Butler County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:16 to 1 School
Description:Organized about the time of the Bryan and McKinley campaign of 1896 when the monetary standard was the chief issue. Also called Independence School, for the church about one mile northwest. (J.L. Raulston; Mrs. M. Zimmerman; Mrs. Iva Murry)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ackerman Ditch
Description:A drainage ditch in Poplar Bluff and Coon Island Townships, extending through the farm of Louis Ackerman, of Dutch descent, who was a soldier in the Spanish-American War. (B.Deem; S. Pottenger; Maps 1926 ff.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Addy School
Description:See Live Oak School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Agee Church
Description:A Methodist Church near the Agee School (q.v.) organized in 1925 by Rev. William Wilmore. Mr. and Mrs. William Melton, the Clayton and Lilly families, and Mrs. J.L. Martin were leading charter members. Named for the school. (Mrs. Wm. Pace; Mrs. Wm. Melton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Agee Creek
Description:A small western branch of Black River near the Agee School (q.v.), fed by several little springs. It took the name of the early settler there, William Agee (cf. Agee School). (Mrs. Wm. Melton; S. Agee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Agee School
Description:In Poplar Bluff Township, northwest of Hillard. It is said to be the first public school organized in the county. Named for its chief promoter William Agee, a prominent pioneer landowner who came from Virginia in the early 1850s. (J.H.H. Potillo; B. Deem; S. Agee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Alford School
Description:Established in 1932 on "Big Island" just north of the Hargrove Bridge. Named for Melbourne Alford, a landowner, who was prominent in getting the school. Also known as Black River School (cf. Black River School, near Keener), because it is so near Black River. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Alfrey
Description:See Alfrey's Heading Factory.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Alfrey's Heading Factory
Description:Established in 1890, just outside the southern limits of Poplar Bluff, by Fremont Alfrey, the proprietor and manager from Crawfordsville, Indiana. It was connected with the I.M. and S. Railroad and with the Frisco Railroad at points known as Alfrey's Switch for the factory manager. Shortened after 1910 to Alfrey. The Young Handle Factory now occupies a part of these old stave yards. (S. Pottenger; THE EVENING CITIZEN, 1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Alfrey's Switch
Description:See Alfrey's Heading Factory.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Alley Oop
Description:A small clubhouse on Mill Creek, near Black River, in a good hunting and fishing section of wild wood. Owned by M. Meystead of Cape Girardeau and named for Hamlin's comic strip "Alley Oop," now shown in the Poplar Bluff DAILY REPUBLICAN and other papers. (Dr. Jos. L. Lindsay; Mrs. Clara Laughlin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Angus
Description:A switch on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, nine miles south of Poplar Bluff. D.W. Hill, a prominent lawyer of Poplar Bluff, owned a large farm nearby which he stocked with Aberdeen Angus cattle about 1910. A Mr. Shackleford, who managed the farm, and Mr. Hill changed the name to Angus. It was formerly known as Eastwood Switch (q.v.). (S. Myrant; D.W. Hill; Maps 1910 ff.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Annapolis
Description:An iron mining camp on Highway 67, north of Poplar Bluff near Hillard, opened in 1930, but now closed as unprofitable. The name is no doubt a transfer from Annapolis in Iron County.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Arkansas Branch
Description:That portion of the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad extending from Ironton, Missouri to the boundary between Missouri and Arkansas. It was named for its terminus on the Arkansas State Line. The Legislative Acts of March, 1868 appropriated the portion of purchase money and interest accruing, $674,300, at the rate of $15,000 for every mile completed within a certain time, and authorized a separate company to build the Arkansas Branch. A company was organized April 7, 1870, with a capital stock of $2,500,000. The first thirty miles were completed Feb. 23, 1871 and the line to the boundary completed Nov. 4, 1872. Trains began running regularly April 2, 1873. (COMMONWEALTH OF MISSOURI 609; G.R. Mabie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ash Hill
Description:A shortened form which has replaced "Ash Hills" (q.v.) for the post office and town. The "s" was probably dropped by the postal authorities. (Maps 1879 ff.; Postal Guide 1883-1895)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ash Hill School
Description:The old village school of Ash Hill, now used for church services by various denominations. The district has been added to the Fisk School District.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ash Hill Township
Description:A later name for Ash Hills Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ash Hills [1 of 2]
Description:A sawmill community in Ash Hill Township. Named by R. Restov about 1870 because of the many sandy elevations covered with ash timber. (B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ash Hills [2 of 2]
Description:Post office and station on the "Cat" Railroad eight miles east of Poplar Bluff. It grew to be a town of about 300 during the timber days, but it declined as the business moved to Fisk. Established by the railroad about 1872 and named for the old sawmill community. Cf. Ash Hill (post office). (B. Deem; P.L. 1874-1876; Campbell, GAZ. OF MISSOURI, p. 20)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ash Hills Cemetery
Description:Near the old village of Ash Hill or Ash Hills (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ash Hills Township
Description:The eastern border township, organized in 1856. The name was retained when in 1866 the townships were relocated. It received its name because the many low sandy elevations, rising from the swampy region, were covered with white ash timber. (Douglas I, 312; Goodspeed, 375; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ashcraft Cemetery
Description:Named for the school nearby (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ashcraft Ditch
Description:A drainage ditch in southern Poplar Bluff Township. Named for a landowner and Baptist minister, Willis Ashcraft, through whose farm it was made about 1900. (Q.N. Barron; S. Pottenger; B. Adams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ashcraft School
Description:A school about five miles southeast of Poplar Bluff. It was named for Willis Ashcraft, a progressive landowner, farmer, and Baptist minister there. (S. Pottenger; B. Adams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ashcroft Addition
Description:The southeast part of Poplar Bluff west of Black River, which grew up around the Ashcroft Mill (q.v.). In 1913, forty acres were platted by Joseph Ashcroft of the mill, and landowners John and Henry Macom, who gave the name Ashcroft-Macom Addition, but the public soon dropped the Macom part of the name, no doubt having in mind only the mill there. It was often called Dog Town because there were so many dogs in the village. (J. Ashcroft)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ashcroft Mill
Description:See Bimel-Ashcroft Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ashcroft-Macom Addition
Description:See Ashcroft Addition.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Aunt Dicie Kearby Hollow
Description:A name affectionately remembered by the oldest settlers of Shiloh Community because "Widow Kearby" lived by the spring in the hollow northeast of the old Methodist campground of Shiloh. (Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bailey
Description:See Bailey's End.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bailey's
Description:See Bailey's End.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bailey's End
Description:A sawmill village situated at what was, about 1890, the southern terminus of the Butler County Railroad. William Bailey managed the mill for the H.D. Cooperage Company. By 1900, when the railroad was extended farther south, the mill village came to be known as Bailey's, and later the station was shortened by popular usage to Bailey. Now Broseley (q.v.). (S. Pottenger; B. Deem; W.N. Barron)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ball's Mill
Description:See Kremlin Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ball's Mill School
Description:See Kremlin School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barefoot Church
Description:See Harmony Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Barron
Description:A discontinued switch junction on the "Cat" Railroad east of Poplar Bluff. When Mr. W.N. Barron, attorney and manager for the Burlington Chicago Railroad, interceding for the timber interests, asked that a station be established there for loading logs, his request was granted and the railroad officials gave it his name about 1907. (W.N. Barron; Maps 1912 ff.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Baskey School
Description:A school northeast of Poplar Bluff, on Highway 60, named for Peter Baskey, who settled a large tract of land which later he sold to a Mr. Ellers. When the district was divided in 1929, this school was known as Baskey No. 1; and the newly formed district in the southern part was called Baskey No. 2, but the latter was soon named Providence (q.v.) for the church nearby. (Mrs. S. Mast; J.L. Raulston; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Baskey School No. 1
Description:See Baskey School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Baskey School No. 2
Description:See Baskey School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bates School
Description:Now a part of the Broseley Consolidated District. Named for Horace Bates, a pioneer of a Republican family from Illinois, who owned a large section of land but lost it all trying for oil in the community. (B. Deem; S. Myrant; E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Batesville
Description:A station and discontinued post office on the old Palmer Railroad (now a highway) two miles north of Broseley. Quite a little timber village in the 1880s and 1890s, but only a store, a filling station, and one old dwelling house remain. Charles Langlotz, a mechanical engineer for Lowell M. Palmer, gave the name in 1899 for Horace Bates, a landowner. Now known in that vicinity as Old Batesville. (Geo. Windsor; W.N. Barron; Postal Guide 1904-1911)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Batterton's Mill
Description:For Sanford Batterton, a merchant in Poplar Bluff for several years in the last years of the 19th century, previously a landowner who operated a sawmill in Beaver Dam Township and kept a post office for a short time. Doubtless the post office was Fredie (q.v.). (B. Adams; Mrs. Lizzie Frank; Crams 1879 Directory)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Baumister Graveyard
Description:A private burial ground one-half mile west of Green Forest Church. Founded by Henry Baumister in 1899. (Wm. Montgomery; J.S. Hudgens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bay Springs Cemetery
Description:Named for the church (q.v.), nearby.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bay Springs Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church, about three miles east of the school (q.v.), for which it is doubtless named.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bay Springs School
Description:In the northern part of Beaver Dam Township. During the 1870s and 1880s, a family named Baize lived near the two large springs nearby. "Baize Springs" sounded like "Bay Springs;" hence the name that has prevailed for the school. (Mrs. Geo. M. Powers; J. Greer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bayles Creek
Description:In Black River Township, a western tributary of Black River, named for a family that lived there years ago. (C. Hunter)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bear Wallow
Description:A large pond up on a high elevation two miles south of Kerens. During the pioneer days many bears actually went there to wallow. (A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Beaver Dam Creek
Description:Rises in southeast Johnson Township in Carter County and flows across Johnson Township in Ripley County, into Little Black River (q.v.) in Butler County. Beavers were numerous in this vicinity in the pioneer days and the animals' dens or dams were common along the stream. (J.K. Langford; Polly Powers; Mrs. Rachel Riggin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Beaver Dam Township
Description:One of the western border townships, relocated and established in 1866. It took the name of the old township (from which it was carved), which was established in 1850 and comprised all the southwestern part of the county. The name, no doubt, is for its chief stream, Beaver Dam Creek (q.v.). (Goodspeed, 374; Douglas I. 312)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Beaver Pond
Description:One of the numerous ponds before the drainage system, situated southwest of Rombauer (q.v.). There were formerly many beavers in the region. It drained into Panther Slough where an occasional panther was seen in the jungles of former days. (W. Sutherland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bee Hole Branch
Description:A northern branch of Ten Mile Creek in Epps Township. A large spring-fed "hole" in the stream was the watering place for wild bees during the pioneer days. (Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Belcher
Description:A discontinued post office in the northeastern part of Beaver Dam Township. On the route from Poplar Bluff, and kept by "Doc" (who had considerable knowledge of medicine) Belcher, father of George Belcher, who lived near the Powers Mill. (Postal Guide 1891-1910; J.S. Hudgens; A. Ward; Thos. Kenzie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bell Rock
Description:A large rocky prominence of the foothills southwest of Rombauer. It was given this name because of its general bell shape appearance when seen at a distance. (Mrs. M. Zoll)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Benton
Description:A railroad station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad about six miles south of Poplar Bluff, as shown on Campbell's Map of 1874. No one was found who knew of the place, but it is very probable that it was named for George H. Benton, whom Goodspeed describes as the attorney for the Missouri Pacific Railroad in St. Louis. He was later placed in charge of their interest in Southeast Missouri in 1878. (S.E. Missouri (1888) 1066)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Benton School
Description:The first public school system of Poplar Bluff, according to Mrs. Walter Kennedy's sketch for Mr. Deem's History of Butler County, consisted of one frame building with three teachers. It was situated on the present site of Williamson-Kennedy School, but I have found no special name for it. Mr. Deem gives its date as 1875. This wooden building was replaced in 1885 by a four room brick building at a cost of $6,000. This building was known as Third Ward School and later its name was changed to Benton for Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858), senator from Missouri 1821-1851. In 1922 the modern elementary school, costing $75,000 was erected on Lindsay Street, the same site as the former buildings. Its name was changed to Williamson-Kennedy School for Mrs. Hattie Williamson (now McDonald), who had served as principal of the school for twenty-five years, and for Mrs. Walter Kennedy, a teacher in the school for many years. The former died in 1943 and the latter in 1935. Both were beloved teachers of the town. (School Records by P.C. Hays; Deem, 79, 170, 178)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Berger School
Description:See Lower Carola.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Berry Lewis Graveyard
Description:Near the center of Epps Township. The name of an early settler. Now generally known as the Houts graveyard, for Amos Houts who bought the land about fifty years ago. (Mr. and Mrs. George Powers; Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Kearby)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Berryman School
Description:In northwest Ash Hill Township. Established in 1926 and named for Jno. Berryman, a prominent landowner and merchant of Poplar Bluff. (Jno. Berryman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church, one-half mile south of its original location, two and a half miles west of Harviell on Highway 67. The church was organized by Rev. Arthur Connor about 1872, and named for his boyhood church, Bethel, in Lawrence County, Tennessee. According to one informant Rev. Connor suggested the name; another says the name was offered by Aaron Tomlin, a blacksmith and shoemaker, who came from Tennessee. Some other leading charter members were Rev. and Mrs. Washington Powers, Henry and Sis Tomlin, Joel Cochran, and Albert Ponder. Soon after the organization two old freed slaves, "Uncle Harrison" and "Aunt Jane," upon their request were accepted as members. "Nigger" Harrison and his two sons did much of the heavy work in erecting the old log house. A familiar Bible name, meaning "house of God" (cf. Gen. 28:19). (Mrs. Eva Webb; A. Powers; Rev. E.H.C. Kenner's notes; A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Black
Description:Locally the suffix "river" is very often omitted in general speech. "Big Black" distinguishes this larger stream from "Little Black" (Little Black River (q.v.), its tributary)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Black River
Description:This name for Black River (q.v.) I find first on the 1822 map. It was probably given by the early settlers to distinguish this stream from a smaller one, Little Black (q.v.) farther west.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Black Water River
Description:This name, probably a translation of a name given by the Indians to the French, who called it La Riviere a l'Eau Noire, is found on Colton's Map of 1855. See Black River (q.v.). Before the country was drained the river would overflow, covering thousands of acres with the dark colored water, suggestive of this descriptive name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Caney Slough
Description:It formerly empties into Beaver Pond (q.v.). Little Caney, a smaller stream entered Big Caney west of Rombauer. Now drained by ditches. (W. Sutherland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Eddy
Description:A distinct bend, a very deep and widened portion of Black River, just northeast of Poplar Bluff. A favorite picnic and swimming place. (B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Hunting Slough
Description:Rises near the Ashcroft School and flows into Black River near the southern border of the county. A few miles east is a smaller stream, called Little Hunting Slough. Both have been almost destroyed by the drainage system. These descriptive names were given by the early hunters and trappers because of the many wild animals found in that section. (County Plat of 1859 and Maps ff.; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Island
Description:That portion of Ash Hill Township lying between Dan and Black Rivers. This topographical and physical name was given by the early pioneers. (B. Deem; B. Adams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Island School
Description:Situated near the center of the district, Big Island (q.v.), from which it derived its name. In 1911 a two-year high school was established here for the consolidated district, of the same name, composed of Liberty, Still Camp, Carter, and H Vam Schools, but the consolidation and high school remained only a few years. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Muddy
Description:See Muddy Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Slough
Description:A small sluggish stream northwest of Poplar Bluff, flowing into Cave Creek. (Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Big Spring
Description:About two miles northeast of Lone Hill School. A good sized spring of living water that was highly prized for its benefit to range cattle. During dry seasons much water was hauled from it to homes in the vicinity.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bimel-Ashcroft Mill
Description:A large factory near the southeast city limits of Poplar Bluff, built in 1902, by Indiana capitalists, of whom Fred Bimel of Portland, Indiana, and Joseph Ashcroft of the Lambertville Spoke Manufacturing Company at Lambertville, New Jersey, were the chief members and managers. Mr. Ashcroft came to Poplar Bluff in 1902 as a manager of this factory, which was one of eighteen such factories in operation in five states. In 1912, Mr. Bimel died, the Lambertville Spoke Manufacturing Company became involved in financial troubles, and Mr. Ashcroft purchased the big business. Then the members of the company that had paid Mr. Ashcroft, the farmer boy, twelve and a half cents an hour, now asked to be enrolled as his employees. The Ashcroft Mill made spokes and other parts for vehicles, shipped to foreign markets during the First World War and afterwards, and has continued a flourishing business at home and abroad, even during the years of depression (1930-1935). At the present time (1934) they are shipping to England only. (S. Pottenger; Wm. Alexander; Deem; 117-118; J. Ashcroft)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Creek
Description:A small stream in Poplar Bluff and Beaver Dam townships, flowing into Cave Creek. A descriptive name given because of the black colored rocks along the stream. (Mrs. Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Creek Cemetery
Description:In the churchyard of Black Creek Baptist Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Creek Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church three miles southwest of Poplar Bluff, organized by Rev. Arthur Connor, in 1872 or 1873, in the old log schoolhouse on Black Creek. It took the name of the school. (A. Emerson; Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Creek School
Description:One of the earliest schools of the county, established near the creek from which it took its name. When the church (q.v.) was organized, Uncle Henry Emerson proposed that if they would allow the church to have the old schoolhouse, he would build a school in the center of the district. Thus the school is about two miles northwest of the church. (A. Emerson; Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Island
Description:A large section of rich, dark alluvial land, formerly quite swampy, in the southern part of the county between Still Camp Slough and Caney Slough. A descriptive name. (B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black River [1 of 2]
Description:It rises from springs in Reynolds and Iron Counties, flows across the southwest corner of Wayne County, and in a northeastern direction across the center of Butler County into White River in Arkansas. It has been known as Big Black, Big Black River, Big Black Water River, and Black River, now the usual name. A translation of the original French name Le Noir (q.v.), first found on the 1765 map. (Conard, HIST. OF MISSOURI 285)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black River [2 of 2]
Description:A discontinued post office established in 1860 at Keener's Ferry on Black River, from which it is named. The mail handled here by a farmer, named Cain, was brought by horseback from Ironton, Missouri. (Southerland and McEvoy, MISSOURI GAZ., 7; Mrs. C. Hunter; C. Hedspeth)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black River Cemetery
Description:About one mile east of Black River School, at the old site of Black River Church from which it derived its name. (C. Hedspeth; Rev. C.W. Wallis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black River Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church established on the west side of Black River, for which it is named, in the northern part of what is now Butler County. It was first at the present site of Wilby (q.v.). Later it was moved to the widow Keener's farm, south of Keener Springs (q.v.). Then, in 1860, it was moved about five miles farther up the river to its present location, which is in Wayne County. In the middle 1920s the old house burned and a concrete block house was built. Various dates have been found for its organization. Goodspeed says it was constituted in 1831, Douglas gives the date as 1833, but the Minutes of Wayne County Churches, 1930, and the M.B.G.A., 1934, give the date as 1818. Unquestionably it was the first church organized in the present limits of Butler County. Rev. Smelser, whose father and grandfather were Baptist ministers, also gives this date. (C. Hedspeth; Rev. C. Wallis; Goodspeed, 556; Douglas I.471; M.B.G.A., 1934; Rev. Wm. Smelser)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black River Club House
Description:A popular rendezvous for hunters and fishermen, near Black River, about where Highway 53 crosses the river, owned by several Poplar Bluff businessmen. It burned about 1930 and has not been rebuilt.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black River School
Description:See Alford School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black River Seminary
Description:The first school in Poplar Bluff, established in 1869 by the Butler County Educational Society, a corporate body, with Green L. Poplin, J.W. Baldwin, James Tubbs, J.M. Henderson, J.M. Spence, B.F. Turner, J.S. Ferguson, and Dr. G.T. Bartlett as trustees with Prof. H. McKinnon as principal. A two-story frame building was erected on what is now Fifth and Main Streets. When the private school was succeeded by the public school, and Benton School was erected, this building was sold to the negroes, who moved it to Lester Street, where they remodeled it and still use it for a Methodist Church, known as Brown's Chapel. (Douglas I.403; Goodspeed, 479-480; Mrs. J.J. Van Eaton; Deem, 79, 123)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black River Township
Description:The northern border township, as re-located and established in 1866. In 1849, it was one of the two original divisions for the northern half of the county. When the county was reorganized in 1850, into four divisions, this name was dropped; but in 1866 when the townships were again relocated and the county divided into nine, this name was given to the middle township on the northern border. It took the name of the main stream, no doubt. (Goodspeed, 374; Douglas I.312)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Black Water
Description:The anglicized form for Leau Noire (q.v.). No doubt the Indians, having met both French and English, called it by this name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Hole Branch
Description:A small western tributary of Cave Creek in Cave Creek Township, which has in its course a very deep pool or portion which appears deep blue in color. (J.J. Kearby; Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Springs
Description:The bluish color of the water is suggestive of these small springs northeast of Rombauer. A few years ago Ed. George planned a pleasure resort for the place, but only a large beautiful house was completed. (Mrs. S. Mast; Mrs. M. Zoll)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Springs Cemetery
Description:Near the Blue Springs (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Springs No. 1
Description:A sawmill village and station near Blue Springs Slough, east of Poplar Bluff on the "Cat" Railroad, during the 1880s and 1890s when William Ferguson and W.H. Wheeler had large timber interests in that vicinity. Named for the slough (q.v.). (Mrs. Geo. Davis; Mrs. M. Zoll)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Springs No. 2
Description:Another one of the mill villages, one mile east of Blue Springs No. 1 (q.v.). It was later called Junland (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Springs Pond
Description:A small lake southeast of Poplar Bluff, in Ash Hill Township, fed by Blue Springs Slough. The drainage system has made it into farmlands. (B. Deem; County Plat, 1859)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Springs School
Description:Formed from Greenwood School District and named for the springs. Later known as Junland School for Junland (q.v.) the railroad station. (L. Guess; Mr. and Mrs. John Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Springs Slough
Description:A slough in St. Francois and Ash Hill Townships. It is now drained by ditches Nos. 10 and 12. It was fed by Blue Springs (q.v.). (County Plat, 1859; Mrs. M. Zoll)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Water Creek
Description:A tributary of Black River, in St. Francis Township. The name is descriptive, suggesting the color of the water. (Mrs. M. Zoll; K. Ham; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Casey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Blue Water School
Description:About five miles northeast of Hendrickson. It derived its name from the creek (q.v.). (Mrs. M. Zoll; K. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bluff Eddy Cave
Description:A small, slightly explored cave near Bluff Spring (q.v.). There is a considerable eddy at that place in the creek. (Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bluff Spring
