Bollinger County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Alliance
Description:A village in the northwestern part of Whitewater Township, a post office was established here in 1891. The name was given because the Farmer's Alliance, which had been organized in Illinois in 1880, was a strong and flourishing organization here at the time. Alliance is also called Jugtown because of the pottery that was manufactured from the clay found there. (Dewitt, Conrad, Slover, MISSOURI AND MISSOURIANS)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Alliance School
Description:The first school in the district was called Johnson School for John M. Johnson, a large landowner, but to avoid confusion with the Johnson school in the central part of Liberty Township, this name was changed to that of the settlement, Alliance. (Myers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Allie Creek
Description:A small stream in the northeastern part of Whitewater Township, running east into Cape Girardeau County, where it empties into Apple Creek. The creek is probably named for a wife or daughter of one of the landowners in this vicinity. (Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Anthony Creek
Description:A large creek in the western part of Scopus Township, named for Albert Anthony, a prominent citizen of the community. (County Map (1940), County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baker Hill School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Liberty Township, located at the edge of Baker Hills (q.v.), from which it is named. (Cooper, Ladd)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baker Hills
Description:A group of sand hills in the southeastern part of Liberty Township, named for Joseph Baker, an early settler in this region. (Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Baltimore Creek
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Union Township. No explanation can be given for the name; it is conjectured that someone named it for Baltimore, Maryland. (DeWitt, Tallent, Alexander, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Barber School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Crooked Creek Township, named for the Barber family. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Beal School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Fillmore Township named for the Beal family, large landowners there. Andrew J. Beal was one of the members of the family. (Myers, County Court Records)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Belmont Branch
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bennett Branch
Description:A small stream in the eastern part of Crooked Creek Township, named from Monroe Bennett, who owns land there. (County Map (1906), County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bep Mill
Description:A mill of importance in the early days of the county, located in the western part of Liberty Township on Cane Creek. It was established as a voting place in 1866. The mill was operated by Bep and named for him. (County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bessville
Description:A small town in the southern part of Crooked Creek Township, on the Belmont branch of the Iron Mountain Railroad. It was laid out soon after the railroad was built in 1869 and named for Sam Bess, who ran a store and became the first postmaster. The Bess family is still prominent there. (Douglass I 372, Bess, Wiggs, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Blue Branch
Description:A branch of Hurricane Creek in the eastern part of Crooked Creek Township, so named from the water which appeared blue because of its clarity and depth. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Hollow Branch
Description:A small branch of Little Whitewater River in the southern part of Scopus Township. The name is descriptive. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Big Whitewater Church
Description:A General Baptist Church located at a gushing spring in the northern part of Whitewater Township. It was organized prior to 1880 and named for the stream in which the members were baptized. The term Big distinguished it from Little Whitewater Church (q.v.). (Tong)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Blue Creek
Description:A small creek in the northern part of Union Township, a branch of Conrad Creek, so named because of the appearance of the water. (Wiggs, Dewitt, Tallent, Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bollinger County
Description:Organized by an act of the State Legislature, approved March 1, 1851; formed of portions of Wayne, Cape Girardeau, and Stoddard Counties. It was named in honor of Colonel George Frederick Bollinger (1770-1842), who was born in North Carolina of Swiss parentage. In 1796 Colonel Bollinger settled on Whitewater River, then in the district of Cape Girardeau. Bollinger became acquainted with Louis Lorimier, commandant of the post at Cape Girardeau, who under Spanish directions, promised him concessions of land if he would bring more settlers to the district. Bollinger went back to North Carolina and returned with his wife and twenty colonists and families. This group crossed the Mississippi River at Ste. Genevieve January 1, 1800. The group included Mathias, John, Henry, William, Daniel and Philip Bollinger and families; Peter and Conrad Stutler, Joseph Nyswonger, George and Peter Grount, Peter Crytes (or Crites), John and Jacob Cotner, John and Isaac Miller, Frederick Limbough, Leonard Welker, and Frank Slinkard. All were of German or Swiss parentage and members of the German Reformed Church. According to Spanish law, up to 800 arpens (640 acres) of land along Whitewater River from the present Whitewater at Burfordsville and Millersville in Cape Girardeau County. Soon after their settlement Larimier ordered the settlers to form a company of militia, and they were organized under the command of George Frederick Bollinger who was given the title of major. Bollinger built one of the best mills in the county (at what is now Burfordville). Other settlers followed these, settling near present Zalma, on Hog Creek, on Crooked Creek, and on Whitewater Creek, and in 1805 Rev. Samuel Weiberg (or Whybark) came from North Carolina at Bollinger's invitation to establish a German Reformed Church. Major Bollinger was made a member of the first Territorial Assembly, and a member of the State Senate for a number of terms. In 1828 he was president pro tem of the Senate, and in 1836 was a presidential elector. He died in 1842, seven years before Bollinger County was organized. On March 24, 1851, the first county court was organized at the home of John Stevens, on Hurricane Creek. The judges were Reuben Smith, John Stephens, and Drury Massey. The first sheriff was William C. Grimsley, and the clerk was O.E. Snider. A courthouse was erected which burned in 1866 with some of the county records. A second courthouse was erected which burned in 1884. Then Lutesville, a railroad town and ambitious, tried to get the courthouse, but this proposition was defeated at the November, 1884 election. In 1885 the present courthouse was built. Bollinger County was divided into six townships in 1851: Union, German, Lorance, Fillmore, and Wayne. In 1872 two new townships, Crooked Creek and Whitewater were created from Union and German, and in 1918 the name of German Township was changed to Scopus. (Douglass I 313, Conard I, Houck II 182-192, Goodspeed 275-282)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bollinger County Tunnel
Description:A tunnel, 890 feet long, with a solid rock roof made for the Iron Mountain (now Missouri Pacific) Railroad in Crooked Creek Township. It was completed and the last spike driven in the railroad in the middle of the tunnel at midnight, August 14, 1869. (Fitzsimmons 277-328)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bollinger School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Scopus Township, named for one of the many members of Colonel George Frederick Bollinger's family who settled in this county in 1800. With Colonel Bollinger came Mathias, Henry, John, William, Daniel and Philip and their families. Since it was Philip Bollinger who had a grant on Little Whitewater, and his son Henry F. Bollinger who lived near Patton in 1912, it is logical that this school was named for Henry or his father Philip. (Tallent, Myers, Conard)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Bollinger's Mill
Description:See Zalma.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brush Creek
Description:A small creek in the southern part of Wayne Township. Greasewood, a low still shrub (sarcobatus vermiculatus) grows abundantly along this creek so that the branches often lap together and make it difficult to wade the stream. Greaswood grows elsewhere in the county but nowhere else is it so thick as here. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Brush Creek Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the southern part of Wayne Township, on Brush Creek (q.v.), from which it was named. (Minutes of St. Francois Assn., Murray)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buchanan
Description:A village in the southern part of Fillmore Township. A post office was established in 1886 and named by Alex McMinn, the first postmaster, for James Buchanan (1791-1868), fifteenth president of the United States who served from 1856-1860. (Douglas I 372, Eaton, Dewitt, Hopkins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck Creek
Description:A small creek in the southern part of Union and Whitewater Townships, flowing into Whitewater River, which was named from the deer which hunters found there in pioneer days. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Buck Creek School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Whitewater Township, located near Buck Creek (q.v.), for which it was named. (Dewitt, Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burg
Description:A post office was maintained here from 1908-1910. The name is a common designation. "What shall we call this burg?" was a frequent question, and in this case no satisfactory answer being given, the name "Burg" was suggested to postal authorities. (Postal Guide, Hamlett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Burk School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Fillmore Township, named for John Burk, a pioneer landowner. (Myers, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Creek
