Camden County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Adair Township
Description:Located in the northwest part of Camden County. Bounded on the north by the Osage River and Morgan County, on the east by Jasper and Osage Townships, on the south by the Little Niangua River and Russell Township, on the west by Benton and Hickory Counties. Adair was one of the six original townships established by the county court in March, 1841. It is said to have been named for an early settler within its boundaries; and it is true that there were Adairs among the first settlers, for the county history records that the oldest marriage license issued in the county was made out to a "Miss Eliza Adear and David Yande," on February 21, 1841. But townships, as a rule, are named for men of more than local prominence; cf. Jackson, Jasper, and Warren below. The fact that the same 1841 act of the State Legislature that created Camden County (under the name of Kinderhook) also created Adair County in the northern part of the state makes it likely that they were named for the same man. Adair County, Missouri, like its namesakes in Iowa and Kentucky was named for Governor John Adair (1759-1840), a very popular political leader and soldier, who had died just the year before. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 293; Gannett; Miss Adam's thesis; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Anderson Hollow
Description:In northeast Osage Township, leading northeast into Auglaize Creek. Named for a family. (Highway Map; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Anderson Hollow Mines
Description:Located six miles southeast of Linn Creek. Named from its location near Anderson Hollow School. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 283; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Anderson Hollow School
Description:Located in the northeast part of Osage Township. Named for the hollow. This school is closed. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Arnhold's Mill
Description:A camping place near Hahatonka Springs. Named for an early owner of the mill. (Williams (1904) 345; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Asboth
Description:A post office in 1867. (Goodwin (1867) 45)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Auglaize
Description:A post office in 1895. Probably to be identified either with Dry Glaize, later Glaize (q.v.), or Wet Glaize (q.v.). Named for the stream on which it is located. (Postal Guide; Eaton (1916) 269)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Auglaize Creek
Description:This stream with its various branches heads in Laclede and Pulaski Counties, in close relation with the sources of the Gasconade River. The branch which perhaps may be designated as Auglaize Creek proper rises in western Pulaski County and runs west into Camden, joining the Wet Auglaize, a much larger stream, near the center of Auglaize Township. Wet Augliaze Creek rises in northern Laclede County and runs north into Camden. After their juncture they flow northeast into Jackson Township, where they are joined by the Dry Auglaize near the northeast boundary of the township. Dry Auglaize Creek rises near the center of Laclede County, in Lebanon Township, then turns east into Jackson Township to join its sisters. The combined three streams, often known as the Grand Auglaize, but also as merely the Auglaize, now take a turn into Miller County, running for a short distance through the southwest corner of Glaze Township; then it reenters Camden County, flowing in a generally northwest direction through northern Jackson and Osage Townships, to empty at last into the Osage River in northeast Osage Township. The name is French, one of the oldest river names in the State. It was originally a French phrase "au glaise," meaning "at the clay," more specifically "at the saline lick." The word "glaise" in standard French means potter's clay or loam; but McDermott says it was used in Mississippi French for superficial deposits of salt in the ground frequented by animals that lick it, or salt licks. He quotes from Dunbar's LIFE, LETTERS, AND PAPERS, 1804: "The soil around consisted of a white tenacious clay, probably fit for Potter's ware: hence the name "Glaize" which the French hunters have bestowed upon most of the licks which are frequented by the beasts of the forest, altho salt is not always to be found in such places so as to merit attention." Dunbar wrote also of "licks, which are sometimes termed 'saline,' sometimes 'glaize'." There is much clay in the region of the stream and its branches, especially near the headwaters. In the spring of the year, when the waters rise, they are often as red as blood. With the retention of the French "au," meaning "at the," compare Auxvasse (for "aux vases," at the swamps) in Callaway County, Aux Barques, Aux Chenes, Aux Gres, all in Michigan, Aux Herbes in Louisiana, Aux Pins in Alabama, Aux Cayes in Haiti, and above all Ozarks (for "aur Arcs," at the Arkansas country). There are an Auglaize River and County in Ohio. The meaning of the variant and branch names is clear in most cases. Pike in his account of his Expedition of 1806 calls the stream the Saline, which his editor Coues thinks was a slip of the pen or memory for Saline Creek in Miller County, which he had passed just a few days before; but he may well have found it in use, as a synonym for "glaize." The frequent variant Grand Auglaize has been explained as used because the stream is the longest, though not the largest, tributary of the Osage, or as referring to the lower part after the junction of all the branches; but Schultz points out that the original French form of the name was Riviere Grande Glaize; and La Grande Glaize, according to McDermott, meant "The Big Lick." The Dry Auglaize is so called because it is dry over large areas for most of the year, in contrast to the Wet Auglaize, which never goes dry. The name is often reduced to Grand Glaize, Grand Glaze, Glaize, or Glaze. (Eaton; Gannett; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 375; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 280, 281; Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; Schultz, HIST. MILLER (1933) 14; J.F. McDermott's GLOSSARY OF MISSISSIPPI VALLEY FRENCH, under "glaise;" theses by Weber and O'Brien; J. Banner; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Auglaize Township
Description:Located in the southeast part of Camden County. Bounded on the north by Jackson Township, on the east by Pulaski County, on the south by Laclede County, on the west by Warren Township. It was originally called Glaize Township, and under that name was one of the six original townships created by the county court in March, 1841. For the change of name cf. Auglaize Creek. Named from Auglaize Creek, which runs through it. (HIST. CAMDEN (1887) 300; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; C.F. Huddleston; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ausburus Creek
Description:Rises in the southeast part of Russell Township, flowing east into Big Niangua River, near the eastern boundary of the Township. Named for a family who owned land near its banks. (Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1883) 26; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 280; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bailey Mines
Description:Located three and a half miles northwest of Linn Creek. A lead mine. Named for the owner. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 283; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Baker Creek
Description:A small creek in the southwest part of the county, rising in Russell Township and flowing north into Little Niangua River in Adair Township. Named for a settler on its banks. (Parker (1865) Map; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Banister
Description:A post office from 1895-97, 1900-15; in northern Russell Township, on Little Niangua River, six miles southwest of Nonsuch. A family name. Also spelled Bannister. (Williams (1904) 345; Postal Guide; Eaton (1916) 269; Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Banks Branch Creek
Description:Rises in the northern part of Laclede County, flowing north into Camden County, joining Big Niangua River near the northern boundary of Warren Township. Named for a family who owned land adjoining the creek. (Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 280; C. Shrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Banks Branch School
Description:Located in the extreme southern part of Warren Township. Named for the branch on which the school is located. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bannister Hollow
Description:A small valley in the western part of Russell Township. Named for a prominent landowner in this section. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bannister School
Description:Located in Bannister Hollow in the western part of Russell Township. A family name. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Barnumton
Description:A post office since 1868; in the center of Adair Township. Named derived from a local family named Barnum. (Postal Guide; MISSOURI GAZ. (1874) 100; MISSOURI GAZ. (1879-80) 103; Eaton (1916) 269; R.M. (1940) 226, 227)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beulah Church
Description:Located in the southeast part of Auglaize Township. Short for Land of Beulah. An allegorical name prophetically applied to Israel (Isaiah lxii:4). (C.F. Huddleston; Webster's DICT. (1934) 260)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Bend Acres
Description:Land located in the northwest part of Adair Township in the bend of the west fork of the Lake of the Ozarks. Named from its location. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Cave
Description:See Hahatonka River Cave. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 281)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Niangua River
