, the mother of Christ. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN Oct. 4, 1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Vincent's Church
Description:Located at the corner of Main and Williams Streets in Cape Girardeau on the site of Louis Lorimier's Red House, this church of Gothic Revival design was built in 1851 and named for the Vincentian fathers who founded it as well as St. Vincent's College (q.v.). (Douglass I 71)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Vincent's College
Description:Located at 201 Morgan Oak Street, the college was opened in 1843 by the Vincentian Priests. It has its beginning in a day school (later St. Vincent's Academy) which was opened in 1838 by Father Odin. The site for the college was purchased from Robert Daugherty, and the college incorporated February 27, 1848. St. Vincent de Pane (1576- 1660), founder of the order of Vincentians, or Lazarists, was canonized in 1737. (Douglass I 413-18)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stroder Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in the western part of Whitewater Township, named for William Stroder. It is all that remains of Stroderville (q.v.). (Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stroder School
Description:A rural school in the southwest part of Whitewater Township, near the ghost town Stroderville, named for William Stroder, prominent landowner. (Putz, Kiehne, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stroderville
Description:A village three miles northwest of Allenville, in the western part of Whitewater Township. It is a ghost town and nothing remains except the old Stroder Cemetery to mark the spot of the intended village named for William Stroder (1817-1872), a prominent pioneer of the county. A post office was maintained in 1889. (Campbell, Postal Guide, Putz, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Table River
Description:See Indian Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thebes Spur
Description:See Cape Girardeau and Thebes Bridge Terminal Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Third District State Normal School
Description:See Southeast Missouri State Teachers College.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Three Notch Road
Description:A county road leading from Jackson, the county seat in Byrd Township, to the Mississippi River. It was one of the main roads in 1860, and was so named because it was merely a blazed trail with three notches marked on the trees along the route. Mr. Hopkins of Marble Hill, Missouri has advanced the idea concerning the reason for the number of notches. He says the three indicate "faith, hope, and charity," and that the pioneers thus set forth the virtues they sought to attain. (Hopkins, Ritgerod)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tilsit
Description:A small settlement in the northwest part of Hubble Township; a post office was established in 1889. John Kerstner owned a store here in the 1870s. He named the place Farmer's village, a name he felt appropriate to the farming region. Mr. Louis Kipping, who bought the store in 1889 and applied for a post office, suggested two names, Carola for a feminine friend, and Tilsit, which was adopted. The name Tilsit was suggested by the German members of the community for the city of Tilsit in East Prussia, which gave its name to the famous peace of Tilsit between Napoleon and the allies Prussia and Russia, signed there in 1807. (Kipping, Rudert, Putz, Macke, Ramsay)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Toad Suck
Description:See Millersville
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trinity Lutheran Church
Description:The Lutheran Church in the city of Cape Girardeau which was organized May 28, 1854. Reverend A. Lehmann was the first pastor. The present church building was erected in 1879. Named for the Christian doctrine. ("Diamond Anniversary" (Pamphlet)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trinity Lutheran School
Description:A school established in 1865 and maintained by Trinity Lutheran Church (q.v.), from which it was named. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN (1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek
Description:A small creek which empties into the Mississippi River in the eastern part of Shawnee Township, named by the pioneer hunters for the wild turkey found in this neighborhood. (Macke)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tywappity Township
Description:One of the five original townships laid off in 1807, Tywappity Township was bounded on the north and west by the middle of Big Swamp, on the south by the district line separating Cape Girardeau from New Madrid, and on the east by the Mississippi River. In 1821 this township was cut off to form Scott County. The name was taken from Tywappity Bottoms, a large area of low land along the Mississippi River, now included in Scott County. For a doubtful conjecture about the original Indian meaning of the name, see the thesis by the present writer on Scott County. Houck says (II 162) that the earliest form of the name (1788) was Ze-wa-pe-ta; later spellings, Theonapita and Tiwappaty. (Houck II 162)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:U.S. Highway 61
Description:See King's Highway.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Unica River
Description:See Whitewater River.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Township