Description:A small creek in the western part of Liberty Township, named from the cane, hollow jointed ligneous stemmed giant reeds or grasses (L. canna, reed), which grow along the creek. (Dewitt, Tallent, Wiggs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Creek Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the western part of Liberty Township, organized about 1878 and disbanded soon after 1904. It was named for Cane Creek (q.v.), on which it was located. (Marble Hill Press (1904), Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cane Creek School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Liberty Township, located on Cane Creek (q.v.), from which it is named. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Caney Creek
Description:Rises near Lixville in northeastern Whitewater Township in Bollinger County, runs east into Cape Girardeau County, flowing east and then south through Apple Creek and Whitewater Township and emptying into Little Whitewater River. Daniel Sexton settled on Caney Creek in 1798. The name is derived from the cane, a native growth of the county. It is sometimes called Caney Fork because it forms a fork with Little Whitewater River. (Geological Map, Spanish Regime II 412, Douglass I XIII, Putz)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cape Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in the western part of Union Township, enters Madison County in Castor Township, and empties into Castor River. Whether this creek was so designated when this was a part of Cape Girardeau County (commonly called Cape County), or whether the creek was so called because it forms a cape-like region in its course is a matter of conjecture. (Dewitt, Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor
Description:A small village in the northwestern part of Fillmore Township on Castor River (q.v.), from which it is named. A post office was established in 1876. (Douglass I 372, Dewitt, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor River
Description:See former study.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Castor River
Description:Castor River rises in St. Francois County, flows south through Madison County near the eastern boundary, then for a short distance along the boundary line between Wayne and Bollinger. It enters Bollinger in Fillmore Township and flows southeast through Wayne Township into Stoddard County, and thence into New Madrid County, where it empties into Little River. Prior to the white man's coming the region in what is now the southern part of Madison and the western part of Bollinger counties was a mass of canebrakes where pools of water collected in rainy seasons. Here beavers built dams and held back the water coming down from the St. Francois hills to the north. When heavy rains came, the beaver dams were broken and the water formed a channel. After many repetitions of this process a river was formed, and it was called Castor, a word meaning beaver, by the French who came to the Mine LaMotte district (in Madison County) near the source of this stream in 1725. Schoolcraft in 1818 refers to this branch as Crooked Creek. (Present Crooked Creek is a few miles east and joins Castor River in New Madrid County). Beck calls the river Castor or Crooked Creek in 1823; Wetmore calls it Castor in 1837, but the name Crooked Creek is not entirely separated from this branch until 1873. (Conard, Douglass I: XII, XIV, Schoolcraft, Beck, Wetmore, Long's Voyage, Campbell, Hopkins, Miss Hamlett's thesis)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cato Slough
Description:A swampy place which has the appearance of a pond or lake in the southern part of Wayne Township. Cato is said to have been an Indian who stayed behind when his tribe left this section of Missouri in 1825. He lived alone somewhere in this neighborhood. (County Map, MARBLE HILL PRESS (1900-1904)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Branch
Description:A small branch in the southwestern part of Scopus Township, named from the cedar trees, well-known evergreen conifero (abies deodora), which grow along the stream. This name was applied to the stream before 1873. (Myers, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cedar Branch School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Scopus Township, located on Cedar Branch, for which it is named. (Myers, Robbins, Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cheek Creek
Description:A small stream in the western part of Scopus Township, named for James Cheek, who lived there in 1906. (Dewitt, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Chicken Branch
Description:A small branch of Crooked Creek in the central part of Lorance Township. The reason for the name is not known. (Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Choat
Description:A post office established in 1899 and discontinued in 1904, named for Albert Choat, a merchant at Buchanan, who ran a store here for a sawmill camp. It was in the east-central part of Fillmore Township. The name appears on the map of 1912, though the place was abandoned about 1908. (Missouri Road Guide (1912), Houck I, MARBLE HILL PRESS)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clippard
Description:A post office maintained from 1902-1904 in the eastern part of Liberty Township and named for a prominent pioneer family. David C. Clippard served as Probate Judge in the county for many years and F.B. Clippard was county assessor from 1900-1904. (Postal Guide, County Map (1906), MARBLE HILL PRESS (1901-1904), Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clubb Creek
Description:A small creek in the western part of Liberty Township, named for the Clubb family, prominent citizens. Abe Clubb was one of the first settlers here. (Dewitt, Yount)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clubb Creek School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Liberty Township, located on Clubb Creek, from which it was named. (Myers, Dewitt, Yount, Ladd)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Clubb Township
Description:Erected in Cape Girardeau County in 1848 when the entire system of townships was revised. This selection became a part of Bollinger County in 1851. It was named for Abe Clubb, a prominent pioneer. Clubb Township was replaced by Fillmore and Wayne Townships when Bollinger County was organized. (Douglass I 163, Myers, Yount, Campbell (1874), County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Combs Branch
Description:A small stream which rises in Union Township, Bollinger County, flows west into Castor Township, Madison County, and empties into Castor River. It is named for Silas Combs, a well-known settler. (Madison Plat, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Conrad Creek
Description:A large creek in the northern part of Union and Whitewater Township, emptying into Whitewater River in Cape Girardeau County. It is named for George E. Conrad and his family, who came to Bollinger County in 1803. (Dewitt, Rhoda Conrad, Mrs. George Conrad)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Conrad School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Whitewater Township, named for George E. Conrad, early settler and prominent citizen. (Rhoda Conrad, Mrs. George Conrad)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crooked Creek
Description:A large stream which rises in the northwestern part of Bollinger County, flows in a southeastern direction, enters Cape Girardeau County, and empties into Whitewater River near Allenville. The stream thus formed is called Whitewater River until it receives the waters of Caney Creek and East Fork, after which it takes the name of Little River. The name was given prior to 1818. Schoolcraft refers to it and to Castor River (west of this branch) as one stream which he calls Crooked Creek. The name is descriptive. Mr. Yount, pioneer of Bollinger County, says he has stood in one spot and thrown a rock on both sides of him, as the stream flows south and then suddenly turns around to flow north. (Douglass I XIII 280, Schoolcraft, Dewitt, Yount)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Crooked Creek Township
Description:In the northwestern part of the county, just south of Union Township organized in 1872 from German Township. It was named for Crooked Creek (q.v.), the principal stream. (Douglass I 313, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cross Roads School [1 of 2]
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Whitewater Township. Cf. above. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cross Roads School [2 of 2]
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Lorance Township, so named because it is located at the crossing of two county roads. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Cypress Lake
Description:A small lake, drained since 1906, in the southeastern part of Wayne Township. It was named for the cypress trees growing in the swamp.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dallas
Description:See Marble Hill.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Davault Creek
Description:A small creek in the southern part of Fillmore Township, named for the pioneer James Davault, who came from North Carolina in 1804 with the first settlers in the county. His Spanish grant was in this neighborhood. His son Christian Davault continued to farm there after his father's death. (Dewitt, Douglass I 687)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dolles Mill
Description:An important mill in pioneer days and still in operation, located in the northern part of Scopus Township. It was operated by John H. Dolle as early as 1868. A post office was established here in 1876 and discontinued in 1896. A.B. Dolle continued to operate the mill in the early 1900s. (Postal Guide, Dewitt, County Court Records)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dongola