Description:This important stream, the largest tributary of the Osage River, heads in Webster County, in relation with the Osage Fork of the Gasconade, and flows north along the boundary between Dallas and Laclede Counties, which it crosses six times. In Camden County it continues north and northeast through Russell and Osage Townships, to fall into the Osage River about five miles above the mouth of Linn Creek. Pike passed its mouth on August 8, 1806, calling it in his Journal the Youngar. In his "Dissertation on Louisiana," Pike describes the river as follows: "The Yungar, or Nehem-gar, as termed by the Indians, derives its name from the vast number of springs at its source; it is supposed to be nearly as extensive as the Osage River, navigable for canoes one hundred miles, and is celebrated for the abundance of bear which are found on its branches. On it hunt the Chasseurs du Bois of Louisiana, Osage, and Creeks of Muskogees." In the Long Expedition of 1819-1820 substantially the same information is given: "The river of the Osages...receives from the east several rapid and beautiful rivers, of which the largest is the Yungar (so named in some Indian language, from the great number of springs tributary to it), entering the Osage one hundred and forty miles from the Missouri." Besides these names, Yungar, or Youngar, and Nehemgar, the later form Niangua has generally prevailed. Another spelling, Neongwah, seems to be indicated by the name of the town Neongwah (q.v.) on its banks. On recent maps the stream is usually called the Big Niangua, obviously to distinguish it from its tributary the Little Niangua (q.v.). The original meaning of the name has been much disputed. Coues disagrees with the explanation given by Pike and Long, as cited above, that it refers to the numerous springs at the sources of the stream, and says that whatever may be its preferable form, it is the Osage name of the bear. Neither derivation is borne out by the only available dictionary of the Osage language, that of La Flesche, which gives "wa-ca-be" as the Osage word for bear and "nicni" or "nihni" for spring. The explanation traditionally given in Webster County, that the river was named for an Indian chief Niangua, who went up the river seeking his lost sweetheart, is of course merely a bit of pioneer romancing. There can be no doubt that the first part of the name, Ni- or Ne-, is the Osage word for river or water, as is used in many streams of the Osage country: e.g., Ni-u-zhu, Main River, for the Neosho; Ni-sho-dse, Smoky River, for the Missouri; Ni-utonga, Big Water, for the Mississippi. It is also apparent that Neongwah and Nehemgar are merely variant attempts to spell the Indian name phonetically, the latter probably being of French origin (since Ne-hem- in French would suggest the same nasalized vowel, approximately, as Niong- in English), and hence probably the earlier form. The still earlier forms Youngar or Yungar may possibly represent the root of the word with the prefix Ni- omitted. A possible clue to the last syllable -ua or -wah is suggested by the popular etymology for the name given by Dallas County histories and old settlers: namely from an obstinate Indian who said, "I won't go 'way," thus expressing his objection to go-on or on-go and leave his native place. Absurd as this farfetched bit of etymologizing is, it may have contributed to making the name end in something that sounded like 'way or away, and thus turned Nianga into Niangua. A recent U.S. Ethnology Bulletin supplies the most scientific and satisfactory etymology for the name yet suggested: namely, from the Indian Ne anoge, meaning water that runs over a person. In the orthography used in La Flesche's dictionary, this would appear as Ni-a-nonge, which is still closer to the Americanized form. The meaning suggested, i.e., a stream so large that it runs over you if you try to wade or ford it, is quite accordance with typical methods of Indian nomenclature. (Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 376, 513; Long Exp., EWT, XIV. 144; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 280; theses by Miss Bell & Miss O'Brien; Francis La Flesche, A DICTIONARY OF THE OSAGE LANGUAGE, Smithsonian Institute, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 109, 1932; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blackman's Mills
Description:A post office in 1891; in Osage Township, ten miles northeast of Linn Creek, near the mouth of Auglaize Creek. Named for the early owner of mills here. (Postal Guide; MISSOURI GAZ. (1891-92) 163; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 375; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bollinger Creek
Description:A short southern tributary of the Osage River, in northern Adair Township. The Bollinger family has long been prominent in just this part of the county. Joseph Bollinger and Wm. H. Bollinger made land entries here in 1840; and Henry Bollinger was appointed judge of election for Adair Township in 1841, county court justice 1858-1861, and sheriff 1862-1864. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 296, 300, 314, 315; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 376; Highway Map; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bollinger's Ferry
Description:On Osage River. Named for the owner. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 308; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Branch
Description:A post office since 1900; in the southern part of Russell Township, nearly touching the boundary between Camden and Dallas Counties. It may have been named for it's location near Mack's Creek, a branch of the Little Ninagua River; or perhaps for a smaller stream once called Long Branch (cf. Long Branch School). It seems more likely, however, to have been a personal name. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brashear Hollow
Description:In northern Jackson Township, leading northeast into Auglaize Creek near Passover. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brown School
Description:Located in the western part of Auglaize Township. Named for Jacob Brown, who owned the land on which it was located. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brush Creek
Description:A small creek rising in the southern part of Osage Township, and flowing north into the Lake of the Ozarks. Named from the thick growth of brush along its banks. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brush Creek Mines
Description:Located four miles southeast from Linn Creek. Named for their location on Brush Creek. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 283; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Byler School
Description:Located in the center part of Warren Township. A family name. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cable Ridge School
Description:Located near the extreme western boundary of Adair Township and Benton County. The county history records that Samuel Cable was appointed judge of the first election in Adair Township, in 1841. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 300; J. Banner; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camden County
Description:One of the south central counties of Missouri, on the northern slope of the Ozark Range of mountains. It is bounded on the north by Morgan County, on the northeast by Miller County, on the east by Pulaski County, on the south by Laclede and Dallas Counties, and on the west by Hickory and Benton Counties. It was organized January 29, 1841, under the name of Kinderhook County. The name was changed by act of the legislature to Camden County on February 23, 1843. On December 13, 1855, when Laclede County was organized, its southern boundary was moved northward, thus reducing the size of Russell and Warren townships. The name Kindehook was borrowed from Kinderhook, New York, an old Dutch town in Columbia County near the Hudson River, not far from Albany. The name is an anglicized form of the Dutch Kinderhoeck, meaning "children's point," and according to Gannett was bestowed by Henry Hudson upon the place on account of the many Indian children he observed there. The reason for its adoption, as well as for its rejection two years later, must be sought in a dramatic chapter of American politics. It was the home of Martin Van Buren (1782-1862), eighth president of the United States (1837-1841). There Van Buren was born and died; there he resided for the greater part of his life; and therefore the name of the town became a political watchword and rallying-cry for the Democratic Party, especially in the stirring campaign of 1840. The newly organized Missouri county was overwhelmingly Democratic in its sympathies, and would probably have desired to be named Van Buren County, had not that name been already appropriated in 1835 by the western county now known as Cass. In 1835 Van Buren was only Vice-President, serving under Andrew Jackson, but was already taking over the leadership of the party. In 1840 he had presided over the nation for four years and was running for reelection in a campaign that in some ways was the most remarkable one that our country has ever experienced. The campaign made Kinderhook, usually known affectionately as"Old Kinderhook," a symbol for the cause its sons represented from one end of the country to the other. Of especial interest to the student of the American language is a theory recently put forward that finds in the 1840 political battle cry of "Old Kinderhook" the true origin of the popular Americanism "O.K." Mr. Allen Walker Read in a recent article, has presented the case for this new explanation of the source of "O.K." most convincingly, as over against a wilderness of claims and counter-claims in favor of other sources. One of the chief means, he says, adopted by the Democratic Party in New York City, especially by its radical "Locofoco" branch, of furthering Van Buren's candidacy was the organization of a set of social clubs; and among them was one announced for the first time on March 24, 1840, as the "Democratic O.K. Club"--the very first time the magic letters "O.K." ever appeared. The meaning of the name, in keeping with political practices of the time, was kept for a while a profound secret; but