Description:A large, soft-water spring flowing from the base of a large bluff on Cave Creek about halfway between the church and school of Shiloh Community. (Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Booser
Description:An abandoned sawmill village on the Missouri Pacific Railroad two miles north of Neelyville, where William T. Booser and sons operated a mill for about four years. (Map 1907; C. Pottenger; S. Myrant)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Booser Mill
Description:See Booser.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boyden Mills
Description:Charles Boyden, a lumberman for twenty years in Michigan, came to Neelyville as a member of the Boyden and Wayman Lumber Company in the late 1880s. They set up a mill with a capacity of 100,000 feet of lumber and furnished employment for 200 men. The firm bought 25,00 acres of land, of which Mr. Boyden became sole owner in 1893. After Mr. Boyden's death, in 1897, caused by a broken pulley at the mill, his heirs continued the timber and land business. In 1900 the Star Ranch and Land Company, of which John Boyden, son of Charles, was president and manager, was organized for the purpose of clearing up the land and selling it to settlers for small farms. Mr. John Boyden, formerly of Poplar Bluff, now lives in St. Louis, and his mother returned to the old home, Grand Haven, Michigan. (B. Deem; S. Pottenger; Douglas II.1179)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boyden School
Description:In Neely Township southeast of Neelyville. Named for John Boyden (see Boyden Mills) who gave the land. (B. Deem; I.H. Barnhill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Boyer Branch
Description:A small stream flowing east into Cave Creek. Robert Boyer is a large landowner in the vicinity. (A. Ward; Geo. Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brannum Graveyard
Description:One of the oldest burial grounds of the county, established by a pioneer, James Brannum, from Tennessee. The cemetery is 3/4 mile southwest of Maple Hill School, but it is no longer used. (Mrs. Eva Webb; A. Powers; Douglas I. 179)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brannum School
Description:The old log schoolhouse, built by the early settlers and named for James Brannum. Used for school and church where Methodists and Baptists lived peaceably. Two pioneer preachers; Elias Brannum, the Methodist preacher and son of James, and the Baptist preacher, Washington Powers, step-son-in-law of James Brannum, often conducted joint services. When the church doors were opened, the Baptist preacher would stand on one side of the pulpit and the Methodist on the other side to receive the new members. The old school was later divided into Forest, Grove, Maple Hill, and Pleasant Hill schools. (A. Ward; A. Powers; Thos. Kenzie; Deem, 17)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brannum's Mill
Description:The first grist mill in what is now Butler County, on Little Black River. Set up by James Brannum for whom see above. It was later known as Ball's Mill (q.v.) and Kremlin Mill (q.v.). (Wm. Montgomery; J.S. Hudgens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brannumsburg
Description:Listed as a post office by Goodwin's Gazetteer of Missouri 1867, p. 45. It is also shown on the 1862 postal list, but not on that of 1873. Mr. Hudgens explains that there was a "right smart" little village there in the early days, where James Brannum and family, with their slaves, operated a large farm, ran the mill, and had a store. (J.S. Hudgens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brooklyn Cooperage Plant
Description:Another name, by which the Palmer Plant was known, for the name of the eastern company that owned it. When the timber, chiefly gum and oak, were exhausted, the mill was moved to South Carolina in 1925. (Deem, 121)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Broseley
Description:A small town, formerly Bailey's End, about nine miles southeast of Poplar Bluff, on the Burlington Chicago Railroad. When the post office was established in 1915, the postal authorities would not accept the name, whereupon Mr. Barron, manager of the Burlington Chicago Railroad offered the name of Broseley in Shropshire, England, a place near which Mr. and Mrs. Barron were reared. (Postal Guide 1915 ff.; W.N. Barron; see his letter in INTR. TO SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE-NAMES, p. 36)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Broseley Consolidated School
Description:A consolidated school organized March 10, 1925; composed of Broseley, Brown, Mayberry, Lone Beach, Calvin, Elk and Wilcox schools. A two-year high school is conducted at Broseley, and the other schools continue the elementary work. Named from the town. (J.D. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Broseley School
Description:Near the post office. Now a part of Broseley Consolidated School. (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brower School
Description:In the extreme northeastern part of St. Francis Township formed from Little Brushy District, but now a part of the Rombauer Consolidated District. Named for George Brower, who sold the lot for the building. Mr. Adamson says that Mr. Brower gave the land. See "Pinch Off" School. (Mrs. M. Zoll; K. Ham; W.M. Adamson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown Chapel
Description:A General Baptist Church, organized May 12, 1905, in a brush arbor about halfway between Broseley and Nyssa Switch (q.v.). John Brown, for whom it was named, went over the community on mule-back to get subscriptions for financing the building. (Mrs. George Garver; H.W. Gunnels)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown Ditch
Description:Named for the school (q.v.) and landowner, John Brown.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown School
Description:One of the Broseley schools, two miles southeast of town, organized about 1896. It was named for John Brown, who came from Illinois and gave the land for the school. (E. Calvin; Mrs. E. Warren)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown's Chapel
Description:The Methodist Church for colored people, on Lester Street in Poplar Bluff. A family name. See Black River Seminary.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Brown's Mill
Description:See Kremlin Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buck Creek
Description:A small stream that flows into Black River north of Hillard. Very likely this region was the habitat of deer in pioneer days.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bullock Spring
Description:Named for Jerry and Joshua Bullock, who came from Tennessee in the 1850s and took up land under the squatter act. In Beaver Dam Township just off the Miller Road west of Poplar Bluff. It is generally known as Spout Spring because a short pipe has been placed in to conduct the water. (J.S. Hudgens; Mrs. M. Mills)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Bumpus Stone
Description:On Highway 60, three miles east of Poplar Bluff. William Bumpus from Kentucky, a landowner in the vicinity, has operated the store for several years. (J.C. Corrigan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buncomb Ridge
Description:A low sandy ridge extending from Success, Arkansas, into Thomas Township across the southwestern corner of Butler County. The name is found in Franklin County and used for several places in the southern states, especially Buncombe County, North Carolina, which gave rise to the famous Americanism "talking for Buncombe," hence buncombe, bunk == "hot air" (see Dictionary of American English). Gannett says all were originally named for Colonel Edward Buncombe of the Continental Army. Colonel Edward Buncombe was born in the West Indies, came to the American colonies and settled in Tyrrel County, North Carolina. In the Revolutionary War he raised and commanded the 5th North Carolina Regiment, and fought at the battles of Brandywine and Germantown. In the latter engagement he was severely wounded, captured, and died of his wounds in Philadelphia in 1777. His name was given to the North Carolina County in 1791. (APPLETON'S CYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY). The phrase "talking to (or for) Buncombe (or bunkum)" is first cited by the DAE in 1828; the story of its origin in a Congressional speech is told in Bartlett's DICTIONARY OF AMERICANISMS in 1848. (S. Pottenger; A.F. Gray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Buncomb Slough
Description:Another name for Red Sea (q.v.), which lies parallel with Buncomb Ridge, from which it doubtless took its name (cf. Buncomb Ridge).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Burkett's Mill
Description:A sawmill, near Keener Spring, recently operated by Robert Burkett. (C.W. Wallis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Butler County
Description:It is a southern border division, organized February 27, 1849, from a part of Wayne County. Later that part west of Cane Creek was added from Ripley County. It is bounded on the east by the St. Francis River, on the west by Ripley County, and on the north by Wayne County. Authorities do not agree as to its name father. William's HISTORY states it was named for Benjamin F. Butler (1795-1858), attorney general during Jackson's second term (1833-1837). Others say the name is for William Orlando Butler (1791-1880). The record of the acts of the General Assembly states, "to be called Butler County, in honor of William O. Butler, of Kentucky." Even if we did not have the report of the Legislature, W.O. Butler would be more likely the one honored because he was a famous son of Kentucky, the state from which many of the earliest settlers of Butler County had come, while B.F. Butler was of New York, far away at that time to the Southeast Missourians. William O. Butler, a staunch Democrat, experienced much hardship in the War of 1812-1814, when he was made captain and served under Andrew Jackson, who praised him very highly. He resigned from the army in 1817 to finish his study of law. Upon the declaration of war against Mexico in 1846, he was appointed by President Polk major-general of the volunteers under General Taylor's command. Butler represented his home county in the legislature in 1817 and 1818 and in 1839 he was sent to Congress where he served two terms. In 1848, he was the Democratic nominee for vice-president. (Eaton, 264; Douglas I.179; Goodspeed, 173; HIST. OF MISSOURI, Conrad 1: 455-456; THE COMMONWEALTH OF MISSOURI 286; Williams, 562; LAWS OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI Fifteenth General Assembly, 25; Dic. of AMER. BIOG., III.356, 371)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Butler County Cemetery
Description:The burial place for the county dependents near the re-located City Cemetery.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Butler County Railroad
Description:A standard gauge road, named for the county, extends from Poplar Bluff (q.v.) to Piggott, Arkansas. Originally the narrow roads, extended into the timbered regions from the Palmer Plant (q.v.), were known as the Palmer Railroad. The Butler County Railroad Company, which was formed in 1900, took over the old lines and changed them somewhat. A main standard gauge road was gradually extended to Bailey's End (q.v.), which, for several years, remained the south terminus. The line was incorporated in 1904 as a public service institution to handle freight and passengers. By 1915 it had been constructed to Piggott. As Robert M. Parker had been the former active president of the Palmer lines, so William N. Barron, president of the new company, continued the advancement of vivid life along the road. The old small tram rails have practically all disappeared and some of the elevated road beds serve as good dirt roads in this large farming section that was formerly swampy and heavily timbered. In 1928 the road was sold to the St. Louis and San Francisco Company, but it is still locally known as the Butler County Railroad. (W.N. Barron; Deem, 29, 31, 121; Douglas I.508)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Butler Township
Description:In 1850 when the county was reorganized into four townships, the county name was transferred to the township in the southeast. (Goodspeed, 374; Douglas I.312)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Byrns Ditch
Description:In the southwest part of Neely Township through land owned by Samuel Byrns. (Map 1912: I.H. Barnhill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cache River
Description:A stream rising in the southeastern part of the county and flowing into the St. Francis River in Arkansas. It is a French word, meaning "hiding place," given by the French explorers who stored meats along the lower part of the stream. The French pronunciation has been anglicized. (Maps 1836 ff.; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cairo Branch
Description:See Cairo, Arkansas, and Texas Railroad.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cairo, Arkansas, and Texas Railroad
Description:The road, finished in September, 1873, extends from the main line of the Missouri Pacific Railroad east from Poplar Bluff to Cairo, Illinois. The two roads made a continuous, direct route from Cairo, through Missouri and Arkansas to Texas. Also called, locally, Cairo Branch and "Cat" the latter being formed with the initial letters. (THE EVENING CITIZEN, Souv. Ed., 1901; G.R. Mabie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Caledonia Hills
Description:See Caledonia Slough.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Caledonia School
Description:About four and a half miles southwest of Ash Hill. Named for the slough and hills (q.v.). Formerly called the Hunt School (q.v.). (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Caledonia Slough
Description:It heads northeast of Nyssa (q.v.) and flows southwest into Black River west of Qulin. Shown on the plat of 1859. It is drained by Ditch No. 25. Mr. Sutherland thinks a family of that name settled there. Mr. Calvin says that at least fifty-three years ago, George W. Jones lived on a farm there, known as the Caledonia Hill Farm. Dr. Lindsay, who seems to speak with definite authority, says that the name is a transplanted one for Caledonia in St. Francis County; that some settlers came from there and located near the slough on the low sandy ridges known as Caledonia Hills. However, the map shows Caledonia to be in Washington County. Both names appear to be borrowed from the town name. (W. Sutherland; E. Calvin; Dr. J.L. Lindsay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Calf Horn Hollow
Description:A branch of Lumly Hollow (q.v.). During the early trapping and hunting days, someone hung a calf horn up in a tree where it remained long enough to give the name. (M. Caldwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Calvin School
Description:An offspring of Lone Beach School. One of the Broseley schools, established in 1907 and named for a former county judge, Charles Calvin, who gave the land and was a leader in the community. E. Calvin; J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Calvin Spur
Description:A sawmill camp on the Frisco Railroad northeast of Poplar Bluff. Named for Charles Calvin, who came from Wayne County, Illinois, in 1889 and served as timber agent for the Palmer Plant. He was later judge of the county. (E. Calvin; Mrs. W.A. Colter)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A discontinued post office of the Cane Creek Settlement. The office was kept by Ezekial Sandlin in his store, by James Ferguson in his home (still standing on Highway 60, near the Cane Creek Bridge), and by others at various times. (P.L. Hayward (1853) 824; Postal Guide 1876-1909; M. Caldwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Creek [2 of 2]
Description:One of the larger creeks, named by the early pioneers because of the plants. Along the lower part of the stream there were large cane brakes, while on the upper branches scattered plants were abundant. The plants reached a height of twenty-five feet or more. The canes were of great value to the early pioneers, who used the long ones for fishing rods and the smaller ones for stems of corn-cob pipes and clay pipes. Middle Prong (the upper part of the main stream), North Prong, and South Prong converge in eastern Johnson Township of Carter County to form the larger stream, which enters Butler County in the western part of Cane Creek Township and flows in a southerly course through the county into Black River in Arkansas. (Polly Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Creek Church [1 of 2]
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in the Cane Creek Settlement. The church records are lost, but Mr. Caldwell thinks it was organized in the early 1860s. Douglas explains that the 17th annual association met with the Cane Creek Church in 1852, and Goodspeed says the church was constituted in 1842 by Elder Henry McElmurry. Mr. Caldwell explains that services were held in the Sandlin Store (q.v.) four or five years until the present house was built, in 1876, upon the hill near the Cane Creek School. On May 16, 1861, at the old church on Ten Mile, the first Sunday School in Butler County, a union school, was organized by "Uncle Jimmie Tubb" who had come from Tennessee. A Presbyterian in belief, he remained with the church and Sunday School through the Civil War. When a church of his faith was established in Poplar Bluff, he became a prominent member. (M. Caldwell; Goodspeed, 556; Douglas I.471)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Creek Church [2 of 2]
Description:See Good Hope Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Creek School
Description:An old school, named for the creek. Built in 1868, on property now owned by Wade Anthony, 3/4 mile northwest of the present location. Lafayette Hull was the first teacher in the old log house, erected on Hamilton Scott's land, who with William Sparkman, Solomon Kittrell, and T.J. Caldwell, effected the establishment. (M. Caldwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Creek Settlement
Description:A community northwest of Poplar Bluff where the first settlements were made in what is now Butler County, in 1819, by the Kittrell's from Kentucky. Other early settlers were Thomas Scott, Malachi Hedspeth, Daniel Epps, Martin Sandlin, and Samuel Hillis. But family Bible dates and cemetery grave stone dates disprove the statement by Mr. Deem and Douglas that Solomon Kittrell was the first Kittrell settler. (See Kittrell Graveyard; Douglas I.179; C. Hedspeth; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cane Creek Township
Description:One of the present nine townships, as relocated and established in 1866. In the northwest part of the county. Formed from Black River Township and doubtless named for its largest stream. (Goodspeed, 375; Douglas I.312)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Caney Island
Description:That part of southern Poplar Bluff Township lying between Dan River and Caney Slough. It derived its name from the dense growth of huge cane, which regions were spoken of by the pioneers as "cane brakes, full of bears, deer, and other animals." (B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Caney Slough
Description:A sluggish stream, now lost by drainage, west of Dan River, flowing into Black River. See Caney Island. (Maps 1873-1924; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carola
Description:A German settlement made in the 1870s on the site formerly known as Gillis Bluff (q.v.). Charles Hendrix, Sr., a citizen of Poplar Bluff, bought a large section of land in that vicinity and induced a hundred immigrants to come from Saxony to develop farms there. They had a steamboat named Carola, and from its name the village was known. (Postal Guide 1883-1915; B. Deem; W.N. Barron)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carola School
Description:Named for the village nearby (q.v.). Later known as Upper Carola School (q.v.). (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carpenter's Bend
Description:A distinct curve and widened part of Black River northeast of Poplar Bluff. Named for the landowner, Ephraim Carpenter. It was formerly a part of Horseshoe Lake, so named on the County Plat of 1859, for its shape. (O.B. Gomer; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Carter School
Description:A school on Big Island, established about 1921, and named for a family living there. (J.D. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cat Branch
Description:See Cairo, Arkansas, and Texas Railroad.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cat Railroad
Description:See Cairo, Arkansas, and Texas Railroad.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cat Tail Creek
Description:Near Rombauer, named for the marsh plants growing along its course before the country was drained. Sometimes spoken of as a slough. (Mrs. M. Zoll; F.M. Kinder)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Catherine Slough
Description:Found on the government survey County Plat of 1859, flowing into Black River southeast of Poplar Bluff. Some of the older residents speak of it as Catherine Lake west of Broseley (now lost by drainage). Evidently a feminine Christian name, but no information could be found about the name. Also spelled "Catharine."
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Catholic Cemetery
Description:A well-kept burial ground southwest of Poplar Bluff, about one mile. (cf. Sacred Heart Church).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cavalcade Park
Description:In 1925, P.G. Haag established this summer resort for hunting, camping, and fishing on Highway 53 and Black River. The tract contains ten acres and has a good building for meals and lodging. It is now opened by Miss Daisy Ashcraft, who gave the name in 1935, Cavalcade, the winner of the 1934 Kentucky Derby races. (Miss Daisy Ashcraft)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cedar Valley Church
Description:A regular Christian Church, organized by George Shadle in 1889, about one mile east of Green Forest Church (q.v.). Named for the grove of cedars nearby, which was started by Nathan O'Ferrel who brought the young trees from Iron County, Missouri. As there was some contention among the members over the use of musical instruments, the house which was built in 1904 was not rebuilt. (J.S. Hudgens; Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Celtis
Description:A mill camp, now lost, in Gillis Bluff Township on the Burlington Chicago Railroad. Named by W.N. Barron from the Latin name of the genus of trees to which belongs the hackberry, a common tree in the vicinity. Cf. Fagus, Nyssa, Quercus, etc. (W.N. Barron; see his letter in INTR. TO A SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE-NAMES, p. 36)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Central Baptist Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church (colored) in northwestern Poplar Bluff, in what was the early negro settlement. Probably named for its location. (Mrs. Roxie Blue)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Central School
Description:The fourth public school building of Poplar Bluff. Erected in 1898, on the old City Cemetery grounds near the center of the town. Built originally for the high school, it has also been enlarged and remodeled and used for various grades. Now made into a junior high school. It was centrally located in the town. (P.C. Hays)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cherokee Bay Road
Description:A noted old pioneer road extending southwest from the Military Road (q.v.) from the Cane Creek Settlement through Naylor, Ripley County (q.v.), to the old Cherokee Indian Settlement in northern Arkansas, called Cherokee Bay. From Houck's map, II, 227, it appears to be a part of the old Natchitoches Path. The road has recently received considerable improvement and is used extensively. (Mrs. Melvina Pottenger; A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cholonallay
Description:See St. Francis River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:City Cemetery
Description:The old cemetery which was formerly where the Poplar Bluff High School and Central School are now located. When Central School was built in 1898, the graves were moved to the present location on Highway 67 northwest of Poplar Bluff. (P.C. Hays; Mrs. J.J. Van Eaton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clark Branch
Description:An old family name given to the small stream, near Lone Hill School, flowing into Muddy Branch (q.v.). (A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clay Pit No. 1
Description:A small outcrop of natural white clay was found in 1920 on the Frank Aden farm seven miles southwest of Poplar Bluff. The deposit was not large enough nor pure enough to warrant any attempt at market, but "continued prospecting resulted in locating and developing a wonderful deposit of natural black clay, that when carefully selected and fired, produces pure white." This Aden deposit has been said by competent persons to be the largest uniform deposit of white burning clay in America. (THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC, May 15, 1929)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Clay Pit No. 2
Description:On the John Kearby farm ten miles northwest of Poplar Bluff, natural brown and black clays were found. The first car load was shipped in 1921. It was quite a thriving industry for three or four years. (THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC, May 15, 1929)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cochran Cemetery
Description:About one and a half mile north of Bethel Church. Named for Joel Cochran from Tennessee, a landowner who deeded the first plot of ground for a public burial ground. Later landowners Crayton Pottenger and Walker Ward gave more land. (C. Pottenger; Mrs. E. Webb; Letter from Ed Cochran)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Collins Chapel
Description:A General Baptist Church in Kellytown (q.v.), organized at Collinsville (q.v.), about 1914, by Rev. Shirley Collins. When the house burned about 1920, it was rebuilt at the present location. (C.H. Hargrove; Mrs. Dora Ketchum)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Collins Store
Description:A small general store, filling station, and blacksmith shop seven miles north of Poplar Bluff on Rural Route 3. It was established in 1921 by G.H. Collins on his farm. (G.H. Collins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Collinsville
Description:A provision station on the Ruth and Hargrove Tram Railroad about twenty-five years ago. Three Collins families Mack, Henry, and Sherley lived there, besides several other families. (C.H. Hargrove; Mrs. Dora Ketchum)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Coon Island
Description:A large section of formerly swampy land in the southern part of the county between Cane Creek and Still Camp Slough. The name was given by the early trappers and hunters because of the many raccoons found there. The old story goes that the name originated during a very high water season when the whole country was inundated except an elevated portion which was seen entirely covered with raccoons. (B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Coon Island Township
Description:The southern border township, formed in 1871 from the eastern part of Thomas Township. It was named for the island (q.v.). (THE EVENING CITIZEN, 1901; B. Deem; Douglas I.312)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Copeland Creek
Description:A creek rising in the northern part of Black River Township and flowing south into Cane Creek southwest of Poplar Bluff. Named for some of the earliest settlers near its headwaters, Van and Green Copeland. The lake in its course, no doubt named for the stream, just west of Poplar Bluff, later was changed to Pike because of the pike fish found abundantly. The stream above the lake acquired the name of Pike Creek and that portion south of the lake, Pike Slough. A land map of the county in 1912 shows A.W. Copeland, a present landowner on the upper part of this stream, but the name of the stream is given as Pike Creek. Doubtless the stream was known in pioneer days as Otter Creek (q.v.). (County Plat of 1859; Campbell Atlas (1873); C. Hedspeth; J. Humphrey; Goodspeed, 477)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Copeland Lake
Description:Later known as Pike Lake (see Copeland Creek). More recently it is sometimes called Hogg's Lake and Schwaner's Lake for James Hogg and Henry Schwaner, later landowners. Under the drainage system the lake is now good farm land, and the proposed change in Highway 67 will cross the old bed. (Maps 1920 ff.; O.B. Gomer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Copeland's Creek
Description:This spelling is shown on the plat of 1859. [See Copeland Creek]
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Corder's Cave
Description:The largest of several small caves in the Brower School District. An old family name. (Mrs. M. Zoll; K. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crane Roost
Description:A section of very swampy country north of Fisk in Butler County, and in Stoddard County where the white cranes were very numerous. A very profitable, unhealthful industry of the earlier days was the gathering of the plumes where the birds had roosted. (THE EVENING CITIZEN, 1901)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Craven Ditch
Description:A drainage ditch, extending through the Eli Craven farm, southwest of Poplar Bluff about one mile.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Craven School