Description:A small village in the southern part of Liberty Township. A post office was maintained from 1900 until about 1915. Mr. George Bidewell, who lived there when the post office was established says he does not know why the name was chosen, but thinks possibly there was some connection with Dongola, a small town in Union County, Illinois. Gannett says the Illinois village was named by its founder from Dongola in Africa. There is another small place named Dongola in South Carolina. Dongola, Africa, is a province of Egypt, in Nubia, which was much in the news in the 1890s in the war waged by England against Mahdi. It was lost by General Charles G. Gordon and finally recaptured by General Sir Herbert Kitchener on September 23, 1896. (Bidewell, Gannett)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Drum
Description:A small village in the eastern part of Liberty Township. A post office was established in 1895, and named for the Drum family, prominent pioneers in the county. Robert Drum was State Senator from this district in 1904. (Dewitt, Myers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Drunken Creek
Description:A small branch of Hog Creek in the eastern part of Lorance Township, which, like most creeks, flows violently and overflows its banks when rain falls. Tradition says that an old settler who lived on the eastern bank often rode a mule into Marble Hill and got drunk. One night when he tried to return home the creek had risen and in his drunken state he could not ford the stream and was drowned. Thereafter the creek was known as Drunken Creek. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Liberty Township, which is so named because it is dry except when a heavy rain falls. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Dry Creek Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the eastern part of Liberty Township. It was established in 1815 on Turkey Creek (q.v.) and called Turkey Creek Church. Douglass mistakenly calls it Turtle Creek Church. The first building was abandoned about 1835 and the new church erected a few miles away on Dry Creek (q.v.), hence the name. (HIST. OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS 26, Tong)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Eaker School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Liberty Township, named for Daniel Eaker, who gave the land for the school. (Cooper, Shell, Murray)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ezra
Description:A post office in the northwestern part of Union Township, maintained in 1910, and named by a prominent man in the community, a Mr. Miller, for his son Ezra. (Postal Guide, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fillmore Township
Description:In the western part of the county, erected in 1851 as one of the original townships; it was named for Millard Fillmore (1800-1874), then serving as thirteenth president of the United States, having taken office in 1850 at the death of President Zachary Taylor. (Douglass I 163, County Court Record, Hopkins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Fish School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Wayne Township, named for Tom Fish, a prominent farmer in the community. (Myers, Thomas, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flatwoods [1 of 2]
Description:Two regions are called by the people of the county by this name. One is in the western part of Lorance Township; the other in the southern part of Whitewater Township. The name is descriptive of the flat plain timbered country which is in contrast to the hill section of the county, the prevailing type of land. (Myers, Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flatwoods [2 of 2]
Description:Cf. above.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Flatwoods School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Whitewater Township, named for the Flatwoods (q.v.) region in which it is located. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Friendship Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the western part of Wayne Township, organized by Rev. Levi W. Revelle and given this ideal name by him (Minutes of St. Francois Assn., A HIST. OF SOUTHERN MISSOURI & NORTHERN ARKANSAS)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garner School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Whitewater Township, named for the Garner family, who gave the land for the school. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Garner's Branch
Description:A small stream in the northern part of Crooked Creek Township, flowing into Crooked Creek, which was named for the Garners, landowners. (Dewitt, Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:German Township
Description:See Scopus Township.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gimlet Creek
Description:A small creek in the western part of Lorance Township. Mr. Dewitt says it was probably named because of its small size and possible likeness to a gimlet. (Dewitt, Wiggs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gipsy
Description:A small village in the northwestern part of Wayne Township. It was named by J.C. Montgomery who applied for a post office in 1908. Mr. Montgomery had come, with his large family, in a covered wagon between 1900-1902 from Tennessee and had camped on the old Hinkle school ground. The people of the community called the Montgomerys "gipsys" because of their manner of coming, and he used that name when he applied for the post office. (Hopkins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gipsy River
Description:A small stream which rises in the eastern part of Cowan Township, flows east into Bollinger County where it empties into Turkey Creek near Gipsy, from which it is named. (Hopkins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gipsy School
Description:A school in the community of Gipsy (q.v.) which was known in early days (1880-1906) as the Hinkle School, and still so called by some people. Hinkle School was named for W.D. Hinkle, a prominent citizen of the community. (Hopkins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gizzard Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Liberty Township. No one ventures an explanation of the name. It may possibly be a map maker's error for Buzzard Creek. (Dewitt, Wiggs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glen Allen
Description:In Lorance Township, a station on the Iron Mountain Railroad (now Missouri Pacific). It was established in 1869 when then railroad was built, and named from its natural features, a glen, and Thomas Allen, president of the railroad, for whom Allenville, in Cape Girardeau County, was also named. The name was written Glen Allen until 1897, since then it is either Glenallen or Glen Allen. (Dewitt, Murray, Yount, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glennon
Description:A Catholic community in the eastern part of Liberty Township, established in 1928 and named for Archbishop John J. Glennon, present Archbishop of St. Louis, as was Glennonville in Dunklin County. (Dewitt, Robbins, Tallent, Hosenfeld)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Glennon School
Description:This was originally the Scott School, named for a prominent landowner, but when Glennon was established in 1928, the school took the name of the settlement officially, although many people refer to it as the Scott School. (Myers, Hosenfeld)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Pond Hill
Description:A hill at the foot of which is a swampy place or pond where old hunters found wild geese, hence the combination of names Goose Pond Hill. (Myers, Robbins, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Goose Pond Hill School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Liberty Township located on Goose Pond Hill, from which it was named. (Myers, Tallent, Robbins, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grassy
Description:A small settlement in the eastern part of Fillmore Township, which was named for Grassy Creek (q.v.) on which it is located. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grassy Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Fillmore Township, so named from the lush sage grass which grows along the banks and even in the bed of the stream. This grass grew extensively in only two places in the county, here, and in the Pine Union community. (Dewitt, Robbins, Yount)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greasy Creek School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Marquand Township, located on Greasy Creek (q.v.) from which it was named. It is usually called the Stephens School locally and is named for Billy Stephens. (Mouser, Stephens)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Green School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Crooked Creek Township, named for Richard Green, prominent settler, organized prior to 1869. (Tallent, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenbrier
Description:A small village in the southeastern part of Wayne Township. The name Greenbrier was suggested to the railroad builders by the rank vegetation, especially blackberry and other green briers which, according to Mrs. George Conrad and Mr. George Myers, were unusually large and thick there. Mrs. Conrad said, "They grew as high as this house." (Dewitt, Conrad, Myers, Eaton, Butler)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greene
Description:See Marble Hill.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Greenwood School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Liberty Township, named for Richard Greenwood, who owns land in the community. (Thomas, Conrad, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Gregory School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Lorance Township, named for the Gregory family, who moved here from Indiana and were prominent citizens. (Myers, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grisham
Description:A stop on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in the southwestern part of Crooked Creek Township which was named for Lin Grisham who located a store, one of a chain, in this place. A post office has been maintained there since 1921. (Dewitt, Cooper, Hopkins, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Grounds Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in the northwestern part of Crooked Creek Township, flows west, enters Madison County in the northern part of Marquand Township and empties into the Castor River. It is named for a pioneer family, several members of which settled up and down the creek. (Berry) (Watts)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hahn