it was at once recognized as the watchword of the "New Era," as Van Buren's cause was entitled. The Whigs promptly attacked this secret Locofoco slogan by satirically attributing many meanings to it, among them the apocryphal story so often since repeated that it stood for Andrew Jackson's illiterate spelling of "Oll Korrect." Late in May, however, the Locofocs felt free to divulge its original significance as standing for the birthplace of their adored leader. As the campaign grew hot in the fall of 1840, the expression swept over the entire country, reaching Ohio, for instance early in September. Undoubtedly it must have been deeply imbedded in the hearts of the fervently Democratic Missouri legislature in January, 1841, when they voted to name the latest Missouri county Kinderhook. Van Buren was defeated in the election, however, by his Whig opponent William Henry Harrison, who took office in March, 1841. Just a month later Harrison died, on April 4, 1841, and was succeeded by his Vice-President John Tyler. Both the Whig and the Democratic parties were split and seriously demoralized during the years that followed. When Van Buren ran for the Democratic nomination in 1844, he was defeated by Polk, a man previously almost unknown. By the next election, in 1848, he had deserted the Democrats to become the candidate of the new Free-Soil Party. The Democrats in turn repudiated him, and nominated Lewis Cass, whereupon both candidates were defeated by the Whig nominee General Zachary Taylor, hero of the just concluded Mexican War. These political circumstances supply ample explanation of why the Missourians wanted to change the name of Kinderhook County in 1843, just as they changed the name of Van Buren County to Cass in 1848. The name they chose to replace Kinderhook was Camden, rather a stock name for American places, being borne by counties in North Carolina, Georgia, and New Jersey, and at least twenty towns, among them Camden, South Carolina, where the Battle of Camden was fought August 16, 1780; this was one of the worst defeats suffered by Americans in the Revolutionary War, the British under Cornwallis overwhelmingly the patriot army of General Gates. It was particularly stamped upon American hearts by the death in the battle of the Revolutionary hero, General De Kalb. The popularity of the name Camden in the United States rests ultimately upon the popularity of the British statesman Charles Pratt (1714-1794), the first Earl Camden. He was Lord Chancellor 1766-1770 and one of the ablest leaders of the British Whig Party. During the struggle with the American colonies that arose and came to its fatal conclusion while the Whigs were out of power, Camden was one of their best friends and ablest advocates of the unconstitutionality of "taxation without representation." He led the opposition in Parliament to the Revolutionary War, and naturally was greatly admired in America as a liberal and far-seeing statesman. It is not certain whether the second name of the Missouri county was bestowed directly in honor of the British statesman or not. Gannett states that it was named for Camden County, North Carolina; and it is true that many of its settlers were North Carolinians. They may also have remembered, however, that Earl Camden was a great Whig, although in the British, not the American, sense of the term; and this fact may well have had its significance at a time when American Whigs were winning and all the principles that Kinderhook stood for were being repudiated or forgotten. (Eaton; Gannett; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 279, 312; HIST. OZARK REG. (1917) 49; ENC. BRIT. (1937); R.M. (1940) 226; MHR, vol. XXXIV (1939-40) 500; Allen Walker Read, THE EVIDENCE ON "O.K.," SAT. REV. OF LIT. XXIV (July 19, 1941) 3-4, 10-11; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Camdenton
Description:A post office since 1932, in the center part of Camden County. Named from Camden County. The county seat was moved from Linn Creek to Camdenton at the general election of 1930, to take the place of the old town largely submerged by the completion of the Bagnell Dam. The new town was laid out and its name chosen by John T. Woodruff, who said he selected it in preference to many other suggested names that were already in use in other states, because there is not another Camdenton in the country. (MHR, vol. XXV (1930-31) 531; Postal Guide; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; J. Banner; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Campground Church
Description:Located in the center part of Auglaize Township. Named because camp meetings were held on this spot. (C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Carver
Description:A post office from 1902-1930; in northern Adair Township on the northern bank of the Osage River. Named for its first postmaster. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 345; Eaton (1916) 269)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cave Pump
Description:A post office from 1860-1890; in Osage Township, on the Big Niangua River, seven miles southwest of Linn Creek. Missouri Gazette (1860) lists it as a post village. (Postal Guide; Missouri Gaz. (1860) 50 & (1874) 100)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chapel Bluff School
Description:See New Pleasant Hill School.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chauncey
Description:See Hugo
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cherry
Description:A village in the eastern part of Auglaize Township. (Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clark School
Description:Located in the central part of Adair Township. A family name. The county history records Judson Clark as serving as sheriff of the county from 1846-1852. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 315; C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Climax
Description:See Climax Springs
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Climax Springs
Description:A post office since 1886; in the western part of Camden County, nearly touching the Benton County boundary. Springs are located here. Called only Climax in 1886. Climax is a popular self-congratulatory name that has been adopted by eight American towns in other states. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Conway School
Description:Located in the northeast part of Camden County. A family name. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Coons Creek
Description:A village in the southeast corner of the county near the boundary of Camden and Pulaski Counties. Named because of the many raccoons found on it. (Colton Atlas (1860) No. 46; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Corum
Description:A post office from 1900-1904; near the boundary line of Camden and Morgan Counties, in Jasper Township. The village has ceased to exist. A family name. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 345; J. Banner; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crain's Ferry
Description:A ferry across the Osage, at or near the mouth of the Niangua, its location being below the mouth of the Niangua and above the mouth of Linn Creek. Kept by Aaron Crain, several years before the organization of the county in 1841. (HIST. CAM. (1889) 340)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crittenden
Description:A village in northwest Adair Township, on the southern bank of the Osage River, at the mouth of Rainey Creek. It is listed as a post office in Camden County from 1879 to 1887, but by some error appears from 1888 to 1897 in Morgan County, then from 1899 to 1930 again in Camden. Named for Governor Thomas Theodore Crittenden (1832-1909) who was governor of Missouri 1881-1885. He was attorney general of Missouri in 1864, U.S. Congressman 1872-1874, and during Cleveland's second administration was consul-general to Mexico, 1893-1897. (Postal Guide; MISSOURI GAZ. (1879-80) 206; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 376; Williams (1904) 345; Eaton (1916) 269; DAB (1930) 550; CRIT. MEMOIRS (1936) 52, 64; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crocker School
Description:Located in the northern part of Russell Township. A family name. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Damsel
Description:A post office from 1886-1918; five miles northeast of Linn Creek; in northern Osage Township. This may have been a local family name, though no record of it has been discovered. Harrison lists it among surnames of the United Kingdom, spelled Damsell. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 345; Henry Harrison, Surnames of the United Kingdom; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dean's Creek
Description:Probably named for John M.D. Dean who served on the first grand jury for the county, July 12, 1841, as recorded in the county history. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 281, 320)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Deberry
Description:A post office from 1899-1904; in the southeast corner of the county, six miles northwest of Stoutland. A family name, spelled Deberry. The county history records that Henry Deberry was elected county assessor in November, 1888. (Postal Guide; HIST. CAM. (1889) 316; Williams (1904) 345; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Decaturville
Description:A post office from 1867-1870, and since 1886. It was settled in 1838. Located in the southern part of Warren Township. Early settlers here named the settlement for their home in central Illinois, on the Sangamon River. Decatur, the county seat of Macon County, Illinois was named, like seventeen other towns and five counties, for Captain Stephen Decatur (1779-1820), naval hero in the Tripolitan War. The -ville was added presumably because there was already a Missouri Decatur, in Cole County. (Postal Guide; MISSOURI GAZ. (1874) 100; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Demeter