Description:About two miles southwest of Poplar Bluff near Highway 67. Named for a local landowner, Eli Craven, who was killed by the tornado of 1927. (B. Deem; Mrs. E. Webb)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Craven's Chapel
Description:A union church, on Highway 67 near the Craven School, from which it took its name. The building was destroyed by the tornado of 1927. (O.B. Gomer, Mrs. E. Webb)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crooked Branch
Description:The name is descriptive of a small stream flowing into Can Creek near Miller's Bridge (q.v.). (Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crooked Slough
Description:A sluggish stream, shown on a 1912 map, flowing into Cane Creek in Coon Island Township. A descriptive name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cross Slough
Description:Quite contrary to the general southerly direction of the other streams, this one crosses Big Island in an east-west direction connecting Black and Dan Rivers. On an earlier map of 1859, it is named Cut Off Slough. It cuts off the water in Dan River, directing it into Black River. Both names are descriptive. (Map 1930; B. Deem; County Plat 1859)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Crowley Hill
Description:An unusually large and steep hill on the Roxie Road, three and a half miles west of Poplar Bluff at Gerhardt's Green House. Named for a former landowner, Charles Crowley, who lived there. (Mrs. M. Donnelly; Geo. Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cut Off Slough
Description:See Cross Slough.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cypress Branch
Description:It heads in Peppermint Spring and empties into St. Francis River north of Mud Creek. Some cypress timber originally grew on the stream. (Wm. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Cypress Swamp
Description:A large region in Coon Island Township, between Cane Creek and Copeland's Creek, formerly very swampy and covered with huge cypress trees. (Map 1912; Plat 1859; C. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dale
Description:An abandoned sawmill village on the Frisco Railroad northeast of Rombauer. It took the name of John Dale, a great timber merchant in southeast Missouri during the timber days. (Map 1910; B. Deem; Mrs. S. Mast; Douglas I.696)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dan River
Description:A familiar shortening for Daniels River (q.v.). Locally this is the only name one hears for the stream.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Daniels
Description:A post office in the vicinity of Fagus, shown on a 1907 map. Mrs. Colter remembers that there was a school over in Arkansas by this name. Mrs. Garver remembers and elderly lady of this name who kept the office. Mr. Gunnels says it was kept in the home on the Potter farm. Doubtlss it is a family name (cf. Daniels River). (Mrs. W.A. Colter; Mrs. Geo. Garver; H.W. Gunnels; Postal Guide 1907- 1915)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Daniels River
Description:The old bed of a portion of Black River in Ash Hill Township. Because of drainage and natural filling, this old bayou has almost disappeared. It took the name of the Daniels family who came to the vicinity as the first settlers during the hunting and trapping days about 1820. Recently known only by the abbreviated name Dan River. (Maps 1859, 1873; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Danish Settlement
Description:Settlements northeast and east of Poplar Bluff, shown on maps of 1865 and 1873. Parker in 1867 writes that Mr. F.R. Brunot, a heavy iron manufacturer in Pittsburg, has purchased large tracts of iron and timber land in the northeast corner of this county Butler at Indian Ford on the St. Francois River. He further writes that a larger colony of Danes are settling near Poplar Bluffs, and "upwards of one hundred families are expected to arrive this season." Brunot plays a part in the place-name history of Wayne County. Some iron mining has been done, and at least some persons of Danish descent did arrive and settled in the vicinity of Hendrickson (q.v.). (MISSOURI AS IT WAS IN 1867, 199-200)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:David River
Description:This name for Daniels River is found on maps 1879, 1891, and 1895. It is probably a misprint, as no information could be found.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davidson School
Description:One of the older schools of the county southeast of Hendrickson. Named for Dr. Hugh C. Davidson, a landowner and pioneer doctor. (Dr. Hugh Davidson; J.H.H. Potillo)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davidson Spring
Description:See Gum Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davidson's Mill
Description:Near Wilby. Davidson is an old family name of the community. It doubtless was one of the earliest grist mills in the vicinity. (Cf. Davidson Spring).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis Ferry [1 of 2]
Description:Another Davis Ferry which was also known as Dekens Ferry (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis Ferry [2 of 2]
Description:The first county court in session in the home of Thomas Scott on Cane Creek, granted a license, on June 18, 1849, to Gabriel Davis to keep a ferry across Black River. The land records show Gabriel Davis to be a landowner northeast of the site of Poplar Bluff, on Black River. This ferry was the Black River crossing of the old road from Brannum's Mill (q.v.) to Indian Ford on the St. Francis River. (Goodspeed, 374; J.C. Corrigan; Deem, 49)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis School
Description:The old original school was organized more than forty years ago and named for Ed Davis, who gave the land for the grounds. It was also known, locally, as Race Track School because horse-racing, a great community entertainment, was conducted on the grounds for a number of years. When the increased settlement made another school necessary, this original school was known as Davis School No. 1 and the other, in the extreme southeast corner of Gillis Bluff Township was called Davis School No. 2. (J.L. Raulston; E. Calvin; L. Guess; Mrs. Ruth Craft)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis School No. 1
Description:See Davis School (Butler).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Davis School No. 2
Description:See Davis School (Butler).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dead Man's Hollow
Description:Another name for Watered Hollow (q.v.). The story is told that during the Civil War, James Chilton saw two soldiers and a civilian go up the valley toward a cave. Soon the soldiers returned without the man. (Mr. and Mrs. R.L. Coleman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Deep Hole
Description:A very wide portion of Cane Creek at the Shiloh Bridge, said to be fifteen feet deep. It is the "Ole Swimmin' Hole" for a large community and visitors from miles away. (W.H. Boxx)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Deep Sink
Description:A small, deep lake about four miles northwest of Neelyville, the bottom of which has not been found. (B. Deem; I.H. Barnhill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Deep Slough
Description:A descriptive name applied to a slough in St. Francis Township, flowing into St. Francis River. Destroyed by the drainage system. (County Plat 1859)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Deer Lick
Description:See Lick Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Deken's Ferry
Description:At the crossing of St. Francis River, a few miles north of Highway 53. Named for an old settler in the vicinity. It is also known as Davis Ferry and Harper's Ferry. Several Davis families live near, and a Mr. Harper ran the ferry for a time. (J.J. Van Eaten; S. Myrant)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Depoyster School
Description:About six miles southeast of Fisk. Named for a landowner, Joe L. Depoyster, who came from Tennessee. (B. Deem; E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Devil's Elbow
Description:A dangerous bend in Black River, several miles south of Poplar Bluff. Named by the river and boat men during the timber days when logs were rafted down the rivers. (B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Devil's Riffle
Description:Named on Railroad Right of Way map of 1873. Now known as Lone Hill Shoots (q.v.). Probably so named because of the dangerous situation; there are small rapids in the river here.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dickens Graveyard
Description:The burial ground on land formerly belonging to Hardy Dickens. As it is one mile south of Lone Hill Cemetery, it is now seldom used. (Geo. Powers; Mrs. E. Webb)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 1
Description:See Main Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 10
Description:It leads from near Rombauer into Main Ditch south of Spread, and helps to drain Blue Springs Slough. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 11
Description:Heads near Hodges Ferry. It leads south and southwest, draining Lake Slough into Main Ditch. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 12
Description:One of the longer ditches. It heads northeast of Rombauer and drains Blue Springs Slough and Panther Slough into Main Ditch. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 13
Description:See Main Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 14
Description:Begins north of Broseley and leads southwest into Main Ditch. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 15
Description:A short ditch southwest of Broseley, leading into Ditch No. 14. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 16
Description:It starts southeast of Hodge's Ferry (q.v.) and leads south and southwest draining Menorkenut Slough into Main Ditch. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 17
Description:Northeast of Fisk; it drains into Ditch No. 16. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 18
Description:A short ditch south of Fisk, leading into Ditch No. 16. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 19
Description:Drains the upper part of Menorkenut Slough into No. 16. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 1A
Description:See Main Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 2
Description:See Main Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 20
Description:A short ditch north of Broseley, draining into Ditch No. 16. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 21
Description:South of Ash Hill; it leads into Ditch No. 16. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 22
Description:It leads from east of Broseley, near St. Francis River, southwest and west into Ditch No. 16. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 23
Description:It extends from northeast of Broseley southwest into Ditch No. 22. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 24
Description:It extends from Black River Ridge, northwest of Qulin, east into Main Ditch. It drains Caledonia Slough. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 25
Description:It begins northwest of Qulin, extends west, carrying the drainage of Ditch No. 30 (q.v.) north of Qulin Ridge into Main Ditch. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 26
Description:It is known as Sluiceway Ditch because of the flood gates to regulate the overflow water. It extends southwest from Ditch No. 24, between Black River and Main Ditch, into Main Ditch above the latter's entrance into Black River. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 27
Description:See Swan Pond Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 28
Description:Begins west of Qulin and drains Cache River into a ditch in Arkansas. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 29
Description:It starts southwest of Qulin and leads in a general southerly direction into Ditch No. 28. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 3
Description:See Main Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 30
Description:This ditch starts near St. Francis River, northeast of Broseley and follows generally the St. Francis Levee southward to Qulin Ridge. Originally it extended on south into Arkansas, but that state made an injunction, objecting to the drainage coming into her territory; whereupon a dam was made in the ditch at its gap through Qulin Ridge. Then Ditch No. 30 began anew south of the ridge, carrying only the natural drainage, at which Arkansas could make no complaint. The southern part drains Fish Trap Slough, and extends from southeast of Qulin southwest through Arkansas into Cache River southwest of Fagus. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 31
Description:It extends from a point east of Qulin, near St. Francis River, and carries the drainage of Ditch No. 30 westward into Ditch No. 16. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 32
Description:This ditch, farther north of Qulin, was projected, but abandoned, because it was considered as not needed. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 33
Description:It begins southeast of Qulin, and extends two and a half miles south into Fish Trap Slough. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 34
Description:This ditch is three and a half miles long, and leads from south of Qulin, south into Fish Trap Slough. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 35
Description:It leads from north of Fagus south into Fish Trap Slough. It is only two and a half miles long. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 36
Description:It is only two and a half miles in length, and leads from northwest of Fagus into Ditch No. 28. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 37
Description:It extends from a point southeast of Qulin, near St. Francis River, southwest into Fish Trap Slough. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 4
Description:See Main Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 5
Description:See Main Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 6
Description:See Main Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 7
Description:See Main Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 7A
Description:A ditch later added to the original plan, an extension of No. 7 toward Black River. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 8
Description:See Main Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ditch No. 9
Description:See Main Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dog Town [1 of 2]
Description:A mill camp on a short spur of the Burlington Chicago Railroad west of Broseley, during the timber days; so named because nearly every family had a dog, some of which were used for hunting. (E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dog Town [2 of 2]
Description:See Ashcroft Addition.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doniphan and Poplar Bluff Road
Description:The early road connecting the two towns. Parts of the road are now highways 67 and 42.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doniphan Branch
Description:A branch of the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad, constructed from Neelyville to Doniphan. It was opened for traffic May 1, 1883. (Maps 1884 ff.; St. Louis Railroad office by G.R. Mabie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doolens
Description:See Doolen's Pasture.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Doolen's Pasture
Description:This name is shown in section 16, on what is now Big Island (q.v.), on the plat of 1859. In section 15 is the name Doolens. Unquestionably this is the name of a man who made an early settlement there.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dooley Graveyard
Description:On the old Dooley farm southwest of Rombauer. The family lived there before the Civil War, and two sons, John and James, were later great timber men. (Mrs. M. Zoll; Wm. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dooley School
Description:The old school, later Greenwood School (q.v.), named for John Dooley who lived there. (Mr. and Mrs. John Martin; Wm. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Driver Springs
Description:Near Black River School. Named for an early family that lived there. (C. Hedspeth)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dry Branch
Description:A small wet weather stream of Cane Creek Township, flowing into Cane Creek near Shiloh Church. It is dry most of the year. (W.H. Boxx; Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dug Ford
Description:See Dug Ford (Ripley).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dunham's Eddy
Description:In Black River near Gillis Bluff, the name of an old resident and landowner. The river boatmen sometimes had trouble here, because it was not easy to get the heavy loaded barges over the eddy. (J.C. Corrigan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dunlap Graveyard
Description:A later name by which Brannum Graveyard was also known, because Jesse Dunlap, an influential, progressive farmer lived nearby for a number of years. (Thos. Kenzie; Thos. Langley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dunning Cemetery
Description:A cemetery in Beaver Dam Township near Highway 67, on land formerly owned by Andrew J. Dunning. (S. Pottenger; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Dusch's Store
Description:A general country store and filling station, established in June, 1933, near the Carola school by Mrs. S.E. Dusch. (Garland Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:East Poplar Bluff
Description:The name given to that part of Poplar Bluff east of Black River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:East Side School
Description:The building was erected in 1902 in East Poplar Bluff, and served the residents of East Poplar Bluff (q.v.). Later J. Minnie Smith School (q.v.). (Deem, 109)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eastwood Switch
Description:Jeff Eastwood had a sawmill which he connected with the Missouri Pacific Railroad about one mile distant. The name was later changed to Angus (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Edgewood Seminary
Description:A private school for girls and women, opened in 1901 in the home of A. Perry Johnson of Poplar Bluff, a former senator from Missouri. The school, conducted by two daughters, Mrs. Georgia Williams and Mrs. Addie Cameron, continued two or three years. The old home, then in the edge of the forest northwest of Poplar Bluff, is now the Children's Detention Home on Fifth Street. Mr. Deem gives the date as 1900. (THE EVENING CITIZEN, Sept. 15, 1901; Mrs. J.J. Van Eaton; Deem, 108)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eidelman Spring
Description:See Kenner Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elder Spring
Description:Near Black River School. Named from the elder shrubs that grow around the spring. (C. Hedspeth)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elk Church
Description:A General Baptist Church, organized in the Elk Schoolhouse for which it is named, in August, 1932. The house was dedicated in April, 1933. (H.W. Gunnels; L. Guess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elk School
Description:It is now consolidated as a part of the Broseley Schools. It took its name from the slough when it was formed, in 1912, from parts of Webb and Depoyster schools. (J.L. Raulston; E. Calvin; L. Guess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Elk Slough
Description:A tributary, before the drainage system was begun, of the St. Francis River, in the eastern part of the county. During the early days there were many elk in the vicinity. (County Plat 1859; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Empire
Description:A station and mill camp on the Burlington Chicago Railroad, where the Empire Lumber Company operated sawmills during the timber days. Nothing remains now but a farm, the Empire Dairy Farm. (S. Pottenger; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:English School
Description:About three and a half miles northeast of Baskey School. Elijah English was a large landowner there during the 1880s. (B. Deem; K. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Epps Ditch
Description:In Beaver Dam Township through the farm owned by John Epps. (S. Pottenger; A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Epps Mill
Description:One of the pioneer grist mills on the Military Road, on Ten Mile Creek, owned by Daniel Epps. No traces, except a part of the old dam, remain. (Goodspeed, 309)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Epps School
Description:One of the early schools in Beaver Dam Township. The first house was of logs with puncheon floors and split log benches, and the early teachers would teach "for a dollar a day and board around." Named for one of the pioneers, Daniel Epps, a landowner. Soon after Martin Fairless of Illinois moved into the community on the old Epps place. The school acquired his name. About 1866, the school was moved to its present location about one mile south and named Lone Hill by the teacher, Robert Hassler, because the building stood alone on a low hill somewhat higher than the surrounding country. (Mrs. Eva Webb; A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Epps Township
Description:A western border township which has retained the name given to one of the four townships created in 1850; doubtless named for the pioneer, Obadiah Epps who was appointed to receive small loans with which to pay for the site of Poplar Bluff. (J.S. Hudgens; Douglas I312; Goodspeed, 477-478)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eugene Field School
Description:An elementary school on Victory Hill, built in 1906 at a cost of $10,000. Named for Eugene Field (1850-1895), the "Children's Poet" of Missouri. Formerly known as Vinegar Hill School for the suburb of that name (q.v.). (School Records; P.C. Hays)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Eureka School
Description:A school district near Kerens in the northwestern part of the county. Doubtless borrowed from the motto of California, taken from the famous explanation of Archimedes meaning, in Greek. "I have found it." (Cent. Dict.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fagus
Description:A village and post office in Gillis Bluff Township on the Burlington Chicago Railroad; formerly a mill camp, "Slap Out" (q.v.). The name suggested by Mr. Barron, is the Latin and botanical term for beech. Beech trees were comparatively rare, though they were found in groups of two or three, and occasionally singly. (Maps 1910ff.; Postal Guide 1915ff.; Campbell, Atlas, 105; W.N. Barron, see his letter in INTRO. TO SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE NAMES, p. 36)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fairless School
Description:See Epps School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:A discontinued school three and a half miles northeast of Hillard. Organized about 1911 and named because of its location. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ferguson Switch
Description:A logging switch established on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, near Neelyville, during the early timber days. William Ferguson and George Wheeler owned sawmills in various places, one of the largest being at Corning, Arkansas, which was supplied with logs chiefly from Butler County. At one of the various purchases, William Ferguson bought for this mill over one million feet of logs from Mr. C.H. Hargrove, logging manager for the Hargrove Ruth Company. (S. Myrant; C.H. Hargrove; C. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:First Baptist Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church on Sixth and Vine Streets in Poplar Bluff, Missouri. It was organized May 25, 1867, by Eld. William R. Combs, and was recognized by a council of members from Cane Creek, Black River, and Union churches on May 27, 1867, according to Goodspeed and the newspaper; but the Association minutes give the date as 1865. The first building was a small box house. In 1883, a larger frame building was erected, which was replaced, in 1913, by a modern brick building. After the Second Baptist Church (q.v.) was established, the prefix "First" was attached as a distinguishing term. (THE EVENING CITIZEN, 1901; Goodspeed, 560; M.B.G.A. 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:First Christian Church
Description:See I.M. Davidson Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fish Trap Slough
Description:Heads southeast of Qulin near St. Francis River and leads southwest, west of Fagus, into Cache River. No reason was found for the name, but doubtless, fish traps were used along the stream in earlier times; or it is possibly due to the fact that, during rainy seasons, the overflow waters would fill the slough with fish, which could not get out when the stream became normal again. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fisk
Description:A small town on the "Cat" Railroad near the St. Francis River. Samuel J. Fisk operated, for a Mr. Garetson and Mr. Greason, sawmills in the community on both sides of the river, and was postmaster of Poplin, the little village and railroad station across the river in Stoddard County. The citizens petitioned that the post office be moved over into Butler County and named the place Fisk for the mill man. Soon Poplin disappeared. (Postal Guide 1900 ff.; Maps 1895 ff.; C. Pottenger; L. Guess; I.F. Jordan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fisk Consolidated School
Description:Organized June 10, 1925 and composed of Riverside Ash Hill, Snyder, Little, and Fisk schools. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Flatwoods School
Description:In Cane Creek Township. A topographical name suggested by the high, nearly level region. (C. Hedspeth; O.B. Gomer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fletcher Branch
Description:A small western tributary of Cane Creek, in Bay Springs community. Named for a local landowner. (E. Thurman; Geo. Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Forest Grove School
Description:Established about 1882 in Beaver Dam Township. It was situated on a tract of land having much underbrush where some of the large timber had been removed. Surrounding this was a dense forest. The situation probably gave the name. (S. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Franklin Creek
Description:A "wet weather" stream flowing into Indian Creek. An old family name. Several families of this name were there in earlier days. (J.J. Van Eaton; K. Ham; J.H.H. Potillo; W. Sutherland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fredie
Description:A discontinued post office about three miles northwest of Harviell (q.v.). It was on the old "horse-back" mail route extending from Harviell to Fredie, on by Fairdealing to Gamburg; then by Kremlin Mills back to Harviell. Before the Civil War Joseph Rushin had a distillery at Round Pond (q.v.). After the war Fred Smiser from St. Louis bought the farm, now known as the Price Farm northeast of Bethel Church (q.v.). He built an unusually good house for that day and community, discontinued the still, and set up a store where the post office was established. It was given the diminutive form of his name. Later he returned to St. Louis, and the post office was kept by Anderson Ward in his home for a time. (Maps 1873-1884; P.L. Campbell (1874) 15; Wilson (1895)37; A. Ward; T.Ward; Thos. Kinzey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Friend's Ferry
Description:A name by which Hodge's Ferry was earlier known for a time because John Friend owned and operated it for a number of years. (K. Ham; Wm. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Friendship Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church, organized in the Kremlin Schoolhouse November 10, 1907, by Rev. J.S. Redman and Rev. George Kenner. This idealistic name was suggested by Rev. Redman for a church in Stoddard County. Soon a house was erected near the school. The church is now Landmark Baptist. (Rev. Wm. S. Smelser; Mr. and Mrs. A. Ward; Mrs. Julia Warren)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Fulton Creek
Description:A later name for Wah Branch (q.v.), named for Joe Fulton who ran a sawmill on the creek about fifteen years ago. (Mrs. Cecil Burton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Funk Creek
Description:Ralph Funk owns the farm through which the small stream flows into Black River in Black River Township. (Mr. and Mrs. S. Agee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gaines Switch
Description:It was established in the early 1900s, on the Frisco Railroad two miles north of Naylor. A Mr. Gaines operated a sawmill here, and lumber and ties were loaded. It is one of the many mill and timber villages. (Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Woodard)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Garretson School
Description:About two miles southwest of Harviell. Named for Robert and Frank Garretson, who had a store and lumber business in Harviell in the 1870s and 1880s. They owned the land near the school. The name was later changed to Maple Hill, because of the maple trees growing on the hill around the school. (Mrs. Eva Webb; S. Myrant)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gentzen School
Description:A name given to the old Qulin School (q.v.) when it was moved about a mile to the farm owned by William Gentzen from Germany, a brother-in-law of Judge Kelley. Cf. Kelly School. (E. Calvin; R. Missenhammer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:George Washington School
Description:The colored school in Neelyville. It was obviously named for the "Father of Our Country."
