Benton County Place Names, 1928-1945

Place name:Alexander Township
Description:In the southwest corner of the county, bounded on the north by Lindsey Township, on the east by Fristoe Township and the Pomme de Terre River, on the south by Hickory County and on the west by St. Clair County. Organized February 13, 1838, comprising what is now Alexander and Tom Townships and the west side of Fristoe Township. It was taken out of the earlier Montgomery Township, to which it left only what is now the northwest corner of Hickory County. From 1873 to 1876 it was known as Alexandria Township, then reverted to Alexander Township. Named after Judge George Alexander, who settled on Turkey Creek in 1832. He was then on the County Court Bench. (HIST. BENTON 1889, 465; Lay 1876, 33; Dr. R.L. Ramsay; HIST. BENTON 1912, 27; R.M. 1939, 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Alexander's Mills
Description:A post office in southwest Alexander Township, from 1862 to 1868. Named for the old mill established in 1862 by Judge George Alexander, one of the first settlers in the county. He came from Kentucky and settled on Turkey Creek in 1832. He was elected county judge in 1836, and served until 1844. (Goodwin (1867-1868) 45; Lay (1876), 17; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Allen School
Description:Located in the northeast part of Tom Township. Named for a landowner in the district. (J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Antioch School
Description:A school in the south-central part of Union Township. Named from Antioch Church in Hickory County. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Archer Creek
Description:In eastern Cole Township, a western branch of Big Buffalo Creek. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Avery
Description:A village on the borderline between Benton and Hickory Counties, and partly in both counties. It has had a post office since 1891. Henry Avery was one of the commissioners appointed by the General Assembly of Missouri in 1837 to select a county seat for Benton County. (Postal Guide; HIST. BENTON (1889) 468; Polk's GAZ., (1891-92) 147; HIST. HICKORY (1907) 50; R.M. (1939) 226; J.R. Boring; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Avery
Description:A village on the border line between Benton and Hickory Counties, and partly in both counties. It has had a post office since 1891. Henry Avery was one of the commissioners appointed by the General Assembly of Missouri in 1837 to select a county seat for Benton County. (Postal Guide; HIST. BENTON (1889) 468; Polk's GAZ. (1891-92) 147; HIST. HICK. (1907) 50; R.M. (1939) 226; J.R. Boring; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Avery School
Description:A school in the southeast part of Alexander Township. Named for the town. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Balke Prairie School
Description:A school in the east-central part of Williams Township. Named for a family who owned land on this prairie. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ballou's Branch
Description:A small branch, four miles long, in the southern part of Lindsey Township, emptying into the Osage River. Named for D.C. Ballou, who called out the state militia during the Turk-Jones feud, beginning in 1840. He was also judge of the circuit court, 1859. He was the first surveyor (1840-44) and the first resident attorney of the county. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 455; 486, 491, 526)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Barber Hollow
Description:In northwest Lindsey Township, leading east into Little Tebo Creek. Possibly a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Barker's Creek
Description:Rises in the southwest corner of Pettis County and flows across the northwest corner of Benton County into Henry County, where it empties into Tebo Creek. Named for Dick Barker, an early settler, about 1830-1833, near its mouth in Henry County. (Lay (1876) 22; Miss Johnson's thesis; History of Benton (1876) 17; History of Benton (1889) 456; Conard (1901); Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Baugh School
Description:A school in the northwest part of Lindsey Township. Named for the owner of the land on which it is located. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Beaver Creek
Description:See Knobby Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Benton County
Description:In the west-central part of Missouri, bounded on the north by Pettis County, on the east by Morgan and Camden Counties, on the south by Hickory County, and on the west by St. Clair and Henry Counties. Organized January 3, 1835, out of parts of Pettis and Greene Counties. Until 1845 Benton included the present Hickory County north of T. 36, and an additional 216 sq. mi. in its northwest corner, between Windsor and Ionia, now in Pettis County. Between 1835 and 1841 it also included a part of the present Camden County, south of the Osage River and west of the Big Niangua. Named for the distinguished Missouri statesman Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858), U.S. Senator 1821-1851. In 1835 he was at the height of his popularity and influence. Counties in seven other states, and more than thirty towns and villages, have been named for Senator Benton. (Campbell (1873) 11; Eaton (1917); Garnett; Dict. Am. Biog. (1930); Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bentonville
Description:A post office since 1891; in the southwest part of Alexander Township. Eaton says it was named for Senator Benton; but its late date makes it more likely that it took its name from the county. (Postal Guide; Eaton (1917) 209; R.M. (1939) 226; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bethel Church
Description:A Christian Church on Little Tebo Creek, organized June 24, 1842, discontinued by 1861. A Bible name: the site of Jacob's dream (Gen. 28:19), the name signifying "House of God." (HIST. BENTON (1876) 68)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Buffalo School
Description:A school in the northeast part of Cole Township. Named for the animal, which used to be common here. (School Directory (1938- 39); J.R. Boring; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Deer Creek
Description:A creek which rises in Jordan Township in Hickory County, flowing north and east through Union Township in Benton County into the Osage River. Named for the animal, plentiful here in early days, and called "Big" to distinguish it from its tributary Little Deer Creek (q.v.). (Campbell (1873) 23)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Pomme de Terre River
Description:See Pomme de Terre River.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Spring
Description:A medicinal spring near Cole Camp. The name is descriptive. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 459; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Tebo Creek
Description:See Tebo Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Big Turkey Creek
Description:See Turkey Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bird Branch
Description:In northeast Lindsey Township, running east into Cole Township where it joins Dureu Creek. Named for a local family. (Highway Map; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bird School
Description:Located in the southeast part of Alexander Township. Probably took its name from Bird Branch. (J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bishop's Store
Description:A former village in the southern part of Alexander Township, which grew up around a trading store for the Indians kept in 1832 by Thomas J. Bishop, later the first County and Circuit Court Clerk. The store was discontinued in 1837 or 1838, when the Indians left. The community had a post office from 1860-1868. The post was originally established by John F. Hogle, an Indian agent for the United States government, and a Frenchman named Narcisse Pensineau, at the mouth of Hogle's Creek, where they found the largest Indian village. It was then known as Hogle's Trading Post, and was the first white settlement in Benton County (S. & M. (1860) 20; Goodwin (1867-1868) 45; Postal Guide; Campbell (1873) 23; HIST. BENTON (1876) 15, 25; HIST. BENTON (1889) 464; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Black Sulphur Springs
Description:Six medicinal springs; five miles north of Warsaw, on the Osage River. A noted resort before 1861. There are indications of sulphur in the mineral springs of this locality. Cf. White Sulphur Spring, which is nearby. Possibly the name of Black was given to the springs to distinguish them from the White Sulphur Springs. Campbell refers to these in 1874 as the Clark Sulphur Springs, named evidently for an early landowner. (Campbell (1874) 60; HIST. BENTON (1889) 458; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blaine
Description:A post office in 1892; now disappeared and could not be located. Probably named for Senator James Gillespie Blaine (1830-1893), distinguished statesman and leader of the Republican party. In 1892 he had just completed his second term as Secretary of State. A mountain in Colorado, three counties, in Idaho, Nebraska, and Oklahoma, and at least twenty towns and villages have been named for him. (Postal Guide; Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bledsoe's Landing
Description:Located where the old military road from Palmyra to Springfield crossed the Osage River, one and a half miles above Warsaw. Established in the fall of 1831; by Lewis Bledsoe, for whom it was named. It was also known as Osage, doubtless for the river, as New Town or Log Town, descriptive names, and apparently as Bristoe's Town, which may be a misprint in Lay's history for Bledsoe's Town. Lay describes it in 1837, when it was a formidable but unsuccessful rival with Warsaw (q.v.) for the county seat, as being a little town with a few stores. The Settlement was still there as late as 1855. (Wetmore (1837) 39; Parker (1867) 188; HIST. BENTON (1876) 36, 464; HIST. BENTON (1889) 468, 499; Lay's HIST. BENTON (1912) 11, 30; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Blue Branch
Description:In southeast Lindsey Township, running north into the Osage River. It has a North Fork and a South Fork. Probably named from the color of the water. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeschen's Store
Description:See Boeschenville.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boeschenville
Description:A post office from 1876-1900; in the northeast part of the county, on Haw Creek. Named for two early settlers on Haw Creek, John and Gesche Boeschen. First called Boeschen's Store. (Postal Guide; HIST. BENTON (1889) 512; HIST. BENTON (1876) 17)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bohrenburg School
Description:A school in the central part of Williams Township. Named for an early landowner. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boone Branch
Description:In northern Union Township; a branch of Mossy Creek. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Box School
Description:A school in the west-central part of Fristoe Township. Named for a landowner in the district. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boyler's Mill [1 of 2]
Description:A post office from 1867-1868. On the northeast border of Cole Township. Later removed across the border into Morgan County; see below. Probably the name of the early proprietor. (Goodwin (1867-8) 45)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Boyler's Mill [2 of 2]
Description:A post office from 1874, 1876-1921; sixteen miles southwest of Versailles; in the northwest corner of Buffalo Township. Named for the owner James Byler. The name was changed by the post office department in naming the post office. A water flour mill was located here. Spelled Byler's in Hayward's Gazetteer in 1853. (Hayward (1853); Campbell (1874); HIST. (1889) 435; Atlas Morgan (1905); Postal Guide; Eaton (1917) 334)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brandon
Description:A post office from 1910-1933; near the northern border of White Township. Named for a prominent landowner on whose land the town was laid out. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1939) 226; E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brauersville
Description:A post office from 1886-1897; a small village in Union Township. Named for Frederick Brauer (b. about 1826) who served as its postmaster for eight years. (Postal Guide)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brickley Hollow
Description:In central Cole Township, leading southwest into Cole Camp Creek. A family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brill's Hill
Description:A scenic hill along the shore of the Lake of the Ozarks. Named for an early landowner, Charles Brill, who was a Union soldier in the War of 1861. (Campbell (1889) 494; Walmsley (1932) 270)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Bristoe's Town
Description:See Bledsoe's Landing.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brush Creek