Description:A post office from 1900-1904; on the southern boundary of the county, six miles northwest of Deberry. Named from the fact that the soil here is very productive. Demeter was the goddess of the fruitful soil and of agriculture. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 345; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Double Oak
Description:A post office in 1853; probably a descriptive name. (Hayward (1853) 824)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Auglaize Creek
Description:See Auglaize Creek
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Glaize
Description:See Glaize
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Ridge
Description:A post office in 1876-1877, ten miles south of Linn Creek. Now extinct. Named from its location. (MISSOURI GAZ. (1876) 169; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 352; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dry Ridge School
Description:Located in the southeast part of Russell Township. Named for its location on the site of the early village. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Eaton School
Description:Located in the southeast part of Auglaize Township. A family name. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Edith
Description:See Green Gables
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elm Grove School
Description:Located in the eastern part of Auglaize Township. The name is descriptive of the location in a grove of elm trees. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Erie
Description:A former village in northern Osage Township, on the southern bank of the Osage River. Its original name was Oregon. In April, 1841, shortly after Kinderhook County had been organized, the commissioners appointed to select a county seat chose its site south of the river and gave it the name of Oregon. The settlement was platted in June, 1841. On February 23, 1843, an act was passed by the State Legislature to change the name to Erie, at the same time as the name of the county was changed to Camden (q.v.). Erie remained the county seat of Camden County until November 15, 1855, when the Legislature replaced it by Linn Creek (q.v.), chiefly, it is said, because the latter was a better landing-place for steamboats. A post office was established at Erie in 1853; but after 1855 the old town was largely abandoned, though the original county courthouse is still partly standing. The earlier name Oregon doubtless reflected the controversy over Oregon Territory which was a live issue in the 1840s; cf. Oregon County, Missouri, organized February 11, 1845. This long-drawn-out dispute between Britain and the United States, which gave rise to the American war-cry "Fifty-four forty or fight," was finally settled by a compromise on the 49th parallel of latitude in 1846. Oregon Territory was organized in 1848, and Oregon became a state in 1859. It was named for the Oregon River, now the Columbia. The name is of Indian origin; but its precise meaning is uncertain. The change of the name Erie is said to have been requested by settlers from Pennsylvania. According to Gannett Erie, Pennsylvania, was named for Lake Erie, which in turn took its name from the ancient Indian tribe on its borders which was conquered in 1653 and absorbed by the Iroquois. The word "Erie," Gannett says, originally meant "Wildcat." There are ten American towns and three counties that bear the name. (Hayward (1853) 824; Colton (1857) map; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 304; Gannett; Miss O'Brien's thesis; C.F. Huddleston; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:Located in the southern part of Auglaize Township. Cf. above. The school is now closed. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fearless
Description:A post office from 1891-1899; eight miles southeast of Linn Creek. Perhaps a variant form of Fairless or Fairley's or some similar surname. Cf. the distorted surnames that seem to be represented in the county by Only, Passover, Rain Water, Hollow, Right Point, and Zebra. (Postal Guide; MISSOURI GAZ. (1891-92) 341; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ferry Mines
Description:Located at Linn Creek. Named from the fact that the lead was ferried across the creek. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 283)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fiery Fork Creek
Description:In southern Adair Township. Rises east of Climax Springs, and flows southeast into the Little Niangua River. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fork of Rainey Creek
Description:Unidentified. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 280)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Freedom Church
Description:A Christian church, ten miles east of Linn Creek. Organized in 1850. An ideal name. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 352; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Freedom School
Description:Located in the eastern part of Osage Township. Named for Freedom Church. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ganter
Description:A post office from 1910-1926; in the southern part of Camden County, on the boundary line between Warren and Auglaize Townships. There was an earlier post office also in Warren Township, probably the same place, known as Gunter's Big Springs in 1874, later called Gunter's Springs, and still later (1886-1895) simply Gunter. This was named for James R. Gunter, a pioneer from Alabama, who is said to have settled nine miles above the mouth of the Big Niangua River. The spring or springs was on his land. The change in spelling from Gunter to Ganter is unexplained. (MISSOURI GAZ. (1874) 101 & (1891-1892) 379; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 286, 292; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; Postal Guide; C.F. Huddleston; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Garmon School
Description:Located in the north-central part of Auglaize Township. A family name. This school is now closed. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:George School
Description:Located in the northern part of Auglaize Township. A family name. The county history records Hoziah George as sheriff in the county from 1880-1884, and county court clerk in 1886. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 314; C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gibson School
Description:Probably a family name. The county history records Samuel Gibson as one of the county court justices from 1852-1856 and 1862-1865. The school is now closed. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 314, 315)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Glaize
Description:A former village on Dry Auglaize Creek, five and a half miles southeast of Zaring. It had a post office named Dry Glaize in 1853. This was refounded under the name of Glaize City in 1860, with a post office from 1868-1870. The post office was reestablished in 1890 as Glaize, which continued until 1904. Its name was taken from that of the stream, progressively shortened. Possibly it is the same as the post office listed as Auglaize (q.v.) in 1895. (Hayward (1853) 824; MISSOURI GAZ. (1874) 100; MISSOURI GAZ. (1879-80) 260; Eaton (1916) 269; Williams (1904) 345; Postal Guide; C.F. Huddleston; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Glaize City
Description:See Glaize.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Glaize Creek
Description:See Auglaize Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Glaize Township
Description:See Auglaize Township.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grand Auglaize
Description:See Auglaize Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grand Glaize Creek
Description:See Auglaize Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Green Bay Terrace
Description:On the northern shore of Lake of the Ozarks in Osage Township, just opposite Linn Creek. It overlooks the bend in the lake. Doubtless named in imitation of the famous lakeside resort known as Green Bay in Wisconsin. It is opposite the precipice of rocks, locally known as Lover's Leap. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Green Gables
Description:A village in southeast Russell Township, on the Big Niangua River. There was a post office there under the name of Edith from 1895-1915, and it still appears with that name on the Highway Map. The summer resort there, however, has recently assumed the more glamorous name of Green Gables, probably inspired by Lucy Maud Montgomery's popular romance ANNE OF GREEN GABLES, first published in 1908. The summer homes there are said all to have painted their gables green. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904); C.F. Huddleston; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gunter
Description:See Ganter
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gunter's Big Spring
Description:See Ganter
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hack Ridge School
Description:Located in the central part of Russell Township. This school was established in 1868 on land belonging to Samuel Hack. The schoolhouse is on a ridge. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hahatonka
Description:A post office since 1897. Located on the eastern bank of Big Niangua River in the northern part of Warren Township, seven miles south of Linn Creek. Named by Major Kellog when the town was laid out at the beautiful springs at this place. He claimed it was derived from the Indian words, "Iha-ha," to smile, and "tonka," meaning water. It means then "smiling waters." The etymology, as is often the case with such artificial, "made-up" Indian appellations, is a highly dubious one. It is true that there is in the Osage language a verb "i-ha-ha," but it means "to laugh" or "to ridicule" rather than to smile; and the word "tonka" (more correctly "tonga" in the Osage language) means "big," not "water." Major Kellog probably modeled his name on that of Lake Minnetonka in Minnesota, which means "big water;" but it is the first part of that name, "Minne," that means "water," and the second part, "tonka," means "big." The Indian name of these beautiful Missouri Springs means, therefore, if it means anything, rather "Big Laugh" than "Smiling Waters."