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gerhardt's Greenhouse
Description:A man by this name has operated the small greenhouse on his farm for a number of years. Cf. Crowley Hill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:German Settlement
Description:This name is shown on Parker's map, 1865 and Campbell's Atlas of 1873, for a place northwest of Poplar Bluff. In this community are families of German descent whose ancestors came soon after the Civil War, among whom are Van Dover, Patty, Freer, Boxx, Eudaley, Ruebottom, Wisecarver and Walton.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gilliam's Ferry
Description:During the Civil War, John J. Gilliam, later county judge (1865-1866), operated the ferry near Indian Ford, where the Frisco Railroad crosses the St. Francis River. He sold the ferry to John Friend who operated it, and whose name it acquired. It was later changed to Hodge's Ferry (q.v.). (Wm. Ham; Mr. and Mrs. J.H.H. Potillo; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gillis Bluff
Description:An old river port on Black River. Before the Civil War a man by the name of Gillis came up the river and made a settlement on the first low bluffs. Later known as Carola (q.v.). From this trading post furs were shipped to Europe. Listed by Campbell's GAZETTEER OF MISSOURI, p. 20, as a post office. (B. Deem; E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gillis Bluff Ridge
Description:This low ridge extends along the eastern side of Black River in the vicinity of Gillis Bluff (q.v.). North of this ridge and on the west side of the river, levees have been constructed to aid in preventing overflows. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gillis Bluff Township
Description:In the southeastern corner of the county; organized in 1866, and doubtless named for the river port. (Goodspeed, 375; Douglas I.312)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gilpin's Cut
Description:A cut through one of the larger sand hills south of Ash Hill, for the old Palmer Railroad. John Gilpin lived near. (Geo. Windsor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Good Hope Church
Description:The early name for Cane Creek Methodist Church. Organized in 1891 by L.M. Lee of the Shiloh Church, and named by Mrs. Amos Houts. It stands near the Cane Creek School, at the foot of the hill upon which is situated the older Cane Creek Baptist Church. An idealistic name, expressing denominational zeal. (Mrs. J.E. Kearby; M. Caldwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Good Hope School
Description:On Highway 67 about six miles southwest of Poplar Bluff. The idealistic name was given by J.B. Marshall, David Booser, H.T. Horton and others of the poor community who had "good hopes" that their families would be greatly benefited by the new school. (Mrs. A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Goose Creek
Description:See Wah Branch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Green Forest Church
Description:A Church of Christ, one branch of the Christian Church, formed by some of the members of Cedar Valley Church (q.v.), three miles west of Poplar Bluff on Highway 60. The house now standing is the third one built here, as the first one was burned, and the second was destroyed by a tornado in 1929. The name, suggested by Mrs. Alice Sparkman, was given because a forest surrounded the house on three sides. (Mrs. Alice Sparkman; Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Green Hill Cemetery
Description:See Green Hill Farm.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Green Hill Farm
Description:A farm, later owned by the Mengel family, is known by this name, according to some informants, because on it is a blue grass- covered hill three miles north of Poplar Bluff, the first elevation on the northern border of the large lowland region to the south and east. On the hill is a burial ground, thought by some to be very old. The name is apparently of double origin, but it seems quite certain that truly it is a personal name. The plat of 1859 shows this land belonging to the David E. Green heirs. By the explanation of Greenwood School (q.v.), we know that Green is a family name in the vicinity. Doubtless the Green family also owned land farther east and south where there were no hills, and this farm took its name, no doubt, from the topography as well as from the family name. (Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Sutherland; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Martin; J.H.H. Potillo; J.J. Van Eaton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Greenville and Doniphan Road
Description:The first "three notch road" in this section, was made about 1852 and led from Greenville, in Wayne County, to Poplar Bluff, and then over the hills to Doniphan. Main Street of Poplar Bluff is a part of this old road. Tradition has it that this road was measured with a grapevine measure. (THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC, May 15, 1929)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenwood School
Description:Established about 1880, possibly earlier, and also known, earlier, as Dooley School (q.v.). It was the first school in Butler County east of Black River and is consolidated with Rombauer in 1925. Its name was given for J.M. Green, who had entered land near the site and who taught the first school; and for the heavily timbered region in which it was located, explained Mr. Sutherland, who now uses the old building as a smoke house and storage room. (Wm. Sutherland; J.L. Raulston; J.H.H. Potillo)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Gum Spring
Description:Near Hendrickson, this spring walled with a portion of a hollow log, marks the old Davidson homestead. David Davidson, grandfather of Dr. Hugh Davidson, and great-grandfather of Dr. A.W. Davidson of Poplar Bluff, settled here in the 1850s. He died in 1865 at the age of 101 years. It is also known by the old family name. (I.L. Davidson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:H Vam School
Description:In the southern part of Poplar Bluff Township, one of the Coon Island schools. Named for Ole K.H. Vam, who came from Sweden more than fifty years ago and bought a large tract of land where he developed a fine farm. He returned to Sweden three years ago, only a short time before his death. K Vam Cemetery was so named because Ole K.H. Vam gave the land. (B. Deem; J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:H.D. Williams Cooperage Factory
Description:A large stave mill near the southern limits of Poplar Bluff during the timber days. Mr. Williams was the manager. It was destroyed by fire December 15, 1901. Earlier it was operated by the American Stave and Cooperage Company, and previous to that, by the F.G. Oxley Stave Company when it was known as Oxley Stave Factory. (THE EVENING CITIZEN, January 1902; Deem, 29)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hale Hollow
Description:Old hunting grounds near Beaver Dam Creek, where many opossums and raccoons were found. A man, called Professor Hale, lived there long before the Civil War. Mr. Ward thinks he was the father of the founder of Hale College, in Wayne County. (A. Ward; A. Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hale Spring
Description:In Hale Hollow (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Halloran
Description:A post office near the Halloran School from which it was named. (Postal Guide 1891-1911; J.E. Kearby; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Halloran Graveyard
Description:A small Catholic Cemetery established by the Hallorans, Bemans, and other Irish settlers in Cane Creek Township. (Jno. Eudalay; W.H. Boxx)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Halloran School
Description:In the northwestern part of Epps Township near Ten Mile Creek. It took the name of an early Irish settler from New Hampshire, James A. Halloran, who, Mr. Harmon explained, was the leader of a party of Irish who came to America in 1852 and then on into Butler County in 1856. Patrick Harmon and a Mr. Whalin were in the group also. (J.E. Kearby; W.H. Boxx; Jno. Harmon)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ham Church
Description:A Primitive Baptist Church, long since disbanded, that was built in 1875 in Hamtown. The Ham, Harwell, and Agee families were the leading members. Miss Evelyn Harwell furnished the money to build the house. Rev. William Ham organized the church with "Uncle Samuel Agee" as clerk. It was also known as Harwell Church. (Rev. Wm. Ham; Mr. and Mrs. I.L. Davidson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hamtown
Description:Near the center of St. Francis Township. Although there was no town, post office, or store, the community has been known by this name for the four brothers, John, James, Steve, and Rev. William Ham, who came from Illinois with their families soon after the Civil War. They had lived in Calloway County, Missouri before the war. (J.J. Van Eaton; Wm. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hamtown Cemetery
Description:About three miles northwest of Rombauer, in the Hamtown Community. See Hamtown School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hamtown School
Description:The school in Hamtown Community (q.v.). The early house of logs was known as the Huffman School for the earlier family that came from North Carolina. The burial ground here was first known as the Huffman Cemetery.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hamtown Union Church
Description:Near the Hamtown Cemetery, two miles from the schoolhouse. Originally organized by the Primitive Baptist in the old log schoolhouse (see Ham Church). The present house was dedicated about fifteen years ago. The General and Primitive Baptist, the Methodists, and the Christians hold services there. (Mrs. M. Zoll; K. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hargrove Bridge
Description:The bridge over Black River for Highway 53. Named for Mr. Charles H. Hargrove, who formerly was a member of the Hargrove-Ruth Lumber Company, and owned a large farm in the vicinity. A popular camping place for hunters and fishermen. (S. Pottenger; C.H. Hargrove)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harmony Church
Description:A Baptist Church, established about 1880, near the upper part of Cane Creek. One informant explained that it was a Missionary at first; then became General Baptist. The name is idealistic. Another name, a nickname that stuck, was Barefoot Church. Two reasons are given for this name. It was explained that so many children went to the church without shoes. Another informant explained that an elderly man, Lafayette Kearby, of a highly respected early family went to church barefooted. Either explanation may be very authentic; but I prefer to accept this last reason because it was not uncommon for children to go to these out-of-the- way churches shoeless, and it is very probable that occasionally a grownup might do likewise. Before the twentieth century it was not uncommon for children to go to rural churches with bare feet. As late as 1885 it was not uncommon in some communities for grownups, when walking to church, to go with bare feet, carrying their shoes to put on when near the church. (H.D. Condray; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harper's Ferry
Description:See Deken's Ferry.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harris Ridge School [1 of 2]
Description:The two schools, one for negro children, are on land formerly a part of the I.M. Davidson estate, a portion of which was owned by a man named Harris at least sixty-five years ago. Situated on a low, sandy ridge. (I.H. Barnhill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harris Ridge School [2 of 2]
Description:See above. The school for colored children.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harrison Mill
Description:See Roxie.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hart Ditch
Description:Named for the Hart School (q.v.), near which it begins.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hart School
Description:One of the more recently formed schools, two and a half miles north of Neelyville. It took the name from Hart's Switch (q.v.). It was later named Walsh School (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hartman Creek
Description:A western tributary of Black River Township. Named for a family that owned land there twenty-five years ago. (Mr. and Mrs. S. Agee; Mrs. Wm. Melton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hart's Switch
Description:An abandoned station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad two and a half miles north of Neelyville, where H.H. Hart owned land and operated mills during the timber days. (I.H. Barnhill; S. Myrant)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harviell
Description:A small town about eight miles south of Poplar Bluff, established by the Missouri Pacific Railroad about 1873, and named for Simeon Harviell, who owned a large tract of land in the vicinity. (Maps 1874 ff.; Eaton, 265; S. Pottenger; B. Deem; Postal Guide 1876- )
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harviell Store
Description:Before the Civil War, Simeon Harviell kept a store near Cane Creek at what is now known as Nickey Bridge. Merchandise was brought by oxen-drawn wagons from Cape Girardeau and Ste. Genevieve. (B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harviell Township
Description:Formed from Beaver Dam Township in November, 1886, and named for Simeon Harviell, a large landowner. When the townships were re-located in 1871, it was divided among Poplar Bluff, Neely, Beaver Dam, and Coon Island townships. (B. Deem; Douglas I.312; County Records, Book A, 460-461)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harwell Church
Description:See Ham Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Harwell Creek
Description:A small tributary of Black River, north of Poplar Bluff, which took its name from Edwin Harwell, grandfather of Dr. James Lee Harwell of Poplar Bluff, who came from Tennessee in 1859 and settled there. (Mr. and Mrs. I.L. Davidson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hathaway Station
Description:Evidently the place mentioned by Goodspeed, as the business place of George Glass (b. 1841), "dealer in timber bolts, piling, logs, etc." and "a large landowner of Neelyville Township," was named for some earlier landowner, as court records show S.L. Hathaway taking action with the county November 29, 1881, making application to enter swampland. Mrs. Zimmerman explained that Simeon Hathaway an elderly man (who lived in Arkansas three miles from the state line) at his death about 1921, formerly had a woodyard and tie yard here when the Missouri Pacific Railroad was being built. Remarking of his character, she said his only mean word was "Ay Judas." The name was later changed to Moark, and evidently was moved slightly, for that name is given to a place on the Arkansas side at the present time. (Goodspeed, 1075; County Court Records A, 2; Mrs. N. Zimmerman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Haw Branch
Description:A small stream north of Lone Hill School named for the many black haw trees growing along its banks. Known also as Boyer Branch (q.v.). (A.Ward; Geo. Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hayes
Description:A mill village, now lost, about three miles south of Fisk, shown on a 1912 map. Named for Ruben Hayes, who operated the mill there. (Geo. Windsor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hayes School
Description:Spelled Hays, also, a shortened form of the old family name. The old Pleasant Hill School (q.v.) assumed this name about 1903, while Jno. Hayes was county judge. Several Hayes families were prominent in Ash Hill Township. (E. Calvin; S. Myrant)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hazel Dell School
Description:One of the Neelyville consolidated schools. Organized more than forty-six years ago in a rather low region, originally covered with a dense growth of hazel brush. (E. Calvin; I.H. Barnhill; J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hazel Ridge School [1 of 2]
Description:In Coon Island Township, organized about 1921 and named for the low sandy ridges covered with a dense growth of hazel shrubs. Later Pleasant Ridge (q.v.). (J.L. Raulston; S. Myrant)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hazel Ridge School [2 of 2]
Description:In Neely Township, but consolidated with the Naylor schools in Ripley County. Organized about 1924 and named for the topographical situation. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hendrickson
Description:A town in the northwestern part of Black River Township on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, about one mile east of Reeves Station (q.v.). Established by the railroad in 1873 and named for Nathan Hendrickson, who owned a large tract of land there, and according to Eaton (p. 265), was of Danish descent. The indications of iron mentioned by Campbell's GAZETTEER OF MISSOURI (1874) 85, has not been worked very extensively. (Mrs. C. Hunter)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hickory Creek
Description:A small tributary of Black River north of Poplar Bluff. Black hickory trees grew along the stream. (J.J. Van Eaton; K. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hickory Grove School
Description:In Beaver Dam Township in a great forest of hickory trees. (A.Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hickory Mill
Description:Also known as the Oil Well Supply Mill and Higgins Mill. Its operations were begun in the 1890s under the management of J.E. Higgins and the supervision of the Oil Well Supply Company of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. After it burned, the Bimel-Ashcroft Mill (q.v.) was built there. It almost exhausted the nearby hickory timber in the manufacture of sucker rods and other supplies needed in drilling oil wells. (Souv. Ed. THE EVENING CITIZEN, 1901-1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hicoria
Description:See Hicoria Spur.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hicoria Spur
Description:A mill village, now lost, northeast of Qulin on a short branch of the Burlington Chicago Railroad. Named by Mr. Barron and Charles Langlotz, because of the abundance of "shagbark" hickory trees formerly growing in that section. Mr. Barron explained that Hicoria is the botanical family name for the hickories, and that shell bark hickory is "Hicoria Ovata," and the big shell bark is "Hicoria Laciniosa." The name is Latin. The station was also known as Hicoria. (Map 1910; B. Deem; W.N. Barron (see his letter in INTRO. TO SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE NAMES, p. 36)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Higgins Mill
Description:See Hickory Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hilbert
Description:A post office listed by Polk's GAZETTEER OF MISSOURI of 1883, p. 88. Mr. Martin explained that it was the name of the earlier post office at Hillard Switch (q.v.), but nothing could be found of the origin of the name. (Jno. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hillard
Description:See Hilliard.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hilliard
Description:A post office and station, seven miles north of Poplar Bluff, established and named by the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad officials for Hill's Yard (q.v.). The postal authorities shortened the form to Hillard, but the old spelling remains for the station. (Maps 1885 ff.; Postal Guide 1886 ff.; Goodspeed, 1077; E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hilliard Switch
Description:An earlier name for Hilliard (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hillis Cemetery
Description:In Ash Hill Township near the large farm settled by Henry Hillis before the Civil War. Robert Hillis now lives there. (E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hillis Graveyard
Description:See Lillis Graveyard.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hill's Yard
Description:In 1869, George W. Hill came from Washington County, Arkansas and bought a large tract of heavily timbered land north of Poplar Bluff. He established a wood yard when the Missouri Pacific Railroad was built and furnished the company with fuel until they began using coal. On p. 1090, Goodspeed spells the name Hillyard. (Goodspeed, 1090 and 1077; E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hodge's Ferry
Description:On the St. Francis River, near the present crossing of the Frisco Railroad. Darius Hodge, a wealthy landowner in Stoddard County, had a store and ferry there at least forty years ago. (Mr. and Mrs. J.H.H. Potillo; K. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hoetop Creek
Description:A small stream flowing into Black River through the farm now owned by William Hoetop in Black River Township. (Mrs. Wm. Melton; S. Agee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hogg's Distillery
Description:About two miles west of Poplar Bluff near the upper end of Hogg's Lake (q.v.), set up in 1886 by James Hogg, a large landowner, who was sheriff of Butler County for several years. THE EVENING CITIZEN of 1901 says of it: "A capacity of 30,000 gallons of pure and unadulterated whiskey, made from the corn grown on the Missouri hills, and is coming more and more into popular favor as it becomes better known." The plant of Hogg's highly advertised "Famous Corn Whiskey" has been displaced by good suburban bungalows. (J.J. Van Eaton; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hogg's Lake
Description:See Copeland Lake.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Holley's Mill
Description:One of the many sawmills of the timber days. It was near the Burlington Chicago Railroad southeast of Morocco, and was operated by a man of this name. (Wm. D. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Holt Graveyard
Description:See Lillis Graveyard.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Holy Cross Protestant Episcopal Church
Description:It is located on Main Street in Poplar Bluff.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Honeycutt Mill
Description:See Howell Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Horseshoe Lake
Description:See Carpenter's Bend. Shown on plat of 1859.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hortsman Store
Description:In 1866 or 1867 Harvey H. Hortsman set up a cotton gin and grist mill on Menorkenut Slough, about two miles east of the present site of Broseley (q.v.). He also had a store. When the railroad was built, he moved to Ash Hill. (Mrs. Ruth Craft; L. Guess; Deem, 34)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Houts Graveyard
Description:See Berry Lewis Graveyard.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Howell Mill
Description:The name first given to the old grist mill at Keener's Spring. More than fifty years ago, Levi Carpenter deeded the mill site to a Mr. Howell from Bardwell, Kentucky, to get a mill built. Soon Mr. Turk and the neighbors gave financial aid. After a few years, Mr. Howell went back to the old home state and left the mill to Mr. Turk, whose name was soon given to it. In later years Mr. Honeycutt from Kentucky operated the mill which took his name. Only the ruins of the old mill dam remain. Later it was known as the Reeves Mill (q.v.). (Mr. and Mrs. C. Hunter)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hoxie Branch
Description:That portion of the Frisco Railroad built about 1903 from Hoxie, Arkansas through northern Arkansas and across Missouri to Mingo in Stoddard County where it connected with the Houck Railroad. Hoxie at that time was the division point for both the Missouri Pacific Railroad and the Frisco Railroad.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hubbel
Description:A station on the Doniphan Railroad, earlier called Hubbells for the mill and the landowner who lived nearby. (Maps 1910 ff.; I.H. Barnhill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hubbells
Description:See Hubbel.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hubbell's Branch
Description:A small branch of Cane Creek in Beaver Dam Township. Named for a family that lived there long before the Civil War. Now sometimes called Wells Creek for the family living near. (J.S. Hudgens; Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hudgens Cemetery
Description:In Beaver Dam Township one-half mile west of Green Forest Church. The land was deeded in 1904 by J.G. Hudgens. (J.S. Hudgens; Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hudgens Hill
Description:A larger, steep hill on the Miller Road at the Hudgens farm, settled in 1870 by William Hudgens. The grandson, D. Hudgens, lives there. (J.S. Hudgens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Huffman Cemetery
Description:Jake Huffman gave the land before 1870. See Hamtown School. (K. Ham; Mrs. Clara Cleveland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Huffman School
Description:See Hamtown School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hunt
Description:A post office at Bailey's End (q.v.). Two informants of the vicinity say that Richard Hunt got the post office and kept it in a small store belonging to John Funk, But Mr. Myrant says that Alfred Hunt kept it in his home for a while. Both statements are possibly true, because so many early post offices were often moved. (S. Myrant; Mrs. Geo. Garver; J.W. Sadler; Maps 1910-1912; Postal Guide 1910- 1915)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Hurricane Creek
Description:The largest stream flowing into Ten Mile Creek. At some time prior to 1856, a tornado or "hurricane" destroyed some trees and a few buildings in the vicinity. Mrs. Daniel Epps, whose home was destroyed, saved her life by getting under the tall, corded bed, thus keeping the falling logs from crushing her. This incident gave rise to the name. (A. Powers; J.S. Hudgens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:I.M. Davidson Church
Description:A Christian Church established in Poplar Bluff in 1877 by Elder E.R. Childress with a small membership. After three or four years it dwindled away, but in May, 1887, it was re-organized by Rev. G.A. Hoffman, and a house was erected on Main Street. Because Isaac M. Davidson, who gave the site, was the chief financial supporter and an influential member, it was often known by his name. It is often spoke of as the First Christian Church. As far as I have been able to find it was the first church of this denomination to be organized in the county. Goodspeed mentions that there were organizations at Piedmont, Greenville, Mill Springs, Greenwood Valley, and Coldwater. (Douglas I.495; Goodspeed (1888) 565- 566; Mrs. J.J. Van Eaton; Rev. J.L. Wilkinson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Icie
Description:A discontinued post office about three miles northwest of Bailey (q.v.). It is a feminine Christian name. The informants say that Mr. Hayden, who lived in the vicinity of Junland, which would be near this place had a daughter of this name, but no definite connection between this personal name and the post office has been found. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Martin; Houck I.72 map; Postal Guide 1876- 1899)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ilex
Description:Another one of the lost mill camps, on the Burlington Chicago Railroad, near Fagus (q.v.). The Latin and botanical name for holly was given by Mr. W.N. Barron, who says "holly does not occur in the bottom lands of this section," but a few older residents say an occasional tree was found; possibly these few were not indigenous. (W.N. Barron (see his letter in INTRO TO SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE NAMES, 36); Geo. Windsor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Illinois, Missouri and Texas Railroad
Description:This was the name when the road building was begun through Butler and Ripley Counties in 1901. Later under new management it was the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway, which name is abbreviated to "The Frisco." When the road was extended from Hoxie, Arkansas to Poplar Bluff about 1901-1902, it was locally known as the Hoxie Branch. (THE COMMONWEALTH OF MISSOURI, 617)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Independence Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church, established in the early 1900s, about four miles southwest of Neelyville. It is a subjective name. (Mrs. Iva Murray)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Independence School
Description:See 16 to 1 School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:Rises in the western part of St. Francis Township and flows southwest into Black River. An old name, probably given because the Indians lived there among the early white settlers. (Maps 1865 ff.; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Indian Ford [1 of 2]
Description:Colton's 1870 map shows two Indian fords. One is near the Wayne-Butler border; another, near where the Frisco Railroad now crosses the St. Francis River, farther south. Here Gilliam's Ferry (q.v.) was later established.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Indian Ford [2 of 2]
Description:Another Indian Ford. See William's Ferry.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Inlow
Description:A post office near Blue Springs (q.v.) on the "Cat Railroad," shown on Houck's map (Houck I.72). A family of that name lived there when the Ferguson and Wheeler Mills were in operation in that section. Mr. Martin says that John Johnson had a store there and kept the post office, and Mr. Sutherland said a family of this name lived near. Doubtless it is a family name. (E. Calvin; S. Myrant; Mrs. Geo. Davis; J. Martin; Wm. Sutherland; Postal Guide 1892-1895)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Inter-River Drainage District
Description:That part of lowland Butler County between St. Francis and Black rivers where a splendid system of ditches and levees has been made for draining the lowlands and protecting them from the overflow of these two rivers. Plans were begun in 1914, when a board of five supervisors, with William N. Barron as president, was organized under the Circuit Court; of that group, now (1943) only Mr. John C. Corrigan is living. An extra ditch tax was assessed on the land, which proved a burden on some smaller landowners, but the rich farming lands have resulted. Actual construction was begun in 1918, and Mr. Barron's office gives the cost as over two million dollars. The ditches were designated by numbers from No. 1 to No. 37, but some of them have acquired other names also. Mrs. Alice Johnson, personal secretary for Mr. Barron, very graciously gave me in detail the ditches and their location. The drainage ditches west of Black River were made under the supervision of the County Court. They are not all known by numbers, and their names are included among the place names of Butler and Ripley counties. Cf. Ditches and Main Ditch (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad
Description:In July 1870, the county court granted to the Iron Mountain and Southern and Cairo and Fulton Railroad Companies vast tracts of swamp lands in consideration of reclamation work to be done by the companies. In 1872, the Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad was completed to Poplar Bluff, at which time it was locally known as the Iron Mountain Road, because it was being extended from Iron Mountain southward. Its offical name was St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railway (q.v.). It was being extended into the southern country, Missouri and Arkansas, from St. Louis by way of Iron Mountain. Later, after its ownership was changed, it has carried the name Missouri Pacific Railroad for its location. (Deem, 47)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Iron Mountain Railroad
Description:See Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:J. Minnie Smith School
Description:The tornado of 1927 destroyed the East Side School building (q.v.). One child, Henry Rexford, was killed and several others injured. A new and larger building was soon erected and this name given by the Parent- Teacher Association, for Miss J. Minnie Smith, who had served as principal of the school from 1897 to 1941 at which time she retired. (Deem, 199)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jennings Ditch
Description:A drainage ditch through land in Butler and Ripley counties, owned by Jennings and Barthold, who operated timber mills in the vicinity. (S. Pottenger; S. Myrant; A. Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson and Wells Mill
Description:A large sawmill, operated at Broseley for several years. It was one of the chief industries of the town. Named for the owners. (E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Johnson Mills