Description:A small settlement in the northern part of Wayne Township, established in 1895 and named for J.W.G. Hahn, one of several members of the family who settled there. (Dewitt, Myers, Hah, Shell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hamestring School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Lorance Township. Mr. Dewitt believes that this unusual name was suggested by the ridge on which the school is located, the ridge curving in such a way as to suggest the familiar piece of harness, the hamestring. This is a method of naming not unknown to pioneers. Cf. Pinhook Ridge in Mississippi County. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hammertown School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Union Township. Mrs. Slover writes that the name originated in the following way: At the time the building was being constructed several other structures were being raised in the neighborhood. The noise of hammers and saws was the tune of the day. While working on the school building, one of the workmen looked up and said, "What are we going to call the school?" Sam Barks, a carpenter in the crowd who was quite a practical joker and had a ready answer for anything, replied, "Why, we will call it Hammertown." (W.E. Statler, Pearl Slover)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hartle School
Description:A rural school in the east-central part of Scopus Township, named for the Hartle family. H.S., Thomas B. and Logan Hartle were prominent landowners. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawker Creek
Description:A small creek in Wayne and Liberty Townships, named for a Mr. Hawker, who owns land at the head of the creek. Mr. Dewitt says the name Virgin (hard "g") is given to the same creek, because Mr. Virgin also is prominent in this region, though a recent map shows Virgin Creek as a branch of Hawker Creek. (Dewitt, County Map (1940)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hawn School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Crooked Creek Township, named for the Daniel Hawn family. Daniel Hawn was born in 1829 on a farm which his parents had settled in 1818, coming from North Carolina. In 1852 Daniel Hawn came to Bollinger County and acquired a farm. (Tallent, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Heitman Mill
Description:A large mill on Little Whitewater River in the northern part of Union Township, named for its owner, William Heitman, a pioneer. (Yount)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Heitman School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Union Township, named for the Heitman family who settled there. William Heitman ran a mill nearby on Little Whitewater River. (Yount)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Henson Branch
Description:A branch of Crooked Creek in the northern part of Crooked Creek Township, named, as was the rural school in the same community, for William Henson, who owns land there. (Tallent, County Map (1906)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Henson School
Description:A rural school in the north-central part of Crooked Creek Township, named for the landowner, William Henson. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hinkle School
Description:See Gipsy School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hog Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Lorance Township, which is said to have received its name thus: a pioneer who stole hogs from his neighbors butchered them and threw the heads, with their identifying markings, in the creek. The settlers then called the creek "the one in which the old man throws the hogs," and finally Hog Creek. (Jones, Allen)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hog Creek School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Lorance Township, near Hog Creek (q.v.) for which it was named. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hurricane
Description:A small village in the eastern part of Crooked Township, located near Hurricane Creek (q.v.) from which it was named. A post office has been maintained since 1895. (Dewitt, Tallent, Robbins, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Hurricane Creek
Description:A large creek in Crooked Creek and Lorance Townships, which flows south and empties into Crooked Creek near Lutesville. It runs with unusual swiftness and violence when a heavy rain falls, making passage across the creek impossible or dangerous. This speed is likened to a storm or hurricane in violence, and hence the stream received this name. It is commonly pronounced "herricane" and is so spelled once in the County Court Record. (Robbins, Wiggs, County Court Records)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Huskey's
Description:A post office maintained from 1888-1892, 1897-1907 in the eastern part of Lorance Township, and named for Thomas Huskey, a prominent citizen, who lives there now at the age of ninety. He came to Missouri in 1871 and in 1884 settled on a tract of land in Lorance Township. He was active in public affairs in the county for many years. (Hopkins, Shell, Murray)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Huxie
Description:A post office in the northern part of Liberty Township, maintained in 1901-1908. A William J. Hux operated a sawmill in this community about 1906, and the place was probably named for him. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:A small creek in the southern part of Crooked Creek Township, so named because many Indian relics were found nearby and traces of an old Indian trail were seen. (Wiggs, County Map, 1906)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jack Hawn Creek
Description:A small branch in the western part of Crooked Creek Township, named for a landowner, "Uncle" Jack Hawn. (County Map (1906) (1940), Dewitt, MARBLE HILL PRESS (1904)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:James Creek
Description:A small creek in the western part of Scopus Township, and named, as was the nearby James School (q.v.) for Randolph James, a landowner. (Shell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:James School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Scopus Township, named for Randolph James, whose father Levi B. James of English ancestry came here from Tennessee in the early 1800s. (Tallent, Shell, Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jamison School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Wayne Township, organized about 1867 and named for Urias Jamison, who came from Bloomfield, Indiana and settled here. He was Mrs. George Conrad's grandfather. (Rhoda Conrad, Mrs. George Conrad, Robbins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jenkins Creek
Description:A stream in the western part of Liberty and Wayne Townships which appears on Campbell's Atlas of 1874. Probably named for an early settler. (Campbell (1874)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson School [1 of 2]
Description:See Alliance School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Johnson School [2 of 2]
Description:A rural school in the central part of Liberty Township, named for Sidney Johnson, a prominent landowner there. (Myers, Hosenfeld)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Jugtown
Description:See Alliance.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:La Riviere Blanche
Description:See Whitewater River.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Ladd School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Wayne Township, named for Thomas Ladd, a large landowner, who gave the land for the school. (Myers, Ladd)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Laflin
Description:A small village in the southeastern part of Lorance Township, a station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. A post office has been maintained since 1886. Named for Sylvester M. Laflin, a director of the Belmont Branch of the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad. (now Missouri Pacific). (Postal Guide, Eaton, Fitzsimmons)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leopold
Description:A village in the northeastern part of Liberty Township; the first name given to this settlement was Vinemount. Campbell's Gazetteer of 1873 lists Vinemount as a place having one store and a Catholic church. No one has been able to suggest a reason for the name Vinemount. It was probably intended as descriptive of the location. A church was built in 1861 by Father John Van Lutyelaar and dedicated to St. John. In 1878 Father Battles came, a new church was completed in 1899, and dedicated in 1901. When a post office was established in 1888 the name Leopold was suggested in honor of Leopold II, Holy Roman emperor (1747-1792) who was first educated for the priesthood, but at the death of his brother Joseph II succeeded to the throne of Hungary. (Myers, Hasenfeld, MARBLE HILL PRESS (1903)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Leopold School
Description:The public school in Leopold is thus designated officially, but the residents, who are Catholic, refer to the school locally as St. John's School, because the church there is dedicated to St. John. (Tallent, Hasenfeld)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lick Creek
Description:A branch of Cane Creek in the western part of Liberty Township. Probably named for a salt lick which the deer frequented in pioneer days. (County Map (1906), Wiggs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lick Log Creek
Description:A small creek in the southern part of Wayne Township, named by pioneer hunters who found a deer lick here. Cf. Lick Creek. The "log" was evidently a prominent one saturated with the saline deposits which the deer licked. (Wiggs, County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Limbaugh School