Description:Rises in the northwest corner of the county, flowing southwest into Henry County, and into Tebo Creek, near the boundary of the two counties. Named from the thick growth of brush along its banks. (Parker (1865) Map; HIST. BENTON (1886) 456; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Brushy Creek
Description:In eastern Cole Township, rising near Zora and running southwest into the Osage River near Lakeview Heights. Named from the brushy appearance of its banks. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buck Branch
Description:In central Union Township, running west into Big Deer Creek. Named for the animal, frequently seen by pioneers. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buckley Hollow
Description:In northern Union Township, leading west into Big Deer Creek. Probably named for an early landowner in the county. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Buffalo Creek
Description:See Big Buffalo Creek. (Campbell (1873) 23)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Byler Branch
Description:In central Cole Township, rising near Edmonson and running southwest into Cole Camp Creek. Likely a misspelling of Boyler, as Boyler's Mill (q.v.) is found in the same locality. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cantrell Hollow
Description:In northern Union Township, leading southwest into Big Deer Creek. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cardinal River
Description:See Turkey Creek
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cedar Grove Church
Description:A Baptist Church six miles southwest of Warsaw; organized in 1868. Many cedar trees form a grove here. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 518; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Centerview School
Description:A school in the central part of White Township. So named because of its location. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chapman
Description:A post office from 1887-1893; seven and a half miles east of Warsaw. Named for the man who gave the land for the town site. (Postal Guide; Polk's GAZ. (1891-92) 249; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cherry Dale School
Description:A school in the extreme northern part of Lindsey Township. Named for its location. Many wild cherry trees are found in the vicinity. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chicago Rock Island Route Railroad
Description:See Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Chicago, Rock Island and pacific Railroad
Description:A railroad that passes through the extreme southwest corner of Greenridge Township in Pettis County, running into Benton County through Brandon, Ionia, and east into Morgan County, passing through Stover, Versailles, and Pacific, leaving Morgan County through the south-central boundary, and crossing into Miller County. This railroad is also called the Chicago Rock Island Route Railroad and the Boonville-Versailles Railroad. It was authorized by a special act of the Illinois legislature in 1847 and was amended in 1851. Construction of the railroad began in Chicago in 1851, and reached the Mississippi River in 1854. Named for its termini. (Showalter (1929) 1; Highway Map; Enc. Brit.; E.J. Heerman)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clark Creek
Description:A small creek rising in the northwest part of White Township, and flowing south into Tebo Creek. Named for a family who owned land along its banks. (Parker (1865) Map; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clark Sulphur Springs
Description:See Black Sulphur Springs.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clear Creek
Description:Rises in the southwest part of White Township flowing south into Tebo Creek. Named from its clear water, because of a gravel bed. (Campbell (1873) 23; E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Clear Creek Church
Description:A Baptist Church on Clear Creek. Named for the creek on which it is situated. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 518; HIST. BENTON (1912) 129, 130)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cloverdale
Description:A village in the center of White Township. It had a post office in 1867-1868. A favorite name for places where there is a rich growth of clover; it is found in nine other states. (Goodwin (1867-8) 45; Campbell's (1873) 23; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Coal Camp Creek
Description:See Cole Camp Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cole Camp
Description:A post office since 1853; in the center part of Williams Township, on Cole Camp Creek. Laid out as a town in 1857. Named like Cole County, Missouri, for Captain Stephen Cole, a famous Indian fighter, who had camped on the creek. Houck says he was born in Virginia and came out to Missouri in 1807. He settled first on Loutre Island in what is now Montgomery County. About 1810 he became the first settler in what is now Cooper County, about one and a half miles east of Boonville. The same year he led the Americans in a famous Indian skirmish on Salt River, in which he was wounded. Cole's Fort, near Boonville, was erected under his leadership as a defense for the white settlers. After the War of 1812 he served as a member of the Missouri legislature. He was killed by Indians in 1822 on the banks of the Rio Grande, opposite El Paso. Houck says Captain Cole was a large, strong, uneducated frontiersman and a brave and skillful leader. (Hayward (1853); MISSOURI GAZ. (1860) 59; HIST. BENTON (1889) 509; Conard (1901) V. 3, 44; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI (1908) I. 182; Postal Guide; Eaton (1917) 209; R.M. (1939) 226; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cole Camp Creek
Description:Rises in the southern part of Williams Township, and flows south into the Osage River. Pike, on his 1806 map, calls this stream Francis River; his editor Coues says he has no idea where he got this name for it. Coues says it is variously called Vermillion, Coal Camp, or Cole Camp Creek. The name Vermillion, which seems to be an authentic variant, is used for Rivers in Illinois, Louisiana, Ohio, and South Dakota; Gannet says they are so named because of the red earth produced by the burning of the shale overlying the crop of coal. The variant spelling Coal (for Cole) Camp seems like a popular etymology also suggested by the presence of coal in the vicinity. Cole Camp, of course, was transferred from the town. (Campbell (1873) 23; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 377; Eaton (1917) 209; Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cole Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Williams Township, on the east by Morgan and Camden Counties, on the south by Union and Fristoe Townships, and on the west by Lindsey Township. It was one of the four original townships, organized February, 1835, but covered a much larger territory than at present, including all of what is now Cole and Union, the east side of Fristoe, and the northeast corner of Hickory County. Not until the creation of Union Township in 1840 out of the southern end of Cole was it reduced to its present boundaries. Named after Captain Stephen Cole, for whom see under Cole Camp, above. (HIST. BENTON (1912) 26; R.M. (1939) 226; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Concord School
Description:A school in Fristoe Township. An ideal name. A universal favorite for American schools, churches, and many towns and villages. (School Directory (1938-1939); Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Conley Branch
Description:In eastern Fristoe Township, running northeast into Turkey Creek. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cooney Creek
Description:In southeast Cole Township, running southeast into the Osage River. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Cooper School
Description:Located in the central part of Tom Township. A family name. (J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Corn Hill School
Description:A school in the northern part of Tom Township. There is much corn grown in this section. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crawfish Hollow
Description:In northeast Lindsey Township, leading southwest into Little Tebo Creek. Named for the crayfish that abound in the creek. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Crest
Description:A village in the eastern part of Williams Township. A station on the Chicago, Rhode Island and Pacific Railroad. It is on a high point of land. (R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Davis School
Description:A school in the southwest part of Union Township. Named for the original site. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Deep Creek
Description:See Little Tebo Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Deer Creek
Description:Rises in the northern part of Hickory County; flowing north into the Osage River. Large numbers of deer frequented this creek. (Williams (1904) 331; E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dell
Description:A village in the northern part of Fristoe Township, six miles south of Warsaw. It was originally given the fanciful complimentary name of Dell Delight, and had a post office by that name from 1876 to 1895. The name of the post office was shortened in 1895 to Dell, and so continued till 1910, when it was discontinued. (Postal Guide; HIST. BENTON (1889) 512; R.M. (1939); F.M. Brady; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dell Delight
Description:See Dell.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Dillon School
Description:A school in the northwest part of Cole Township. A family name. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ditler Branch
Description:In northern Lindsey Township, an eastern branch of Clear Creek. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Duck Creek [1 of 2]
Description:In northern Lindsey Township, an eastern branch of Clear Creek. This was once a favorite habitat of wild ducks. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 456; I; HIST. BENTON (1912) 69; F.M. Brady; Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Duck Creek [2 of 2]
Description:In White Township Barker's Creek flows into it. Cf. above. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 456; I; HIST. BENTON (1912), 69)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Duren Creek
Description:Rises in northeast Lindsey Township, and runs east into Cole Township to join Cole Camp Creek. Named in honor of Mannen Duren, who lived near its mouth. He built his first cabin here in February, 1831. He was a judge at the first election held in Lindsay Township. (I: HIST. BENTON (1876), 16; Campbell (1889) 464, 475; Eaton (1917) 210; Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Durham Hollow
Description:In northern Fristoe Township, running east into Turkey Creek, near its mouth. Possibly named for the Durham breed of cattle, originating in the county of Durham, England. Cf. Duroc, below. (Highway Map; Webster's DICT.)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Duroc
Description:A post office since 1858; on the southern side of the Osage River, in northern Union Township; organized May 14, 1847. Possibly named for the Duroc, or Duroc-Jersey, hog, a robust and sturdy breed of swine very popular in Missouri in early days. Cf. Holstein in Warren County, said to have been named for its Holstein cattle. The term Duroc is said by the Standard Dictionary to have been an arbitrary name given a boar after a famous stallion. (I: HAYWARD'S GAZ. (1853) 824; MISSOURI GAZ. (1860) 73; Parker (1867) 189; HIST. BENTON (1889) 512; R.M. (1939) 226; Postal Guide; Miss Harrison's thesis; E.H. Preuitt; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Duroe
Description:See Duroc.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Edmonson
Description:A post office from 1887-1915; in the northern part of Cole Township. A family name. (Postal Guide; Eaton (1917) 210; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Edmonson School
Description:A school in the northern part of Cole Township. So named for a family in the neighborhood. (School Directory (1938- 39)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Edwards
Description:A post office since 1886, on the western branch of Deer Creek, six miles southwest of Knobby. Named for an early settler who owned land in this vicinity. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 331; Eaton (1917) 210; R.M. (1939) 226; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Edwards School
Description:A school in the south-central part of Union Township. Named from the village. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Elk Creek
Description:See Flat Creek (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Evening Shade School
Description:A school in the eastern part of Fristoe Township. Named for its location. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fairfield