Description:Large lumber mills operated by M.A. Johnson in the northwestern part of the county during the 1880s. Mr. Johnson was almost as great a timber man in Butler County as Mr. Holliday in Wayne County. (Jno. Eudalay; Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Jones Graveyard
Description:In the western part of Beaver Dam Township. Named for one of the early settlers, Gordon Jones, who came from Tennessee. (Mrs. B. Langley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Josh Polk Slough
Description:One of the old sloughs (drained now) that lay between Qulin (q.v.) and Fagus (q.v.). Doubtless a man of this name lived there. Cf. Polk Township. (Mrs. Ruth Craft)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Junland
Description:An abandoned station on the "Cat" Railroad about six miles east of Poplar Bluff. When the mill village, Blue Springs No. 2 (q.v.), was made a station, the railroad officials gave the name because "it was surely in the jungles." A shortened form of Jungleland. (Map 1924; W.N. Barron; Geo. Windsor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Junland School
Description:Named for the railroad station. Used as the meeting place of the Junland General Baptist Church. (Mrs. Dora Holloway)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:K Vam Cemetery
Description:See H. Vam School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kearby Cemetery
Description:Known also as the Halloran Cemetery (q.v.). Land was deeded by Wesley Kearby for the cemetery and church (q.v.). (Jno. Eudalay; W.H. Boxx)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kearby Chapel
Description:A defunct Methodist Church, organized in the early 1870s. In 1880, a building was erected on the Kearby homestead, near Ten Mile Creek, where Thomas Lee Kearby and family, from Tennessee (originally from North Carolina) settled in 1838. The church was named for this early settler. The building burned several years ago and has not been replaced. (Jno. Eudalay; J.E. Kearby; Deem, 167)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Keener
Description:A station and post office on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, named by the officials for Ephraim B. Keener, who gave the right of way for the road. He came from North Carolina, and took up 1000 acres of land in what is now Butler and Wayne counties. A considerable village grew up during the timber days, as there were several mills there in succession, but it has declined greatly since the mills have gone. Shown in postal guides from 1886 to 1891 as Keener's and as Keener in 1895 ff. Doubtless "Keener's" originated with the mills, the chief interest of the village, and the postal authorities made the usual shortened form. (R.L. Keener; Mrs. C. Hunter)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Keener Cave
Description:A large cave between the springs (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Keener Creek
Description:A short stream leading from the springs to the river.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Keener Gravel Pits
Description:During recent years two large machines have been busy lifting gravel from the beds of the creek and Black River for road improvement. Many car loads have been shipped. A lake is gradually being made.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Keener Springs
Description:Two large springs one mile southwest of Keener, near Black River. The ruins of the mill dam (see Howell Mill), the hills, the springs, and the streams make a picturesque retreat for nature lovers. A part of the natural beauty is being destroyed, as the present owner, Mr. Steffan, is making a modern summer camp there. The old story is still told that in the early days when the Indians lived there peacefully among the white settlers, they would bring from somewhere between the two springs gold bullion. (Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Keener's (post office)
Description:See Keener.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Keener's Ferry
Description:The ferry was kept at the old Military Road crossing a few yards down the river from the gravel pit. (C.W. Wallis)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelly School
Description:The early school, said to have been established in the early 1880s, three-quarters of a mile from the present site of Qulin (q.v.). It was named for Alfred Kelly, who had come from Tennessee in 1868 and settled near Ash Hills (q.v.). Later he bought 120 acres in the vicinity of present Qulin from Charles P. Choteau of St. Louis. Here he was a progressive citizen, and got a post office established, which he kept in his home. He gave to it the name Qulin (q.v.). He was a county Judge of the Eastern District (1884- 1886), the first Republican judge in the county. The old schoolhouse burned and the new school, erected about two miles from the present Qulin was named Qulin School for the post office in the Kelly home. Later, this building burned, and the new school came to be called Gentzen (q.v.). (E. Calvin; Mrs. Jno. Craft; R. Missenhammer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelly Town
Description:The southern suburb of Poplar Bluff, on the western side of the Missouri Pacific Railroad. About thirty years ago, Joe Kelly, a barber who later was in the real estate business in Poplar Bluff, bought the tract of land and laid it out in lots. Many of the residents are employed in the mills in that vicinity. (J.C. Corrigan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kelly Town School
Description:A two-room elementary school, established in 1921, at a cost of $3500. In Kelly Town (q.v.). Later the name was changed to Eugene Field School. (School Records; P.C. Hays)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kenner Spring
Description:Near Black River Church on a farm owned by a Baptist minister, E.H.C. Kenner, from 1879 to 1928. The spring branch flows into Black Creek. The spring was earlier known as Thompson for a former landowner, Samuel Thompson. Now it is sometimes called Eidelman Spring for the present owner. (E. Thurman; C. Pottenger; Mrs. L. Hillgorve; J.S. Hudgens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kenner Spring Branch
Description:See Kenner Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kenzie Graveyard
Description:A very old burial ground southwest of Bethel Church (q.v.). It is still used and well kept. It was started on land belonging to James Adams Kenzie, grandfather of the informant, who came from Kentucky to Missouri before 1821. His youngest daughter, Didamia, was the first person buried there. (Thos. Kenzie; S. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kenzie School
Description:An old log house was built near the Kenzie Graveyard (q.v.) in pioneer days for subscription schools. It took the name of the landowner, James Adams Kenzie. Later Pleasant Hill and Kremlin schools were formed chiefly from this old district. (Thos. Kenzie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kerens
Description:A discontinued post office, which Eaton says was named for R.C. Kerens, a former postmaster of St. Louis. Local residents say a Mr. Kerens had a store here for a while and kept the post office. Near Eureka School. (Postal Guide 1904-1921; J.E. Kearby; MISSOURI HIST. REVIEW, 272)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kerens Chapel
Description:A Pentecostal Church, in the Kerens post office community, established in 1918. Also called Kurz Chapel because W.A. Kurz, landowner and resident there, gave the land for the site. (W.A. Kurz)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:King's Place
Description:A log house, long since gone, that was built by the earliest settlers of Shiloh Community, near Mr. King's home. Here religious services were conducted, and the capable persons would teach the children, each giving a week of his time free. (Jno. Eudalay; W.H. Boxx)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kinyon School
Description:See West End School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kinzer
Description:A large lumber village, now gone, east of Poplar Bluff, on the "Cat" Railroad. Isaac Kinzer of Pennsylvania, began the timber business there for the Keystone Lumber Company in the early 1870s. Harry Kinzer succeeded his father as manager. (Mrs. S. Mast; S. Pottenger; Postal Guide 1886; Map 1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kittrell Graveyard
Description:Apparently the first burial ground of the white man in what is now Butler County, the small cemetery is across Cane Creek from the farm, now owned by Mr. Odie Smith, which was a part of the tract of land entered by the Kittrells. Seldom is one buried here, and the roads and highways have left the place quite remote and solitary, suggestive of a Missouri "Gray's Elegy." Crude chiseling of names and dates on some of the rough, native slabs of stone are still legible. One has the inscription: "MA April 12, 1820"; another, "MP DECT Sept 3, 1823." The most notable one, "S Kit B 1777 D 1838," corresponds with the dates in the Old Kittrell Bible, now held by Mrs. Martha Smith of Poplar Bluff, which records Samuel Kittrell (1777-1838) and four others, Solomon, Joseph, Lemuel, and Samuel, who Mrs. Smith says are the four sons of Samuel Kittrell. The grave, "S Kit," is pointed as that of Samuel Kittrell, and one, unmarked except by the old method of surrounding and covering over with large, flat, native stones is said to be that of Solomon Kittrell who died in 1872. I mention this because it disproves statements in history that Solomon Kittrell was the first settler. Since the father did not live many years and appears not to have been active in business circles, it is easy for history to speak only of Solomon. Old residents point with pride to the place where Samuel Kittrell, a squatter built his cabin, and to the hillside nearby where the home of Solomon was built with quarters for their slaves. (Mrs. Cecil Burton; Mrs. Martha Smith; Cf. Kittrell's Mill in Ripley County)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kittrell School
Description:All traces are gone of the log house with a puncheon floor, split log benches, and broad fireplace; but Lemuel Kittrell , an elderly ancestor who died three years ago, had pointed out the places to those living near the spring just across Wah Branch from the old site which is marked only by a maple tree. The nearest school after the public school law was passed was Shiloh School. Victory School is now about a mile north. (Mrs. Cecil Burton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kittrell Store
Description:Solomon Kittrell, one of the first settlers of what is now Butler County, came with his family and elderly father Sameul Kittrell, who lived only a short time, from Kentucky in 1819, and settled on Cane Creek near Wah Branch, with only Indians for their neighbors. He soon set up a trading post and general store, bringing his goods by ox wagons from Cape Girardeau. Here he did a good business with the Indians and pioneer hunters and trappers. Later he put in a distillery and tanyard. Mr. Van Dover says he also had a grist mill on Cane Creek. (Polly Ann Powers; Deem, 15; Goodspeed (1888) 309; M.F. Van Dover)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Knickerbocker School
Description:See Star School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kremlin
Description:A discontinued post office at Kremlin Mill, on the route from Harviell by Fredie post office and Gamburg post office (q.v.). (Postal Guide 1888; A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kremlin Mill
Description:About 1878 George H. Crumb, who was located at Ironton, Missouri, as a registrar of government land, had a vision of making a great industry at the old Brannum Mill (q.v.) place and retiring from the land business. He built a three-story burr grist mill for grinding corn and wheat, and named it for the old citadel in the heart of Moscow, Russia, which is now the communist government center. After his death, the mill was bought by John Lucian Ball of Poplar Bluff, about 1900, and operated by him for a number of years. It is still known by his name locally. During the Crumb ownership, the mill was also known as Brown's Mill for a Mr. Brown who operated it for some time. Mr. Ball put in a sawmill. Also a store was established and it was a thriving place for a number of years until the roller flour mill of Poplar Bluff was established. Now only the old ruins remain. (Mrs. Julia Warren; Thos. Kenzie; I.H. Barnhill; E. Abington; B. Adams; S. McPheeters; Maps 1879-1912)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kremlin School
Description:A school near Kremlin Mill, for which it was named. It is also known as Ball's Mill School for the later name of the mill. See Kremlin Mill. (Mrs. Julia Warren; Thos. Kenzie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ku Klux Bend
Description:See Price's Shop.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Kurz Chapel
Description:See Kerens Chapel.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:La Riviere a l'Eau Noire
Description:Another French name for Black River, "the river of the black water." See Le Noir River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:La Riviere Noire
Description:See Le Noir River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lade School
Description:In St. Francis Township, now consolidated with Rombauer. Named for Frank Lade, Sr., who lived near. (J.L. Raulston; J.H.H. Potillo)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lake Ponds
Description:Two small lakes near each other in what is now St. Francis Township, south of Deep Slough. Lost by drainage. Evidently the two merged into one large lake during the rainy season. (County Plat 1859)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lake Slough
Description:From Swan Lake (q.v.) into Black River. Drained by Ditch No. 11. A descriptive name. (County Plat 1859; Map 1930)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lane Mill
Description:See Roxie.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Last Chance
Description:A store, lunchroom, and filling station on U.S. Highway 67 near the state line. It was leased, in 1934, by G.W. Warren from the Kiser family who had established it several years before. The name was given because it is the last opportunity to buy gasoline in Missouri, where it is much cheaper because of the higher state tax in Arkansas. (Bert Ruble)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lat Ditch
Description:Evidently a name of position, the abbreviated form for lateral, as it is the most western ditch in the county. As shown by the maps of 1912 and 1926 it is the same as Lateral Ditch in Ripley County. It is a short ditch heading in Butler County and leading into Ditch No. One in Thomas Township of Ripley County.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lateral Ditch
Description:See Lat Ditch.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Le Noir River
Description:This name is a combination of French and English. Le Noir for "the black" was, no doubt, suggested to the early French explorers and hunters by the blackish water, very dark with sediment, when compared with the lighter, yellowish color of White River at their junction. Mr. Dorrance has found in the Colonial Archives proof of the French origin of the name. He found in papers, dealing with estates there, a document, dated October 22, 1773, in which two men, Colon and Joliet, state that one Jeanot Francoeur left, after his death, on L'eau Noire (the Black Water) "a cache of five hundred pots of bear oil, a gun, a powder horn, etc." In a second document (October 30, 1773) one Louis Chamard, merchant at Sainte Genevieve, represents that he also has a claim against the estate of the aforesaid Francoeur, a hunter on La Riviere Noire (the Black River). (Brown, Gaz. 175; THREE OZARK STREAMS, 58)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:L'Eau Noire
Description:The French name for "Black Water": another name for Black River (q.v.). See Noir River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lee Potter School
Description:An earlier name for Fagus School, one-half mile from the station. The name of landowners. Lee Potter lived there during the 1880s. Later Potter School (q.v.). (Mrs. Jno. Craft)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Legate Creek
Description:A small stream in Black River Township flowing into Black River. An old family name. The right of way map made by the railroad officials shows William and James Legate as landowners there. (Map 1873; C. Hedspeth)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Levee Ditch
Description:It extends parallel with the levee on the western bank of Black River from the northern junction of Dan River with Black River to the Arkansas line. (Postal Guide Haag; Map 1930; F.M. Kinder)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Liberty Cemetery
Description:See Liberty School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Liberty Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church, built near the Potillo Graveyard about 1879; now defunct. The building committee, composed of Joseph Porch, A. Granville Riggins, and Jacob Potillo, who were made the trustees, accepted the idealistic name suggested by Joe Wallis. (J.H.H. Potillo; Rev. E.H.C. Kenner's Notes)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:About 1888, a house was built two miles north of the present site of Liberty School south of Poplar Bluff for school and church. This Missionary Church disbanded after a few years. The place, which is marked now by Liberty Cemetery, was given this idealistic name. Later the present schoolhouse was erected and carried on the old name. (Wm. D. Martin; Wm. Bumgardner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lick Branch
Description:An eastern tributary of Cane Creek in Black River and Epps townships. The name was given by early hunters and trappers because for some distance along the banks the deer would actually lick the whitish saline clay. The clay banks were known as deer licks. (M. Caldwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lillis Graveyard
Description:Near Hillard. It was named for a St. Louis, Iron Mountain Railroad section foreman, Joe Lillis, who owned land and lived there soon after the railroad was built. He gave the land and was the first person buried there. It is now generally called Hillis Graveyard which name, Mr. and Mrs. Martin explain, is a mistake, a mispronunciation of the old name, although a Hillis family does live near this community but not near the cemetery. This is an excellent example of how a name father may be forgotten, as well as how a new name may arise through pronunciation or a defect in hearing. The oldest name was Holt Graveyard, given for Drury Holt, who lived there during the Civil War. (Mr. and Mrs. S. Agee; Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Melton; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Martin; Cf. Hillis Cemetery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lindsay Club House
Description:See Rinky Dink Club House.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Bethel Church
Description:A small Missionary Baptist Church (now defunct) for colored people. It was organized in 1883 by Rev. H.A. Anthony, and a small house was built west of the present site of Morocco (q.v.). This body of seven members dwindled after a few years, and Morning Star Church (q.v.) was established at which time Little Bethel "was re-resurrected in a dwelling house" near Morocco and continued for a few years. The diminutive term seems to have been given because the membership was small. The Bible name is that which Jacob gave for Luz, the place of his vision. Cf. Morning Star. (Wm. D. Martin; Gen. 28:19)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Black
Description:See Little Black River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Black River
Description:"A stream of clear water 90 ft. wide with a swift current," rising in Carter County, and flowing across Butler and Ripley counties into Black River in Arkansas. The descriptive name was doubtless given by the pioneers to distinguish this stream from the larger one, Big Black River (q.v.). The river is formed by the junction, in Johnson Township, Ripley County, of North Fork of Little Black River and South Fork of Little Black River. North Fork rises in southeastern Carter County. South Fork heads about twelve miles north of Doniphan. Mr. Slayton explains that it was named by the government surveyors in 1821. The diminutive term distinguishes it from the larger stream, Big Black River. Locally it is often called Little Black, omitting the element "River." (E.B. Slayton; Schoolcraft, 85)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Brushy School
Description:Formed from Hamtown District, but now one of the Rombauer (q.v.) schools. Named because at the time of its establishment there was such dense growth of underbrush in the forest around the school. (Mrs. M. Zoll; Mrs. Dora Holloway)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Caney
Description:A small branch of Big Caney Slough (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Caney Slough
Description:A small stream in Neely Township, now drained, flowing into Cane Creek. (Maps 1873-1907; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Hunting Slough
Description:See Big Hunting Slough.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little School
Description:Near Ditch No. 16, south of Ash Hill two and a half miles, one of the Fisk schools. Established about 1914 and named for an Illinois immigrant, Lee Little, who gave the land for the grounds. (Mrs. P. Saltzman; Mrs. J.T. Jordan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Vine Church [1 of 2]
Description:An abandoned Primitive Baptist Church, established about 1910, near Marble Hill School (q.v.). It was destroyed by a tornado in 1928, and has not been rebuilt. For several years, Agee School had been used by the Methodists and Baptists for services. "Grandpa," Thomas M. Henson, who had brought his family from Tennessee in 1898, was the dynamic figure in the building of the church. When at the school election, someone said, "I'm in favor of locking the doors and not letting anyone preach there," Mr. Henson remarked that he "hated to live in a neighborhood where the schoolhouse can't be used." He encouraged the brethren, saying that there was not a church house between Poplar Bluff and Hendrickson, and that he had some money. He then got donations for $175 and furnished the balance himself. Other leaders were Rev. Ples Whitwell, Rev. A.R. Raulston, T. Gilliam, and S. Agee. The name was suggested by the pastor's wife, Mrs. Ples Whitwell from the words of Jesus: "I am the vine; ye are the branches" (John 15:5). It is a favorite church name in this part of Missouri. Cf. below. (Thos. Henson; S. Agee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Little Vine Church [2 of 2]
Description:A General Baptist Church six miles south of Fisk. Organized in 1910 under a brush arbor, by Rev. J.N. Gaines of Dudley, Missouri. Named by Mrs. Etta Warren, a charter member, for her childhood church, a Missionary Baptist Church in Dunklin County, Missouri. During the winter, services were held in the Hayes Schoolhouse until 1912 when a house was erected on the old arbor site. (Mrs. Dora Rescetter; Mrs. Etta Warren)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Live Oak School
Description:Near Highway 53, southeast of Poplar Bluff five miles. Mr. Harve Jett was most instrumental in getting it established. The vicinity was wooded with various kinds of oak trees and "the people were very much alive in the community," Mrs. Easton explained. It is possibly a physical name descriptive of the people, but doubtless this species of oak was the real cause of the name being given. I do not know that any oak of this species grew there, but post oak with its slender leaf which resembles the live oak slightly, grows there abundantly. Doubtless it is a flora name. The school was formerly known as Addie School, for Charles W. Addy, County Collector, who gave the land. (B. Adams; Mrs. Wm. Easton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Loma Linda
Description:A tourist camp, north of Poplar Bluff, at the junction of highways 60 and 67. There are two large concrete buildings in Spanish style, a service filling station, a lunch room, and some cabins. It was built in 1932 and 1933 by R.M. Elkins of Poplar Bluff. The name was suggested by Mr. Hinchey (son of Allen Hinchey of Cape Girardeau) who first operated the place. It is a Mexican name for "soil (Loma) and "land lay" (Linda), explains Mrs. Elkins. (Mrs. Lillian Elkins)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Beech School
Description:One of the Broseley schools. A peculiarity of this section was an occasional beech tree found among various other kinds of trees. Only one tree, a beech, stood on the school ground for years. Established more than forty years ago on the Calvin farm southwest of the present site of Broseley. (S. Pottenger; Mr. and Mrs. E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Hill
Description:A topographical name given years ago to one of the larger foothills, near Black River, standing somewhat apart from the others, southwest of Rombauer. (Mrs. M. Zoll; K. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Hill Cemetery
Description:In the Lone Hill Church yard (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Hill Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church near Lone Hill School, from which it derived its name. Organized by Rev. Gray about 1897. (Mr. and Mrs. A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Hill School
Description:See Epps School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Hill Shoots
Description:A narrow portion of Black River about five miles north of Poplar Bluff near the railroad crossing of the river near Lone Hill (q.v.). Here the river may be said to leave the hills, as the valley begins to widen considerably. The pronounced fall in the stream causes increased swiftness and the water is unusually deep below the fall. The spelling "shoots" is an Anglicized form of the French word "chute," fall, used for a rapid. (F.M. Kinder)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Oak Church
Description:A General Baptist Church at Nyssa Switch (q.v.), organized August, 1921, by Rev. Herd of Piggott, Arkansas. Jack F. Dunning gave one acre of land for the site and suggested the name for the one oak tree standing nearby. Most of the timber was gum. (Mrs. Jno. Craft; Mrs. W.A. Coulter; Mrs. Geo. Garver; Mrs. J.H. Dickey)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Star Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church three miles south of Poplar Bluff, organized August 19, 1906, in the Live Oak Schoolhouse by Rev. J.T. Savelle, pastor of the First Baptist Church (q.v.). The present site was deeded by Byrd Duncan a banker of Poplar Bluff and the house was erected in 1910. The name, given by Mrs. Dora Ketchum, who with her husband David H. Ketchum, was a leader in getting the church organized, was suggested to her because her father, M.C. McGuire, who had lived for many years in Texas, the "Lone Star State," was more desirous, as he grew older, of returning to that state. (Mrs. Dora Ketchum)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lone Star School
Description:See Star School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lost Cave of the Romines
Description:A series of underground chambers, the entrance of which became lost, but has more recently been found, near Romine Springs (q.v.). There are old legends about the caves; one is that it is the lost cave somewhere in the hills where a very large sum of money and metal was hidden by the Indians. (McCanes; Mr. and Mrs. John Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lowell Junction
Description:The junction of the Palmer Railroad, both of which are gone, with the "Cat" Railroad, three miles west of Fisk. Named by the railroad officials for Lowell M. Palmer Company that operated large mills east of Poplar Bluff. (Maps 1907-1912; Geo. Windsor; S. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lower Carola School
Description:Formed from the southern part of the old Carola District. Known also as the Berger School, for Amiel Berger, an immigrant from Germany, who gave the land for the school. (J.L. Raulston; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lower Pike Slough School
Description:In the southern part of Poplar Bluff Township near Pike Slough (q.v.). So named to distinguish it from Upper Pike Slough School three and a half miles north.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lumly Branch
Description:An eastern tributary of Cane Creek in Epps Township through the farm now owned by Ray Sliger. Named for an early settler of the 1830s. (M. Caldwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lumly Hollow
Description:Drained by the small stream of this name (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Lutz Cemetery
Description:Started across the road from Slimm's Graveyard (q.v.) when the latter was nearly filled. George Lutz, whose child was the first one buried there, gave the land. (Mrs. Zimmerman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Maberry Church
Description:A General Baptist Church, organized in 1906 and named for Monroe Maberry who lived nearby. The two-story building was erected north of the present site of Broseley for the Odd Fellows Lodge and for the church, on land given by the Great Western Land Company, with the stipulation that, when no longer used for that purpose, it should go back to the owners. The building was practically destroyed by a storm about 1925, and has not been rebuilt. The members went to neighboring organizations. Cf. Maberry School. (H.W. Gunnels)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Maberry School
Description:One of the Broseley schools. Named for Monroe Maberry, who settled there in the early 1890s and was the leader in establishing the school. (J.L. Raulston; S. Myrant)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mackintosh School
Description:It is in the north-central part of Neely Township. The family name is also spelled McIntosh; it belonged to a restaurant proprietor in Poplar Bluff in the early 1900s, according to the town paper. The "o" of the last syllable is often pronounced as short "u." Mrs. Cook remembers hearing that an elderly man of the name lived there. Mr. Kinzie (cf. Kenzie Graveyard) says that an old man of the name settled there before the Civil War, and built his house near the site of the school. During the war, he disappeared, and has never been heard of. (Souv. Ed., THE EVENING CITIZEN, 1901-1902; Mrs. H.E. Cook; Thos. Kenzie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Madie
Description:A station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad south of Neelyville. The name is coinage from the surnames of two men in the Poplar Bluff office of the railroad company: Maintenance of the Way Clerk, T. Clarence Maddox and Chief Clerk, G.R. Mabie. It was made, Mr. Maddox writes, by taking the first three letters of his name and adding the last two letters of Mr. Mabie's. (Letter from T.C. Maddox; Maps 1912, 1926)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Magill Ferry
Description:Before the railroad was built, Henry Magill, a prominent farmer, owned a store and ferry boat at the present site of Hendrickson. (Mr. and Mrs. S. Agee; Mrs. Wm. Melton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Main Ditch
Description:Also known as Ditch No. 1. It starts at the foothills near Rombauer (q.v.), extends southward to Spread (q.v.), then follows a course generally parallel with Black River, and empties into that river near Gillis Bluff (q.v.). Ditches numbered 1A, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 7A, 8, 9, and 13 are short lateral ditches extending in the east-west lines from the low ridge along Black River to Main Ditch. The other ditches extend in a general northeast to southwest direction. No. 1A was added after the original plan was made for the purpose of carrying off the excess drainage near Sawyer (q.v.). (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Maple Hill School
Description:See Garretson School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Marble Hill Cemetery
Description:Named for the school (q.v.) nearby. (Mrs. Wm. Melton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Marble Hill School
Description:One of the older schools, north of Poplar Bluff two and a half miles. The hard marble-like rocks, underlying so much of the surface soil in the vicinity probably gave the name. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Maries