Description:A rural school in the north-central part of Scopus Township, named for the Limbaugh family, prominent settlers there. J.W. Limbaugh was a farmer; J.P. became county judge, and many members of the family became prominent. (Tallent, County Court Record, MARBLE HILL PRESS (1904)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Brush Creek
Description:A branch of Brush Creek (q.v.), from which it is named, flowing through the southern part of Wayne Township. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Crooked Creek
Description:A small creek flowing through Lorance Township into Crooked Creek (q.v.), from which it is named, near Glen Allen. (County Map (1906) (1940)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Muddy Creek
Description:A small creek which rises in Whitewater Township and flows through the northern part of Scopus Township into Cape Girardeau County, where it empties into Whitewater River. It is named for a man of that community whose nickname is "Muddy," John M. (Muddy) Johnson. This was doubtless the same John M. Johnson for whom Johnson School (q.v.) near Alliance was originally named. (Hohs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Vine Church
Description:A rural General Baptist Church in the western part of Fillmore Township. This name, especially popular with Baptist Churches, is derived from Christ's words in John 15:5: "I am the vine, ye are the branches." (Myers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Vine School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Fillmore Township, named from Little Vine Church (q.v.) which is nearby. (Myers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Whitewater Church
Description:A General Baptist Church at the head of Little Whitewater River in the southern part of Union Township, five miles west of Patton. The church was first organized in Bollinger Schoolhouse in 1878. It was named for the stream on which it was located and in which the members were baptized. (Tong)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Little Whitewater River
Description:A tributary to Whitewater River which rises in the northern part of Union Township, flows southeast through Whitewater Township, and enters Cape Girardeau County where it joins Whitewater River from which it is named, near Bufordville in Kinder Township. (County Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lixville
Description:A village in the northeastern part of Whitewater Township established in 1897 and named for Louis W. Lix (1868- ), who was the first postmaster. The pioneer was Henry Lix, a German, who became a United States citizen in 1846. (Robbins, Dewitt, County Court Record (Cape Girardeau County)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Locust Grove Church
Description:A rural church in the eastern part of Lorance Township, so named because it is located in a grove of locust trees. (MARBLE HILL PRESS (1904)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lodge
Description:A small community in the western part of Lorance Township. Squire Minter had a post office there in 1886, but no one, not even his grandsons, can suggest the reason for the name. (Alexander, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lone Grove School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Scopus Township. The name is descriptive of the isolated woodland in which the school is located. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Long's Creek
Description:A small stream in the southern part of Union Township, near Patton, named for a Mr. Long who owns land there. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lorance Township
Description:Erected in 1824 in Cape Girardeau County, changed in 1848 when Liberty Township was cut off. This township became a part of Bollinger County in 1851 when the county was organized. It was named for John Lorance who settled on Crooked Creek in 1805. (Douglass I 163, 178, Butler)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Loyd
Description:A post office maintained from 1901-1904. J.H. Reagan was in business there in 1903. It was named for a prominent settler. (Dewitt, Postal Guide)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Lutesville
Description:A small town one-half mile from Marble Hill, the county seat, on the western side of Crooked Creek, a station on the Iron Mountain (now Missouri Pacific Railroad). It was laid out in 1860 by Eli Lutes, in whose honor it was named. Mr. Lutes offered the land for the station to the railroad provided the road was laid off on the western side of Crooked Creek instead of nearer the town of Marble Hill. This proposition was favorable to the officials because they would not have to bridge Crooked Creek so they accepted the offer. There is a local story to the effect that the woman who owned the land near Marble Hill, for which the officials were bargaining, asked such an exorbitant price that they declined to pay it and turned to Lutesville. Lutesville and Marble Hill are sometimes referred to as Twin Cities and Twin Cities Park lies between them on Crooked Creek. (Dewitt, Yount, Jones, Butler, Mrs. Alice (Lutes) B.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Malone's Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Liberty Township, named for the Malone family. (Wiggs, Campbell (1874), County Map (1906)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marble Hill
Description:The county seat of Bollinger County, in the east-central part of Lorance Township. In March, 1851, Thomas Hamilton laid off a town near Crooked Creek and called it New California, doubtless a reference to the popularity of California at that time just after the discovery of gold. In December of the same year David Ramsey, Isaac Shepherd (or Sheppard), and J.J. Daugherty, commissioners appointed to select a county seat, chose this place and changed the name to Dallas. The significance of this choice is not known. When a post office was applied for, Dallas was preempted by a town in Greene County, and for several years this place was known as Dallas (Greene post office). Who suggested the name Greene we do not know; doubtless when post office authorities informed the citizens that Dallas existed in Greene County, they reversed the names and offered Greene as a possible appellation. It was quite inconvenient to have two names for the same place, and between 1868-1873 Marble Hill was submitted. The name Marble Hill, it is generally conceded, was chosen because of the mistaken belief that the hill on which the town was built was composed of marble. Actually, geologists have discovered, the hill is "a large block of coarsely crystalline white Kimmswick limestone which...because of its purity and crystallinity was called marble." So far as can be ascertained from the people living there now no quarrying operation was ever undertaken, and Mr. Hopkins, student of local history and geography, believes that the name Marble Hill referred, not to a possible vein of marble, but to the rounded tops (resembling marbles) of the hills in that vicinity. Turkey Hill (q.v.) nearby and the hill on which the town is located were thus shaped. Others feel that it was just an impressive name chosen for its dignified sound, but the belief that marble existed there is the most logical of the theories advanced. The town has been handicapped in growth by the absence of a railroad and the proximity of Lutesville (q.v.). (Jones, Hopkins, Conard, Douglass I 280, 313, Hayward, Campbell, Goodwin, Heller)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Marble Hill Baptist Church
Description:The First Baptist Church of Marble Hill was organized in 1840 on Hog Creek by B. Clark and Moses Bailey. The first members, eight in number, gave the ideal name New Hope to the church. The congregation divided after a few years and part of the congregation met on Crooked Creek at the home of Joseph Slinkard. In 1851 they moved to Marble Hill where the church took the name of the town. (Goodspeed 558-59, Minutes St. Francois Assn.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mayfield
Description:A small village in the central part of Scopus Township, named by Dr. W.H. Mayfield, who established the post office in 1886. Dr. Mayfield was responsible for the Mayfield Sanitarium in St. Louis, for Will Mayfield College at Marble Hill (this county), and his family had settled Mayfield, Kentucky, on their way from North Carolina to Missouri. (Douglass I 372, 1073, Truman Mayfield, Dewitt, HIST. OF WILL MAYFIELD COLLEGE)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mayfield Creek
Description:A small creek in the southern part of Scopus Township, named for the Mayfield family who lived here. (Cooper, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mayfield-Smith Academy
Description:See Will Mayfield College.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:McKelvey School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Lorance Township, named for Elijah (lige) McKelvey. This school is often referred to as the Flatwoods (q.v.) School by the people of the community. (Tallent, Cooper (McKelvey's grandson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mingo Bottoms
Description:A low or swampy place in the southern part of Wayne Township (extending into Wayne and Stoddard Counties). It was named for Chief Paye Mingo (Piomingo) of the Chicacha tribe. Hodge says Mingo is from the Algonquian mingew "stealthy, treacherous," and is a name applied in various forms by the Delawares and affiliated tribes, to the Iroquois and Cognate tribes. (Houck II 189, Houck's SPANISH REGIME II, 112, Bennett, Hodge)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mingo Swamp
Description:A large swamp in the southeastern part of Jefferson Township. Cf. Mingo Bottoms, Bollinger County.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Railroad