Description:A post office since 1853; on the Osage River; in the eastern part of Alexander Township; organized March 15, 1869, on the farms of two early settlers. A complimentary name widely used for places in good farming territory. There are more than twenty-five Fairfields in the United States. (Hayward (1853); MISSOURI GAZ. (1860) 79; HIST. BENTON (1889) 508; R.M. (1939) 226; Postal Guide; E.H. Preuitt; Dr. R.L. Ramsay; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fairfield School
Description:A school in the eastern part of Alexander Township. Named from the village. (School Directory (1938-39); E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fairview School
Description:A school in the west-central part of White Township. Cf. above. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fargo
Description:A post office from 1895-1901. Possibly named for William George Fargo (1818-1881), one of the founders of the Wells, Fargo Express Company organized in 1851, and mayor of Buffalo, New York, in 1862-1866. Fargo, North Dakota, was named for him, and so probably were the Fargos in Michigan, Texas, and Ontario. (Postal Guide; Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fargo School
Description:A school in the northwest part of Tom Township. Named from the former village. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Feaster Branch
Description:In western Cole Township, running south into the Osage River. Named for an early landowner. (Highway Map; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Feaster School
Description:A school in the southwest part of Cole Township. Named for the owner of the original site of the school. (School Directory (1938- 39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Flat Creek
Description:This stream is said to rise variously in the northern part of Benton County, or in Elk Fork Township of Pettis County. The discrepancy seems to arise from its two branches. The one that bears the name Flat Creek on most maps rises in Elk Fork Township, but a more southern branch rises in northeastern White Township of Benton County, flows north across the county line just west of Ionia into Washington Township of Pettis County, and joins the other branch on the border between Sedalia and Flat Creek Townships. This southern branch is marked on some maps as South Flat Creek (q.v.), and the part of it in Benton County, on the Highway Map, is apparently named Elk Creek (q.v.). The united stream flows east across Pettis County, through the southern part of Smithton Township into Morgan County, where it joins the Lamine River in western Richland Township. The name has been explained as descriptive of the bottom of the creek bed, which is very flat and wide. It seems more likely that it is either a translation of an earlier French name Riviere Platte, or at least influenced by the sense of the French adjective plat, i.e. "shallow." Two large rivers and a multitude of smaller streams were so named by the French pioneers, and this considerable tributary of their Riviere a la Mine may have been one of the number. (HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1079; HIST. BENTON (1912) 69; Map of Morgan; Highway Map; Gannett; E.H. Preuitt; Lee T. Sims; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Flat Rock Creek
Description:In eastern Cole Township; a western branch of Brushy Creek. Possibly named for the flat rocks found in the bed of the stream. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fleming Branch
Description:In northern Lindsey Township, a western branch of Little Tebo Creek. Possibly named for an early landowner in this vicinity. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fordney School
Description:A school in the southwest part of Williams Township. A family name. (School Directory (1898); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fort Lyon
Description:A post office from 1868-1870, and 1876-1902; in the western part of White Township, nineteen miles northwest of Warsaw. Named, almost certainly, for General Nathaniel Lyon (1818-1861), who commanded the Union forces in Missouri until he was defeated and killed in the Battle of Wilson's Creek, August 10, 1861. Counties are named for him in Kansas, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nevada, and he is also commemorated by Lyon Park and Lyon School in St. Louis. Lay tells in the county history of the lively skirmish that took place at Cole Camp on June 19, 1861, between Southern sympathizers from Warsaw and the Cole Camp "Home Guards," all of whom were Germans and Union men. The Germans were surprised by an attack at dawn and fled, leaving between fifty and one hundred dead. A few days after the fight, Governor Jackson led the Confederate forces from Boonville through Warsaw, in retreat before General Lyon. The Warsaw contingent followed him south. They were in the battles at Carthage and Wilson's Creek, and returned to Warsaw in August, soon after their victory. Fort Lyon doubtless owes its creation and name to these events. (Campbell (1874) 62; HIST. BENTON (1876) 72; R.M. (1939) 226; Postal Guide; Gannett; Miss Welty's thesis; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Forthview
Description:Located on the Lake of the Ozarks, in the northern part of Union Township. A descriptive name. (E.J. Heerman)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fowler Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church, South, one mile west of Lincoln. Named for the main supporter and organizer, Samuel Fowler. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 517)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fraction Point School
Description:A school in the northeast part of Fristoe Township. The district is very small, hence the name, meaning relatively small. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Francis River
Description:See Cole Camp Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fredonia
Description:A post office from 1896-1910; on the Osage River in the northern part of Union Township. An extremely popular name for American places, being found in at least seventeen other states, with the supposed ideal significance of "Home of Freedom." It was even proposed at one time as a worthy name for the nation: see the paper "Proposed Names for the United States," by Allen Walker Read, read before the Modern Language Association of America, December 28, 1937 (PMLA, LII. 1356). Other proposed names for the United States of America have been Columbia, Washingtonia, Hesperia, Atlantia, Usona, etc. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1939) 226; Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fredonia School
Description:A school in the northeast part of Fristoe Township. Named from the village. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Free Nigger Springs
Description:Near Fairfield. Named for two free negroes, Lige and Manuel who settled there between 1833 and 1836. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 465)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Freedom School
Description:A school in the western part of Alexander Township. Cf. above. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Freund School
Description:Located in the eastern part of William Township. A family name. (J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fristoe
Description:A village in the southeast part of Fristoe Township, with a post office established since 1896. To be distinguished from the early trading post north of Warsaw known as Fristoe Town in 1837. Both were named for Judge Markham Fristoe, an early settler and judge on the County Court Bench. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 468; Eaton (1917); R.M. (1939); Postal Guide; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fristoe School
Description:A school in the southeast part of Fristoe Township. Named from the village. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fristoe Town
Description:An early trading post or village north of Warsaw, established by Judge Markham Fristoe, and a formidable but unsuccessful rival with Warsaw in the race for the county seat in 1837. Lay, in the HISTORY OF BENTON (1912), says it was on the Sedalia road where the first house north of Warsaw now stands, and was in 1837 a little town with a few stores. It was known also as Old Town, apparently because it was a little older than Osage or Bledsoe's Landing (q.v.), which was called New Town. (HIST. BENTON (1912) 30)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fristoe Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Lindsey and Cole Townships, on the east by Turkey Creek, on the south by Hickory County, and on the west by Alexander and Tom Townships. Organized June 18, 1845. Named for Judge Markham Fristoe, then on the County Court Bench. (Campbell's (1873); Eaton (1917) 210; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Fuller
Description:A post office from 1897-1899. (Postal Guide)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Garrett's Mill
Description:A sawing, planing, hub and spoke mill on Grand River, three and a half miles northeast of Warsaw. Was running in 1874. Named for the owner. (Campbell (1874) 62; E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Gibson
Description:A post office in 1889 and 1891. Named for the first owner of the store here. (Postal Guide; HIST. BENTON (1889) 512; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Globe School
Description:A school in the north-central part of Union Township. Named from the school's globe used in the study of geography. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Golden School
Description:A school in the northeast part of White Township. An ideal name, signifying that "the way of wisdom is golden." (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grand River
Description:Rises in eastern Kansas, flowing east through Polk, Hickory, and Benton Counties. It joins the Osage River in Benton County, northwest of Warsaw. An Americanization of the original French name Riviere Grande, the "big river," evidently conferred for its comparative size. It is the largest branch of the Osage, with the exception of the Niangua, and the largest stream in this part of Missouri. Also known as South Grand River, perhaps to distinguish it from the much larger northern tributary of the Missouri that flows through Gentry, Daviess, Livingston, and Carroll Counties to join the Missouri River at Brunswick. (Campbell (1873) 11; Conard (1901) V, 31; Pike Exp., ed. Coues, II. 379; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Grange Hall
Description:Located at Palo Pinto, during its days as a trading post. An assembly hall, probably so named for the secret associations known as Granges, which were for the purpose of promoting agricultural interests. The association was founded by Oliver H. Kelley at Washington, December 4, 1867. It spread through the west in 1868. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 512; DICT. U.S. HIST. (1931) 376)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Greenfield School
Description:A school in the north-central part of White Township. Descriptive of its location. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hastain
Description:A post office since 1886; in the northern part of Union Township. Named in honor of a local family. (Postal Guide; Eaton (1917) 210; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hastain School
Description:A school in the western part of Cole Township. Named from the village. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Heath's Bend
Description:On the Osage River. A prairie bottom, named for C.G. Heath, landowner. (HIST. BENTON (1876) 17; HIST. BENTON (1889) 465)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Heimsath's Store
Description:See Lake Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Helton Branch
Description:In northwest Union Township, leading west into Turkey Creek. A family name. (Highway Map; E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hickory Township
Description:It is what is now the northeastern corner of Hickory County, and was cut off with Hickory County, February 14, 1845. Named in honor of President Andrew Jackson, as was Hickory County (q.v.). (HIST. BENTON (1889) 476; HIST. BENTON (1912), 28, 29)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hink School
Description:A school in the southeast part of Williams Township. A family name. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hockman
Description:A post office from 1886-1904; in the eastern part of Fristoe Township, nine miles east of Dell. Named for W.W. Hockman, a prosperous farmer; he was born in Ohio in 1834, came to Pettis County about 1873, and in 1875 moved to Benton County. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 331; Eaton (1917) 210; Miss Bernita Isley)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hogles Creek