Description:This name is found on Mitchell's map, 1836. Apparently it was near the present location of Qulin (q.v.), near Menorkenut Slough. Parker, 1865, Campbell, 1873, and Rand McNally give the name as Mariesville, and it appears to be near the site of Broseley (q.v.). No one has been found who knows anything of the name. It could be from the feminine name "Mary" or "Marie," but it is more probable that it is the anglicized form of the French term "Marais" meaning swamp. Cf. "Marais Croche" Crooked Swam or Lake, from its shape, in St. Charles County, and the name of Maries County, originally Marais, for which see Mr. Weber's thesis. (COMMONWEALTH OF MISSOURI, 173)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mariesville
Description:See Maries.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mark Twain School
Description:An elementary school building on North Main Street, Poplar Bluff, erected in 1910, at a cost of $15,000. Named for the famous Missouri author and humorist, Samuel B. Clemens, (1835-1910). Considerable additions were made to the building in 1921. (School Records; P.G. Hays)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Marshall
Description:A lost mill camp on the old Palmer Railroad south of Lowell Junction. Named for John B. Marshall who was a great sawmill man in the vicinity. (Map 1910; Geo. Windsor; S. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Martin School
Description:One of the older schools, southeast of Hillard; originally made of hewn logs and named for John J. Martin, Sr., who gave the site from land he had entered in 1845. (Mrs. Wm. Melton; K. Ham; Jno. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Masonic Cemetery
Description:The old burial ground of the Masonic Order, near the old City Cemetery, on what is now the eastern side of Pine Street between Sixth and Seventh Streets in Poplar Bluff. Graves were removed to the re-located City Cemetery, and Central and the high school now occupy the grounds. (Mrs. J.J. Van Eaton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Massey Switch
Description:During the 1880s, a logging camp was established three and a half miles north of Harviell (q.v.) in a large cypress brake, where logs for piling were shipped out on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. The name was given for a family of loggers living there. (J.R. Nentrup)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mast Church
Description:A General Baptist Church northeast of Poplar Bluff, named from the school (q.v.). (Mrs. Dora Holloway)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mast School
Description:In northeastern Poplar Bluff Township. Named for Aaron Mast, who came from Reading, Pennsylvania, over forty-six years ago to operate mills for the Keystyone Lumber Company. He later became a large landowner and prominent citizen of the county, serving as public administrator for a time before he was elected judge of the county in 1890. (B. Deem; Mrs. S. Mast)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:McCown Ford
Description:The old crossing at Cane Creek one-half mile south of the present site of Miller Bridge. Named for Dr. J.C. McCown, who came from Bourbon County, Kentucky in 1878 and bought a large section of land which he developed into one of the best farms on the creek. (Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Melton Cemetery
Description:On the farm now owned by Chas. Smith south of Poplar Bluff. John Melton, an early landowner and resident, gave the land, but a legal deed was not made; consequently trouble recently developed but has been settled, and the place remains a public burial ground. (J.L. Raulston; Mrs. Wm. Easton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Melville
Description:A mill village, at which is now Qulin, on the Palmer Railroad. Named by Charles Langlotz, railroad engineer, for Lowell Melville Palmer. See Palmer Plant. When a post office was established, the postal authorities refused this name because it would be a duplication, and accepted Qulin, which was the name of a school three miles southwest of the village. (Geo. Windsor; W.N. Barron; Map 1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Melville School
Description:Near the mill village Melville (q.v.), an early name, now Qulin. (Geo. Windsor; Mrs. Jno. Craft)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mendonsa
Description:An abandoned mill camp and station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad two miles south of Neelyville. The mill was set up during the timber days, in the early 1880s by a Canadian, possibly of this name. (Map 1910; Ed Abington)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mengel
Description:A logging station at the head of navigation on Black River, where the Missouri Pacific Railroad now crosses the river. During the 1880s John Mengel, Sr. (who died in 1892) and sons owned a large tract of land nearby, from which they floated logs to the mills near Poplar Bluff. (Jno. C. Corrigan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Menorkenut Slough
Description:Rises northeast of Poplar Bluff and flows into Black River, as shown by old plat. Now drained by Ditch No. 19. Mr. Barron explains that since the land was surveyed in 1825 it is probably an Indian name. Another informant remembers hearing his father say that the name was given by the Indians. Mr. Guess says it is an Indian name. Mr. Martin, whose grandfather settled here in 1845, says that many "yonkquapin" plants grew in the slough, and that his father told him "Menorkenut" is another name for this plant. (W.N. Barron; R. Missenhammer; L. Guess; Jno. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Midway Park
Description:In 1929,W.G. Henson of St. Louis bought forty acres of land on Highway 60. He has a store and filling station and has made a small tourist camp. It is about halfway between Poplar Bluff and Elsinore.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Military Road
Description:It is a part of one of the most famous trails, the Natchitoches Path (q.v.). Dr. John R. Hume wrote as quoted in the MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW, Vol. 24, p. 613: "One of the oldest and most interesting roads in the Middle West, because it is woven into the warp and woof of our pioneer life in such a way as to make it inseparable from our national history." Houck wrote: "After the settlement of the country, the Natchitoches Path became the military and wagon road of the immigrants moving into Arkansas, crossing the Mississippi River at Bainbridge or Cape Girardeau, thence moving to the St. Francois River, crossing the same at the Indian Ford, thence to Black River, there crossing near Poplar Bluff and then Current River at what was long as Pittman's Ferry." Tradition says that it was along this road that the Kittrells (cf. Kittrell Store in Butler County and Kittrell's Mill in Ripley County) came, and that it was along this trail that under President Jackson's command was cut out the road over which the United States moved the Indians in 1839 (cf. Indian Ford in Ripley County). Older settlers mention the road in connection with General Price and his army during the Civil War and point out occasionally insulators in the Cane Creek community, where wires were extended by him for sending messages (cf. Reeves Station in Butler County and Battle Hollow in Ripley County). Colonel William Monks of West Plains, who remembered the Cherokee Indians in Alabama, wrote that his father, James Monks, who with his family came from Alabama, and located first in Fulton County, Arkansas (later came to Howell County), "came by way of Jackson, Missouri, traveled the old military road made by the government troops in removing the Cherokee Indians from the State of Alabama to their present location." He further states that it was the only road leading west. The MISSOURI CASH BOOK, August 6, 1936 has an interesting article on the removal of the Cherokee Indians from North and South Carolina, east Tennessee, northern Georgia, and northern Alabama to Arkansas, and Indian Territory. The writer explains that in 1817 some of the dissatisfied Cherokees traded their rights for lands west of the Mississippi along the upper branches of Red and White rivers. They located in northwestern Arkansas. Then in 1838-1839, because of encroachments of the Whites, the other branch of the Cherokees, by a treaty of 1835, were moved by military force from their old home to the Cherokee Reservation (now in Oklahoma), where those of Arkansas joined them. Dr . Hume also mentions an old trail leading from Sunflower Landing on the Mississippi River and up the river to the now famous Cherokee Bay and northward. These statements add weight to the local reports that a portion of the Military Road in Butler and Ripley counties was also known as the Cherokee Bay Road (q.v.). Some of the oldest settlers interviewed spoke of the country about Corning, Arkansas, as the Cherokee Bay section. It seems quite certain that both names, the Military Road and Cherokee Bay Road derive their names from these Indians; the first, for their forced removal, the latter for the early settlement in Arkansas. (C. Pottenger; Mrs. G. Powers; Houck I.227; MISSOURI HIST. REV. Vol. 24; 613; THE CASH BOOK)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mill Creek
Description:See Spencer Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Miller Bridge
Description:On Cane Creek, seven miles west of Poplar Bluff. Named for Ezekial Miller, a prominent landowner and businessman in Poplar Bluff, and at one time county judge, who later developed a good farm on Cane Creek. His son Fred Miller now lives there. A splendid retreat for picnics and fishing. (Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Railroad
Description:On March 10, 1849, a charter was granted to a St. Louis company to construct a railroad west across Missouri. The contract to build the road was let, and on July 4, 1850, a multitude met on the southern bank of Choteau's Pond west of Fifteenth Street, whence Luther M. Kennett, mayor of St. Louis, removed the first spadeful of earth. The first locomotive, "The Pacific" ran out to Manchester Road in November, 1852. Later this company became owner of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain, and Southern Railway, and the latter's name became the Missouri Pacific Railroad. This company now owns all the railroads in these five counties except those owned by the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company. (THE COMMONWELATH OF MISSOURI, 604)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mole Hill Cemetery
Description:An old cemetery southeast of Broseley. It received its name because there were so many moles found in the sandy elevations of that community. (B. Deem; E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Montgomery Graveyard
Description:A cemetery three-quarters of a mile southwest of Green Forest Church. Established and deeded to the public by John Montgomery in 1882. The Montgomery families, prominent farmers, came from Illinois in 1870. (Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Morning Star Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church (colored) near Morocco (q.v.). It was organized in October, 1922, by Rev. J.L. Nash from Fredericktown, filed-missionary, who suggested the name, which is evidently a subjective name in this case, because some of these members had formerly belonged to Little Bethel Church at its first location, and Rev. Nash remarked that it would not do to call this church Little Bethel (q.v.). From my coversation with these colored people I gathered that the name seems to suggest "a new day," another attempt, with exalted hope, to make life better, the inherent goal of the normal man. (Rev. and Mrs. E.W. Vest; Wm. D. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Morocco
Description:A workman's camp, and later a railroad village, established three miles southeast of Poplar Bluff, when the Burlington, Chicago Railroad was under construction. As most of the work was done by negroes, many of whom lived nearby, the name of the African country was given to it. Some of the workmen remained as farmers, and the settlement came to be called "Nigger Town." William D. Martin, colored, explained that they had to go on to Holley's Mill to board the trains so they (the colored people living near) "got after Mr. Barron to get a stop and we named it for Morocco." (S. Pottenger; W.N. Barron; F.M. Kinder; Wm. D. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Morocco School
Description:Established for the negro children in the "Nigger Town" settlement. See Morocco.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Calvary Church
Description:The Methodist Church for colored people, situated at 914 Benton Street, Poplar Bluff. The name is that of the small elevation near Jerusalem where Jesus was crucified. (Luke 23:33).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Olive Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church (colored) in East Poplar Bluff near Bartlett Street. The name is that of the famous mountain ridge east of Jerusalem to which David fled, and the place where many scenes in the life of Jesus were enacted, as related by the Gospels. (Mrs. Roxie Blue; II Sam. 15:30)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mount Zion Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church organized in 1836, on Brush Creek in Wayne County, where a small log house was used for worship. The present house was erected in Butler County, during the late 1880s, one-half mile southwest of the original location. It remains a member of the Wayne County Association. Obviously named for the royal residence of David in Jerusalem. Mount Zion Graveyard, at the original site in Wayne County, took the name of the church. (Jno. Casey; Mrs. Mary Robinson; Goodspeed (1888) 556; Isaiah 10:32)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mud Creek
Description:A descriptive name applied to a small stream in St. Francis Township, flowing into St. Francis River. (County Plat 1859 and Maps ff.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mud Creek Township
Description:One of the four townships relocated in 1850. In the northeastern part of the county and named for the chief creek. It was formed from the original Black River Township through which Black River ran. Later the name was changed to Black River Township (q.v.). (Douglas I.312; Goodspeed, 374)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Muddy Branch
Description:A stream in Beaver Dam Township, flowing into Cane Creek. Also known as Big Muddy. Both are descriptive names.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Murray School
Description:An old school southwest of Harviell (q.v.). Named for an earlier, large landowner Mark Murray. Before 1905 the district was divided and New Hope was given for the new school southeast of the older one. New Hope Church, listed in the Minutes of the Association, used this school house for services. Between 1910 and 1915, Oak Dale School, now consolidated with Neelyville, was formed between New Hope and Neelyville from a part of New Hope District. (Mrs. Iva Murray; J.L. Raulston; I.H. Barnhill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Mussel Shoals
Description:An old ford on the St. Francis River, five miles south of Fisk (q.v.). The river is shallow here, and many mussels were formerly found there. It is a baptizing place for the Walnut Grove Church (q.v.) (L. Guess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Natchitoches Path
Description:An old Indian trail on the southern side of the Mississippi River, starting from near the present site of Cape Girardeau, and diverging "southwest to Natchitoches, one of the ancient Spanish posts of Mexico, now in Louisiana." Houck (II, 104) says it crosses the St. Francis River at "Indian Ford." By his map (I, 227) the Indian Ford is questionably the one later called William's Ferry (q.v.) and Pollard's Ferry (q.v.), for the trail is shown as crossing Butler County from the extreme northeast corner in a southwestern direction northwest of Poplar Bluff, and across the southeast corner of Ripley County into Arkansas. Later known as the Military Road (q.v.). It leads to Natchitoches, on Red River, an old French mission town, founded in 1714. It is now the seat of Natchitoches Parish. Its origin is that of an Indian tribe, the Natchez along the lower Mississippi River and westward. (Houck I.227; II.104)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Neely Township
Description:Formed in 1871 from Thomas Township and named for a large landowner, Obadiah Neely. (Goodspeed, 375; I.H. Barnhill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Neelyville
Description:A small town in Neely Township on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Established in 1872 by the railroad officials and named for a landowner, Obadiah Neely. About 1910 the postal authorities shortened the earlier spelling, "Neelysville." (Maps 1873 ff.; Postal Guide 1876 ff.; I.H. Barnhill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Neelyville Colored School
Description:Just west of the town, for the negro children.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Neelyville Consolidated Schools
Description:Organized in 1925, and composed of Neelyville, Hazel Dell, Hazel Ridge, Oak Dale, and 16 to 1. A two-year high school is conducted at Neelyville. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Neelyville Handle Mill
Description:A successful branch of the Boyden Mill until 1910, when it burned. (Douglas, II.1179)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Negro School
Description:See Wheatley School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nentrup Store
Description:Mrs. Rose Nentrup explained that she established the small general store and filling station at the junction of highways 51 and 53 northwest of Qulin in 1928.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Harmony Church
Description:A Pentecostal Church, now defunct, organized and continued under a brush arbor or in neighboring homes for three or four years about 1898. A little friction in the Lone Hill Church resulted in a few members leaving and helping to establish this church about two miles north of the Lone Hill Church. The idealistic name may have been suggested by these circumstances. (A. Ward; Mrs. E. Webb)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:New Hope School
Description:See Murray School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nickey Bridge
Description:Spans Cane Creek on Highway 60 near Harviell Store (q.v.). Named for an old family who owned the land and built the finest rural home in Butler County at that time. The son, E.C. Nickey, who died recently in California, was for a number of years the county engineer for Butler County. A portion of the creek here was long used by Bethel Church for its baptistry and the wooded banks have long been popular for picnics and fishing parties. (S. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nigger Creek
Description:See Spencer Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nigger Hollow
Description:A name by which Mill Creek Valley is known because after the Civil War the freed slaves, Henry Spencer and his family, remained there. It was generally pronounced "Holler." (Mr. and Mrs. S. Agee; Mrs. Wm. Pace)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nigger Town
Description:See Morocco.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:North Fork
Description:The northern branch of Cane Creek. Rises in Wayne County and flows into Cane Creek in Cane Creek Township. It is also known as the North Prong of Cane Creek. (Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nunn Cemetery
Description:North of Poplar Bluff. Named for the donor of the land, Matthew Nunn, who came from Virginia in the early 1850s. (J.H.H. Potillo, Mr. and Mrs. S. Agee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nye
Description:A later name for the post office in the vicinity of Ash Hill (q.v.). One informant thought it was so near Inlow (q.v.) that Nye, a corrupt spelling for "nigh" would be an appropriate name. Mr. and Mrs. Martin explained that the name was given by the Post Office Department. This is a good example of how the early post office, kept at mills, in homes, or small country stores changed names. Here Ash Hill came to be Inlow, which was later Nye. Doubtless the rural mail route from Poplar Bluff was established about 1918 when Nye was discontinued. (Wm. Sutherland; Mrs. Ruth Craft; Mrs. George Davis; L. Guess; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Martin; Postal Guide 1904, 1915)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nyssa
Description:A station and timber village three miles south of Broseley, on the old Burlington, Chicago Railroad. It is the botanical generic name of Greek derivation, for tupelo gum, which was given by Mr. Barron and Charles Langlotz because that species of gum grew abundantly and to a very large size in southeastern Butler County and neighboring localities. Only a church house remains to make the place. (Map 1910; OED; Campbell, Atlas, 108; W.N. Barron (see his letter in INTRO. TO SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE NAMES, p. 36)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Nyssa Switch
Description:Another name for Nyssa (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Dale School
Description:See Murray School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove Baptist Church
Description:See Oak Grove School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:It is about three and a half miles northwest of Poplar Bluff, and originally was in a large oak grove. The church, built later during the middle 1920s, took the name of the school nearby. (J.S. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Hill Cemetery
Description:See Oak Hill Church.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Hill Church
Description:A Union church three miles northeast of Hillard, established in 1890 by the Methodists of whom L.M. Lee, Joseph Turner and wife, Mrs. J.J. Martin, and John Carpenter were charter members. It was named for the hills and red oak timber. The burial ground, earlier known as the Patterson Graveyard, is one and a half miles south of Oak Hill Church, which name it has acquired. (Mrs. M. Zoll; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Hill School
Description:Near Highway 67, north of Hillard. Formerly it was Pleasant Hill, but when moved to its present location in 1916, the name was changed for the topography and red oak timber. Mr. and Mrs. Agee think it was named for the church, but Mr. and Mrs. Martin, who live in the community say the school name has no connection with the church, which is about three miles northeast. (Mr. and Mrs. S. Agee; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oak Ridge School
Description:Established in 1898. Named by a landowner, and Baptist minister, J.M.H. Russell, because a distinct ridge of the Ozark foothills extended through the district, and oak was the chief tree growing there. (Mrs. Eva Webb)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ogdeon School
Description:A name by which the Gentzen School is sometimes known, because George Ogdeon (also spelled Augdeon) owned the land nearby. (R. Missenhammer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oglesville
Description:Mr. Louis Ogle, a large landowner, has a store and filling station southwest of Qulin. His home and a General Baptist Church organized in 1932 by Rev. W.M. Mangum are near the store. The church took the name of the store. (Garland Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oglesville Church
Description:See Oglesville.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oil Well Supply Mill
Description:Another name for Hickory Mill (q.v.). (THE EVENING CITIZEN, December, 1901)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old Batesville
Description:See Batesville.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old Graveyard
Description:A very old cemetery, three-quarters of a mile southeast of Shiloh School, apparently having thirty graves. Very little is known, but tradition relates that Henry Turner's ( a very large landowner before the Civil War) mother and other pioneers are buried there. (Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old River
Description:A short stream, or arm, of Little Black River, which was formerly the main bed of the river. In Beaverdam Township crossed by Highway 42. (S. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old Soldier Graveyard
Description:On the old Vandover farm on Beaver Dam Creek and Little Black River are the graves of seven soldiers who were killed there when General Price's army made its raid along the old military road. During his lifetime, Mr. Vandover kept the graves fenced, but now they stand almost unmarked on the hillside near the barn. Explanations were passed on to Mr. Ward by "Uncle" Andy Powers, of Powers Mill (A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Old State Road
Description:See Natchitoches Path.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Osborn School
Description:A more recently organized school southeast of Qulin, named for Ike Osborn, a landowner, who was instrumental in getting the school established. (B. Deem; S. Myrant)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Otter Creek
Description:See Otter Creek Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Otter Creek Township
Description:One of the two original townships. It comprised the southern part of the county, but no definite reason has been found for its name. There is an Otter Creek in Wayne County, but it could hardly have influenced the name for this township. It is very probable that Pike Slough (upper part of Pike Creek) (q.v.), also called Copeland Creek, had an earlier name, Otter Creek, given by the early trappers and hunters, because otters were numerous in the early days in this section of Missouri. (Cf. Otter Creek in Wayne County and Otter Pond and Otter Lake in Butler County). Pike Slough (possibly Otter Creek) flows through the region of Otter Pond (q.v.) into Cane Creek, and since it is the main stream (besides Cane Creek which no doubt is a very early name) of this early township, and because the other division was named for Black River, it is evident that the main stream here must have been Otter Creek for which this township was named. (Goodspeed, 374; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Otter Lake
Description:See Otter Pond.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Otter Pond
Description:A mill village or camp on a short branch of the Burlington, Chicago Railroad extending from Rossville Spur (q.v.) and named for the small lake nearby which was the habitat of otters in the hunting days. Mr. Deem explained that there were many ponds or lakes where otters were found in the southern part of Butler County. (B. Deem; Map 1910; Geo. Windsor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Owen Graveyard
Description:Established about 1896 by a landowner J.W. Owen three and a half miles southeast of Rombauer. (Mrs. N. Zoll; K. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Oxley Stave Factory
Description:About 1880, F.G. Oxley of Cincinnati, Ohio, set up a stave factory near the southeastern limits of Poplar Bluff. Later it was acquired by the American Stave and Cooperage Company and then by the H.D. Williams Cooperage Company. Under all the managements it was locally known as The Stave Mill. A Mr. Gilman and Mr. Reynolds operated a mill here previous to the Oxley Mill Goodspeed says, but it appears to have had no special name. (S. Pottenger; Deem, 29; Goodspeed, 479)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ozark Dog Kennel
Description:During the late 1920s, R.E. Koontz established this place for the purpose of raising, training, and renting pointers and setters. He has a charming little home on Highway 60, northwest of Poplar Bluff, back of which he keeps the kennels. The writers in MISSOURI GUIDE SERIES states that Mr. Koontz is nationally known as a dog trainer. Ozark is given for the foothills of the Ozarks in which it is located. (MISSOURI GUIDE SERIES, 428-429)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Palmer Plant
Description:A large cooperage factory located just outside the city limits of eastern Poplar Bluff during the timber days. Lowell Melville Palmer of New York City was president, and Elijah Windsor of New York City was sent to manage the plant. It was operated by the Brooklyn Cooperage Company. The local papers say of it: "One of the largest in the world...covering several acres of ground, having a railroad system of its own, and the owner of fine timber land, this plant manufactures coffee box and sugar barrel material which is shipped to Brooklyn and New Orleans where it is finished. Contrary to the usual custom, very few negroes are employed. It is equipped with modern machinery, a well 367 ft. deep, and employs about three hundred men." The mill was burned April 10, 1902. (THE EVENING CITIZEN 1901; Geo. Windsor; S. Pottenger; Deem, 109)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Palmer Railroad
Description:A small system of Company railroads built during the late 1880s and early 1890s, connecting the timber lands with the "Cat" Railroad and with the Palmer Plant (q.v.). Charles Langlotz, who came with the company was the road engineer and manager. Later called the Butler County Railroad. (q.v.). (S. Pottenger; Geo. Windsor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Palmer Slough
Description:The remains of a reservoir, almost one half mile long and fifty feet wide which was constructed by the Palmer Plant. Connecting with Black River it was used for soaking the logs, chiefly gum, to prepare them for sawing. (THE EVENING CITIZEN; S. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Panther Slough
Description:Now drained by Ditch No. 12. See Beaver Pond.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Park
Description:An abandoned lumber village and post office in Neely Township on the Frisco Railroad. About 1906, John and Barnes Park, brothers and landowners in the vicinity, set up a huge sawmill there. (Maps 1907-1912; Postal Guide 1913-1917; C. Pottenger; Thos. Kenzie; Mrs. Julia Warren)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Patterson Graveyard
Description:Deeded to the public by William Patterson. Later Oak Hill Cemetery (q.v.). (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Patty's Cave
Description:A small cave near Cane Creek, noted because during the Civil War, residents of the community hid corn, meat, and other provisions there from the "Jayhawkers." Named for John C. Patty, a farmer and blacksmith, who came from Tennessee in 1852 and bought land in the Cane Creek and Ten Mile communities. He later served as judge of the Western District and as probate judge for several years. (Mrs. Geo. Powers; Mrs. B. Langley)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Paul Finny Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church about five miles northwest of Poplar Bluff on Highway 67. Paul Finny gave the land about twenty years ago. (Mr. and Mrs. S. Agee; Mrs. Wm. Melton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Peppermint Spring
Description:In St. Francis Township, the head of Cypress Creek (q.v.). Named for the plants growing there. (Wm. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Phillips Store
Description:Mr. Harvey Phillips explained that in December, 1934, he established a small store in one room of his home on Qulin mail route one.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pike Creek
Description:Doubtless it was named for Pike Lake (q.v.). Cf. Copeland Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pike Creek School
Description:An old school west of Poplar Bluff near the creek which gave the name. Discontinued as an individual school since consolidation with the Poplar Bluff School District. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pike Lake
Description:See Copeland Creek and Lake.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pike Slough
Description:That portion of the stream south of the old lake, earlier called Copeland Creek (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pin Hook
Description:A name given to the first sawmill camp in Ten Mile Community. The mill was operated by S.D. Author and D. Livingston during the early 1880s. Mr. John Eudalay said it was named by W.R. Minix, but the reason was not found. It is possible that it is a derisive name for small or something for play. Fifty years ago, and, no doubt, long before that time, one amusement for children along the small streams was to "go fishing" with pin hooks made from large dress pins or hair pins. It was great fun to catch the minnows ("topwaters") as they played about the streams. Possibly a bend in the stream nearby, a "hair pin" bend, or "pin hook" gave rise to the name, but the exact origin must remain for the present, a mystery to be solved later. Cf. Pin Hook in Pettis County, the original name of the first county seat, later changed to St. Helena, now Helena. Mrs. Overlay states in her thesis that it was borrowed from one of three places named Pin Hook in Tennessee.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pinch Off School