Description:In 1849 the Pacific Railroad was chartered and so named because of the intention of the company to reach the west coast. On July 4, 1851, Mayor Luther M. Kennett of St. Louis turned the first spadeful of dirt for the construction of Missouri's first railroad. The first iron for the rails arrived in 1852. Thomas Allen began serving as president of the company in 1850. By 1853 the road had been constructed as far as the Pacific. In 1860 financial difficulties increased and the State Government seized the railroad. During General Price's raid in 1864 great strips of the Pacific Railroad were destroyed. The road was leased to the Atlantic and Pacific Company in 1872, sold at public auction to Andrew Pierce, Jr. September 6, 1876, sold to St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company two days later; sold to L.K. Garrison and reorganized as the Missouri Pacific and became, in 1879, a part of the Jay Gould system. On March 3, 1851, the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad was incorporated, the name indicating the purpose of building a road from St. Louis to Iron Mountain or Pilot Knob. The privilege of extending the road to the Mississippi River at Cape Girardeau or any other point south thereof was also granted. Preliminary surveys were made in 1852. By 1856 only twelve miles of the road had been built, but by 1858 it had reached Pilot Knob. In 1866 the state planned to sell the railroad, but since bids did not cover the indebtedness, the commissioners purchased it. After some difficulties and public protests in 1868 the road went to Thomas Allen, who had resigned as president of the (Missouri) Pacific Railroad in 1854. Already in 1854 J.H. Morley, civil engineer for the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad, had surveyed the 119 mile line from Bismarck in St. Francois County to Belmont in Mississippi County, a line passing through Madison, Bollinger, and Cape Girardeau Counties. Construction was started from both the Bismarck and Belmont ends of the line; and at midnight August 14, 1869, the two parts of the line were brought together in the middle of the Bollinger County Tunnel. It was opened for travel August 19, 1869. In 1880 the Missouri Pacific acquired the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad by purchase, and it has since been known by that name. The branch of the St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad which extended from Bismarck to Belmont on the Mississippi River is known as the Belmont Branch, from its terminal. (Thornton, Douglass I 499, thesis by Fitzsimmon (1931), MISSOURI & MISSOURIANS I 765- 6)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Mount Carmel Church
Description:A rural church in the western part of Crooked Creek Township, named by the founders for the mountain of Canaan, a very beautiful and productive mountain. The church was first organized in Green Schoolhouse in June, 1869. (MARBLE HILL PRESS (1904), Bible, Tong)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Myers School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Wayne Township, named for Frank Myers, who gave the land for the school. (Myers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New California
Description:See Marble Hill.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Hope Church [1 of 2]
Description:See Marble Hill Baptist Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Hope Church [2 of 2]
Description:A pioneer Baptist Church in the western part of Wayne Township, long disbanded, organized in 1838 by Elder W. Settle, who gave it this common idealistic name. (Goodspeed 558-59, Murray)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:New Salem Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church on Hurricane Creek in the northern part of Lorance Township, six miles north of Marble Hill. It was organized in 1855 by Monroe Robbins and Rev. T.A. Bowman. This is a common church name, a shortened form of Jerusalem. It was called New Salem doubtless in distinction from the far older Salem Church (q.v.) nearby. (Goodspeed 558-59, Minutes of St. Francois Assn., Murray, Tong)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:North Patton School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Union Township. The school was once the Shirley School and is named for Dr. J.M. Shirley and is so called by many people of the community, but the offical name of the school is North Patton, from its location north of Patton (q.v.). (Tallent, MARBLE HILL PRESS (1900-1904)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Oak Mound School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Lorance Township, named for the oak trees growing on the rounded hill or mound on which the school is located. (Robbins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:O'Possum Creek School
Description:See Possum Creek School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pacific Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Palmore Church
Description:A rural church in the central part of Lorance Township, existing in 1904. The name is that of one of the prominent members of the church when it was founded. (MARBLE HILL PRESS (1904)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Panther Creek
Description:A small creek in the eastern part of Scopus Township, named for the panthers which the early hunters noted there. The name was usually pronounced _____ by the pioneer hunters, and is still so pronounced by some people of the county. It flows into Little Whitewater Creek in the southwestern part of Whitewater Township in Cape Girardeau County. (Tallent, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Panther Creek
Description:See Bollinger County.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Passover Church
Description:A rural church in the eastern part of Liberty Township, named by the founders for the Jewish institution, the Passover or Feast of Unleavened Bread, which is significant to Christians for its connection with Christ's Last Supper. (MARBLE HILL PRESS (1901- 1904), Bible (Luke 2:41, Jn. 18:28)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Patterson School
Description:A rural school in the central part of Fillmore Township, named for William Patterson, who came here from Indiana and was one of the prominent citizens of the community. (Myers, Cooper, Shell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Patton
Description:A small village established in the southeastern part of Union Township. A post office was established in 1874 and named for the Patton family. J.J. and Harvey Patton were prominent members of the family. However, Mr. Yount says that Bob Drum tells the story that this community had a dancing place in pioneer days, at which the people danced long after the fiddlers were exhausted by patting hands. The expression "keep a pattin'" was used so often that the place was named Patton. (Robbins, Yount)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perkins Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A post office in the northwestern part of Wayne Township, maintained from 1854-1868, and named for Perkins Creek (q.v.) on which it was located. (Hayward, Goodwin)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Perkins Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A large creek in the southern part of Fillmore Township and the northern part of Wayne Township. Perkins Creek is mentioned in all of the early gazetteers of Missouri. It was named for Peter Perkins, pioneer farmer. (Shell, Hobs, Hayward, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pine Hill School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Union Township, so named because it is located in a region where scrub pine trees grow on the hills. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pine Union School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Crooked Creek Township, originally built in Union Township, named for the township and the pine trees (scrub) growing there. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pleasant Hill Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the southern part of Liberty Township on the edge of Mingo Swamp, organized in 1883-1884 by Rev. Levi W. Revelle and others. It is no longer in existence. The name is one of approbation and description. (Tong, Monks 235)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pond Creek
Description:A small creek in the northwestern part of Wayne Township, originating in a pond, or small lake, from which it is named, and emptying into Castor River. (County Map (1940), Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pond Creek Church
Description:A rural church in the northern part of Wayne Township, named from the creek. Cf. above. (Robbins, Myers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pond Creek School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Wayne Township, named from Pond Creek on which it is located. (Myers, Robbins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Possum Creek
Description:A small creek in the southern part of Lorance Township, named for the animal common in this region, the opossum, better known as the possum. (Myers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Possum Creek School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Lorance Township, located on Possum Creek (q.v.), for which it is named. The name is sometimes written O'Possum, but most of the people of the county use the shortened form Possum. There is of course no justification for using an apostrophe in the name. (Myers, Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Pound School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Fillmore Township, named for Thomas Pound, a prominent citizen of the community. (Myers, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Precinct
Description:A post office in the western part of Union Township maintained in 1904. The postmaster was Dr. Mathias M. Reagan, who practiced medicine in the county many years and owned a large farm near Patton. This name, suggests that a voting precinct was set up here and the word used as the post office name.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Probst School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Whitewater Township, named for W.A. Probst, a prominent landowner. (Robbins, Tallen, MARBLE HILL PRESS (1900-1904)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Prospect School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Lorance Township. The name was probably descriptive of the situation.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Punch River Creek
Description:A stream in the western part of Crooked Creek Township. The name probably indicates a situation similar to Rum Branch (q.v.), in Cape Girardeau County, or it may have been suggested by Drunken Branch (q.v.) in Bollinger County. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Reagan Branch