Description:Rises in Hickory County, runs through eastern St. Clair County, flowing northeast into Benton County, where it empties into the Osage River at a point in the northeastern part of Alexander Township. Named for John F. Hogle, German, who was a government Indian agent in Missouri prior to 1832. He established a trading post at the mouth of this stream, the first store and first white settlement on the creek. On Pike's map for the expedition of 1806, this stream is apparently chartered under the name of Hallico River, an obvious misspelling. Called Noyles Creek by Williams in 1904; the reason was undiscovered. (Parker (1865) map; Campbell (1873) 23, 26; HIST. BENTON (1889) 464; HIST. HICKORY (1889) 206, 215; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 380; Williams (1904) 331; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hogles Creek School
Description:A school in the northwest part of Alexander Township. Named from Hogles Creek. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hogles Trading Post
Description:See Bishop's Store.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Holloway Island
Description:An island in the Osage River, in the bend just above the mouth of Grand River. The source of the name has not been ascertained; possibly it was connected with Captain John Halloway, who raised a Benton County company in the summer of 1846 when the Mexican War broke out, and led it across the plains, under General Sterling Price, to New Mexico. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 492; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 379; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Horn Branch
Description:In southwest Cole Township, running south into the Osage River. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hughes School
Description:A school in the extreme northwest part of White Township. Named for the Hughes family in the neighborhood, whose paternal ancestor, George H. Hughes, settled here in the spring of 1832. (HIST. BENTON (1876) 12; School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hulda
Description:See Mount Hulda.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Hutsler School
Description:A school in the southeast part of White Township. Named for an early settler in this section. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Indian Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in the southeast part of Williams Township, and flows west into Cole Camp Creek. This was a favorite hunting ground of the Indians. Many Indian relics have been found along this creek. (Campbell's (1873) 23; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ionia City
Description:See Ionia
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ionia School
Description:A school in the northeast part of White Township. Named from the post office. (School Directory (1938-39); E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Jack Branch
Description:In northeast Union Township, running west into Knobby Creek. Possibly the Christian name of an early landowner in the vicinity. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Johnson Branch
Description:In northwest Union Township, running west into Turkey Creek. Possibly a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Johnson Spur
Description:Central part of Williams Township, on the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad. Named from the owner of the land on the ridge. (I: HIST. BENTON (1912) 69; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Knobby
Description:See Nobby.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Knobby Creek
Description:Rises in the center part of Union Township, flowing north where it empties into the Osage River. Name suggested by the "knobby" character of the surrounding country, i.e. full of "knobs" or low hills. Sometimes called Beaver Creek, from the animal found here in early days. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 454; E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kreisel School
Description:A school in the southwest part of Williams Township. Named from Kreisel's Mill, the early village that was located here. (School Directory (1938-39); F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Kreissel's Mill
Description:A post office in 1874. A mill in the southern part of William Township on a branch east of Cole Camp Creek. Named for the proprietor of this early mill and post office. The mill was built by Christopher Kreisel and his son, Eugene, who settled in Benton County in 1838. (Campbell (1873) 23; Campbell (1874) 62; HIST. BENTON (1889) 723; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:L.P. Union School
Description:A school in the southern part of Alexander Township; the letters L.P., Mr. Lundquist informs me, stand for Little Pomme de Terre River. (School Directory (1938-39); V.A. Lundquist)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Creek
Description:A post office from 1868-1870, 1876-1895, 1899-1910; in the northeast part of Williams Township. Named for the stream, Lake Creek. Written Lakecreek in 1910. Was first called Heimsath's Store, for the owner of an early trading post here. (Williams (1904) 331; Eaton (1917) 210; R.M. (1939) 226; Postal Guide; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Creek
Description:Rises in northern Williams Township in Benton County and runs north through Lake Creek Township, Pettis County; makes a turn to the east through Richland Township in Morgan County; reenters Pettis, and empties into Flat Creek in southeast Smithton Township. Named for the reason that it winds a sluggish course through the heavy soil, and forms numerous small lakes. When a flood comes down from its source, it overflows its banks and spreads far out, covering thousands of acres of the bottom lands, and even weeks at a time presents the appearance of a lake, filled with growing trees and underbrush. (Campbell 1873, 62; H: HIST. PETTIS (1882) 218; HIST. PETTIS (1882) 1098; HIST. BENTON (1889) 69; Williams (1904) 331; Eaton (1917) 210; HIST. PETTIS (1919) 181; Hammond, 312)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Creek School
Description:A school in the northeast part of Williams Township. Named from the post office here. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake of the Ozarks
Description:An irregular body of water extending over five counties, including besides the three from the present study mentioned above also Miller and Henry Counties. It is said to be the largest artificial lake in the world, and the largest body of water between the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico. It is over 129 miles long, comprises over 95 square miles of water, and has a shore line more than 1,300 miles long. It was created in 1931 by the completion of the great Osage Dam at Bagnell in Henry County, by which the valleys of the Osage, Niangua, Little Niangua, Gravois, and Glaize Rivers and their tributaries were flooded. The name for the new lake was much disputed. The General Assembly of Missouri passed a resolution that it should be called Lake Benton, for Missouri's great statesman Thomas H. Benton. J.W. Vincent, editor of the Linn Creek Reveille, made an effort to have it called Lake McClurg after Governor J.W. McClurg (1818-1900), who was governor of Missouri from 1868-1870. The name designated by the builders, however, namely The Lake of the Ozarks, is the one that has come into popular use and favor. It is transferred, of course, from the Ozark Mountain region of Missouri and Arkansas, in the heart of which the lake is located. The name Ozarks, according to the best opinion, although this has been disputed, is derived from French and Indian sources: the original phrase used by the French colonists for the entire region was Aux Arcs, meaning "at or in the Arkansas country." It was the custom of the French to abbreviate the long Indian tribal names by using only the first syllable; in this way the great tribe which occupied the larger part of what is now the state of Arkansas and southern Missouri were commonly known as "Les Arcs," and their home as "Aux Arcs," which was later written phonetically by the American Ozarks. (Keith McCanse, Where to go in the Ozarks, 1932 ed., p. 36; theses by ,Weber and Miss O'Brien; Dr. R. L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lake Ozark Forest
Description:In the northeast part of Fristoe Township, along the southern bank of the Osage River. Named from the lake. (E.J. Heerman)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lakeside Estate
Description:A lake resort. Located on the northern bank of the Osage River in the southern part of Cole Township. Obviously named for its location. (E.J. Heerman; V.A. Lundquist)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lakeview Heights
Description:A post office since 1933; in the central part of Cole Township. The name is descriptive of the location. It overlooks the Lake of the Ozarks from the north side. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1939) 226; E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lemon Branch
Description:In northwest Cole Township, running southeast into Duren Creek. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Leslie
Description:A former village on the southern boundary of Union Township. Goodwin, who spells it Lessley, lists it as a post office in 1867-1868. A family name. (Goodwin (1867-8) 45; Campbell (1873) 23; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Liberty School
Description:A school in the southeast part of Fristoe Township. Cf. above. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Limestone School
Description:A school in the southern part of Lindsey Township. Named from the strata of limestone rock found in this locality. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lincoln
Description:A post office from 1868-1870, and since 1876; in the southeast part of White Township established in 1869. A station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Named for the great emancipator Abraham Lincoln (1807-1865). (Postal Guide; HIST. BENTON (1889) 510; Eaton (1917) 210; Dict. U.S. Hist. (1931) 286, 287; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lindsey Township
Description:Bounded on the north by White Township, on the east by Cole Township, on the south by Fristoe and Tom Townships, and on the west by Henry County. It was one of the four original townships organized February, 1835, and at first comprised all of Morgan County west of Cole and Williams and north of the Osage and Grand Rivers, running to the northern line of the county and including all of what is now White Township. The creation of White Township (q.v.) in 1838 reduced it to its present boundaries. Named for Judge John W. Lindsay, then on the County Court bench. Spelled Lindsay in the county history of 1912, which is apparently the more correct form. (Campbell's (1873) 23; HIST. BENTON (1876) 26; HIST. BENTON (1912); R.M. (1939) 226; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Deer Creek
Description:A small stream which rises in Jordan Township in Hickory County, runs north into the southeastern part of Union Township, in Benton County, and then flows northwest into Big Deer Creek. So named to distinguish it from Big Deer Creek (q.v.). (Campbell (1873) 23; HIST. BENTON (1889) 454, 455)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Hogles Creek
Description:In eastern Alexander Township, running north into Hagles Creek near Wisdom. So named to distinguish it from Hogles Creek (q.v.). (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Pomme de Terre River
Description:A branch of the Big Pomme de Terre River, rising in southern Wheatland Township in Hickory County, flowing north through Montgomery Township into Benton County, and joining the Pomme de Terre near Fairfield. (Campbell (1873) 26; HIST. BENTON (1876) 68; HIST. HICK. (1889) 206; Highway Map; E.I. Miller; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Tebo Creek
Description:Rises in the southern part of White Township, and flows southward through central Lindsay Township into the Osage River, just one mile below the mouth of Grand River, and two miles above Warsaw. Pike in the text of his EXPEDITION of 1806 calls it Vermillion River, which Coues says was an error of memory; on his map Pike charts it as Deep Creek, a name not elsewhere recorded, but obviously descriptive. The present name Little Tebo is used to distinguish it from the Big Tebo, or Tebo Creek (q.v.), a stream roughly parallel a few miles west, which empties into Grand River. For the latter part of the name see under Tebo Creek. (Campbell (1873) 23; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 379; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Little Turkey Creek
Description:A western tributary of Turkey (or Big Turkey) Creek, in western Fristoe Township, rising near Dell and running north. So named to distinguish it from Turkey Creek (q.v.). (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lively
Description:A post office from 1901-1910; in the northeast part of Union Township, near the mouth of Knobby Creek. Named for the fact that business was lively here when the post office was first established. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1939) 226; E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Locust Ridge School