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hahatonka Castle
Description:Located four miles southwest of Camdenton. Built by Robert M. Snyder of Kansas City. He died in an auto accident October 27, 1906 in Kansas City. It was completed by his son, Robert. It is now a sort of resort and museum. Daniel Boone is said to have trapped beaver in 1801 on what is now Hahatonka Lake. The region was visited in 1806 by a member of Pike's Expedition, and was described by Henry M. Brackenridge in his VIEWS OF LOUISIANA, published in 1814. Named from the town. (Mrs. J. Ellis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hahatonka Natural Bridge
Description:Located northeast of Hahatonka. Cf. above. (Mrs. J. Ellis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hahatonka River Cave
Description:Located northeast of Hahatonka. Named from the village. Prior to 1889, this was called by the natives "Big Cave." (Mrs. J. Ellis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hardscrabble School
Description:Located in the northern part of Auglaize Township. Said to have been named from the rocky ground on which the school children scraped their feet. More likely a mocking name implying poverty. It is a favorite bit of Missouri pioneer humor. There is a Hardscrabble School in Dent County, a town named Hardscrabble in Bates County, and the shrine now known as Grant's Log Cabin in St. Louis, called by General U.S. Grant himself Hardscrabble when he lived there, with reference to the bitter fight he was making for daily bread. This school is closed. (C. Schrimsher; Theses by Misses O'Brien, Johnson, & Welty; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Harold Mills Mines
Description:Located near the eastern boundary of Camden County. Named for the owner. (HIST. CAMDEN (1859) 283; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Harper's Chapel
Description:Located in the northeast part of Camden County, one mile north of Damsel. Named for the owners of the land on which the chapel was built. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hazel Valley School
Description:Located in the northern part of Russell Township. Named for its geographical location among hazel nut brush. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Grove School
Description:In a valley in the southwest part of Russell Township. A descriptive name; but there are no trees here now. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:High Point Church
Description:In the southwest part of Auglaize Township. Named from its location. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:High Point School
Description:In the west-central part of Russell Township. Cf. above. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hines Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church, on Dry Ridge, ten miles south of Linn Creek. Organized in 1887. Named for the owner of the land. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 352; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hollow Mines
Description:Located ten miles west of Linn Creek. Named for their location in a hollow. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 283; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hoon's Diggins
Description:A lead mine; located twelve miles west of Linn Creek. Named for the prospector. (HIST. CAMDEN (1884) 283; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hugo
Description:A post office since 1915; on the western bank of Dry Auglaize Creek, eight miles southeast of Linn Creek, in southeast Osage Township. Before 1915, the village was called Chauncey in honor, it is said, of a General Chauncey. This may be an error for Captain Isaac Chauncey (1772-1840) of the War of 1812, who carried General Dearborn's army to the attack on Toronto in 1813, and later defeated an English fleet on Lake Ontario. Five other towns in the United States are named for him, and since he died just the year before Camden County was organized his fame must then have been fresh in the hearts of his countrymen. Cf. the other Canadian names in the county, Toronto and Montreal. The reason for the later change to Hugo, and the source of that name, have not been ascertained. It may be a surname, or perhaps a given name. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 345; J. Banner; C.F. Huddleston; Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hugo School
Description:Located in the western part of Jackson Township. Named for the small village nearby. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hunter Mines
Description:Located five miles northeast of Linn Creek. Named for the owner, D. Hunter, who was first lieutenant adjutant in the Osage Regiment of Home Guards during the Civil War from 1862-1863. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 283, 332; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Independence School
Description:Located in the center part of Auglaize Township. An ideal name. The school is now closed. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jackson Township
Description:Located in the southeast part of Camden County. Bounded on the north by Miller County, on the east by Pulaski County, on the south by Auglaize Township, and on the west by Osage Township. One of the six original townships created in 1841. Doubtless named for President Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), who was idolized in this predominantly Democratic section. Nearly twenty counties, including Jackson County, Missouri, and numerous towns and townships, were named for "Old Hickory." Cf. also Hickory County, above. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 300; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; C.F. Huddleston; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jasper Township
Description:Located in the northeast part of Camden County. Bounded on the north by Morgan County, on the east by Miller County, on the south by Osage Township, and on the west by Adair Township. It was organized in June, 1841, when the county court cut it off from Osage Township. Doubtless named, like Jasper County, Missouri, which was organized the same year, for the Revolutionary War hero Sergeant William Jasper (1750-1779), who lost his life trying to replace the fallen flag at Savannah, Georgia. Six other counties and at least twenty other towns and townships bear his name. (Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 310; PLAT BOOK CAMDEN (1902); R.M. (1940) 226, 227; Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kinderhook County
Description:See Camden County.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kolb's Hollow
Description:In southern Adair Township, leading southeast into the Little Niangua River. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:La Belle Roche
Description:Mentioned by Pike on August 17, 1806, as passed on the west (or north) side of the Osage River, just above the mouth of the Auglaize. Coues says it is a notable bluff not far from Damsel, but on the other side of the Osage. The location is approximately the same as that of Rockdale (q.v.). There is also a common kinship in the names. La Belle Roche is of French derivation, the phrase meaning "a beautiful rock." Many place-names in the United States are derived from the French word, roche for "rock," such as Roche a Gris, a river in Adams County, Wisconsin, listed by Gannett, and meaning "gray rock." (Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 375; Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Niangua
Description:Located in the southwest part of Warren Township. It is a part of the Niangua River, for which it is named. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake of the Ozarks
Description:An irregular body of water extending over five counties, including besides the three from the present study mentioned above also Miller and Henry Counties. It is said to be the largest artificial lake in the world, and the largest body of water between the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico. It is over 129 miles long, comprises over 95 square miles of water, and has a shore line more than 1,300 miles long. It was created in 1931 by the completion of the great Osage Dam at Bagnell in Henry County, by which the valleys of the Osage, Niangua, Little Niangua, Gravois, and Glaize Rivers and their tributaries were flooded. The name for the new lake was much disputed. The General Assembly of Missouri passed a resolution that it should be called Lake Benton, for Missouri's great statesman Thomas H. Benton. J.W. Vincent, editor of the Linn Creek Reveille, made an effort to have it called Lake McClurg after Governor J.W. McClurg (1818-1900), who was governor of Missouri from 1868-1870. The name designated by the builders, however, namely The Lake of the Ozarks, is the one that has come into popular use and favor. It is transferred, of course, from the Ozark Mountain region of Missouri and Arkansas, in the heart of which the lake is located. The name Ozarks, according to the best opinion, although this has been disputed, is derived from French and Indian sources: the original phrase used by the French colonists for the entire region was Aux Arcs, meaning "at or in the Arkansas country." It was the custom of the French to abbreviate the long Indian tribal names by using only the first syllable; in this way the great tribe which occupied the larger part of what is now the state of Arkansas and southern Missouri were commonly known as "Les Arcs," and their home as "Aux Arcs," which was later written phonetically by the American Ozarks. (Keith McCanse, Where to go in the Ozarks, 1932 ed., p. 36; theses by ,Weber and Miss O'Brien; Dr. R. L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake of the Ozarks Recreational Area
Description:In the northeast part of the county, occupying the lower part of the valley of Auglaize Creek. Named for the Lake of the Ozarks, created in 1931. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lick Creek
Description:A creek, rising in the extreme northwest part of Adair Township, and flowing northeast into the Lake of the Ozarks. Cf. above. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lick Creek School
Description:Located in the northwest corner of Adair Township. Named for the creek. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lick Township
Description:One of the six original townships created by the county court in March, 1841. It was cut off and disappeared when Laclede County was organized in 1849 and the southern part of Camden ceded to it. The name was merely the American equivalent of the French term "glaize" and doubtless conferred for the same reasons as explains Auglaize Creek (q.v.), which ran through it. (HIST. CAMDEN (1887) 300, 311; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Linn Creek [1 of 2]
Description:Rises in central Osage Township, flowing north into the Osage River, less than one mile below the mouth of Big Niangua River. Named for the many linn trees that originally grew on its banks. (Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; PLAT BOOK CAMDEN (1902); Eaton (1916) 269)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Linn Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A village on Linn Creek, for which it was named. It was settled in 1841 by Benjamin R. Abbott, who opened a store there. On November 15, 1855, it was chosen as county seat, to replace Erie (q.v.), because it afforded a better landing-place. It has been a post office since 1867. The village consisted of what was known as Old or Lower Town, later as Old Linn Creek, which was at or near the mouth of the stream, and the New or Upper Town about one-half mile up the creek, the latter being the site of the county seat. At the general election of November 4, 1930, the county seat was removed to the new town of Camdenton (q.v.) about five miles to the south, because it was known that Linn Creek would be largely submerged, as soon as the Bagnell Dam was completed, by the Lake of the Ozarks. Only a fringe of the old town, about a dozen houses, remained uncovered on the bluff after the waters of the Osage River has been impounded. The rest of the town has been removed about three miles up the creek. (Postal Guide; Eaton; MISSOURI GAZ. (1860); Goodwin (1867) 24; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 302, 340; MHR, vol. XXV (1930- 31) 531; R.M. (1940) 226; Highway Map (1940); Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Niangua