Description:A name, contemptuously given by some of the objectors to the Brower School, which was organized, only by arbitration, from Little Brushy School District. (Mrs. M. Zoll; J.H.H. Potillo)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pine Ridge Camp
Description:A tourist camp with cabins, lunchroom, and a filling station, on Highway 60, eight miles northwest of Poplar Bluff. It was established in June, 1926, by D.R. Scott on his farm, which was the homestead of Lemuel Mills on the old Military Road (q.v.). Legend says that soldiers were camped here during the Civil War and that there are three soldiers buried there somewhere. The name was given for the topography and pine trees. (Mrs. D.R. Scott)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Platanus
Description:A vanished sawmill village and switch on the Burlington, Chicago Railroad, two miles north of Fagus (q.v.). The name, given by Mr. Barron, is the Latin botanical name for sycamore, a kind of tree very common in this section of Missouri. (W.N. Barron (see his letter in INTRO. TO SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE NAMES, p. 36)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church (colored) on Garfield Street in Poplar Bluff. Cf. above.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church [1 of 3]
Description:A Pentecost Church west of Pleasant Hill School south of Ash Hill, established in 1929 by Rev. V. Hill of Illinois. Named from the school. (J. Elfers; Mrs. P. Saltzman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church [2 of 3]
Description:An old Methodist Church in Beaver Dam Township, erected on a low elevation given by Joe Stout. Earlier they had used the old Brannum School southwest of the new location. A name of approbation. Before 1895, a school was built on the same grounds and it took the church name. (A. Ward; Thos. Kenzie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church [3 of 3]
Description:A General Baptist Church that stood for many years where the school (q.v.) is now situated, four miles south of Ash Hill. It was organized by Rev. Thos. Davis of Dexter, Missouri, and Parson Francis of Ash Hill about 1905 or 1906. A name of approbation, suggested by the low, sandy, elevations. When the house burned in 1919, the church was disbanded. (J. Elfers; Mrs. P. Saltzman; L. Guess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School [1 of 3]
Description:See Pleasant Hill Church in Beaver Dam Township.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School [2 of 3]
Description:Established before 1890 and named for the old Pleasant Hill Church (q.v.). Known also as the Hayes School (q.v.) but the older residents would never accept this name. (J. Elfers; Mrs. P. Saltzman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School [3 of 3]
Description:An earlier name for Oak Hill School (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Ridge School
Description:A newer name for Hazel Ridge School in Coon Island Township, suggested by a former teacher, Mrs. Lovie Godwin. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pleasant Valley School
Description:This district was formed, in 1904, from that part of Pleasant Hill School in Beaver Dam Township, lying nearer Little Black River. A name of approbation and topography. (S. Myrant)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Polk Township
Description:In 1850 or 1851, a few months after the county had been re-divided into four townships, Polk Township was formed, evidently partly superseding Butler Township. Any idea that it was named for President James K. Polk (1795-1849) has been disproved by local history. Goodspeed mentions Samuel Polk as one of the pioneers with James Brannum (cf. Brannumsburg). Mr. Corrigan, an abstractor of Poplar Bluff for years, says there were landowners of this name in the county before the Civil War, and that the site of Morocco (q.v.) was owned by negroes of this name. An elderly, colored resident of the vicinity of Morocco, Mr. Martin, whose statement corroborates that made by Mr. Corrigan, and also that of Goodspeed, explains that two brothers, Pete and Tom Polk, who had been slaves of the Polk family in Arkansas, came here after they had been freed, and settled on both sides of Black River. In 1866 when the new township of Gillis Bluff was organized, the name Polk Township disappeared from the map. (Goodspeed, 309, 375; J.C. Corrigan; Wm. D. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pollard Ferry
Description:See William's Ferry.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ponder's Mill
Description:An earlier name for Powers Mill. It was owned by Thomas Ponder, who had married Andrew Powers' sister. (M.F. Vandover)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poplar Bluff
Description:This city, the largest in this section of counties, is now situated on both sides of Black River, on the Missouri Pacific and Frisco railroads, and it is the terminus of the "Cat" Branch, and Butler County Railroad. It owes its rapid growth to the timber business and its means of transportation. The commissioners, appointed by the County Court, John Stevens, William Henley, and John F. Martin, selected for the site 160 acres of government land and appointed Obadiah Epps to receive small loans from individuals, with which to pay for the land. The town site was surveyed early in 1850, and, on May 17, and in August, public sales were made for selling lots. The post office was established February 27, 1850. In February, 1870, it was incorporated by the County Court as a village. Its name was suggested by the dense growth of the famous tulip tree, commonly called poplar, the magnolia of the north, which at that time covered the bluffs overlooking the river. The tulip or yellow poplar belongs to the magnolia family "magnoliaceae." "Liridendron," meaning lily and tree, and "tulipifera," tulip bearing, are two Greek words describing this variety of poplar. It is one of the largest and most beautiful of our native trees and is known to have reached a height of 190 ft. with a trunk ten feet in diameter. Parker, MISSOURI AS IT WAS IN 1867, p. 200, gives the name "Poplar Bluffs" for the place. Locally, in the rural section, "The Bluff" is a very commonly used term. They more often say "go to The Bluff" than "to Poplar Bluff." (P.L. and Postal Guide 1853-; Houck II.169-170; Douglas I.312)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poplar Bluff Township
Description:When the townships were relocated in 1866, Poplar Bluff Township was established in the center of the county and took the name of its central and largest town. (Goodspeed, 375; Douglas, 312)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poplar Bluffs
Description:See Poplar Bluff.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poplar Grove
Description:The Poplar Grove mentioned by Davis and Durrie is now seldom heard of, for the large tulip poplar trees, reaching a diameter of three and four feet, that grew all along Black River for some miles south and east of the foothills were cut years ago. (Cf. Poplar Bluff. (Davis and Durrie, MISSOURI, 328; J.J. Van Eaton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Poplin Ferry
Description:This ferry was on the St. Francis River where the Cairo Branch of the Missouri Pacific Railroad now crosses. It carried the name of the little mill village, Poplin, on the Stoddard County aide, now one of the lost villages, which was a family name. Cf. Fisk. (Mrs. E. Calvin; J.F. Jordan; Goodspeed, 479)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Potillo Graveyard
Description:An earlier name for Three Springs Cemetery, given for Jesse A. Potillo who came from North Carolina in the early 1850s and settled there. (J.H.H. Potillo)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pottenger Spring
Description:See Powers Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Potter School
Description:A school near the present site of Fagus (q.v.), established as early as 1907, and named for Samuel Potter, a landowner there. It is now a part of the Fagus School. (W.H. Gunnels)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Powers Creek
Description:A small stream entering Black River south of Hendrickson. George Powers owned a farm there in the late 1870s or early 1880s. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Powers Fort
Description:A peculiar formation on the western county line, near Little Black River in Beaver Dam Township, which Houck says is an Indian mound, and describes it: "an embankment enclosing an area of about 750 sq. ft. A ditch from three to five feet deep surrounds the fort which has four mounds; on land owned by Powers." No other information was found, but I rather think, as the name indicates, that it may be the ruins of a sort of stockade built for protection during the Civil War, because Washington, and Andrew Powers, with their families, lived in that vicinity during the war. However, Indian mounds would be very probable, for the red men were here when the first settlers came. Cf. Powers Mill. (Houck I.74)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Powers Graveyard
Description:See Powers Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Powers Mill
Description:A pioneer grist mill, of which only the ruins remain, in Beaver Dam Township on Little Black River and on the Military Road, near the Ripley County line. "Uncle Jimmy" Tubb built the mill before the Civil War apparently for Thomas Ponder, by whose name it was known for a time. Then Holly Powers, who lived in Ripley County and kept the Beaver Dam post office operated the mill before the Civil War. Later "Uncle Andy" (Andrew) Powers, for whom the mill was named, owned the mill and operated it for many years, when it was the best in the county at that time. It has not been used since in the very early 1900s. The post office nearby was called Belcher. Powers Graveyard, in the vicinity of the mill, was started during the Civil War. It is known by this name because the older members of the Powers, Washington, and Andrew families were the first to be buried there. (E.B. Slayton; Mrs. M. Arnold; Polly Powers; A. Powers; A. Ward; M.F. Vandover)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Powers Post Office
Description:Mr. Montgomery says that there was a post office at the Powers Mill, which was kept by Washington Powers, a pioneer Baptist minister, son of Thomas Powers; but other informants think Belcher (q.v.) was the nearest post office, and I did not locate the name in Postal Guides. It is quite probable that such a place did exist before Belcher was established. Washington Powers moved from the mill vicinity before 1885. It is more probable that Beaverdam post office in Ripley County (q.v.) kept by Holly Powers, son of Washington, is the one in mind, and "Powers" was only a local name. (J.S. Montgomery; O. Ferguson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Powers Spring
Description:On land in Beaverdam Township, four and a half miles northwest of Harviell, owned by Washington Powers, a pioneer Baptist minister. About 1879, the youngest child Melvina, playing in the sand by a small stream, discovered a small stream. Spading out the place at the foot of a hill a strong spring was found, which has been made into a well, and that has never gone dry. Now called Pottenger Spring for Crayton Pottenger, who later owned the farm. The place was the neighborhood "washing place," for many brought the family laundering there, and many barrels of water were hauled away each summer. (Mrs. Eva Webb; Mrs. Melvina Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Price's Shop
Description:Originally a blacksmith shop set up on the Charley Price farm (cf. Fredie), one and a half miles west of Harviell (q.v.) and southeast of Round Pond (q.v.), as early as 1895. Later the son Frank became the owner. A store was added later and a dwelling house or two were built. The place acquired the name of Ku Klux Bend, because during the Ku Klux trouble in Poplar Bluff about 1924, a group of Poplar Bluffians, said to be on the trail of the Klan, had a wreck at the abrupt bend in the road there. (B. Deem; F.M. Kinder)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Providence Church
Description:A Baptist Church near Highway 60, east of Poplar Bluff. It is a Bible name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Providence School
Description:See Baskey School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Pry's Chapel
Description:A union church near the Victory School, organized in 1924. Mrs. Charlotte Pry, a native of Germany, gave the land for the building. (Mrs. Cecil Burton; J.E. Kearby)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Purdyville
Description:A flourishing little sawmill village having a store and about twenty houses, situated north of Harviell on the Missouri Pacific Railroad during the 1880s and 1890s. Named for Purdy, the man who operated the mill. (B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Quercus
Description:A Latin botanical name for "oak," given in 1906 by Mr. Barron and Charles Langlotz to a switch on the Burlington, Chicago Railroad, which was an important point for the concentration of cars for the Quercus Lumber Company of east Poplar Bluff. The company had a contract with the Great Western Land Company for cutting the oak timber from their vast tracts of land in Butler County. G.C. Swallow, state geologist and professor of Missouri University, writes: "In 1856 our surveying party measured trees in Southeast Missouri. In Mississippi County, A Spanish Oak, Quercus falcota, measured 28ft. in circumference and 100 ft. in height." (W.N. Barron (see his letter in INTRO. TO SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE NAMES, p. 36); S. Pottenger; OED; Campbell, Atlas (1873) 108)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Qulin [1 of 2]
Description:The name of a post office kept by Alfred Kelly in his home until a few days before his death (1896), when he turned it over to William Gentzen. I have not found whether the name was changed at that time or not. It was established as early as 1883. The origin of the name is not known definitely. Mr. Calvin thinks it was given for Quincy (later Mrs. William Gentzen), Mr. Kelly's eldest daughter; but Mrs. John Craft, a daughter of Mr. Kelly's gave the following explanation. Dr. Cook of the community suggested calling the office Ruth for Ruth Kelly (Mrs. John Craft), but that her father objected and just took some letters and made up the name. When the papers came from Washington, accepting the name, she, a mere child at the time, asked him what it meant and where he had got such a queer word. He answered, "I don't know." She further explained that the Quincy mentioned was a sister of her father's, and that his daughters were Ruth, Laura, Alice and Quincy. Alice was not living when the post office name was selected. She also stated that Fred Pratt, who was later a timber and mill man in that section, thought the word was the name of a kind of timber. On the railroad map of 1910 the name is spelled Quilin, an attempt at simplified spelling. This spelling probably came from the idea that it was another of the tree-name villages along the Butler County Railroad. It seems to me very obvious that the suggested names, Quincy and Laura, must have been the cause for Mr. Kelly's just taking some letters and forming a word. "Qu" from Quincy, the initial letter from "Laura," and the second two letters of Quincy make the word. However certain one may feel that the two daughters' names are the real parents of the post office name, one can only conclude that Mr. Kelly arbitrarily coined the word, and apparently we have no way of finding how he was thinking at the time. (Cf. Kelly School, Qulin School, and Qulin the village. (E. Calvin; Mrs. Ruth Craft)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Qulin [2 of 2]
Description:A small town on the Burlington, Chicago Railroad, a name which supplanted Melville (q.v.) prior to 1910. Mr. Barron, who was president of the railroad company, earlier its attorney, says he knows nothing of the origin or the name, but that "Qulin was the name of a schoolhouse some three miles southwest of the present town of Qulin and the name was stolen and transplanted to the town." It is possible that the old Qulin post office name could have been changed to another name before the town was established, but it is very likely that the old post office was moved to the station, and the new Qulin was merely the old post office name as well as the school name. Cf. Melville and Qulin post office. (W.N. Barron (see his letter in INTRO. TO SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE NAMES, p. 36; Map 1910)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Qulin Consolidated Schools
Description:Organized in May, 1929, and composed of Gentzen, Osborn, and Davis schools. A two- year high school is established at Qulin, and the others are elementary schools. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Qulin Ridge
Description:A low sandy elevation which extends from the St. Francis Ridge and level westward north of Qulin to Black River. A number of the drainage ditches were dug across it. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Qulin School
Description:See Kelly School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Race Track School
Description:See Davis School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rag Town
Description:A mill camp, composed of shacks and ragged tents near one of Marshalls mills in the vicinity of Broseley in the timber days. A descriptive name. (E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ralph's Place
Description:See State Line Service Station.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Randall School
Description:In the northwestern part of Coon Island Township. Named for the landowner, Loyd Randall.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Randles Mill
Description:See Roxie
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Red Sea
Description:A lowland region that heads in Butler County and leads between Naylor and Neelyville into Little Black River in Arkansas. Before the drainage system was established, it would, during rainy seasons, become an impassable sea. This condition caused the early settlers to give it the Bible name for the sea over which Pharoah tried unsuccessfully to pursue the Israelites in their exodus from Egypt. (W.D. Randel; Rev. J.R. Leroux; I.H. Barnhill; Exodus: 14)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Reeves Mill
Description:Albert Reeves had a pioneer grist mill at what is now known as Keener Springs. A few remains may yet be seen. Cf. Reeves Station. (Deem, 17)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Reeves Station
Description:According to Eaton, this was the earlier name for Hendrickson (q.v.); but old residents say Reeves Station was about a mile west of that town, which location agrees with the 1859 plat. These local informants connect the name with Colonel Timothy Reeves, whom they declare was stationed there during the Civil War, on the old Albert Reeves farm, to head off General Sterling Price on his famous raid of August 29 to December 2, 1864, along the old military road. One informant remarked that German soldiers under his command took a special liking to him, and that "people enjoyed life while he was stationed there, for the Jayhawkers did not give so much trouble." An explanation of authentic historical records, however, shows that local tradition has distorted the facts in making Reeves an officer on the Union side. He was in truth a Confederate officer under General Price, and is referred to as himself a notable "bushwhacker" in the official records of the Union Army. A report of the skirmish at Reeve's Mill, November 19, 1864, mentions "a rebel force of about two hundred men under Timothy Reeves," and declares that the Union force "killed a notorious bushwhacker, Ely Garbert, at Reeve's Mill, and destroyed the mill, which had been used as a place of resort by them and was furnishing supplies continually." Colonel Reeves has been better remembered by present day inhabitants at Battle Hollow (q.v.) in Ripley County, and as officer on the Confederate side and in command of the Southern troops at the skirmish of Ponder's Mill on September 20, 1864. Goodwin and West, 1867, p. 45 gives Reeves Station as a post office. Mr. Deem explained that Colonel Timothy Reeves was a brother to Albert Reeves. (J.H.H. Potillo; B. Deem; S. Agee; R. Keener; Eaton; THE WAR OF THE REBELLION: A COMPILATION OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF THE UNION and CONFEDERATE ARMIES, 1901, Series 1, vol. xli, Part I. p. 924)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Relleford Store
Description:Built in 1866, by Arch Relleford who came from California at the close of the Civil War and built the store on the Military Road near the present site of Cane Creek School. When Ezekial Sandlin bought the store, it soon acquired his name. See Sandlin Store and Cane Creek Baptist Church. (M. Caldwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Renton
Description:A post office or town listed by Wilson, 1875, but no information could be found about it. Since it is an unusual name it is, no doubt, a misprint for Benton (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Resnik
Description:About ten miles west of Poplar Bluff in the Bay Springs School Community. John Resnik has a blacksmith shop, a store, a filling station, and a garage at the place. (Mrs. Eva Webb)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ringo Ford
Description:At the old crossing on Little Black River, now spanned by a bridge for Highway 42. A store, a filling station, and a number of cabins have been built, all of which add to the comfort of the popular picnic and fishing grounds. It acquired its name from the Ringo Mill (q.v.). (Jno. C. Corrigan; I.H. Barnhill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ringo Mill
Description:On August 1, 1838, Richard Ringo acquired a large tract of land on Little Black River in the vicinity of Ringo Ford (q.v.). Here he operated a small grist mill, before the Powers Mill further up the stream, was established. He and his son, Lafayette, improved the mill and had started to add a flour and carding mill when the Civil War came. Legend has it that there was a little skirmish here during the war, but that the corn mill continued to operate for a while. Also, it is said that there are Indian graves in the vicinity. A portion of the old mill dam remains, and the small bay above has long been the baptizing pool for neighboring churches. (Jno. C. Corrigan; I.H. Barnhill; E.B. Stayton; Thos. Kenzie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rinky Dink Club House
Description:A fishing and hunting resort on Black River eight and a half miles north of Poplar Bluff. It was built by Dr. Joseph L. Lindsay, a dentist of Poplar Bluff, who gave the name. Dr. Lindsay says he borrowed the name from the "old comic series of "Winnie Winkle the Breadwinner." Perry, her little brother and his gang built a little shack and called it Rinky Dink." This comic strip by B. Ranner in the KANSAS CITY TIMES and other publications has been very popular during this first half of the twentieth century. The place is also known as Lindsay Club House for the owner. Dr. Lindsay explains that he has taken in three partners, and that the small two-room house has been improved into "a nice Ritzy place, but the name still holds." (Dr. J.L. Lindsay; Mrs. Clara Laughlin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rio San Francisco
Description:See St. Francis River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Riverside Mill
Description:A name applied to the large timber mill operated in the 1880s and early 1890s, by Benjamin S. Garetson and Hugh Greason at the present site of Fisk (q.v.) on the western side of St. Francis River. (Wm. Sutherland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Riverside School
Description:A discontinued school, so named because of its location near Black River in St. Francis Township. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Riviere des Chepoussea
Description:See St. Francis River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Robinson Cemetery
Description:Three miles east of Mount Zion Church (q.v.). James Robinson, who came from Tennessee at the close of the Civil War, homesteaded here. (Mrs. Jno. Harmon; Mrs. R.C. Robinson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Robinson's Ferry
Description:On the St. Francis River east of Rombauer at the mouth of Deep Slough, Louis Robinson, a farmer, keeps canoes for rental, but there is no real ferry boat. (K. Ham)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rocky Ford School
Description:See Ruebottom School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rombauer
Description:A small town in St. Francis Township on the Frisco Railroad. Some of the citizens wanted to name it for George Spangler who gave the town site and right-of-way for the road, but a vote was taken which gave the name for Judge Rombauer of St. Louis. A story is told that Judge Rombauer was on the train with the first inspection group. When they came to this place, all the members of the party got off except him, and someone remarked that they should name the place for him. This name father, Roderick E. Rombauer, was born in Hungary and died in St. Louis in 1924 at the age of ninety-one years. He had been a prominent judge in St. Louis. (S. Babcock; Mrs. Sarah Mast; Mrs. M. Zoll; Wm. Sutherland; Eaton, 265; Postal Guide 1904 ff.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rombauer Consolidated Schools
Description:Organized March 14, 1928 and composed of Lade, Rombauer, Hamtown, Little Brushy, Brower, and Star schools. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Romine Springs [1 of 2]
Description:An abandoned station and post office on the Frisco Railroad, near the large springs on the land formerly owned by Abraham Romine, one of the judges of the county court when it met in 1850, its first meeting in Poplar Bluff. (Douglas I.292-293; Postal Guide 1904; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Romine Springs [2 of 2]
Description:Springs on land owned by Abraham Romine. Cf. Romine Springs. (post office and station).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rossville Spur
Description:A mill village, or camp, on the Burlington, Chicago Railroad from which a short branch extended west. Named by John Marshall, for the Widow Ross, who lived near. (B. Deem; Geo. Windsor)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Round Pond
Description:On what is now the Price farm northeast of Bethel Church, the site of an early distillery and Fredie post office. Springs were not common in that immediate vicinity, and this pond was one of a few good watering places for stock. (A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Roxie
Description:A post office and old grist mill site on Cane Creek between Poplar Bluff and Bay Springs Church. During the Civil War, it was operated by a Mr. Harrison, by whose name it was known. Later it was owned by Thomas M. Lane, who had come from Georgia to Butler County in 1869 and lived on a farm near the mill, then Tubb's Mill (q.v.). Later William Randles came from Indiana and bought land and the mill. He got the post office established, to which they wished to give his name, but the postal authorities would not accept that name. Mrs. Ollie Randles, daughter-in-law of William Randles, explains that her husband, Morton Randles, then a small boy, offered the name Roxie for his little sister who had died a short time before. This discovery disproves the possible origin, as suggested by Rev. Wallis, because of the fact that several loads of rocks had been thrown into the creek to make the ford more shallow. Nothing but the old ruins of the mill remain, but the place is a good place for picnicking and fishing. (Rev. C.W. Wallis; Thos. Kenzie; Mrs. Ollie Randles; Postal Guide 1892-1915; J.S. Hudgens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ruebottom School
Description:Also Rocky Ford School (q.v.). A schoolhouse built over forty years ago by the residents in the southern part of Shiloh School district and named for one of the chief promoters. It was near a very rocky ford of Cane Creek. As they did not comply with proper legal regulations for relocating the house, an appeal was made to the Commissioner of Education and the house was never used. (Jno. Eudaley; W.H. Boxx)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ruebottom Spring
Description:A large spring one-quarter of a mile south of Shiloh School on land settled by Ezekiel Ruebottom previous to 1820. (Jno. Eudalay; W.H. Boxx)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rushville Camp
Description:A mill camp in Epps Township between Ten Mile and Beaver Dam creeks, where M.A. Johnson operated a sawmill, but nothing has been found about the origin of the name. Cf. Rushville School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Rushville School
Description:Established in 1890 in the western part of Epps Township. It took the name of the mill camp where M.A. Johnson operated a large sawmill in the early 1880s. (Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ruth and Hargrove Mill
Description:A large spoke and handle mill, established in the late 1880s near the southern limits of Poplar Bluff by Harvey I. Ruth of Pennsylvania and Charles H. Hargrove formerly of Stoddard County, Missouri. The mill was later operated by the son, Harry I. Ruth. (C.H. Hargrove)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ruth and Hargrove Tram
Description:Built in the early 1890s southwest from Poplar Bluff into the timber regions for the purpose of bringing logs to the Ruth and Hargrove Mill (q.v.). The road is being junked, and the rails sold, since the use of trucks is now possible. (C.H. Hargrove)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ruthville
Description:The old logging camp, about twelve miles southeast of Poplar Bluff, the terminus of the Hargrove and Ruth Tram (q.v.). Named for Harvey I. Ruth, Sr., from Pennsylvania, who was for years a prominent lumber and businessman of Poplar Bluff. His son, Harry I. Ruth, continued the business. (C.H. Hargrove)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ryan
Description:Postal Guides, 1893, list this as an office in Butler County. Nothing definite could be found about the post office, but the name is a very common family name in this section of Missouri. Mrs. Ellen O'Neill of Doniphan explains that her father, Peter Ryan, came from Ireland and was one of the Irish settlers in Ripley County. Ryan Hollow is listed in Carter County as a tributary of Cane Creek, and informants say that Johnny Ryan lived near the mouth of this hollow. Since this is very near the Butler County line, doubtless the post office was near this place and took his name. (Postal Guide 1893)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sacred Heart Church
Description:The Catholic Church in Poplar Bluff which was first represented as a district body in 1871, when Bishop Hennessey of Wichita, Kansas, organized the first church with about a half dozen members. In the same year a small building was erected about two blocks west of its present site. About 1891, a larger church was built on the old site. During the late 1920s a larger stone building was erected on Eighth and Pine streets with a large membership and school. (Mrs. M. Donnelly; THE EVENING CITIZEN, 1901)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sand Slough
Description:A descriptive name for a small slough near Marshall Junction before the drainage system was begun. (Mr. and Mrs. E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sanders Gravel Pit
Description:Opened recently on land near Rombauer owned by D.L. Sanders of Poplar Bluff, who opened the pit to the public without charge, so that the roads might have improvement. (J.H.H. Potillo; cf. Bluff City Business College)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sandlin Store
Description:See Relleford Store.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sappington Ditch
Description:Extends through the farm now owned by John Sappington, near Harviell. (S. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sawyer