Description:A school in the south-cental part of Fristoe Township. Named from the location on a spur, and because some locust trees are found in this section. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Log Town
Description:See Bledsoe's Landing.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Look Out School
Description:A school in the northeast part of Fristoe Township. Named from its location on a high bluff overlooking the Osage River. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lower Ferry
Description:Crosses the Osage River at Warsaw; established by George Hooper. Named from its location on the Osage River a little below Upper Ferry (q.v.). (HIST. BENTON (1889) 505; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Lutjen School
Description:A school in the northern part of Cole Township. A family name. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Majorville
Description:In northeast Fristoe Township, about two miles east of Dell. Named for a pioneer family--possibly for that of Lewis Redd Major, brother-in-law of General George R. Smith, who came with him in 1833 from Kentucky to Pettis County. See under Smithton. (Highway Map; E.J. Heerman; Harding's LIFE OF GENERAL SMITH, p. 10; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Matlock Hollow
Description:In western Union Township, leading west into Turkey Creek. Named for residents of this hollow. (Highway Map; E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:May Hollow
Description:In northern Union Township, leading east into Big Deer Creek. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McCall's Branch
Description:In northern Fristoe Township, running north into the Osage River. Named for a former landowner, H.M. McCall. (Campbell (1889) 510; Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McFarland School
Description:A school in the northeast part of Lindsey Township. Named for an early landowner. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:McMurdo School
Description:A school in the southeast part of White Township. Named for the owner of the land on which the school was built. (School Directory (1938-39); F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Melvin
Description:A post office from 1897-1899; probably from the Christian name of the first postmaster. (Postal Guide)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Missouri Pacific Railroad
Description:A railroad that enters Morgan County through the extreme northwest corner, passing through the east-central boundary of Pettis County, running west through Smithton, Sedalia, Dresden, and La Monte, leaving Pettis County on the west side of La Monte Township, entering again through the northeast corner, and passing through Syracuse. A branch line of the Missouri Pacific enters the northern Pettis County line and passes through Houstonia, Hughesville, Sedalia, and south into Benton County through Mora, Cole Camp, Lincoln, Schuyler, and Warsaw. This railroad was incorporated on March 12, 1849, and construction was started in St. Louis in 1851. In 1853 it reached Franklin, Missouri, in 1855 it reached Jefferson City, and Sedalia in 1861. The Warsaw branch was incorporated February 24, 1853. (Laws Missouri (1848-49) 222, (1852-53) 373, 375; County Plat Book (1929) 1; Enc. Brit.; E.J. Heerman)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Montgomery Township
Description:A former township, which was organized in 1835. It comprised all of what is now Tom and Alexander Townships, the west side of Fristoe, and the northwest corner of Hickory County, running out beyond Quincy. In 1838 it lost all Benton County territory to the newly formed Alexander Township, but retained that in Hickory County. Named for Judge Joseph C. Montgomery, then on the County Court bench. On the organization of Hickory County in 1845, it became one of its first townships. (HIST. BENTON (1876) 27; HIST. HICK. (1889) 216, 229; HIST. BENTON (1912); R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mora
Description:A village in northern Williams Township, near the border of Pettis County. In Polk's Gazetteer of 1879-1880 it is listed as a post office in a thinly settled part of Pettis County, but since 1886 has been put by postal guides in Benton. It was platted by the Missouri Pacific Railroad in 1882, and is now a flag stop on the railroad. The name is apparently Spanish, meaning "raspberry." There is a Mora County in New Mexico. It may be, like Palopinto (q.v.) and perhaps Passo, one of the Spanish names brought back to Benton County after the Mexican War. (Polk's Gaz. (1879-80) 457; HIST. BENTON (1889) 492, 512; R.M. (1939) 226; Postal Guide; Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mora School
Description:A school in the northern part of Williams Township. Named from the village. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mossy Creek
Description:In northern Union Township, running north into the Osage River near Duroc. Named for the marshy, boggy condition of the land adjoining the creek. (Highway Map; V.A. Lundquist)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mossy School
Description:A school in the northern part of Union Township. Named from the creek. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Heerman School
Description:A school in the southeast part of Alexander Township. Probably a misspelling of the Bible name Mount Hermon, conjectured site of the Transfiguration. The altered spelling may be due to the fact that Heerman is a familiar family name in the county; one of my informants, Mr. E.J. Heerman, is a life-long resident and has been twice elected county clerk. (School Directory (1938-39); E.J. Heerman; J.R. Boring; R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Home School
Description:A school in the southwest part of Tom Township. Named for its location on a large hill, and because the school was first held in a private home. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Hope School
Description:A school in the northern part of Alexander Township. An ideal name for a school on a hill. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Hulda
Description:A small village in the northern part of Cole Township. A post office was established there from 1903-1917 under the name of Hulda, which was changed in 1918 to Mount Hulda. The reason for using the feminine first name has not been ascertained. The place is located on a small elevation. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount Lasca School
Description:A school in the northeast part of Alexander Township. Named for its location on a small mountain. The source of the second part of the name, however, has not been discovered. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount View
Description:See Mountain View.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mount View School
Description:A school in the southwest part of Fristoe Township. Named from the post office. (School Directory (1938-39); F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mountain View
Description:A former post office, in the southeast part of Fristoe Township. It was established in 1853 under the name of Mount View, which was changed about 1862 to the more euphonious Mountain View. Discontinued in 1895. Named for its location. (MISSOURI GAZ. (1860) 192; Parker (1865) Map; Campbell (1874) 62; HIST. BENTON (1889) 512; Postal Guide; F.M. Brady; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Moxley Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church, South, one mile north of Warsaw, built in 1882. Named for an early settler who gave the land for the church. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 517; HIST. BENTON (1912) 129; E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mt. Olivet Church
Description:A Baptist Church, west of Cole Camp, built in 1877. A Biblical name. A mountain near Jerusalem, which was the scene of Christ's Ascension (Acts 1:9-12). (HIST. BENTON (1889) 518; HIST. BENTON (1912) 129)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Mt. Pleasant Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church. Formerly called Poplar Bluff Church, taking its name from the schoolhouse of that name, where services were held for many years. The name is obviously descriptive. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 517; HIST. BENTON (1912) 130; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:National School
Description:A school in the southern part of Tom Township. An ideal name. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Nay
Description:Located in the central part of Williams Township. A family name. (I: Map (1930); V.A. Lundquist)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:New Town
Description:See Bledsoe's Landing.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Nigger Creek
Description:In eastern Lindsey Township, running south into the Osage River. Possibly named from the number of dark colored boulders, commonly known as "niggerheads," found in the bed of the stream. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Nobby
Description:A village in the eastern part of Union Township, where a post office was twice established, 1886-1888 and 1899-1910. The original spelling was Knobby; the simplified form first appears in the Postal Guide for 1910, and is the prevalent spelling today. The name was transferred from the nearby Knobby Creek. (Postal Guide; Eaton (1917); R.M. (1939); Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:North Dell School
Description:A school in the central part of Fristoe Township. Named for its location north of Dell. Cf. South Dell School. (School Directory (1938- 39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:North Fairfield School
Description:A school in the northern part of White Township. So named to distinguish it from Fairfield School in Alexander Township. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:North Indian Creek
Description:See Williams Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:North Pleasant Hill School
Description:A school in the northwest part of White Township. So named to distinguish it from South Pleasant Hill School (q.v.). (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:North Star School
Description:A school in the western part of Union Township. An emblematic name. (School Directory (1938-39); E.J. Heerman)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Noyles Creek
Description:See Hogles Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Grove School
Description:A school in the southwest part of Lindsey Township. The school is surrounded by an oak grove. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Oak Hunter Hollow
Description:In northern Union Township, leading east into Big Deer Creek. Named for the oak trees found along the banks, in which one may discern squirrel nests. A favorite hunting territory for squirrels. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Harmony Mission Road
Description:Left Boonville and Springfield road near Cole County. It ran through the northern part of the county. Probably traveled before Benton County was settled; the mission having been established in 1821 by missionaries from New York, who went up the Osage River in keel boats. (H: HIST. BENTON (1876) 15)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Ionia
Description:See Ionia
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Road
Description:A road, which in the earliest records was cut out by the United States government for military purposes. Extended from Palmyra, on the Mississippi River, through Boonville, Springfield, and Fayetteville, Arkansas to Fort Smith. It was the chief source of travel from the upper Mississippi to Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas. It ran through Benton County on the way from Boonville to Springfield. Cut out and located to legal width by act of March 7, 1835. (I: HIST. BENTON (1876) 15)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Town
Description:See Fristoe Town.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Old Zora
Description:See Zora.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Olive Branch School
Description:A school in the southeast part of Union Township. Cf. above. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Orr School
Description:A school in the central part of Lindsey Township. Named for a landowner in the district. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Osage
Description:See Bledsoe's Landing.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Osage River