Description:A post office in 1868, and 1876-1877; in the west-central part of the county, on the southern bank of the Little Niangua River, for which it is named. (Postal Guide; Parker (1865) Map; MISSOURI GAZ. (1876-77) 299; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Niangua River
Description:A tributary of the Big Niangua River (q.v.), which rises in Grant Township, Dallas County, and flows north along the boundary between Hickory and Camden, which it crosses three times. It traverses Stark and Jordan Townships in Hickory County, and divides Russell from Adair Township in Camden County, to fall into the Big Niangua about six or eight miles above the mouth of the larger stream, in western Osage Township. So named to distinguish it from the Big Niangua. (Campbell (1873) 26; HIST. HICK (1889) 205; HIST. CAM. (1889) 280; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 376; R.M. (1940) 226; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lone Star School
Description:Located in the eastern part of Warren Township. An emblematic name. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Long Branch School
Description:Located in the southwest corner of Russell Township. Named for a family by the name of Long, and for the small village of Branch nearby. Probably there was a Long Branch, named for the family, and both the school and the village of Branch were named for it. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lover's Leap
Description:A precipice of rocks, 200 ft. above the place where the Big Niangua River flows into the Osage River. A magnificent view of the Osage, Niangua, and Linn Creek Rivers, and the precipice of the Ozarks can be obtained here. Attached to this place is the usual romantic but impossible Indian legend of a love-lorn maiden throwing herself from its heights to her death below. The name is a common one in Missouri and was probably given by some early newspaperman. The name of "Bluff City" originated later. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 285, 289, 290; Conard (1901) V. 4, 125, 126; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lower Big Spring
Description:Unidentified. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 281)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mack's Creek [1 of 2]
Description:The principal branch of Little Niangua River from the south and southeast, rising in the south-central part of Russell Township, flowing northwest into Little Niangua River. Named for an early settler. This may have been a distorted form, under the influence of popular etymology, of the family name, Hack (q.v.) (Cf. Hach Ridge School). (Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 280; Eaton (1916) 269)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mack's Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A post office since 1876; in the center of Mack's Creek Township. Settled as early as 1840. Named for the stream on which it is located. (Postal Guide; MISSOURI GAZ. (1874) 101; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 339; Eaton (1916) 269; R.M. (1940) 226, 227)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Maries Creek
Description:(HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 280)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McCrery Mines
Description:Located two miles south of Linn Creek. Named for the early owner. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 283; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Meadland
Description:A post office in 1868, in the southeast part of the county. Named for its location in a level meadow land. (Postal Guide; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Miller Creek
Description:Rises in the southwest part of Auglaize Township, flowing north and joining Wet Auglaize Creek near the northern boundary of the Township. Named for two early landowners in the vicinity, George W. and John R. Miller who sold their land to the county, December 12, 1883, for a poor farm. The former was circuit court judge from 1851-1869 and 1875-1879. (Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 308, 315; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mills School
Description:Located in the southern part of Russell Township. A family name. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Montreal
Description:A post office since 1886; in the southeast part of Camden County near the northern boundary of Auglaize Township. Named by Canadian settlers for Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Montreal, Canada, was named Ville Marie de Montreal by Father Vimont and his sixty followers in 1642. There are at least two places in France named Montreal, i.e. "royal mountain." (Postal Guide; W.B. Enc. (1934) 4632; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; C.F. Huddleston; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Montrose Church
Description:Located in the eastern part of Auglaize Township. Named by early settlers for a small village in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania borough, according to Gannett, was probably named for Montrose in Scotland. (WEBSTER'S DICT. (1934) 3095; Gannett; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mosier
Description:A post office from 1910-1918. A family name. (Postal Guide; Eaton (1916) 269)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Tabor School
Description:Located in the southwest part of Jasper Township. Named for a mountain of northern Palestine. The Old Testament refers to Tabor as the place to which Barak summoned his forces for the desperate conflict with Sisera (Judges IV). (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount View Church
Description:Located in the eastern part of Auglaize Township. The name is descriptive of its location. (C.T. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mt. Sinai School
Description:Located in the northwest part of Jasper Township, on a knoll. Named for Mount Sinai where God called Moses to give him the ten commandments (Exodus 19:20). It is supposed to be one of the three peaks of the mountain range on Sinai Peninsula. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Myetta
Description:A post office from 1901-1904; four miles north of Decaturville. No village here now. Probably the Christian name of the founder's wife or daughter. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 345)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Myetta Church
Description:Four miles north of Decaturville. Named for the former village. (C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Nehemgar River
Description:See Big Niangua River.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Neongwah
Description:A post office from 1927- 1933; in the southern part of Camden County, in western Warren Township, on the Big Niangua River (q.v.). It presumably preserved the older form of the river's name. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1940) 226, 227)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Pleasant Hill School
Description:Located in the southwest part of Warren Township. Originally named Pleasant Hill. When it was united with Chapel Bluff School, it was named New Pleasant Hill. Pleasant Hill is a descriptive name for its location, as is also Chapel Bluff School. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Niangua Big Spring
Description:Near the northern edge of Warren Township, a branch end of the Big Niangua River, eight miles from Linn Creek. Named from the Big Niangua River. (Parker (1867) 207; Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Niangua River
Description:See Big Niangua River.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Niangua Township
Description:This township was a part of Benton County from May, 1835 to January 29, 1841, after which it was attached to Camden County. It lies south of the Osage River and west of the Big Niangua River. It takes its name from the Big Niangua River. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 475; HIST. BENTON (1912) 27)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Nichol Hill School
Description:Located in the southwest part of Adair Township. A family name and descriptive of its location. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Nonsuch
Description:A post office from 1895-1918, 1926-1930, on the northern side of the Little Niangua River in the southern part of Adair Township. Named for an old British royal palace built by Henry VIII in Surrey, near the town of Ewell. The construction of the palace and grounds were begun in 1539, and celebrated Italian architects and landscape artists were employed to make it a place of unexampled magnificence. The name was evidently intended to describe its "nonpareil" quality, and it was a favorite abode of Queen Elizabeth. (Postal Guide: Eaton; Strickland, ELIZABETH (1885) IV. 178; Enc. Brit. (1929) under LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE; Place-Names of Surrey (1934) English Place-Name Society, vol. 11, p. 73; R.M. (1940) 226; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Hill School
Description:Located in the center part of Jasper Township. Named for its location on a hill. Large oak trees grow in the yard. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak View School
Description:Located in the center part of Auglaize Township. Named for its location on a hill among oak trees. This school is now closed. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:O'Halloran School
Description:Located in the eastern part of Auglaize Township. A family name. This school is now closed. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Linn Creek
Description:See Linn Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Olive City
Description:A village in 1874, on the Osage River, one mile north of the Osage Iron Works. (MISSOURI GAZ. (1874) 101)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Only
Description:A post office from 1915-1918, near the southern border of Russell Township. No information could be secured about the origin of this name. Its most likely source is from the surname of some resident whose identity has not been ascertained. Harrison in his dictionary of the surnames of the United Kingdom includes Only or Onely as derived from the English village of Onely in Northhamptonshire. The name might be a distortion of the far more common surname Olney, or just possibly for Ownsbey, an old and prominent family name in the county. Archibald and Nicholas Ownsbey were among the first settlers to make land entries along the Osage River. (Postal Guide; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 296; Henry Harrison, Surnames of the United Kingdom; Highway Map; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oregon
Description:See Erie
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Osage Beach
Description:In northeast Osage Township, near the Miller County boundary. It is on the eastern shore of the Lake of the Ozarks, or Osage River, for which it was named. (Highway Map; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Osage Beach School
Description:About two miles south of Osage Beach, from which it takes its name. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Osage Iron Works
Description:A post office from 1876-1930. Located in the northern part of Adair Township, on the southern bank of the Osage River. Coues says they were on Bollinger Creek. Named for an iron furnace situated there. (Postal Guide; MISSOURI GAZ. (1874) 101; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 376; Eaton (1916) 269; R.M. (1940) 226, 227)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Osage River