Description:A branch of Crooked Creek in the western part of Crooked Creek Township, named for Dr. Mathias M. Reagan who owned land there, practiced medicine in the county many years, and was a public spirited citizen. (County Map 1906, County Court Record, Douglass)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Revelle School
Description:A rural school in the southeastern part of Lorance Township, named for John W. Revelle, who taught school there when the name was given, and was later circuit court clerk and superintendent of public schools in 1872 and 1874. (Myers)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Richardson
Description:A railroad stop on the Zahma Branch of the Frisco Railroad (now discontinued) for the Richardson sawmill, and so named for the Richardson family. There is only a farm there now. (Dewitt, Murray)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rocky Creek
Description:A small creek crossing in the west-central part of Wayne Township and entering Wayne County where it empties into Lost Creek. It is named from the rocks through which it flows. (Wiggs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Roe School
Description:A rural school in the south-central part of Whitewater Township, named for J.M. and David C. Roe, prominent landowners. (Tallent, MARBLE HILL PRESS (1900-1902)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rose
Description:A post office in the southeastern part of Lorance Township maintained in 1893 for a sawmill camp belonging to Walker Rose, and named for him. (Postal Guide, Shell, Murray)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Rose Bud School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Union Township, located in a region of poor, thin soil where many wild roses grow. The founders of the school named it Rose Bud because of these roses. They still grow in profusion there. (Dewitt, Slover)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:S.M. and A. Railroad
Description:See St. Louis San Francisco Railroad (Southwestern Branch)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Salem Church
Description:A rural Baptist Church in the southwestern part of Lorance Township, organized in 1814 by S. Winingham. Cf. New Salem Church. (Goodspeed 558-59)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sank
Description:A small settlement in the south-central part of Liberty Township. Jasper Cooper owned a store there and applied for a post office in 1915. He chose the name Sank because it was the nickname of a friend and prominent man of the community, "Sank" Fowler. (Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scheperville
Description:A post office in the central part of Liberty Township maintained from 1886-1902. Doubtless named for an early settler. (Postal Guide; Road Guide (1912)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Schlatitz School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Liberty Township, named for a German merchant and landowner, F.O. Schlatitz. A post office was maintained in this community from 1908-1910, but now is only a rural school and community. (Myers, Robbins, Tallent, Hosenfeld, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scopus
Description:A village in the southern part of Scopus Township, established in 1897 and named by Rev. George W. Tallent, whose grandson says he "named it from the Bible." Scopus is from a Greek word "skopes," a watcher; one that watches. Perhaps the minister meant the name as a shortened form of "episcopus," bishop. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scopus Township
Description:One of the original townships of Cape Girardeau County organized in 1807; it extended from the district line south to Big Swamp and Whitewater River to Turkey Creek and was named German Township for the large number of German settlers who came in the 1800s. This township included the present Bollinger and Madison Counties. In 1851 when Bollinger County was organized, the name of the original township was given to the eastern part of the new county. The name was changed to Scopus Township in 1918. Mr. Frank Hopkins says it came about thus: He was conducting a Liberty Bond Sale at Scopus and prefaced his talk with the words, "The quota for German Township is $--; by the way, I don't like that word German." From all over the house came cries, "Neither do we." Then Mr. Hopkins suggested that the assembly vote to ask the county court to change the name. The vote was unanimous; the substitute name presented was Scopus, the place at which the meeting was held. The County Court Record does not reveal this change, but in 1919 the name is Scopus Township. (Douglass I 163, 249, County Court Record, Hopkins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Scott School
Description:See Glennon School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seabaugh School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Scopus Township, named for the Seabaugh family, long prominent in the community and civic affairs in the county. In 1800 the paternal grandfather came to Bollinger County from North Carolina. Reuben Seabaugh and his three brothers continued to live there and their descendants are there now, Joseph and Allen Seabaugh being prominent in 1910. (Tallent, Douglass II 1254)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sedgewickville
Description:In the southern part of Whitewater Township. The first settlement here was called Smithville in honor of Dr. H.J. Smith, and was the site of Smith or Mayfield-Smith Academy (see Will Mayfield College). The Academy was moved to Marble Hill in 1880, the town was renamed and incorporated as Sedgewickville in honor of the Sedgewick family in 1892. (Robbins, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Seiler School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Liberty Township, named for Joe Seiler, landowner. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shirley School
Description:See North Patton School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shrawn Creek
Description:A small stream in the northern part of Whitewater Township, flowing into Whitewater River near Alliance, named for the landowner on whose farm the creek is located. (Highway Map, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Shrum
Description:A small village in the southeastern part of Crooked Creek Township which was established in 1900 and named for Nicholas Shrum, a landowner. J.H. Shrum was one of the early merchants of Shrum. (Robbins, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sitzes Store
Description:A rural store and community center in the west-central part of Fillmore Township where Joseph and Wade Sitze were merchants. (County Map (1906), MARBLE HILL PRESS (1900-1904)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Slagle Creek
Description:A small stream in Wayne Township, which was named for J.A. Slagle, pioneer farmer of this community. (MARBLE HILL PRESS (1900- 1904), County Map (1906), Goodspeed)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Smith School
Description:A rural school in the south-central part of Union Township, named for the Smith family, many prominent members of which still live there. (Slover, Statler)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Smithville
Description:See Sedgewickville.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snake Bluff
Description:A bluff in the southwestern part of Wayne Township, where large numbers of rattlesnakes were found. It is said that hunters came down from St. Louis to this spot for the sport of killing the rattlers. (Conrad, Tallent, Robbins, Ladd)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Snake Bluff School
Description:A rural school in the southwestern part of Wayne Township, named from Snake Bluff, near which it is located. (Conrad, Tallent, Ladd)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:South Liberty School
Description:A rural school in the northern part of Union Township, organized about 1915. The term "south" indicates that there was once a Liberty School north of this one, but that school is not known to the present residents. (Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Anthony's Church
Description:The Catholic church in Glennon dedicated in 1928 to St. Anthony. St. Anthony of Padua (1195-2131) was a Franciscan monk and the patron saint of Padua and Portugal. His feast day is June 13. (Hosenfeld)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. John's Church
Description:The Catholic church of Leopold (q.v.), established in 1861 by Father John Luytelaar, and named for his patron saint, the Apostle. (Goodspeed 524-29, Hosenfeld)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. John's School
Description:See Leopold School.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis Iron Mountain Railroad
Description:See Missouri Pacific Railroad.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:St. Louis San Francisco Railroad (Southwestern Branch)
Description:This branch of the St. Louis San Francisco Railroad joins the main line (St. Louis to Memphis) at Cape Girardeau and extends in a southwesterly direction through Cape Girardeau, Bollinger, and Wayne Counties, and on to Hoxie, Arkansas. The first name applied to the railroad was Cape Girardeau and Southwestern Railroad, from its direction. It was built by Louis Houck and was completed to Williamsville in Wayne County in 1886. From Williamsville the road extends through Butler and Ripley Counties and on to Hoxie, Arkansas. This part of the road is called South Missouri and Arkansas Railroad (S.M. and A.). The civil engineer for the road, which was completed in 1880, was Charles McCray. It was a part of the Louis Houck enterprise. (Julian, Wilkinson)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Starkey Branch
Description:A small stream which enters Marquand Township from Bollinger County, running into Castor River at Marquand. It is named for a family who own land on the creek. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Starrs