Description:The course of this important stream is described as follows by Coues in his edition of the Pike Expedition of 1806: "Arising in the Ozark Mountains of Kansas, the Osage River leaves that state and enters Missouri in Vernon County, which it delimits in part from Bates County; traverses St. Clair County and continues past the corner where this, Henry, and Benton Counties adjoin; traverses Benton, enters Morgan, forms a part of the boundary between this and Camden, makes a loop through the latter and again separates it for a short space from Morgan, then for a little distance separates Camden from Miller, traverses the latter, enters Cole, and finally runs to the Missouri River between this last and Osage Counties." Since 1931, a large part of the valley of the Osage and its tributaries has been flooded and is now included in the Lake of the Ozarks (q.v.). It is one of the oldest place-names in the state, being of French origin. The earliest mention of the name appears to be that of Du Tissenet in 1719, who calls it the Riviere Ouschage. The French named it for the Osage tribe of Indians, who dwelt upon its banks. The most important of all the Indian tribes in Missouri seem to have been located, at the time of Marquette's journey in 1673 near the mouth of the Missouri River, which he called the Osage River; but they later removed to the vicinity of the river that now bears their name, where they remained in their two branches, known as the Great and Little Osages, till late in the nineteenth century. Up till about 1835, the Big Pomme de Terre River (q.v.) was the dividing line between the Indians and the whites. In 1870, the tribe sold their lands to the United States government, and agreed to their removal to Indian Territory. Hodge declares that the name Osage was a corruption by the French traders of the native name Wazhazhe. It appears in many other forms: Haxa or Hayas, by Coronado in 1541, Ouchage and Autre acha by Marquette in 1673, Hazzas, Wawhas, and Ous by Penicault, Zages on Franquelin's map, and, according to Long, Wacase, Wawsashe, or Wassashsha. As to the original meaning of the name there is equal uncertainty. Holcombe says that Osage meant "strong," probably referring to the gigantic stature of the tribe, few of whom according to Bradbury were under six feet in height. Houck declares, more plausibly, that the native name signified merely "men" or "people;" like the ancient Teutons and many other primitive tribes, they proudly called themselves "Human Beings" in implied contradistinction to the "lesser breeds without the law." (Holcome, HIST. VERNON (1887) 94; Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 370; Thwaites, EWT. XVI. 273; Hodge; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI I. 133, 177; Schoolcraft, 104; Miss Johnson's thesis; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Osage Valley and Southern Kansas Railroad
Description:An earlier railroad that was to run from Boonville through Morgan County to Versailles, and into Benton County, passing Cole Camp to Warsaw and onward. This railroad was incorporated on November 21, 1857. By law it was to commence at any point between Jefferson City and Roundhill and pass through Morgan, Benton, Henry, and Bates Counties in the direction of Emporia in Kansas Territory. Work was commenced in 1870, along the line to Warsaw, but the enterprise collapsed. This is also known under the name of Osage Valley, Southwest and Kansas Railroad. Named for its proposed terminals. (Laws Missouri (1857) 60, 63; HIST. BENTON (1889) 520)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Osage Valley, Southwest and Kansas Railroad
Description:See Osage Valley and Southern Kansas Railroad.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ozark Mountains
Description:A mountain range that is very old as well as beautiful. The name is of Indian and French derivation and it is said that it is the result of a misunderstanding by the English. It means literally "at the (country, river, or place of the) Arkansas." The Quapaw Indians, belonging to the Siouan stock and after migrating westward, were called the Arkansas by the Illinois. Early eighteenth century maps by G. De. l'Isle show that both the Ohio and Wabash rivers were known as the Arkansas. It was customary for the French to abbreviate the difficult Indian place-names; hence les Arkansea became les Arcs. Miss O'Brien states that in the French archives "the phrase "aux arcs" appears many times, meaning on the river, at the post, or in the country of the Arkansas." The shortened phrase "aux arcs" was mistaken by the English for one word and they spelled it Ozark. (Miss O'Brien's thesis)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Palopinto
Description:A post office from 1876-1904; in the southern part of White Township. Lay speaks of it as a "trading post of some importance" in 1889. It is a Spanish name, meaning "stained timber;" cf. Palo Alto, "high timber," Palo Verde, "green timber," etc. There is a river, county, and town with the name in Eastern Texas, from which it may have been borrowed. Possibly the name, like Passo and Mora, both of which are nearby, was brought back to Benton County after the Mexican War. Lay says that Captain John Halloway, when the Mexican War broke out, raised a Benton County Company in the summer of 1846, and with it marched across the plains, under General Sterling Price, to New Mexico. He also declares that when he wrote (1889) there were five survivors of this company still living in Benton County. Many place-names from the Spanish Southwest, California and South America were brought back to Missouri at this period, shortly after the Mexican War and the Gold Rush of 1849: cf. Mexico, Taos, Brazito, El Dorado, Oronogo, Lima, Callao, Valparaiso, Bolivar, Nevada, etc., in other counties. Written Palo Pinto until 1896, afterwards consolidated. (Postal Guide; HIST. BENTON (1889) 492, 512; R.M. (1939) 226; Gannett; Ramsay, INTRO. TO A SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE NAMES, p. 28; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Passo
Description:A post office from 1899-1908; in the northern part of Lindsey Township. The village must have been in existence long before; and although no direct evidence has been found, it is likely enough that the original spelling was Paso or El Paso, from the city in Texas, whose Spanish name signifies "the pass," "the gap," or "the passage." In that case it must have been one of the southwest names brought back after the Mexican War, like nearby Palopinto (q.v.) and perhaps Mora (q.v.). The change of spelling would have been an effort to preserve the Spanish pronunciation with an unvoiced "s." (Postal Guide; R.M. (1939) 226; Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Peal Bend School
Description:A school in the southern part of Tom Township. Named for its location in a bend of the Osage River. Peal is a family name. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:People's Ferry
Description:Crosses the Osage River at Warsaw; established in 1857 by a company. Named from the fact that it was company owned and not individually owned. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 505; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Persimmon Creek
Description:Mentioned in the county histories as a fork of Flat Creek, rising in Benton County and flowing northeast into Pettis County. It does not appear on recent maps, unless it is to be identified with Lake Creek (q.v.). Named for the familiar tree. (HIST. BENTON (1886) 456; Conard (1901) 206; HIST. BENTON (1912) 69; E.H. Preuitt; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Picnic Hollow
Description:In northeast Union Township, leading northwest into Big Deer Creek, near Hastain. Named because it was a famous location for old- time picnic celebrations on the Fourth of July. (Highway Map; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Plain View School
Description:A school in the western part of Williams Township. The name is descriptive of its location. (School Directory (1938-39; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Green School
Description:A school in the west-central part of Union Township. The name is obviously descriptive. (School Directory (1938-39; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Grove School
Description:A school in the southeast part of Lindsey Township. Named for its location in a grove of trees. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pleasant Hill School
Description:See South Pleasant Hill School.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pole Hollow
Description:In southeast Williams Township, leading into Buffalo Creek. Possibly a good location for finding fence poles, fishing poles, etc. because of the number of willow trees growing here. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Pomme de Terre River
Description:Rises in Greene County, flowing north through Polk, Hickory, and Benton Counties, through the southern part of Fristoe Township, and into the Osage River. Coues says it was pronounced by the natives as "Pumly Tar." Pike charts it on his map for the Expedition of 1806 as "Potatoe River"--an obvious attempt at Anglicization that did not prevail. This stream formed the division line between the Indians and the whites until 1835. Named perhaps by the French fur traders. It is the French words for "Potato River." But cf. J.F. McDermott, A GLOSSARY OF MISSISSIPPI VALLEY FRENCH, 1941, under "pomme de terre:" "The cowberry, ground nut, or wild bean." McDermott quotes Bradbury and Owen as identifying the "pomme de terre" of the French voyagers with the root of the apios tuberosa or potato bean, also called "sagaban," used as food by the Indians of the Northwest and elsewhere. The stream was also known as Big Pomme de Terre to distinguish it from its tributary the Little Pomme de Terre (q.v.). (Pike's Exp., ed. Coues, II. 380; HIST. BENTON (1876) 7; HIST. BENTON (1889) 508; HIST. BENTON (1912) 3, 10; Conard (1901) v, 31; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Poplar
Description:A post office from 1897-1904; in the northeast part of Lindsey Township. Named for the poplar trees that abound in this vicinity. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1939) 226; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Poplar Bluff Church
Description:See Mt. Pleasant Church.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Poplar Bluff School
Description:See Poplar School.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Poplar School
Description:Located in the eastern part of Lindsey Township. Formerly called Poplar Bluff School, from its location among poplar trees on a bluff. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 517; E.H. Preuitt; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Potato River
Description:See Pomme de Terre River.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Powers Ferry
Description:Located at Warsaw. Founded by Mark Fristoe. According to V.A. Lundquist, an Ed Powers ran the ferry. (HIST. BENTON (1912) 20; V.A. Lundquist)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Creek
Description:In western Fristoe Township, running northwest into Pomme de Terre River. Named from its location on a vast prairie. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie Flower School
Description:A school in the northwest part of Williams Township. An emblematic name. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Prairie View School
Description:Located in the northwest corner of White Township. Cf. above. (J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Racket
Description:A post office since 1899; in the western part of Lindsey Township. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Racket School
Description:A school in the western part of Tom Township. Named from the post office. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Raymond
Description:A post office from 1902-1904; on the Sedalia, Warsaw, and Southern Railroad, six miles southwest of Cole Camp. The Christian name of the first proprietor of the store and post office here. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 331; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ritter Branch
Description:In eastern Union Township, running west into Knobby Creek. Possibly a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rock Island Railroad System
Description:A railroad that enters the county through the northeast corner of Moreau Township, passing through Barnett, running northwest into Versailles, and on west through the northeast corner of Benton County. The full name of the railroad is the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific. Rock Island, Illinois is its eastern terminus. (M. and C. Map Morgan County)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rock Springs School
Description:A school in the west-central part of Union Township. Named for its location near springs that seep through a ledge of rock. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rocky Dale School
Description:A school in the central part of White Township. Named from its location. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rocky Ridge School [1 of 2]
Description:A school in the southeast part of Cole Township. Named from its location. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Rocky Ridge School [2 of 2]