Description:The course of this important stream is described as follows by Coues in his edition of the Pike Expedition of 1806: "Arising in the Ozark Mountains of Kansas, the Osage River leaves that state and enters Missouri in Vernon County, which it delimits in part from Bates County; traverses St. Clair County and continues past the corner where this, Henry, and Benton Counties adjoin; traverses Benton, enters Morgan, forms a part of the boundary between this and Camden, makes a loop through the latter and again separates it for a short space from Morgan, then for a little distance separates Camden from Miller, traverses the latter, enters Cole, and finally runs to the Missouri River between this last and Osage Counties." Since 1931, a large part of the valley of the Osage and its tributaries has been flooded and is now included in the Lake of the Ozarks (q.v.). It is one of the oldest place-names in the state, being of French origin. The earliest mention of the name appears to be that of Du Tissenet in 1719, who calls it the Riviere Ouschage. The French named it for the Osage tribe of Indians, who dwelt upon its banks. The most important of all the Indian tribes in Missouri seem to have been located, at the time of Marquette's journey in 1673 near the mouth of the Missouri River, which he called the Osage River; but they later removed to the vicinity of the river that now bears their name, where they remained in their two branches, known as the Great and Little Osages, till late in the nineteenth century. Up till about 1835, the Big Pomme de Terre River (q.v.) was the dividing line between the Indians and the whites. In 1870, the tribe sold their lands to the United States government, and agreed to their removal to Indian Territory. Hodge declares that the name Osage was a corruption by the French traders of the native name Wazhazhe. It appears in many other forms: Haxa or Hayas, by Coronado in 1541, Ouchage and Autre acha by Marquette in 1673, Hazzas, Wawhas, and Ous by Penicault, Zages on Franquelin's map, and, according to Long, Wacase, Wawsashe, or Wassashsha. As to the original meaning of the name there is equal uncertainty. Holcombe says that Osage meant "strong," probably referring to the gigantic stature of the tribe, few of whom according to Bradbury were under six feet in height. Houck declares, more plausibly, that the native name signified merely "men" or "people;" like the ancient Teutons and many other primitive tribes, they proudly called themselves "Human Beings" in implied contradistinction to the "lesser breeds without the law." (Holcome, HIST. VERNON (1887) 94; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 370; Thwaites, EWT. XVI. 273; Hodge; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI I. 133, 177; Schoolcraft, 104; Miss Johnson's thesis; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Osage Township
Description:Located in the east-central part of Camden County. Bounded on the north by the Osage River and Jasper Township, on the east by Miller County and Jackson Township, on the south by Warren Township, the Niangua River, and on the west by Russell and Adair Townships. It was one of the six original townships, created by the county court in March, 1841. Named from the Osage River. (R.M. (1940) 226, 227; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ozark Fisheries
Description:Located on the Grand Auglaize in the center part of Auglaize Township. Named for their location. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ozark Mountains
Description:A mountain range that is very old as well as beautiful. The name is of Indian and French derivation and it is said that it is the result of a misunderstanding by the English. It means literally "at the (country, river, or place of the) Arkansas." The Quapaw Indians, belonging to the Siouan stock and after migrating westward, were called the Arkansas by the Illinois. Early eighteenth century maps by G. De. l'Isle show that both the Ohio and Wabash rivers were known as the Arkansas. It was customary for the French to abbreviate the difficult Indian place-names; hence les Arkansea became les Arcs. Miss O'Brien states that in the French archives "the phrase "aux arcs" appears many times, meaning on the river, at the post, or in the country of the Arkansas." The shortened phrase "aux arcs" was mistaken by the English for one word and they spelled it Ozark. (Miss O'Brien's thesis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Parrack Grove School
Description:Located in the northeast part of Russell Township. Named for a family who owned land in the district, and because there are many trees surrounding the schoolhouse. The county history records that a Mr. Parrack was appointed judge of election for Glaize Township in 1841. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 301; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Passover
Description:A post office from 1904-1930; seven miles southeast of Zebra, in the northern part of Jackson Township. A Biblical name: the feast which was established to commemorate the coming forth out of Egypt, because the destroying angel passed over the Israelites (Exodus 12:6-8). But it is not likely that a town would be named for the Jewish feast, or even a church, from which the town might have borrowed its name. At least no church or synagogue with the name Passover has been observed, either here or elsewhere. It is much more probable that it was taken from a personal name. Such surnames as Easter, Christmas, Nowell (for Noel, Christmas), Pace (for the Paschal feast) are fairly common, and are to be explained as "birth names," that is, originally conferred for the season of the year when the first individual bearing the surname was born. Passover may have been an American rendering of such a German surname as Passche or Paschke, meaning Easter; or a popular etymology for such a name as Passauer, man from Passau. Cf. Similar distortions of surnames in the case of Rain Water Hollow, Right Point, Zebra, etc. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 345; G. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Passover School
Description:Located near the eastern boundary of the county. Named for the village of this name. This school is closed. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pearson Branch School
Description:Located in the southern part of Adair Township. Named for the creek near which the school is located. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pearson's Branch
Description:Rises in the northern part of Adair Township, flowing north into the Osage River. Named for an early settler. Also known as Pearson's Creek (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 280; Pike Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 376; Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pearson's Creek
Description:See Pearson's Branch.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pin Oak Camp
Description:A summer camp near the eastern part of the Lake of the Ozarks. It is surrounded by pin oaks. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Grove School
Description:Located in the western part of Warren Township. Cf. above. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:See New Pleasant Hill School.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Knoll School
Description:Located in the southeast part of Auglaize Township. Named from its location. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Hollow
Description:In northeast Russell Township, leading northeast into the Little Niangua River. Named for its location. (Highway Map; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Hollow School
Description:Located in the northeast part of Russell Township. Named for the hollow. This school is closed. (J. Banner; C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pritchett School
Description:Located in the southwest part of Auglaize Township. Named for Edward Pritchett, on whose land the school was located. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Purcell
Description:Located on the Osage River, three miles south of Linn Creek. Named for the Purcell family, who were pioneers. Daniel Purcell, from Kentucky, settled near here before 1833. He was made road commissioner on April 12, 1841, to help lay out the first county road from Linn Creek to Oregon. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 284, 291, 309)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Purvis
Description:A post office since 1889; in the northern part of Camden County, in western Jasper Township. Named in honor of the Purvis family, pioneers. (Postal Guide; Eaton (1916) 269; R.M. (1940) 226, 227)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ragg School
Description:Located in the northern part of Russell Township. Named for Riley E. Ragg, a prominent landowner in the district. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rain Water Hollow
Description:In northern Russell Township, leading north into the Little Niangua River. This is probably a distorted form, by popular etymology, of the name of the Wrainwaters family, who lived in this exact neighborhood. The county history records Daniel and Pleasant Wrainwaters, members, and D.M. Wrainwaters, pastor of the Baptist Church on Little Niangua in 1846. Cf. Right Point, probably for the Wright family, and Zebra, perhaps for a Siberer or Ziebers, etc. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 350; Highway Map; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rainey Creek [1 of 2]
Description:In northwest Adair Township, running north into the Osage River near Critenden. Also spelled Raney Creek. Named for a neighboring landowner. (Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 376; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rainey Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A post office in 1870, 1874; in the west-central part of Adair Township. Named for the creek. (Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; Missouri Gaz. (1874) 101; Postal Guide; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Raney Creek
Description:See Rainey Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Red Sink
Description:A circular basin, 300 ft. in diameter at the top and 100 ft. deep, located a half mile southeast of Gunter's Springs. Named Red Sink on account of the red clay subsoil, which is exposed at places. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 287)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Reindeerhoof
Description:The highest point in the vicinity of Gunter Springs, three miles distant. A fanciful name for a lofty spot. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 287)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Richland
Description:Located in the southeast corner of Auglaize Township. Half of the village is in Camden County and half of it is in Pulaski County. Mr. Weber, in his thesis on Pulaski County place-names, states that the town was originally laid out in 1869 and named Lyon for General Nathaniel Lyon, who had been killed a few years before in the battle of Wilson's Creek. When it was discovered that there was already another Lyon in the state--probably Fort Lyon (q.v.) in Benton County, the name was changed to Richland for C.W. Rich, a director of the old Pacific Railroad. No doubt there was also an allusion intended to the fertility of the soil. (C.F. Huddleston; Mr. Weber's thesis; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Right Point
Description:A village in the southernmost point of Auglaize Township, northwest of Stoutland. This may be a distortion of the surname Wright. Foster P. Wright was Circuit Court Judge 1841-1845, and the family has been prominent in county affairs throughout its history. Cf. also Wright County, organized in 1841, the same year as Camden, and named for Silas Wright (1795-1847), a leader of the Democratic Party, and United States Senator from New York 1833-1844. For the spelling cf. Rain Water Hollow, probably from the Wrainwaters family, Zebra for Siberer or Zieber, etc. (Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 315; Miss Bell's thesis; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riverview Church