Description:A township erected in 1840 by William Harrell, Sam Seely, and Anson Hays, commissioners appointed to make a new township out of part of Apple Creek Township and German Township. The boundaries were "Beginning on Apple Creek opposite the house of the widow of John Smith, thence to David Dunn's, thence to David Wells, including both in Apple Creek Township, thence to the Farmington road at Fielding Guenleys, including him in the new township, thence to Christopher Seabaugh's to the old Fredericktown road to Little Whitewater, thence to the Perry County line. To be called and known by the name of Union Township." Union Township was disbanded in 1851 when Bollinger County was organized. It was obviously an ideal name. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vancil's Ferry
Description:See Green's Ferry.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vancil's Landing
Description:See Green's Ferry.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Village Sauvage
Description:See Shawnee Village.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Virginia Warrior's Path
Description:See Warrior's Path.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Waller's Ferry
Description:A ferry twelve miles north of Cape Girardeau on the Mississippi River established in 1797 by Joseph Waller, for whom it was named. (Houck I 190)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Washington School
Description:An elementary school in the city of Cape Girardeau, erected in 1914 and named in honor of George Washington. (SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN Oct. 4, 1934)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Welch Township
Description:In the southwest part of the county, organized May 27, 1856, and named for Judge M. Welch, farmer, who was a native of Bollinger County. (County Court Record, Putz, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whig
Description:A post office maintained from 1899-1904; no explanation of the name can be offered and the location of the place is unknown.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whitewater
Description:A small village in the western part of Hubble Township, on the Belmont Branch of the Iron Mountain Railroad. It was first settled as a town in 1866; a post office was established in 1890, and the town incorporated in 1898. It is named for Whitewater River (q.v.) on which it is located. (Postal Guide, Campbell, Douglass I 373)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whitewater Presbyterian Church
Description:This early church was organized June 2, 1832, under the trees on the banks of Whitewater River, about eight miles from the present site of Whitewater (q.v.) by Reverend Jas. Ladd, home missionary from the East, and Alex Boyd, Elder at Farmington, Missouri. It was named from the stream on which it was organized. (Jackson Cash Book Sept. 29, 1932, Conrad)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whitewater River
Description:The largest stream in the county; it is formed by the junction of the Little Whitewater (q.v.), Cane Creek, and other branches in Kinder Township and flows south into Stoddard County, where it becomes known as Little River. The Indians called the river Ne ska or Unica. Schoolcraft says the name the Osages gave the river is Unica, but he is said to have confused this river with White River, largely in Arkansas. The Chippeway name is Ne ska or Niska, meaning white water, obviously a descriptive name for its crystal clear water. The early French settlers translated the Indian name as La Riviere Blanche or L'Eau Blanche, which was in turn rendered by the Spanish as Rio Blanco, and by the English as Whitewater. In Francis La Flesche's DICT. OF THE OSAGE LANGUAGE Niska is the Osage name for White River, from ____ river and ____ white. Unica is doubtless the same name with the common Osage prefix u-, of uncertain meaning. (Schoolcraft 853, Douglass I 230, Houck I 17-17)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whitewater Township
Description:In the western part of the county; organized in 1852 and named for Whitewater River (q.v.) which flows through the county. (Douglass I 163, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Willard's Landing
Description:See Moccasin Spring.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williams Creek
Description:A small creek in the southeast part of Byrd Township. The stream was first known as Riviere Charles, a name given by the early French settlers, doubtless honoring Charles III or Charles IV of Spain, to which Louisiana had been ceded in 1763. In 1798 the Randol (or Randall) family came from Hamilton County, Virginia, and settled there. Enos Randol, the father of ten children, gave his name to the stream which ran through his Spanish grant. The name was written Randol's Creek on the earlier maps, but was changed to Randall's Creek. Now the stream is known as William's Creek, for William Williams, who came to this section in 1802 and became a prominent citizen and landowner. ("Farm Aristocracy in Cape Girardeau County") (pamphlet), SPAN. REGIME II 408, Douglass I 178)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Williams School
Description:A rural school in the southeast part of Byrd Township, named, as was the creek, for William Williams, prominent landowner and citizen. (Kiehne, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Young's Creek
Description:A branch of Byrd Creek (q.v.) in the southeast part of Byrd Township, where Phillip Young settled in 1803. (Houck II 185)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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