Description:A school in the western part of Williams Township. Cf. above. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ross Creek
Description:In northern Cole Township, an eastern branch of Cole Camp Creek. Named for two young men named Ross, who built a cabin near the mouth, in 1830 or 1831. (HIST. BENTON (1876) 16; Conard (1901) 206; HIST. BENTON (1912) 11)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Ross Creek School
Description:A school in the northern part of Cole Township. Named from Ross Creek. (School Directory (1938-39); E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Santiago
Description:A post office from 1900-1904; in the central part of White Township. Named by the man who laid out the city, and who had fought in the battle of Santiago (1898), during the Spanish-American War. The battle took place near Santiago, Cuba. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1939) 226; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Santiago School
Description:A school in the central part of White Township. Named from the village of Santiago. (School Directory (1938-39); F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sarvis Branch
Description:In central Union Township, running west into Big Deer Creek. Possibly named, like Sarvis Point in Webster County, for the service- berry bushes that were found along its banks. The service-berry is a well-known fruit in the Ozarks, and "sarvis" is a dialect pronunciation. (Highway Map; Miss Bell's thesis; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Schuyler
Description:A post office from 1897-1904; in the northeast part of Lindsey Township. A family name. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1939) 226; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Scott Hollow
Description:In northwest Fristoe Township, running west into the Osage River. Probably named for an early landowner in that vicinity. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sedalia, Warsaw and Southern Railroad
Description:A railroad from Sedalia in Pettis County to Warsaw in Benton County, commenced in 1869 and completed. It runs generally south, except to swerve to the east to pass through Cole Camp, in Benton County. Named for its termini. It is called the Sedalia-Warsaw Railroad in the Pettis County Plat Book in 1929. (Campbell (1873) 23; HIST. BENTON (1889) 520; COUNTY PLAT BOOK (1929) 1; Williams (1940) 331)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shawnee Bend
Description:In the southern part of Lindsey Township. A bend of the Osage River, opposite the mouth of Grand River. The Shawnees, one of the greatest of Indian tribes, came originally from South Carolina. In 1793, a considerable body of them accepted the invitation of the Spanish government and settled in Missouri near Cape Girardeau. In 1795 they retired to the headwaters of the Auglaize and the Osage. In 1798 came the fierce rebellion of the Shawnees in Ohio, led by Tecumseh; but the Missouri Shawnees, who formed about half the tribe, had no part in Tecumseh's struggle. They sold their lands in 1825 and were removed to a reservation in Texas. (HIST. BENTON (1876) 10; Conard (1901) 206; School Directory (1938-39); Hodge; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shawnee Bend School
Description:In the Shawnee Bend, for which it is named.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shiloh Church
Description:A Methodist Episcopal church, South, south of Fairfied, built in 1868. A Biblical name: meaning "tranquility;" ten miles north of Bethel (Judges 21:19). (HIST. BENTON (1889) 517; HIST. BENTON (1912) 129)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shiloh School
Description:A school in the southwest part of Alexander Township. Named for the church. (School Directory (1938-39); E.H. Preuitt)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Shiptonsburg
Description:A former village, the exact locality of which has not been ascertained. It was organized in 1841. Named for John Shipton who owned a mill there. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 551, 512)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Short School Hollow
Description:In northern Union Township, leading southwest into Big Deer Creek. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Smith Mill
Description:A mill in the center of Cole Township on Cole Camp Creek. Named for an early settler who ran the mill. (Campbell (1873) 23; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Dell School
Description:A school in the southern part of Fristoe Township. Named for its location south of Dell, to distinguish it from North Dell School (q.v.). (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Grand River
Description:See Grand River. (Campbell (1873) 11, 23)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:South Pleasant Hill School
Description:A school in the central part of Alexander Township. Changed to South signifying it was in the southern part of the county; cf. North Pleasant Hill School. Formerly called Pleasant Hill School, for its location. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Branch
Description:See Spring Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Creek
Description:In northwest Union Township, running north into Turkey Creek near its mouth. Called Spring Branch on the Highway Map. It is partially fed by a spring. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 455; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spring Grove Church
Description:A Baptist Church on Tebo Creek. Named from its location. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 518; E.H. Preuitt; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Spry Hollow
Description:In northern Union Township, leading east into Big Deer Creek. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Starett Creek
Description:In Lindsey Township about two miles north of Warsaw, running west into Osage River. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sterett Creek
Description:In Lindsey Township about two miles north of Warsaw, running west into the Osage River. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Stevenson Hollow
Description:In western Lindsey Township, leading south into Tebo Creek. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sugar Camp Hollow
Description:In western Lindsey Township, leading south into Tebo Creek. Named from the large number of maple trees in its vicinity, from which, at an earlier date, quantities of syrup were made. (Highway Map; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sunny Side Church
Description:A Presbyterian Church west of Lincoln, built about 1878. Cf. above. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 518; HIST. BENTON (1912) 130; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sunny Side School
Description:A school in the northern part of Lindsey Township. Named from Sunny Side Church. (School Directory (1938-39); F.M. Brady; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Sweet Water School
Description:A school in the northeast part of Union Township. Named from the delightful water in this vicinity. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tackner
Description:A post office from 1891- 1910; in southeast Tom Township, near the Osage River. Named for a large landowner in this section. (Postal Guide; Williams (1904) 331; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tahoma
Description:A town in the western part of Williams Township, on Cole Camp Creek. An Indian name. Possibly it is an altered spelling of Tehama, a county in California, whose name is said to mean "highwater." The California name was applied from the fact that at certain seasons the Sacramento River overflowed its banks at this point, partially submerging the settlement. The Missouri town is near Palopinto (q.v.), Passo, and Mora, any may like them have acquired its name during the days of the Mexican War and the California Gold Rush of 1849. (R.M. (1939) 226; Gannett; F.M. Brady; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Teabo Creek
Description:See Tebo Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tebo Creek
Description:Rises in the southern part of Johnson County, runs through the northeast part of Henry County and on into Benton County, joining Grand River in the western part of Lindsey Township. The name is also spelled Teabo, Tabo, Tebeau, Taveau, Thibaut, and Thibault. To be distinguished from Tebo River in Lafayette County, which empties into the Missouri River. It is also known as Big Tebo Creek, to distinguish it from the Little Tebo (q.v.). For a full discussion of this old French place-name, see INTRODUCTION TO A SURVEY OF MISSOURI PLACE-NAMES by R.L. Ramsay, University of Missouri Studies, 1934, pp. 32-36, with references there given. The stream took its name from an early French trader, either Hebert dit Berry Taveau or Francois Thibeault dit Liberge, both of whom may have been in this section around 1800. (Pike's Exp., ed. Coues, II. 379; Campbell (1873) 23; HIST. BENTON (1912) 7; Miss Johnson's thesis; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Thatcher Hollow
Description:In northeast Union Township, leading north into Big Deer Creek near its mouth. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Thibault River
Description:See Tebo Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Tom Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Lindsey Township, on the east by Fristoe Township, on the south by Alexander Township, and on the west by Henry County. Organized April 2, 1842, from the north end of Alexander Township. Probably named after Tom Bishop, who was court clerk, when the township was organized. Thomas J. Bishop was proprietor of Bishop's Store (q.v.) nearby, which was discontinued in 1837 or 1838. (Campbell's (1873) 23; HIST. BENTON (1912) 27, 28)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Trinity Branch
Description:Rises in the northern part of Wheatland Township, flowing northwest into Benton County. Named from the Trinity, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, as was the Trinity River in Texas. Less likely it was named because it helped to form a triangular shaped piece of land. (HIST. HICKORY (1889) 206; Gannett)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Turkey Creek [1 of 2]
Description:Rises in northern Hickory County and flows north into the Osage River, forming the boundary between Fristoe and Union Townships. Along its banks were made the earliest settlements in the county. The name is doubtless derived from the wild turkey so plentiful in early days. Called Big Turkey Creek on the Highway Map, to distinguish it from Little Turkey. Pike on the map of his Expedition of 1806 calls this stream Cardinal river, a name which his editor Coues thinks was due to some confusion with Vermillion River, the old name for Cole Camp Creek (q.v.) --for "cardinal and vermillion are two names of red color." Perhaps it was a humorous variant, suggested by the strutting turkey-cock with his red comb! (Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 378; R.M. (1939) 226; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Turkey Creek [2 of 2]
Description:A post office in 1853. Named from its location on Turkey Creek. (Hayward (1853)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Turpin Branch
Description:In northeast Alexander Township, running west into the Osage River. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union School
Description:In the northwest corner of Montgomery Township and Benton County. An ideal name. Named from the fact that the school is located in two counties. Discontinued. (E.I. Miller)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union School
Description:A school in the southwest part of Alexander Township. Children from both Hickory and Benton Counties attend this school. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Union Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Cole Township, on the east by Camden County, on the south by Hickory County, and on the west by Fristoe Township. Organized June 2, 1840, out of the southern end of Cole Township. It originally included the northeast corner of Hickory County, the southeast corner of the present Fristoe Township, and only the southern part of the present Union Township, for Cole Township still ran south of the river to Township 30. Not until when Hickory County was cut off and Fristoe Township created was Union Township reduced to its present dimensions. So named because it united parts of three previous townships. (HIST. BENTON (1912) 28; R.M. (1939) 226; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Upper Ferry
Description:Crosses the Osage River at Warsaw; established by William Wright. Named from its location on the Osage River a little above Lower Ferry (q.v.). (HIST. BENTON (1895) 505; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Vance Branch
Description:In northeast Alexander Township, running west into the Osage River. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Vermilion Creek
Description:See Cole Camp Creek.