Description:A sawmill camp and railroad stop on the Missouri Pacific Railroad in 1908, named for the mill owner, a Mr. Starr. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Stepp School
Description:A rural school in the southern part of Wayne Township, named for Jim Stepp, a prominent landowner in the community. (Myers, Ladd)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sturdivant
Description:A small village in the southern part of Wayne Township. Emanuel Kinder was born there in 1840. It was laid out in 1869 when the railroad was built by Louis Houck and named by him to honor his friend Robert Sturdivant (1817-1906), who organized the Sturdivant Bank of Cape Girardeau in 1882 and doubtless helped Houck financially in building the railroad. (Douglass I 510, Giboney Houck, Dewitt, Houck's M. SKETCHES 61-72)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sumac
Description:An early settlement in the northeastern part of Fillmore Township, existing in 1873. It was not permanent. The name is that of a familiar shrub sumac or sumach (Rhus glabrum), a native growth in the county. (Dewitt, Campbell (1873)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Summer's Creek
Description:A small stream in the western part of Crooked Creek Township, named for the Summers family, who own land there. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sylvan Ridge
Description:A ridge or elevation in the western part of Liberty Township, named by some classical settler who called this wooded ridge Sylvan from the Latin word "silva," forest. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sylvan Ridge Church
Description:A General Baptist Church originally a Missionary Baptist church in the western part of Liberty Township, in the Sylvan Ridge community. Doubtless some early settler, a classical scholar, gave the church this Latin name signifying the forest in which the church was built. (Dewitt, Murray, Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Sylvan School
Description:A rural school in the western part of Liberty Township, also called Sylvan Ridge. It is located near Sylvan Ridge Church (q.v.) from which it is named. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tallent
Description:A small village in the northern part of Crooked Creek Township. A post office was established here in 1902 and named for Rev. George W. Tallent (1828-1904), a minister and school commissioner, who named Scopus. The post office was discontinued in 1934. (Postal Guide, Douglass I 372, Tallent)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Thornburg School
Description:A rural school in the eastern part of Lorance Township, named for C.M. Thornburg, large landowner who served as sheriff of the county at one time. (Tallent, MARBLE HILL PRESS (1900-1904)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Tip Top School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Whitewater Township, which is located on a high hill, the highest or "tip top" elevation in the community. (Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trace Creek
Description:A small creek which begins in the western part of Lorance Township, flows across the southeast corner of Madison County, and then to the western part of Fillmore Township and empties into Castor River in Wayne County. Like the larger Trace Creek in Madison County it is believed to have been named from an old Indian trail or trace. (Dewitt, Wiggs, McDonald)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trace Creek School
Description:A rural school in the northwestern part of Lorance Township, named from Trace Creek (q.v.) near which it is located. (Dewitt, Tallent, Robbins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Trowel
Description:A post office in the northeastern part of Wayne Township, maintained from 1908 until 1917. It was established by a number of citizens of the community who belonged to the Masonic Lodge of Marble Hill and named by them for the well-known masonic emblem, the trowel. (Postal Guide, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek
Description:A large creek which rises in the northern part of Cedar Creek Township, flows southeast through Cowan Township, enters Bollinger County, continues to flow southeast and empties into Castor River. It was named by the pioneer hunters who found an abundance of wild turkeys along the stream. On the Hevenor Map it appears as Jackey Creek, but according to informants in the counties this is a map maker's error. (Ward, Duncan, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek [1 of 2]
Description:A post office maintained from 1915 until 1922 on Turkey Creek (q.v.), from which it is named, in the western part of Wayne Township, doubtless for a sawmill camp which was temporary. (Postal Guide, Dewitt)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A branch of Bear Creek in Wayne County. Turkey Creek is in the western part of Wayne Township and named for the wild turkeys which the old hunters found here. (Dewitt, Wiggs)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Creek Church
Description:See Dry Creek Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turkey Hill
Description:The highest hill in the county located in the central part of Lorance Township, and named by the early hunters because of the abundance of turkeys there. (Dewitt, Robbins)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Turtle Creek Church
Description:See Dry Creek Church.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Twin Cities
Description:See Lutesville.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Twin City Park
Description:A park located on Crooked Creek in the east-central part of Lorance Township between the towns of Marble Hill and Lutesville (q.v.) sometimes known as Twin Cities, hence the park name. (Jones)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Unica River
Description:See Whitewater River.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Church
Description:An early church built by several denominations to be used alternately and hence called Union Church. It was in the northeastern part of Lorance Township. Union Ridge School, built later, was named for the church. (Shell, Murray, MARBLE HILL PRESS (1900- 1904)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Ridge School
Description:A rural school in the northeastern part of Lorance Township, named from Union Church (q.v.) built on the natural elevation or ridge. (Shell, Murray)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Union Township
Description:In the northwestern corner of the county. Erected in 1848 when the system of townships was revised in Cape Girardeau County. This section became a part of Bollinger County in 1851. Its boundaries were changed in 1872 when Whitewater Township was created. An ideal name. (Douglass I 163)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Vinemount
Description:See Leopold.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Virgin Creek
Description:See Hawker Creek.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Virginia Warrior's Path
Description:See Warrior's Path.
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wash Creek
Description:A small stream which enters eastern Marquand Township from Bollinger County and runs into Castor River at Marquand. The name doubtless refers to the "wash" or low swamp from which the creek flows. (Highway Map)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wayne Township
Description:In the southern part of the county, organized in 1851 and so named because it was part of Wayne County (q.v.), or the "State of Wayne," before Bollinger County was organized in 1851. (County Court Record, Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Whitewater Township
Description:In the northeastern part of the county, created in 1872 by dividing Union Township. It was named for Whitewater River (q.v.) in Cape Girardeau County. Little Whitewater flows through this township. (Douglass I 163, County Court Record)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Will Mayfield College
Description:Formerly a junior college under the auspices of the Baptist Church, located in Marble Hill until it was disbanded in 1930. It began in 1878 as Mayfield-Smith Academy in Southville (now Sedgewickville) and was named for its founders Dr. William H. Mayfield, who also founded Mayfield Sanatarium in St. Louis, and Dr. H.J. Smith. In 1880 the school was moved to Marble Hill and in 1903 renamed Will Mayfield College in honor of Dr. Mayfield's son Will who had died in 1902. (MARBLE HILL PRESS (1903) HIST. OF MISSOURI BAPTISTS 512-15, Douglass I 419, 572, WILL MAYFIELD C. HIST.)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Wolf Creek
Description:A small stream in the southeastern part of Whitewater Township, known to the hunters and named by them before 1874 for the wolves which frequented this region. (Dewitt, Wiggs, Campbell)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Woodlawn School
Description:A rural school in the south-central part of Wayne Township. It was given this descriptive name because of the smooth, level appearance of the schoolground where a few lovely trees (wood) grew. (Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zalma
Description:A village in the northern part of Wayne Township, the terminus of a branch of the St. Louis San Francisco Railroad. The second settlement in the county, made in 1800 on Castor River by Irvin Asherbramer was located here. Asherbramer erected a watermill which was later purchased by one of the Bollingers and called Bollinger's Mill. A post office was maintained under that name from 1886 until 1890. When Louis Houck built the railroad, he suggested the name Zalma for Zalma Block, a friend in Cape Girardeau who was well known to the people of Bollinger County; and his suggestion was adopted, the post office name being changed in 1891. (Postal Guide, Hopkins, Houck's MEMORIAL SKETCHES 45-49)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

Place name:Zephyr
Description:A post office maintained in 1910 in the northern part of Wayne Township. Mr. Cooper says, "Old man Lloyd gave the name." (Cooper)
Source:Hamlett, Mayme L. "Place Names Of Six Southeast Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1938.

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