Description:Located in the northeast corner of Camden County. The name is descriptive of its view of the Osage River. (C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Riviere Grande Glaize
Description:See Auglaize Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Roach
Description:A post office from 1887-1897, and since 1904; in the south-central part of Camden County, in southwest Osage Township. Named in honor of a family of early settlers. The county history records that L.J. Roach served as sheriff for the county (1868-1870), and as county clerk (1870-1886). (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 315; Postal Guide; Eaton (1916) 269; R.M. (1940), 226, 227; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Roach School
Description:Located in the central part of Warren Township. The school is one and a half miles west of the small village by the same name. This school is now closed. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Robber's Cave
Description:Located at the head of Gunter's Springs. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 286)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rockdale
Description:A post office in 1915; located in the center of Jasper Township. The name is descriptive of its location. The village is now extinct. (Postal Guide; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rockdale Church
Description:Located in the center of Jasper Township. Named from its location. (C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Russell Township
Description:Located in the southwest part of Camden County. Bounded on the north by Adair Township and the Little Niangua River, on the east by Warren and Osage Townships, on the south by Dallas County, and on the west by Hickory County. It was one of the six original townships created by the county court in March, 1841. It was probably named for a prominent landowner, William Russell, who was one of the first judges of election for the township. He was later made justice of the peace, and he and other members of his family are often mentioned in the county history. Possibly, however, like Russell Counties in Kentucky and Virginia, it was named for General William Russell of the Revolutionary War. Cf. the men whose names were commemorated in the other Camden County townships Adair, Jackson, Jasper, and Warren. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 293; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; Gannett; C.F. Huddleston; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sagrada
Description:A post office from 1887-1895, 1899-1933; in the extreme northwest corner of Adair Township, six miles northwest of Crittenden. No clue has been discovered as to the origin of this mysterious name. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 345)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Saline Creek
Description:See Auglaize Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Skin Hell School
Description:Located in the northeast part of Auglaize Township. Named for the fact that bare foot school children skinned their heels on the sharp rocks. The location of the schoolhouse is very rough and rocky. This school is closed. (J. Banner; C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Snyder School
Description:Located in the southern part of Jackson Township. A family name. The county history records John M. Snider, from Tennessee, as one of the early settlers, on the southern side of Osage River, five miles below Linn Creek. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 292; C. Schrimsher; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spencer Creek
Description:Rises in the southern part of Warren Township, flowing northwest into the Big Niangua River at the northern boundary of the Township. Named for a settler on its banks. (Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 280; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Valley
Description:A post office from 1888-1915; in the northwest corner of the county, four miles west of Crittenden. The name is descriptive of its location. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 345; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stoutland
Description:A post office since 1870; was settled in 1869. Situated on the line between Camden and Laclede Counties, a portion of it lying in each. Named in honor of Captain Stout, a director of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad. (now the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad), on which it was located. (Postal Guide; MISSOURI GAZ. (1874) 101; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 343; Miss O'Brien's thesis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sunnyside Church
Description:In the northern part of Auglaize Township. Named from its location on a southern slope. (C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sunrise Beach
Description:A post office since 1932; near the northern boundary of Jasper Township, on the western shores of the Lake of the Ozarks. Named from its location. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; Highway Map; C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sweatt School
Description:Located in the center part of Auglaize Township. Named for John Sweatt, the owner of the land on which the schoolhouse was built. This is perhaps the John D. Sweatt recorded in the county history as settling in this section shortly after 1844; he was captain in the 47th Union regiment in 1862, and a representative in the State Legislature in 1888. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 294, 333; C. Schrimsher; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Thornberry
Description:A post office from 1918-1929, in northern Adair Township near Crittenden. A family name. The county history records an L.C. Thornberry as elder in the Christian church organized October, 1882, near the eastern boundary of the county. (Postal Guide; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 353; C. Schrimsher; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Toronto
Description:A post office since 1876; Missouri Gazette (1860) lists it as a post village first settled in 1832; in the eastern part of the county, on Wet Auglaize Creek, sixteen miles east of Linn Creek. Located in the southern part of Jackson Township. Named by Canadian settlers for Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Eight other American towns have borrowed the Canadian name. It is an Indian word, said (by the Century Dict.) to mean "place of meeting." Gannett says it meant "oak tree rising from the lake." (Postal Guide; MISSOURI GAZ. (1860) 459; Parker (1865) Map; Parker (1867) 207; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; C.F. Huddleston; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tuckersville
Description:A post office in 1868; in the northwest part of Adair Township, situated on the southern bank of the Osage River. Named for Tucker, the owner of the land where it was laid out. (Postal Guide; Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tunnel Dam
Description:Located north of Lake Niangua, between the lake and the Niangua River. The name is descriptive. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union Church
Description:Located in the southern part of Warren Township. An ideal name. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union School
Description:Located in the southern part of Warren Township. Named from the church. (C. Schrimsher)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Victory School
Description:Located in the extreme southwest part of Warren Township. An ideal name. (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Voorhees
Description:A post office in 1896-1897. Named for the man who operated the store and post office. (Postal Guide; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Warren Township
Description:Located in the southern part of Camden County. Bounded on the north by Osage Township, on the east by Auglaize Township, on the south by Laclede County, and on the west by Russell Township. It was organized in September, 1841, when the county court cut it off from Auglaize Township. Doubtless named, like Warren County, Missouri, and thirteen other counties, as well as more than thirty towns, and townships all over the country, for the Revolutionary War hero, Joseph Warren (1741-1775), who fell at Bunker Hill. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 310; R.M. (1940) 226, 227; Gannett; J. Banner; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Watson School
Description:Located in the northern part of Osage Township. A family name. The county history records John L.A. Watson as making one of the earliest land entries not far away from the site. This school is closed. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 295; J. Banner; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wet Auglaize Creek
Description:See Auglaize Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wet Glaize
Description:A village in central Auglaize Township, near Wet Auglaize Creek. It has been a post village since 1837, and a post office since 1853. Named from the creek. Often spelled Wet Glaze, and occasionally, by a misapprehension of the meaning of the abbreviation W. Glaize often used, as West Glaize or Glaze. (Postal Guide; Colton (1857) Map; Missouri Gaz. (1860) 478; J. Banner; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:White Hall School
Description:Located in the northern part of Jasper Township. The name is descriptive of the interior of the building. (C. Schrimsher; J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wilson Bend School
Description:Located in the north-central part of Adair Township. A family name. The county history records that S.W. Wilson served as sheriff of the county from 1844-1846. (HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 315; C. Schrimsher; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Woolsey's Creek
Description:Rises in the northwest corner of Laclede County, flowing northwest through the edge of Warren Township, joining the Big Niangua River in the extreme southeast corner of Russell Township. Daniel Woolsey settled on the Dry Augalize before 1833. (Campbell's Missouri Atlas (1873) 26; HIST. CAMDEN (1889) 280, 291)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Youngar River
Description:See Big Niangua River.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Yungar River
Description:See Big Niangua River.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Zaring
Description:A post office from 1900-1904; five and a half miles northwest of Glaize. Named for the postmaster. (Postal Guide; Camden Plat Book (1902); Williams (1904) 345; C.F. Huddleston)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Zebra
Description:A post office since 1888; in the northeast corner of Osage Township and of Camden County, four miles northeast of Damsel. Said to have been the name of the owner of the land on which the village was laid out. It may have been a distorted form, under the influence of popular etymology, of such a fairly common German surname as Ziebers, Ziebarth, Siebrecht, Sieber, Siberer, or the like. Cf. Rain Water Hollow, Right Point, Only, Passover, and Fearless as discussed above. (Camden Plat Book (1902); Williams (1904) 345; Heintze-Cascorbi, Die Deutschen Familiennamen (1933); Postal Guide; C.F. Huddleston; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Zion Church
Description:Located in the center part of Osage Township. A Bible name: the southeast hill of Jerusalem, surrounded on all sides except the north by deep valleys (II Sam. 5:7). (J. Banner)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

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