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Walnut Grove School
Description:A school in the southern part of Tom Township. Named for a grove of walnut trees nearby. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Walnut Valley School
Description:A school in the southeast part of Cole Township. Named for its location in a valley where black walnut trees grow. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Warsaw
Description:A post office since 1838, and county seat, in the west-central part of Benton County and southern part of Lindsey Township, on the Osage River. Organized January, 1838. The first house was built here in the fall of 1831 by Stephen A. Howser, County Collector in 1835-1836. He has had much to do with securing the selection of its site for the county seat, after much bitter rivalry between Fristoe (q.v.) and Osage (q.v.), and at once the place began to grow. Mr. Howser chose its name for the capital city of Poland, for which just at this time Americans felt much sympathy and admiration on account of its unsuccessful rising for freedom from Russia in the 1830s. (MISSOURI GAZ. (1860) 467; Postal Guide; Campbell (1873) 6; Eaton (1917) 209; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Warsaw Island
Description:A very large island in the Osage River opposite Warsaw, from which it was doubtless named. (Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 379)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Warsaw Male and Female Academy
Description:Opened by Lougan and Shanklin, April 4, 1853, in the McMurty Brick Building, east of Warsaw. So named because it was a coeducational academy. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 513; F.M. Brady)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wayne Hollow
Description:In northeast Union Township, leading northeast into Knobby Creek. Possibly the family name of a former resident in the vicinity. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wesley Chapel
Description:A Methodist Episcopal Church, near Lincoln. Named for John Wesley (1703-1791) of England, who was the founder of Methodism (1743). (HIST. BENTON (1876) 69; Enc. Brit. (1937)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Whig Creek
Description:In northeast Alexander Township, running southeast into Pomme de Terre River. Possibly named by an adherent of the Whigs in honor of the political party that became prominent in the United States from about 1824 to 1852. The party believed in the broad construction of the provisions of the Federal Constitution. (Highway Map; Enc. Brit.)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Whitakerville
Description:In southern Lindsey Township, about two miles south of Warsaw. Probably from the family name Whitaker. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:White Branch
Description:In northwest Fristoe Township, rising near Dell and running north into Little Turkey Creek. Probably named for an early judge of the county, Judge William White. (Highway Map; J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:White School
Description:Located in the eastern part of Smithton Township. Named for an early landowner in the district, Judge William White. (J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:White Sulphur Spring
Description:A medicinal spring near the Osage River, eight miles northwest of Warsaw, in Lindsey Township. A noted resort until 1861. Cf. Black Sulphur Spring, which is nearby. There are indications of sulphur in the spring. The name was doubtless suggested by the far more famous White Sulphur Springs in Greenbrier County, West Virginia. Gannett lists a White Sulphur Springs in Meagher County, Montana, so named for the medicinal springs there. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 461; Conard (1901) 206; Gannett; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:White Township
Description:Bounded on the north by Pettis County, on the east by Williams Township, on the south by Lindsey Township, and on the west by Henry County. Organized November 12, 1838. Named after Judge William White, one of the first settlers, and then county judge. (HIST. BENTON (1876) 11; HIST. BENTON (1912) 2I; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Williams Creek
Description:A creek which runs through the central part of Williams Township, flowing southwest into Cole Camp Creek. Doubtless named, like Williams Township (q.v.), for Ezekiel Williams. Sometimes called North Indian Creek, obviously from its position north of Indian Creek (q.v.). (Campbell's (1873) 23; HIST. BENTON (1889) 455)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Williams Island
Description:An island in the Osage River, just below the mouth of Deer Creek. Named after Judge William White. (Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 377)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Williams Township
Description:The northeast township: bounded on the north by Pettis County, on the east by Morgan County, on the south by Cole Township, and on the west by White Township. It was organized in February, 1835, and has retained its original boundaries. It was named for Ezekiel Williams, the man who has a better right than anyone else to be considered the true founder and patriarch of Benton County. As Lay declares (in the HISTORY OF BENTON OF 1912), "Ezekiel Williams is commonly understood, and I believe correctly, to have been the first Anglo-Saxon settler in Benton County. According to the best information I can get, he came in the fall of 1830 or early in 1831, and settled...about three miles southwest of Cole Camp." Elsewhere Lay records that the first election held in the county was at Ezekiel William's house. Another statement made by Lay, however, is incorrect namely, that Williams had been one of the followers of Lewis and Clark in their famous expedition across the Rocky Mountains in 1804. His name does not occur in the Lewis and Clark Journals, either in the list of members or anywhere else. The error was not an unnatural one, however, in view of the information about him collected by Houck, which makes him one of the most remarkable figures in early Missouri history. Houck's account of the man, necessarily condensed, is as follows. Ezekiel Williams was a hunter employed by the Missouri Fur Company. We first hear of him in 1806, when a settlement he had formed in the Osage Country on White River, in defiance of the orders of the government, was broken up by direction of General Wilkinson. At a date which is disputed, between 1807 and 1810, he went up to the headwaters of the Missouri with a considerable party and spent two years hunting for the Missouri Fur Company. The party, consisting of about twenty men, then started south across what is now Colorado, journeying for forty to fifty days until they struck a river they later learned was the Arkansas. Williams was the third American known to have visited Colorado. The next spring the party held a council on the head of Platte River and separated, eight or ten of them crossing the Rockies in an attempt to find the Spanish settlements. Williams and five others determined to try to get their precious furs back to St. Louis. Three of them were murdered by the Indians, and Williams and two others took refuge with the Arapahoes, where they spent the winter. The next March, Williams alone left his companions and tried to make his way down the Arkansas. He was captured by the Kansas Indians, robbed of all his furs and badly treated, but finally released and had most of his goods restored to him. He reached Boonslick and civilization on September 1, 1813. The most authentic account of these stirring events is given by Williams himself in a letter printed in the MISSOURI GAZETTE, September 14, 1816. Here Williams tells the story of his expedition in detail, in order to refute the charge that had been made that he had murdered his one remaining companion in order to appropriate all the furs for himself. There are apparently a few errors in dates in this letter, but in the main it is confirmed by independent testimony, especially that in the report made by Major George C. Sibley to Governor Clark on November 30, 1813, of William's experiences with the Kansas Indians. Somewhat later, however, a highly colored and exaggerated account was embodied in a romance that had a wide circulation in the Western country and was for many years regarded as veritable history. This was THE LOST TRAPPERS: A COLLECTION OF INTERESTING SCENES AND EVENTS IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS, by David H. Coyner, copyrighted in 1847 and published in Cincinnati in 1855. Coyner makes Williams and his whole party succeed in crossing the mountains and reaching Los Angeles, then returning by way of Santa Fe to Missouri. He says they had cached all their furs in Colorado and later Williams went back to the mountains and recovered all of them. Houck in his History, it seems, attached too much credit to Coyner's Facile embroidery, which is now regarded as "a lie with circumstance--the circumstance being sometimes true, but the general narrative false throughout." Coues, on the other hand, seems altogether too skeptical when he says, in the Introduction to his edition of the JOURNAL OF JACOB FOWLER: "Ezekiel Williams, James Workman, Samuel Spencer, sole and shadowy survivors of Coyner's LOST TRAPPERS, are only uneasy spirits flitting from the Missouri to Mexico and California in an apocryphal book, never materializing out of fable-land into historical environment." See for a judicious discussion the article in MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTIONS, vol. 4 (1912-1923), pp. 194-208, where Williams's letter is reprinted in full. In 1820, Houck continues, Ezekiel Williams was living on the Missouri River, five miles above Franklin; and it was from his residence, and largely by his inspiration, that the first regular trading party started for Santa Fe, led by William Becknell. The old Kentuckian did not accompany them; but ten years later, in 1830, he led the way and helped to organize the new county of Benton in the heart of the Osage country. Perhaps the old trapper was realizing the dream of a lifetime when he succeeded where he had failed back in 1806. (Journal of Jacob Fowler, ed. Coues (1898) xix; Houck, HIST. MISSOURI (1908) I. 201, III. 93; HIST. BENTON (1912) 10, 26; special refs. given above; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wilson Hollow
Description:In northern Lindsey Township, leading west into Little Tebo Creek. Probably a family name. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wind Cave
Description:Named from the current of onrushing air felt at its mouth. (HIST. BENTON (1889) 457)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wisdom
Description:A post office since 1899; in the western part of Alexander Township. Named for A.J. Wisdom, local resident. (Postal Guide; Eaton (1917) 210; R.M. (1939) 226)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wiseman School
Description:A school in the southeast part of Union Township. A family name. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wolf Branch Hollow
Description:In northern Union Township, leading northeast into Big Deer Creek. Named for the many wolves found here. (Highway Map)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Wright's Island
Description:An island in the Osage River, in the bend just above the mouth of Grand River. Probably named for Wright's Creek in St. Clair County, the mouth of which is a few miles up the stream. (Pike's Exp., ed. Coues (1895) II. 379; Miss Johnson's thesis; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Yeager
Description:A post office from 1896-1899; an old settlement on the site of Bledsoe's Landing (q.v.), on the Osage River, one and a half miles above Warsaw. Named for Yeager or Yearger, an early settler who started a store there about 1831. (Postal Guide; HIST. BENTON (1876) 16; HIST. BENTON (1889) 468)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Yeager School
Description:A school in the southern part of Cole Township. Takes its name from the former village. (School Directory (1938-39); J.R. Boring)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Zinc
Description:A post office in 1901; in the southern part of the county. Probably named for the zinc deposits in this section. (Postal Guide; E.J. Heerman; V.A. Lundquist)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

Place name:Zora
Description:A post office from 1888-1930; in the eastern part of Cole Township. Called Old Zora on the 1940 Highway Map. The source of the name has not been discovered. If the village borrowed its name from a church, for which there is no evidence, it might be an altered form of the Biblical Zoar, or Zorah. Zoar, which means "little," the one City of the Plain that escaped when Sodom and Gomorrah were destroyed (Gen. 19:21, 22), has often been used for a small church, and there are four American towns so named, all doubtless named for churches. It is less likely to have been a misspelling of Zorah, the birthplace of Samson (Judges 13:2); yet there is one Zorah in the United States, a small place in North Carolina. (Postal Guide; R.M. (1939) 226; Highway Map; Dr. R.L. Ramsay)
Source:Overlay, Fauna R. "Place Names Of Five South Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1943.

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