Description:A discontinued station and post office on the Frisco Railroad about two and a half miles southwest of Rombauer. Named for Charley Sawyer, who had a large sawmill and kept the post office. (Mrs. M. Zoll; Postal Guide 1904-1915)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Schraeder
Description:A switch (shown on the 1910 map) on the Missouri Pacific Railroad south of Neelyville, in the timber days, for loading piling and other large timbers. It took its name from a sawmill operated there by a man of the name. (A. Powers; Thos. Kenzie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Schraeder Mill
Description:See Schraeder
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Schwaner's Lake
Description:See Copeland Lake.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Second Baptist Church
Description:A Missionary Baptist Church in Poplar Bluff, on Pine and Fifth streets. In 1905, a number of persons, some from the older, now First Baptist Church, formed an organization and met for a time in East Poplar Bluff in a store building on Front Street. In 1907, a building was erected at the present site, and in 1922 a substantial addition was made to the building. Its membership has grown rapidly, and a notable feature is that they have had only one pastor, Rev. William S. Smelser, whose father and grandfather were ministers in this section. (Deem, 198)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shadle Graveyard
Description:A burial ground near Cedar Valley Church, which took its name from Samuel Shadle, a resident there since the Civil War. (J.S. Hudgens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sheppard Cemetery
Description:A private burial ground, established by Elijah Sheppard, an old Mexican War Soldier from Illinois. In Poplar Bluff Township southeast of Green Forest Church. (Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh
Description:A discontinued post office that was kept by various persons in the community. See Shiloh School and Church. (Postal Guide and P.L. 1874- 1901)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh Church
Description:A Methodist Church, near the center of Cane Creek Township established in May, 1842, and said to be the second church established in Butler County. Cf. Black River Church. The first house was of logs, at the site of Shiloh Graveyard, used for school also. It has continued active, and during the early days was the scene of many camp meetings. A familiar Bible name. (Cf. Gen. 49:10; Jno. Eudalay; Deem, 83-84; W.H. Boxx)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh Graveyard
Description:A very old burial ground near Shiloh Church, which name it acquired.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh School
Description:A school near Shiloh Church for which it was named.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shiloh Union Church
Description:The old Shiloh Schoolhouse, just across the road from the present schoolhouse. About 1920 Rev. Wandaline of Grandin organized a union church, and the old house is used occasionally by various religious sects. (W.H. Boxx; Jno. Eudalay)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Shipman Ford
Description:On Black River not far from Hillard. Named for Daniel Shipman, first white child born in what is now Poplar Bluff, who later lived near Hillard. (B. Deem; J.P. Bumgardner)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Simms Graveyard
Description:Very old. About three miles from Neelyville. Jackson Simms, an early settler, gave the land. (Mrs. N. Zimmerman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Slapout
Description:A derisive name given by the workmen to their camp at what is now Fagus. While building the railroad, the crew boarded at the one shack of a settler there, who habitually excused the absence of meat or some other needed food by saying he was "slap out" of the article, but would get it soon. (W.N. Barron (see his letter in INTRO. TO SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE NAMES, p. 36)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sliger Filling Station
Description:A country store in Oak Grove School District on Highway 60, established in July, 1933, by W.C. Sliger, near his home.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sluiceway Ditch
Description:See Ditch No. 26.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Snyder School
Description:Near Blue Springs. One of the Fisk Consolidated Schools. William H. Snyder gave the land and was a leader in its establishment. (J.C. Corrigan; Wm. Sutherland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Souders Ferry
Description:John Souders, a farmer and timber man had a ferry boat at the old Military Road crossing of Black River near Hilliard, about forty years ago. (S. Agee; L.M. Henson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Southern Missouri and Arkansas Railroad
Description:The road was completed from Hoxie to Poplar Bluff in October, 1901. Later known as "The Frisco." Locally it was at first known as the Hoxie Branch. (Souv. Ed. of THE EVENING CITIZEN, January, 1902)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sparkman Cave
Description:In Epps Township near Cane Creek on land now owned by John Sparkman. A popular place for outing parties.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sparkman Cemetery
Description:On Cane Creek one-half mile from Cane Creek Church; named from early settlers. A burial place long before the Civil War. (J.E. Kearby)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sparkman Settlement
Description:The Cane Creek Settlement (q.v.) is now also known by this name from the very progressive families who came from Kentucky in 1840. (AMERICAN REPUBLIC, May 15, 1929)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spencer Creek
Description:A western tributary of Black River, north of Agee School. William Spencer, from Virginia, was an early settler there. It was also known as Mill Creek and Nigger Creek after the Civil War because James Spencer, who operated the grist mill during the war, gave it to his elderly freed slave, Henry Spencer, at the close of the war. More recently it has acquired the name Hoetop, for a recent landowner. (J.H.H. Potillo; M. Caldwell; Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spencer's Mill
Description:See Spencer Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spout Spring
Description:See Bullock Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Spread
Description:A station on the Burlington, Chicago Railroad two and a half miles northwest of Broseley. It received this name when the road was under construction and the workmen's camp was here, because, even in slightly rainy seasons, the overflow water spread out around this higher elevation into a vast sheet. (W.N. Barron; H.W. Gunnels)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Francis Ridge
Description:Along the western side of St. Francis River, extends a low sandy elevation, preventing the natural drainage of the lowlands of the southeastern part of the county from entering the St. Francis River. It is not high enough to prevent the overflow of the river during rainy seasons and levees have been made from the Frisco Railroad southward. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Francis River
Description:The chief stream of Wayne County, and the eastern boundary of Butler County. It rises in the higher parts of the Ozark Mountains and empties into the Mississippi River in Arkansas. The anglicized form of the French "St. Francois" is given on the 1821 map, and is now in general use. The San Francisco River, mentioned by Schoolcraft and Williams appears to be the Spanish form of the name. Houck quotes from Silliman's JOURNAL OF SCIENCE, Vol. III (1821) 25: "According to Bringier" it was known by the American Indians as "Cholohollay," a Choctaw word meaning "smoke," taken from "Oca Cholohollay" meaning "smoky water." He further states that on Franquelin's map, published in 1864, the St. Francois River is named Riviere des Chepoussea, the same name as an Indian village farther north. Eaton says the name was given for the founder of the Franciscan Order, St. Francis of Assisi (1182-1226). (Houck I.17, 170; Wetmore, 28; Missouri the Mother of the West, I.78; TOUR INTO MISSOURI, 86; Eaton, 265)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Francis Township
Description:In the northeastern corner of the county. Formed from Black River Township in 1866. The earlier form St. Francois Township, nearer the original French, is still sometimes used. The township was named for the river. (Goodspeed; Douglas, 312)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Francois River
Description:See St. Francis River.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Louis and San Francisco Railway
Description:The St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company now owns all the roads in these five counties except the "Cairo Branch" and the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Hence the present name, locally known as "The Frisco." It was taken, of course, from the terminal cities.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:St. Louis, Iron Mountain, and Southern Railway
Description:The road, completed from Iron Mountain (Iron County), through Wayne and Butler Counties, was opened for traffic April 2, 1873. Cf. Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad. (Records in St. Louis Railroad office, by G.R. Mabie)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Star School
Description:This school, now consolidated with Rombauer, was formed from Greenwood School about 1893. It was first known as Lone Star School because it was situated so far toward the east away from other schools. Later the prefix Lone was dropped. The old school was also known as Knickerbacker School for H.C. Knickerbacker, a blacksmith, who helped to get it established. (Wm. Ham; Wm. Sutherland)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:State Line Service Station
Description:Established in 1931 on Highway 67 by Ralph Shelton at the Arkansas-Missouri line, south of Last Chance (q.v.). Also known as Ralph's Place. A neat building which serves a home, a little store of groceries, lunch counter, and filling station. (Mrs. Ralph Shelton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Still Camp
Description:See Still Camp Slough.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Still Camp Ditch
Description:Named for the slough (q.v.) which it drains.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Still Camp School
Description:Named for the slough nearby. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Still Camp Slough
Description:In Coon Island Township, now drained by Still Camp Ditch. Mr. Haag explained that there was a large logging camp there during the timber days. Persons interviewed did not know or were reluctant to tell, but Mrs. Craft says that back in the 1870s or early 1880s there was a large distillery there. (Postal Guide Haag; Mrs. Ruth Craft; Plat 1859)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stringtown [1 of 2]
Description:During the prohibition days of the Eighteenth Amendment, there was said to be a bootlegging joint, about twelve miles west of Poplar Bluff, where the less scrupulous went "stringing in and out." A name of disapproval. (Mrs. Eva Webb)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Stringtown [2 of 2]
Description:A timber camp of rough huts arranged in a row on a branch of the Burlington, Chicago Railroad near Marshall, during the mill age. (E. Calvin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Summer Breeze Camp
Description:A small tourist camp on Highway 60 about three miles northwest of Pine Ridge Camp (q.v.). Situated on a hill, it has the full benefit of any currents of the air. A topographical name.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Swan Lake
Description:Formerly a shallow lake (now in good farms), covering about six hundred acres of land between the "Cat" and Frisco Railroad. Swans wintered there in the early days, and later the region was a great hunting section, the habitat of wild ducks. (County Plat 1859; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Swan Pond
Description:Formerly a large expanse of water between Cache River and the site of Carola. Swans are said to have been there in the very early days. It is now drained by Swan Pond Ditch (q.v.). (B. Deem; Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Swan Pond Ditch
Description:A name given to Ditch No. 27, because it drains Swan Pond (q.v.). The ditch is only about three miles long and leads into Cache River. (Mrs. A. Johnson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Sweet Home Church
Description:The organization name for the colored Methodists of Morocco vicinity, who were organized in March, 1932, and use Woodruff Chapel (q.v.) to which they also apply the name Sweet Home. Their pastor explained, "We all meet there for the convenience of the people; it is a pleasant place to meet to worship God." Hence a name of approbation. (Rev. M.D. Giles; Wm. D. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Swift Creek
Description:A descriptive name given to a small western tributary of Black River, among the hills of Black River Township. (C. Hunter; C. Hedspeth)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Taft
Description:A former post office and sawmill village on the Frisco Railroad in Neely Township. Only one small store remains. Ira Taft owned land there and operated a sawmill, which facts led some informants to think it was named for him; but the donor of the name, Mr. Thomas Kenzie, says he himself had a small store at the place, got the office established, and named it for William Howard Taft (1857- 1930), who was then President of the United States (1909-1913), which fact verifies Eaton's statement. (C. Pottenger; T. Ward; Thos. Kenzie; Postal Guide 1910-1917; Eaton, 265)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Taft Ditch
Description:In Neely Township, beginning near Taft (q.v.). (Map 1926 ff.)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tan Yard Creek
Description:A small branch of Indian Creek, known by this name because a Mr. Walker had a tan yard there in pioneer days. (Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ten Mile
Description:A post office, near Ten Mile Creek, about one and a half miles southwest of Halloran (q.v.) from which the office was moved. Discontinued November 1, 1931, when a mail route from Poplar Bluff was established. (P.T. Nance; Postal Guide 1915- 1931)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ten Mile Creek
Description:Heads northeast of Hunter in Johnson Township and flows into Cane Creek in Butler County. Named for its length. (Rev. H.H. Stratton; A.M. Link; Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ten Mile School
Description:The old school of the settlement on Ten Mile Creek, later moved and named Halloran (q.v.). (P.T. Nance)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Barrens
Description:A large section in the western part of Beaver Dam Township. An open country, timbered, but earlier there was no underbrush. Formerly a good grazing ground for cattle. (A. Ward)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Bluff
Description:See Poplar Bluff.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Bluff City Business College
Description:A commercial school, owned and managed by D.L. Sander, since May, 1918. Situated in Poplar Bluff and named for the local name of the city, "The Bluff" (q.v.).
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Cat
Description:A coined word for the Cairo, Arkansas and Texas Railroad. It is used locally for the name of the railroad from Cairo, Illinois, to Poplar Bluff.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Frisco
Description:See St. Louis and San Francisco Railway.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Hoxie Branch
Description:See the Illinois, Missouri and Texas Railroad.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:The Stave Mill
Description:See Oxley Stave Factory.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Third Ward School
Description:See Benton School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thomas Township
Description:Formed in 1860 from Butler and Beaver Dam townships. A family name. Cf. Thomas Township in Ripley County. (Goodspeed, 375; Douglas, 312; Map 1873)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Thompson Spring
Description:See Kenner Spring.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Three Springs Camp Ground
Description:Near the site of Three Springs School. The first Methodist camp built in the county for religious camp meetings, very famous in pioneer days. Usually a brush arbor or a clapboard open shed was built, and sometimes a few log cabins were constructed. These "protracted meetings" continuing for three or four weeks, were attended by some persons who came in ox-drawn wagons from their homes twenty to thirty miles away. "Batching" supplies were brought, and a very enjoyable social, as well as religious, gathering was experienced. (J.H.H. Potillo; Polly Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Three Springs Cemetery
Description:The old Potillo burial ground later acquired the name of the school. (J.H.H. Potillo; S. Agee)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Three Springs School
Description:In the western part of Black River Township. Organized in the early 1870s, and the name acquired from the old Camp Ground (q.v.) and the three springs. Although no springs now exist, they were very good in the early days. (Mr. and Mrs. S. Agee; J.H.H. Potillo; O.B. Gomer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Trainer Graveyard
Description:A private Catholic cemetery two and a half miles west of Shiloh School, on land formerly owned by Matthew Trainer, a native of Ireland, who came to the community in the early 1870s. As Mrs. Trainer had been a nurse in a hospital in Rolla, Missouri, she was the community physician for many ills. (Jno. Eudalay; W.H. Boxx)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Tubb's Mill
Description:James, "Uncle Jimmy," Tubb owned the mill in 1866, before William Randles acquired it. It was on the old road from Poplar Bluff to Doniphan. Cf. Roxie. (County Court Records Book A, 450)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Turk Mill
Description:See Howell Mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Twin Springs Church
Description:A General Baptist Church, established in 1934 and named for the school nearby. (A. Emerson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Twin Springs School
Description:Formed from Black Creek and Good Hope districts. Named for the two springs near the school. (A. Emerson)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Ulmus
Description:A Latin botanical name for elm, given by Mr. Barron and Charles Langlotz to a mill camp on the Palmer Railroad, two miles east of Qulin. Much elm timber grew in the region. (W.N. Barron (see his letter in INTRO. TO SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE NAMES, p. 36)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Upper Carola School
Description:A name given to the original Carola School when the district was divided, to distinguish it from Lower Carola School (q.v.), which is at the southern end of the district. (J.L. Raulston)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Upper Pike Slough School
Description:In Poplar Bluff Township, near the head of Pike Slough. It is now generally known as Willow Oak School, for that species of oak growing there. Cf. Lower Pike Slough School farther south. (J. Humphreys; B. Adams)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Upton
Description:A post office about which nothing definite could be found. Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Duncan say there were people of this name in Wayne and nearby counties. Mrs. Maggie Duncan relates that several years ago, an elderly man of this name lived not far from their home southwest of Piedmont. The post office name is doubtless a family name. (Mr. and Mrs. A. Duncan; Mrs. Maggie Duncan; Postal Guide 1887)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vail Cemetery
Description:On land formerly owned by a Mr. Vail before the Civil War; two miles northeast of Broseley. A soldier, killed during the Civil War, was the first person buried there. (E. Calvin; Mrs. P. Saltzman)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vastus
Description:A discontinued post office near Coon Island School. Named by Judge B. Deem, when he, then a young man, taught the school and was instrumental in getting the post office established in 1883. Mr. Deem explains that as the postal authorities wanted a short and unusual name, he chose the Latin word meaning "great," because "we thought we were great then and had great possibilities." (Postal Guide 1892-1927; B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vastus Community
Description:A name by which a part of Coon Island School District is still known, six miles east of Neelyville. Named from the post office. (B. Deem; I.H. Barnhill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Victory Hill
Description:An idealistic name, by which Vinegar Hill (q.v.) is now known because that suburb was rebuilt so promptly and with buildings much better than those destroyed by the tornado of 1927.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Victory School
Description:In Epps Township. Named by Fabian Toutant, a Canadian Frenchman, who bought land in the community and, with a few neighbors, finally succeeded in getting the district formed from the Cane Creek District in 1895. He probably chose the name to commemorate his success. (Mrs. Cecil Burton; Mrs. Dora Holloway)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vinegar Hill
Description:A suburb of Poplar Bluff in the southwestern part, now generally known as Victory Hill. The following story is told to account for the name. About 1880, when only a few houses stood on the hill, a farmer, Horace Horton, was going to town with a load of sorghum molasses and vinegar. While going up the hill, the ingate of the wagon fell out and some of the contents were spilled. The place was known for a time as Molasses Run and Vinegar Hill. By 1894 this suburb had grown considerably, being populated almost exclusively by employees of Alfrey's Heading Factory (q.v.). (B. Deem; THE EVENING CITIZEN, 1901)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Vinegar Hill School
Description:Cf. Eugene Field School and Vinegar Hill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Virginia Settlement
Description:During the 1850s the Spencer and Agee families (possibly others) came from Virginia and settled northwest of the site of Poplar Bluff. Cf. Agee School and Spencer Creek.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Virginia Warrior Path
Description:Houck's map shows it extending westward from Poplar Bluff from the Natchitoches Path through Butler, across Carter and Current River south of Van Buren, across Shannon and Howell counties. Nothing has been found about the origin of the name, but very likely it is from the state of this name. (Houck I.226)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wah Branch
Description:An eastern tributary of Cane Creek near Victory School, named for an early squatter of Indian descent. In later years it acquired the name of Goose Creek because so many tame geese were raised along the stream. Still later it was known as Fulton Branch (q.v.). (Mrs. Martha Smith; C. Hunter)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walnut Grove Church
Description:A General Baptist Church, near Mussell Shoals, organized in 1912 by Rev. Thomas Sheffield. A descriptive name. (L. Guess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walnut Hill Cemetery
Description:Near the H Vam School. Named because of the large black walnut timber growing there in the earlier days and for the low sandy elevation on which it is situated. (B. Deem)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walsh
Description:See Walsh Spur. Doubtless "Spur" was dropped from the name when the post office was established. (Postal Guide 1911- 1913)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walsh Mill
Description:See Walsh Spur
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walsh School
Description:See Walsh Spur and Walsh. Doubtless it was named for the mill.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walsh Spur
Description:Now, known as Walsh, near Hart's Switch. A man of this name had a sawmill there. Hart School (q.v.) is now known by this name, for the station. Walsh is still a station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. (Mrs. M. Zimmerman; Jno. C. Corrigan)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walton School
Description:Formed from the Shiloh District in 1884. Four brothers, William, Tom, John, and Rube Walton, whose father came from Tennessee in the early 1840s, were the leading families in the northwestern part of Cane Creek Township. (Jno. Eudalay; W.H. Boxx)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Walton's Chapel
Description:A Methodist Church in the extreme northwestern part of Cane Creek Township, one-half mile west of Walton School (q.v.), from which it took its name. Goodspeed says it was organized in 1887, but old residents give the date as 1890 and say it was organized as an "arm" or branch of Shiloh Church (q.v.). (Goodspeed, 544; Jno. Eudalay; W.H. Boxx)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wappapello Unit of the U.S. Forest
Description:It took its name from the village Wappapello in Wayne County. Approximately 78,000 acres were in Butler, 130,000 in Wayne, and 35,000 in Carter, according to a report of March 27, 1934. Probably more has been added. (THE AMERICAN REPUBLICAN, March 27, 1934)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Warren Graveyard
Description:Another and later name by which the old Kittrell Graveyard is known, because "Old Grandpa Warren" (whose son was a physician, not living) owned a small farm nearby during the Civil War. (Mrs. Cecil Burton)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Water Works Spur
Description:The watering place for the engines of the Frisco Railroad. The Poplar Bluff Light and Water Plant is located there and a small park is being developed there near Black River, about the plant.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Watson Skinner Mill
Description:A sawmill and camp south of Harviell on the Missouri Pacific Railroad; operated by Watson Skinner during the early 1890s. (E. Calvin; C. Pottenger)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Webb School
Description:In the southeastern part of Ash Hills Township. Named for James Webb who gave the site and lived nearby. (J.L. Raulston; L. Guess)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wells Creek
Description:A later name for Hubbell's Branch, given for James Wells, who came from Kentucky about sixty-three years ago and bought land there. (J.S. Hudgens)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:West End School
Description:A two-room elementary school, erected in 1892, in the western part of Poplar Bluff on Vine Street. In 1925, a larger modern building was erected at a cost of $75,000 and named Kinyon School, for Mrs. Mary I. Kinyon who had given a lifetime service as teacher and principal of the school. Mrs. Kinyon died soon after her retirement in 1933. (School Records; P.G. Hays)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wetbolt
Description:Campbell gives this name of the 1873 map. It was, before the drainage system was established, a great swampy region in the southwestern part of the county. Nothing has been found about the meaning of "bolt." (A. Powers; I.H. Barnhill)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wheatley School
Description:The new building for a colored elementary and high school was erected in 1928, on the old Negro School grounds, on Garfield Street in Poplar Bluff. The old school was a four-room brick, erected in 1901. Named for Phyllis Wheatley, early negro poetess. (Mrs. Roxie Blue)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Widow Creek
Description:A name by which Spencer Creek (q.v.) was known for a time after the Civil War, because so many war widows lived there, some of whom were Mesdames Lacks, Jonas, Varner, Harviell, Keener, Stewart, and Hammons. (J.H.H. Potillo)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wilby
Description:A station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad two and a half miles south of Henrickson. A story, which was perhaps only a late invention, is told that two Davidson brothers kept a store and the post office there. As many calls were made for articles not in stock, customers would be repeatedly answered with "We will have (the article) before long." So in a spirit of ridicule, the name, a corruption of "Will be" was given the place. The reason given by Mr. and Mrs. Davidson, lifelong residents there, is doubtless the true origin of the name. A man by the name of Whitworth had a wood yard there, and as the timber business opened up, the people asked the railroad company to put in a spur. Instead they put in a siding, the work of which was managed by an experienced elderly man by the name of Wilby, for whom the place was named. (J.J.J. Potillo; Mrs. S. Agee; Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Davidson; W. Head)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wilcox School
Description:A family name for the voting precinct, but the Bates School (q.v.) was sometimes known by the name. The family lived near. (E. Calvin; J.L. Raulston; 1912 map)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Willcutt Hill
Description:A very steep, long hill in the Miller Road, four miles west of Poplar Bluff, named for an early family that lived near. (J.S. Hudgens; Geo. Powers)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Williams Ferry
Description:An old Wayne County family name for Indian Ford (q.v.), given by Colton's Map of 1867. Later called Pollard Ferry for the man who ran the ferry. (Wm. Ham; Map 1865)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Willow Oak School
Description:See Upper Pike Slough School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Winchester
Description:An old logging camp on the Hargrove and Ruth Tram Railroad (q.v.) three miles southeast of Poplar Bluff. Named by Mr. C.H. Hargrove, at that time log manager for the mill, because he had one of the famous Winchester rifles, named for their American manufacturer, Oliver F. Winchester (1810-1880), while the other men had only common shot guns. (Webster's Dict., C.H. Hargrove)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:WK School
Description:See Williamson Kennedy School.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wolf Creek
Description:A small stream flowing into Pike Creek six miles west of Poplar Bluff. According to Goodspeed, Joseph W. Morris settled there in 1867 and owned three hundred acres of land. During earlier days there were many wolves there. (Goodspeed, 1084; Wm. Montgomery)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Wolf Den Hollow
Description:Drained by Nigger Creek (q.v.). The great number of wolves in the earlier day gave the name. Some wolves are yet found in the vicinity. (M. Caldwell)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Woodlawn Cemetery
Description:The newer addition, east of the highway, of the City Cemetery. Named because of the wooded land where it is located.
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Woodruff Chapel
Description:A freewill Baptist Church, colored, organized June 30, 1889, by Rev. J. Crumpton, in the woods in front of Tolliver Lay's house. Services were held in a log cabin until 1894, when Woodruff Chapel, "named in memory of the church starting in the woods and for its pastor at the time of the building, Rev. J.W. Woodruff," explained Mr. Martin. At this time (1932) only three members are left of the Freewills--Mr. Martin, his son Jitty, and Mr. Murphy, who worship with the Methodists. Cf. Sweet Home Church. (Rev. M.D. Giles; Wm. D. Martin)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Yates Mill
Description:Mrs. Mary Greer, an elderly resident of the community, says that James Yates had the first little grist mill at what is now Ringo Ford. And that the Ringo family bought it from him. (Mrs. Mary Greer)
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

Place name:Young School
Description:The school for colored people near Morocco (q.v.) [The] site was given by Norvelle H. Young, a colored land[owner] who lived there for many years. (Jno. C. Corrigan; P. Bumgardner) [original card was torn and words lost]
Source:Pottenger, Cora Ann. "Place Names Of Five Southern Border Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1945.

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